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"OPY" 2005 Obituary


OPYC  OPYRIUK 

OPYC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-07 published
NOLAN, Pamela (née KEELEY)
After a lengthy illness at Markham Stouffville Hospital on Friday, November 4, 2005 in her 50th year, surrounded by her family. Pamela, beloved wife of Glen NOLAN and loving mother of Benjamin. Beloved daughter of Jill and Roger KEELEY. Dear sister of Michele and Jim DROHAN, Christopher and Kim KEELEY, Tracey and Dean OPYC and Todd KEELEY. Loving granddaughter of Eleanor KEELEY. Also lovingly remember by her 6 nieces and nephews. Her integrity, humility and strength of character were a gift to all who knew her. Friends will be received at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home 166 Main St. N. (Markham Rd.) Markham on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday, November 9, at 11 a.m. in St. Andrew's United Church 32 Main St. N. Markham. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Canadian Marfan Association Central Plaza Postal Outlet, 128 Queen St. S.P.O. Box 42257 Mississauga, Ontario. L5M 4Z0 would be appreciated.

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OPYC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-06 published
NOLAN, Pamela (née KEELEY)
After a lengthy illness at Markham-Stouffville Hospital, on Friday, November 4, 2005, in her 50th year, surrounded by her family. Pamela, beloved wife of Glen NOLAN and loving mother of Benjamin. Beloved daughter of Jill and Roger KEELEY. Dear sister of Michele and Jim DROHAN, Christopher and Kim KEELEY, Tracey and Dean OPYC, and Todd KEELEY. Loving granddaughter of Eleanor KEELEY. Also lovingly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Friends will be received at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main St. N. (Markham Rd.), Markham, on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. (Time and place of service later.)

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OPYC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-07 published
NOLAN, Pamela (née KEELEY)
After a lengthy illness at Markham-Stouffville Hospital, on Friday, November 4, 2005, in her 50th year, surrounded by her family. Pamela, beloved wife of Glen NOLAN and loving mother of Benjamin. Beloved daughter of Jill and Roger KEELEY. Dear sister of Michele and Jim DROHAN, Christopher and Kim KEELEY, Tracey and Dean OPYC, and Todd KEELEY. Loving granddaughter of Eleanor KEELEY. Also lovingly remembered by her 6 nieces and nephews. Integrity, humility and strength of character were a gift to all who knew her. Friends will be received at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main St. N. (Markham Rd.), Markham, on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday, November 9th at 11 a.m. in St. Andrew's United Church, 32 Main St. N., Markham. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Marfan Association, Central Plaza Postal Outlet, 128 Queen St. S., P.O. Box 42257, Mississauga, Ontario, L5M 4Z0 would be appreciated.

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OPYRIUK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-03 published
Jaroslaw OPYRIUK
By Lubomyr LUCIUK and Nadia LUCIUK, Friday, June 3, 2005, Page A22
Accountant, poet, Ukrainian patriot, refugee, chef, gentleman. Born January 8, 1915, in Volosiv, Ukraine. Died May 3 in Kingston, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 90.
He was a shy man, a quiet man, or so we had come to accept. Yet, after his death, as we sifted through his papers (long secreted away in an old cookie tin), much that we had not known about him was exposed.
Jaroslaw, or "Uncle Slawko," as we always called him, was born in a small village, Volosiv, now western Ukraine but then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. He never knew his father, Wasyl, a soldier lost in the Great War. His widowed mother, Ustina (BAGALIUK,) was left in desperate straits. Thankfully the two Zakh sisters, daughters of a wealthy landowner and Czechs by nationality, accepted Jaroslaw as their own, providing him with a somewhat pampered life and his mother with work and shelter.
Ustina later became Petro LUCIUK's wife, and Jaroslaw was joined by a half-brother, Roman, and half-sister, Paraskevia. It was in the interwar period that he also came to know our father, Danylo, the start of a lifelong Friendship that would endure a second world war, exile and resettlement.
His privileged position secured Slawko a better education than the norm. He became an accountant, with a cultivated taste for literature, classical music and poetry, which he also wrote. He rose to a position of administrative responsibility within the Ukrainian co-operative movement and remained working for the betterment of his people under the Polish, Soviet and Nazi occupations. Escaping west in 1944, when it became clear that Ukraine would again fall under the Communist yoke, he and Danylo found asylum in a displaced persons camp, just north of Munich. There he took an active role in cultural life, foreshadowed by his having earlier starred as Taras Bulba in a theatrical rendition of Hohol's famous work.
In 1949, Slawko was selected for emigration to Canada, officially identified as a lumber-camp worker. It is doubtful he would have fared well in northern Ontario's forests. Luckily our mother, Maria, intervened with her supervisor at Kingston's Hotel Dieu Hospital, and secured a kitchen job for "Jerry," as he was known to staff there. He would work there for the next three decades, eventually becoming chef. The certificate of appreciation he received on retirement became one of his most cherished documents, carefully preserved. That several of the nursing sisters he knew decades ago attended his funeral to bid their goodbyes, was one reminder of how appreciated he had been.
Some of our earliest memories are of playing in the hospital's basement, being treated to still-warm apple pie, a perk of having our "Uncle Slawko" in charge of the ovens. Although he became somewhat reclusive in later life, Slawko remained committed to all things Ukrainian -- particularly the arts, the Ukrainian Catholic Church and various charitable and educational foundations. His generosity helped sustain Lubomyr during his doctoral research. When the resulting book appeared, exploring the postwar refugee community's struggle for Ukrainian independence, Slawko was delighted for, always a voracious reader, this tome treated a topic close to his heart. He kept himself informed, continuing to read even after he had to be taken to hospital in Kingston.
Slawko died peacefully, having witnessed the Orange Revolution herald a real chance for democracy in Ukraine. Buried in Canadian soil, he was also covered with a handful of earth brought from Volosiv.
Indeed his course was much like Ukraine's. Both endured and so both are finally free.
Lubomyr and Nadia LUCIUK are Slawko's nephew and niece.

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