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"JAF" 2005 Obituary


JAFFARY  JAFFE  JAFFEY  JAFFRAY 

JAFFARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-15 published
William ARCHER, Lawyer And Politician: 1919-2005
Toronto alderman was 'subtle, intricate -- one might even say devious -- but clever.' He failed to become mayor yet won respect as a dogged public servant who always did his homework
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, April 15, 2005, Page S7
Toronto -- While the rest of the country has to reach for a thesaurus to find the words for how much it hates Toronto, William ARCHER was a rare breed: a man deliriously in love with the city.
Toronto was his town, every nook and cranny of it. An unabashed policy wonk, his encyclopedic knowledge of arcane bylaws, municipal regulations and rules of procedure came in handy in his years as a Toronto alderman, controller and mayoral candidate -- especially when he peppered his fellow councillors with pointed questions.
He saw himself as "one who has kept an eye on things, one who has raised questions," as he related to this newspaper in 1974. "The fact that I might raise questions has had an effect on people."
At times, it was "hard to see what effect that has, apart from irritation," wrote one city hall reporter of the day. "Much time is taken up with items he has raised."
The word "gadfly" came up now and then in relation to Mr. ARCHER, but it's one former Toronto mayor David CROMBIE dismisses.
"He was much too serious to be a gadfly," recalled Mr. CROMBIE, now president and Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Urban Institute. "He provided very solid advice. We used to call him 'the grey eminence.' He was very serious about his politics."
And maybe even a little mischievous. At a 1974 council meeting, with Mr. CROMBIE absent, Mr. ARCHER called for a number of roll-call votes for reasons no one could quite understand. Then, the tactic became clear: He was racking up Mr. CROMBIE's absentee record, which, at the time, stood at about 17 per cent.
"Subtle, intricate -- one might even say devious -- but clever," pronounced The Globe and Mail.
A Toronto alderman from 1958 to 1974, with the exception of three years from 1966 to 1969, Mr. ARCHER was remembered by colleagues as dogged, almost obsessive about digesting the mass of the dry arcana city politicians confront every day.
"He was one of the few who did an enormous amount of homework," recalled Mr. CROMBIE, who was elected alderman in 1969 and was Toronto's mayor from 1972 to 1978. "There were a lot of people who would show up to meetings having read the executive summary or sort of skimmed [reports]. But Bill was very thorough -- a detail man -- one of the few who actually read the by-laws."
Mr. ARCHER's wife of 47 years, Gwen, is more blunt: "He had a mind like a rat trap. He could listen to two radios, the television and read the paper at the same time. He was so honest, it was sickening. And he'd talk to a fence post if it would talk back."
Even so, one colleague, alderman Karl JAFFARY, described Mr. ARCHER as "good at government but not at politics." Mr. CROMBIE once introduced Mr. ARCHER as "perhaps not the best politician, but by far one of the best and most devoted public servants this city has ever seen."
Born in Hamilton into a family of Anglican priests, Mr. ARCHER worked in Toronto as an office boy while still a teenager, and later as a junior with the Imperial Bank of Canada. During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve, and served in the Atlantic and Pacific. He left the service with the rank of lieutenant-commander and never lost his love of the water, sailing seven-metre Star sailboats for years and enjoying a life membership in the Royal Canadian Yacht Club.
He attended McGill University in Montreal and Osgoode Hall law school in Toronto, excelling at both in debating, and established a Bay Street law practice before the political bug bit.
In 1958, he was elected to Toronto city council and to Metropolitan Toronto council, and served as Toronto's controller from 1963 to 1966, the year he made a run for mayor. After a 12-week campaign, he polled a respectable 41,000 votes, but lost to fellow controller William DENNISON, who proved a careful and quiet mayor. Some blamed Mr. ARCHER for causing the defeat of the more flamboyant incumbent mayor, Phil GIVENS, and as Mr. ARCHER told his supporters on election night, "We shook the city up quite a bit."
As former Toronto mayor, recent Senate appointee Art EGGLETON, remembers the '66 campaign, where Mr. ARCHER's slogan was " ARCHER listens, learns... leads."
"He followed it, though he didn't always go the conventional way," Mr. EGGLETON recalled. "Not everyone agreed with him, but he was man of his convictions."
