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"KVE" 2005 Obituary


KVEDARAS  KVER 

KVEDARAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-09 published
KVEDARAS, Alice Emma (SPEDER)
Passed away peacefully, on Thursday, April 7, 2005, at Toronto East General Hospital. Loving mother of Audrey KVEDARAS and her husband Paul SYME, Paul KVEDARAS, and Sandra WILCOX and her husband David. Adored grandmother of Jeffrey and Matthew WILCOX and Clara SYME. Alice was born November 26, 1927 in Suvalkija, Lithuania, as the daughter of the SPEDER family. She grew up in Lithuania and moved to Canada where she became a nurse in 1956 and married Vytautas KVEDARAS a short time after. Over the years she volunteered at the Kingsway Lambton United Church and many other charities. Alice spent over 30 years on Addison Beach on beautiful Georgian Bay. She loved to walk in parks and always saw the beauty of the natural surroundings. She always enjoyed the companionship of dogs. A Memorial Service will be held at Park Lawn Cemetery, Mausoleum Chapel at 2845 Bloor St. W., Etobicoke, on Tuesday, April 12, 2005 at 2 p.m. Arrangements entrusted to Turner and Porter Butler Chapel (416) 231-2283. If desired, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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KVEDARAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-18 published
KVEDARAS, Aldona
Passed away after a short illness on Tuesday, August 16, 2005 at Centenary Health Centre in her 85th year. She is survived by her husband Frank, her brother-in-law Vytautas and his wife Houri and their children and son-in-law Walter BARKEY. She is predeceased by her daughter Laima BARKEY, her sister Bronis and brothers Kazys and Jonas. Fondly remembered by many relatives in Lithuania. Friends and family may visit at The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre, 1057 Brock Road, Pickering (south of 401) 905-686-5589 on Tuesday, August 23, 2005 from 1-2 p.m. Service to follow at 2 p.m. Cremation. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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KVEDARAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-16 published
KVEDARAS, Frank
Passed away after a short illness on Tuesday, November 15, 2005, at Centenary Health Centre in his 90th year. He is survived by his brother Vytautas and his wife Houri KVEDARAS in Toronto, two sisters in Lithuania and his son-in-law Walter BARKEY. According to his wishes he is to be cremated. There will be no Funeral Services. In his memory, you are welcome to donate to the charity of your choice.

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KVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-15 published
Frank STALLEY, Broadcaster: 1924-2005
Television pioneer who lost the power of speech during a boyhood bout of Bell's palsy was one of the first Canadian Broadcasting Corporation anchors on The National, writes Sandra MARTIN. He later became a network executive
By Sandra MARTIN, Tuesday, March 15, 2005 Page S7
Long-time Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television broadcaster Frank STALLEY was a co-host with Anna Cameron on Open House, the precursor to Take Thirty, and an anchor and newsreader on the nightly news before moving from behind the cameras to a series of management jobs in London and across Canada.
Francis (Frank) Palmer STALLEY was born in Stratford, Ontario, the only child of Frank and Sarah Frances STALLEY. By the time he was 4, his parents realized that he had a natural aptitude for music. For the next 17 years, he trained to be a concert pianist and performed in recitals on radio and in local venues, winning many awards and scholarships. He studied piano at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and later at the Royal Schools of Music in London.
His musical training was interrupted in the mid-1930s when he was struck simultaneously with polio (then called infantile paralysis), which left him unable to walk, and Bell's palsy (trauma to the seventh cranial nerve), which deprived him of speech. To regain the ability to walk, he took swimming lessons and practised hard to regain the ability to talk, he spent hours speaking with a pencil between his teeth. A biographical sketch written for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1959 says Mr. STALLEY's "speech recovery was extremely difficult and even now... he has to consciously form each word before speaking."
He tried to enlist in the Royal Canadian Navy during the Second World War but was rejected the first time because he was too young and the second time because he was suffering from mastoiditis, a condition that left him with diminished hearing in one ear.
So, in 1944, the 20-year-old Mr. STALLEY found a position as supervisor of elementary school music in Ontario's Bruce County. A year was enough to persuade him to seek his fortunes elsewhere. Through a mix of ingenuity and happenstance -- a neighbour offered him a job -- he found himself the "announcer-operator-news editor-commercial writer and technician" at CJCS in Stratford, Ontario Apparently, he also swept out the place at night.
A year later, he switched to CFCH in North Bay and a job as staff announcer. Even though he was promoted to chief announcer in 1947, he moved to KVER in Albuquerque, N.M., and a dual position as news editor and newscaster. Moving up meant moving around, or so he thought, as he headed for Los Angeles, where he was reduced to washing dishes, or "pearl diving" in the slang of the time. He found some success as a freelance announcer and as a writer of scripts for classical music programs. In 1948, he moved to San Francisco, where he stayed until the Korean War broke out. He then headed back to radio station CHOK in Sarnia, this time as program manager, a position he held until he went to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as an announcer in 1954.
He was a regular anchor on The National news, along with Larry Henderson and Rex Loring. Broadcaster Patrick WATSON remembers directing him as a newsreader when "I was a new boy and he a staff announcer, and that he was helpful and courteous and good at his job."
Broadcaster Vincent Tovell also remembers him from the early 1960s. "My memory of him is totally positive. He was easy, pleasant, very efficient, all of those nice things. Television was live and you had to be cool."
Among many other assignments during the 1950s and 1960s, Mr. STALLEY was the co-host of the first women's program, Open House, with broadcaster Anna Cameron. She remembers him as "a very nice and gracious man" who played the piano, sometimes even on the show.
Actor and broadcaster Paul SOLES, who co-hosted Take 30, the successor to Open House, first with Ms. Cameron and then with Adrienne Clarkson, says Mr. STALLEY "had a light, genuine, engaging manner and voice."
As a neophyte performer on television, Mr. SOLES looked on announcers such as Mr. STALLEY as "the standard setters" for the use of language and phrasing. "I recall his calm, often wry, welcoming and gentleness" as a host, and his "quiet formality."
After only a decade before the cameras, Mr. STALLEY "moved up the line" into administration, working first in Ottawa as executive assistant to Charles Jennings, the vice-president of regional broadcasting. That's where he met and married Sarah GRANT, his wife of nearly 40 years. "He was a wonderful, intelligent, humorous, caring individual," she said.
In 1968, he was posted to Vancouver as director of radio for British Columbia, and then to London as the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's radio and television program representative. "He loved that," said Mrs. STALLEY. " His family had come from England and he had spent a lot of time there with his parents in his youth. Living in London in the '70s was the time to be there."
After London, he was given the choice of moving to Toronto or Halifax; he chose the latter partly because his wife's family came from there and partly because he wanted a quieter posting as he headed toward retirement. He stepped down from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation at the age of 63 in 1987. In retirement, travel, music and his membership in the Presbyterian church became big interests.
In the past decade, he survived three serious illnesses -- bacterial meningitis, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and a pulmonary embolism. "We thought he would always survive everything," his wife said last week. Then shortly before Christmas, he developed an unusual and aggressive type of lung cancer. Not even he could beat cancer.
Frank STALLEY was born in Stratford, Ontario, on May 29, 1924. He died of lung cancer in Halifax on March 4, 2005. He was 80. He is survived by his wife, Sarah and daughter Christian.

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