Mr. ARCHER returned to his law practice after his defeat but surfaced in 1969 with three headline-grabbing feats: In May, he spent a weekend as a derelict in Toronto's Cabbagetown neighbourhood, living on handouts and sleeping in a flop house -- all designed, he said, to gauge the city's services to the destitute. "It was the most lonely and exhausting weekend of my life," he told reporters.
In July, he drove a taxi for a week. "Well, see, I'm doing it to learn more about my community," he explained as he handed out a six-page transcript of his recorded thoughts and impressions. "And let me tell you, it's the loneliest job in the world. I mean it." His tips went to the Brothers of the Good Shepherd, who put him up during his homeless weekend.
In August of that year, he walked the length of Toronto's waterfront to get to know the harbour.
To anyone cynical enough to suggest these were publicity stunts, Mr. ARCHER had an answer: Honni soit qui mal y pense (roughly, evil to him who thinks evil). Whatever it was, it worked, and in the 1969 elections, Mr. ARCHER was back on council. "His politics were old-fashioned progressive conservative, and I mean that as a complement, a type that's almost lost now," says Mr. CROMBIE, whose term on council overlapped with Mr. ARCHER's until 1972. "He was progressive on social issues and pretty strict on economic and financial issues. He was a man of principles -- his own."
In all, Mr. ARCHER represented three midtown and downtown wards, and served on a slew of influential committees and boards, including works, transportation and planning. He fought for better pensions for municipal employees, improvements to welfare and was chiefly responsible for building the city's new fire boat. He also co-ordinated the Yonge Street mall, a popular pedestrian walkway closed to traffic that lasted for a few years in the early 1970s.
He clashed with council on two major issues: a 45-foot height bylaw and the decision not to have separate elections for Metro and the city. He called the latter "the greatest tragedy of this council."
Mr. ARCHER lost to a left-wing candidate in the 1974 election but the next year, he was appointed commissioner of a provincial review of the Niagara region, followed by many years on the Toronto Historical Board. In 1997, he received the Toronto Award of Merit.
His fight against the status quo did not wane. In 1986, a task force on which Mr. ARCHER served suggested more than a dozen changes to the municipal voting process, including holding elections on a Sunday in October, with separate election days for mayor, council and school trustees.
Mr. ARCHER once said that voters make a few mistakes, but not as many as politicians. "I only know I needed to do what I considered the right thing," he said, "whether I stood alone or not."
William Lee ARCHER was born in Hamilton on September 25, 1919, and died in Toronto of heart failure on March 6. He was 85. He is survived by his wife, Gwendolyn (née BAMFORD,) and a daughter, Janet. A service will be held at a later date.

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JAFFARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-13 published
Dorothy THOMAS stormed city hall
One of reformer group elected to council in 1972
She started poop and scoop program in Toronto
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
Once upon a time, when Toronto was younger and believed in itself much, much more, a group of urban idealists stormed city hall. They called themselves reformers and they got into the council chamber by getting themselves elected. David CROMBIE was their leader, a man dubbed Toronto's "tiny perfect mayor" by the media of the day, and great things were expected and sometimes even delivered.
Now, these reformers were feisty and forward-thinking -- they were people like the late Colin VAUGHAN, an architect turned activist, lawyers Dale MARTIN and Karl JAFFARY, renegade thinker John SEWELL. And three of the newly minted aldermen -- for that was the job title of councillor in those days -- were women.
But only two -- Anne JOHNSTON and Dorothy THOMAS -- made it through the first term of office. JOHNSTON, who retired from municipal politics at the time of the last election, says that was only because they learned to be tough and because they had each other.
"I met her December 4, 1972, the night we were all elected. There was a spontaneous gathering of all the reformers at city hall and I remember Dorothy was wearing a hat and she came up to me and said: 'You and I are going to be Friends,'" she said.
They were a gang of citizen politicians who believed they were going to create a livable, even lovable city, but THOMAS was right about at least one thing that night: she and JOHNSTON were Friends until May 9 this year, when THOMAS died of cancer at Dorothy MIKOS was the proud daughter of very proud Hungarians. Her father, a tailor, and her mother, a talented seamstress, came to Canada in the 1930s. Theirs was the classic immigrant story, according to THOMAS's only child, Nye THOMAS, a lawyer and policy director of the Ipperwash provincial inquiry. His grandparents worked hard in Spadina Ave. sweatshops so their children would never have to and were thrilled when their daughter went to the University of Toronto.
THOMAS discovered journalism there -- it was the heyday of the varsity press -- as well as Ralph THOMAS, another journalist who would become a well-known Canadian filmmaker. Now living in California, he is best known here for Ticket To Heaven and The Terry Fox Story. Dorothy THOMAS left university before she graduated to work at the Toronto Star, where she was an arts reporter under the watch of the legendary entertainment editor Nathan COHEN.
She was a stay-at-home mom living in a fourplex on Wineva Ave. in the Beach when she joined up with a group of residents to successfully fight the construction of the Scarborough Expressway, which would have cut right through her neighbourhood.
THOMAS served two terms on Toronto council, from 1972 to 1976 and from 1981 to 1985, representing the old Ward 9 until ousted by a tag team of Paul CHRISTIE and Tom JAKOBEK. She had been one of the founders of the City of Toronto's Person's Day Award and had headed the Mayor's Task Force on the Status of Women.
"She was an excellent politician," said Barbara CAPLAN, a former Toronto city clerk. "She could build consensus across political ties."
JOHNSTON said her friend initiated Toronto's poop and scoop program, an achievement not among those noted on the condolence motion passed by council 10 days after THOMAS died, but not without its significance.
"She owned the public works committee," said JOHNSTON. " She was always the chair. She liked it because it was working on neighbour stuff."
Attractive and articulate, THOMAS was also blunt. "There was no filter with her, ever," her son said.
She made headlines when she and Alderman Dale MARTIN visited Calgary in 1985 for the 48th annual convention of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. "The whole of downtown Calgary shows an amazing lack of planning," she said. Ralph KLEIN was the mayor then and he summoned photographers to record him standing in front of Calgary City Hall wearing boxing gloves and dissing the smug politicians from the East.
THOMAS didn't back down. "It's very ugly in Calgary," she told the Star. "It even makes (Metro planners) look good."
By then a single mom working punishing hours, THOMAS still made a point of being home every night to have dinner with her son. When she quit politics the first time, it was to spend time with Nye. When she left municipal politics for good, she moved to Euclid Ave. and got a job heading and helping clean up the Metro Licensing Commission, serving on the subsequent Toronto Licensing Tribunal until 2003.
A spectacular cook and a stylish hostess, she was often asked to donate her talents to fundraising events. A dinner party for four catered by Dorothy THOMAS was always a hot ticket at silent and not-so-silent auctions for the New Democratic Party. She was generous with her money as well as time, donating to 60 charities, including the Canadian Marmot Foundation (because she thought no one else would, her son said).
Her dinner table was a natural gathering place for Friends and their families. For 10 years she met one Wednesday night every other month with a group of powerful women such as June CALLWOOD, Doris ANDERSON and Sylvia OSTRY, and for twice as long as that, she was part of a poker player gang of Friends that included fellow activist Ethel TEITELBAUM, who often travelled with THOMAS.
"She was a complicated woman who attacked a lot of people who loved her. But we hung in there because she was loyal and wonderful company -- witty, generous. I always thought she was beautiful," said TEITELBAUM.
Last fall they had travelled to Sicily, one of THOMAS's must-see destinations. "We had a ball," said TEITELBAUM.
But THOMAS, who disliked doctors, was in pain and in fact had been suffering for some time. When she was finally diagnosed with cancer at Christmas, it was too late. THOMAS was admitted to Princess Margaret Hospital, where she had hundreds of visitors. "They said they had never seen anything like it," said CAPLAN, who was soon sending out regular emails about THOMAS to 125 recipients.
In recent years, THOMAS had moved to Port Hope and had been immersed in developing the Port Hope Ecology Garden.
THOMAS never got home again: she spent 17 weeks in hospital, latterly at the Toronto Grace where she celebrated her 67th birthday with Friends. She wasn't in pain, but she was unable to read or watch much television, and every morning she would wake up and be angry that she was still around. "She wanted to leave the arena," CAPLAN said.
She insisted both Nye and his wife, Karen, go to China on a long-awaited trip to bring home Mei Leigh, their adopted daughter and her first grandchild. She died two days after they left Canada.
Her many Friends are gathering tonight at 7 p.m. at the Gladstone Hotel for her memorial. There will be good food, wine, Friends reuniting, laughter and only four speeches. Her son says it is where and how she would have wanted it.

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JAFFARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-17 published
JAFFARY, Joyce (née BARBEAU)
Peacefully on Saturday, October 15, 2005 at Toronto in her 79th year. Beloved mother of Lynn METZLER, Helen JAMES, Chris JAFFARY and Barbara PARTRIDGE. Loving grandmother of Jules and the late Amber. Dear sister of Reta. Fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by numerous family members. Memorial Service to follow at a later date in her hometown of Sault Ste. Marie. "You're home Mom" "We love you"

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JAFFE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-24 published
WOOLLEY, David Arthur
Passed away peacefully, surrounded by family, on the morning of September 16, 2005, after a long and courageous battle against cancer. He was 61. Born in Tillsonburg, Ontario, July 5, 1944, Dave grew up in Lambeth, before moving to Castlegar, and then, in 1979, became an active member of the North Vancouver community. He was predeceased by his son Robbie, and infant brother Robert. He is survived by wife Susan, parents Jean and Art WOOLLEY, sister Barb WILLSIE (Jim,) sons Kevin, Martyn (Pieta,) Geoff, Joel JAFFE, and Rick DE ATAIDE, extended family, and dear Friends. A celebration of his life will be held at Lambeth United Church, Friday, September 30th, at 1 p.m. For those who wish, a donation to the Lions Gate Hospital Foundation, Oncology or Palliative Care Fund, 231 East 15th Street, North Vancouver, British Columbia V7L 2L7 would be appreciated, in lieu of flowers.

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JAFFE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-26 published
GERTLER, Jeffrey Lee
January 18, 2005
After a recurrence of brain cancer, despite the best of care at the Clinique de Genolier, Switzerland, and the constant support of family, colleagues and Friends, his courage and morale undiminished, on January 18, 2005 he was taken from his wife, Ann Stewart GERTLER their sons Marin (fiancée Rocio LASTRAS) and Joshua; his parents, Maynard and Ann Straus GERTLER; brothers and sisters-in-law, Michael (JoAnn JAFFE,) Alfred (Kathryn MacRAE,) Franklin (Catherine OLIVER) and Edward (Mary-Jo LOW/LOWE/LOUGH;) sisters-in-law, Cynthia VON MAERESTETTEN and Rowena STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; mother-in-law, Thisbe STEWARD/STEWART/STUART nieces, Lisa and Jardena; nephews, Mark, Maxim, Will, Leo, Nicholas, John Nathaniel and Theo; beloved family member, Doris WINKLER and his extended family in Ottawa, Toronto, New York, California, England and Scotland who survive him to celebrate his 51 productive years. He was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, among the Plain People, where his college-teaching parents chose to farm. But his education was to begin at Darwin House, Cambridge, England (when they resumed research interrupted by service in the wartime administrations and army (Maynard) of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman) -- to be continued largely at St. George's School, Montreal. His further development was associated with training institutes in non-violence and peace research, fostered by the Canadian Peace Research Institute and sponsored by the Canadian Friends Service Committee and the Canadian National Commission of United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. He was a "resource person" for the 1970 and 1971 high school peace workshops which took place at Grindstone Island on Big Rideau Lake, Portland, Ontario, the former summer home of Admiral Sir Charles Edmund KINGSMILL (first director of the Royal Canadian Navy) and his family, and loaned by his heirs for that purpose. Jeffrey's professional skills were acquired at Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania, by a B.A., with emphasis on contemporary political economy, history and French (Université de Grenoble), by study at the Institute of Comparative International Law, Paris, on Regulation of International Business Transactions, by a J.D. at the University of San Diego, California, an LLM from Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., and by work with the Commonwealth Secretariat, London, the U.S. International Trade Commission, and the Office of the United States Trade Representative, among others. A member of the California and District of Columbia bars and of the American Society for International Law, he entered his latest field of activity through applications to United Nations and United Nations-affiliated agencies. Invited to Geneva by the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, he was employed by them in 1988, and stayed on when the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade evolved into the World Trade Organization in 1995. As Senior Counsellor in the Legal Affairs Division, he was active in the elaboration of dispute settlement procedures, in panels pertaining to the admission of countries, such as China, to the World Trade Organization, in work, duty travel and conferences on four continents, including university-sponsored speaking engagements on various aspects of globalization: human rights, labour, environment and living conditions, as well as trade. Jeffrey gravitated toward work in the public interest by an early internship with the Environmental Defense Fund of Washington, D.C., and by a spell as Special Assistant to the Rector of the United Nations University of Tokyo. Not incidentally, his two non-professional affiliations in 1988 at the time of joining the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade were with the Lawyers Alliance for Nuclear Arms Control, and Friends of the Earth. He delighted in sailing off Norfolk, England, on Lakes Ontario and Champlain, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, the Chesapeake with his wife Ann and boys, from their first home at Shady Side, near Annapolis, Maryland, and Lake Geneva (Léman). He loved life and knew well what to do with it, was an enthusiastic skiier and swimmer, an accomplished photographer, a keen gardener and family farmer, in Ontario, and an excellent cook. At various times he played the recorder, violin and guitar. Family meant the world to him, and his children were his greatest joy. Facing final illness, his supreme regret was the prospect that he might not be around to share in their lives, to support them, and to help celebrate their accomplishments. The warmest of farewells were given him at the Temple de Genolier above Lake Geneva, January 24, on a sunny day, emblazoned by fresh snow and invigorated by the mountain air. In addition to his wife, sons and brothers, some 150 Friends and colleagues were in attendance, many from the World Trade Organization, the United Nations family, the International School of Geneva, the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, Femmes Pour la Paix, and the International Peace Bureau. Following cremation, Jeffrey's remains will be interred near his home in Divonne les Bains, France. Contact with the family in Montreal may be had through Franklin GERTLER, at Aldred Building, 507 Place d'Armes, Suite 1200, Montreal, Québec, Canada H2Y 2W8; telephone (514) 842-0748; e-mail: franklin@gertlerlex.ca, or Maynard and Ann GERTLER, at 482 Strathcona Avenue, Westmount, Québec, Canada H3Y 2X1; telephone (514) 933-7913; fax (514) 933-1702 e-mail: ann.maynard.gertler@videotron.ca (and Box #58, Williamstown, Ontario, Canada K0C 2J0; telephone (613) 347-3505.

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JAFFEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-19 published
RONAN, Jane Marie
Peacefully at her home, in Toronto, on Thursday September 15th, 2005. Jane RONAN, in her 47th year. Beloved daughter of the late Patrick and Patricia RONAN, Colgan. Loving sister of Marie and her husband John JAFFEY, Michael and his wife Cheryl, Judy SHAW, Neil and his wife Terry, Teresa RONAN, Frances and her husband Dave McDONELL, Joanne and her husband Brian MUNRO, John and his wife Anita, Joseph RONAN, and Kevin and his wife Trudy. Sadly missed by her 18 nieces and nephews. Resting at Rod Abrams Funeral Home, 1666 Tottenham Road, Tottenham, 905-936-3477 on Monday September 19th, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be held in St. James Church, Colgan, 11: 00 a.m. Tuesday September 20th, 2005 followed by cremation.

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JAFFRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-27 published
ANDERSON, Jack Alexander Edward
Passed away peacefully on Sunday, September 25, 2005 in his 81st year at Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga. Beloved husband of Davina and loving father of Karen, Bob and Susan. Proud Papa to Nolan and Lauryn. Cherished brother to Gwen JAFFRAY and Doreen ZAVITZ. Jack will be fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews and Friends. The family will receive Friends at the Lee Funeral Home, 258 Queen St. South, Streetsville on Tuesday evening 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Services to be held at Trinity Anglican Church, 69 Queen St. South on Thursday, September 29, 2005 at 2 o'clock p.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Salvation Army or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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JAFFRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-27 published
ANDERSON, Jack Alexander Edward
Passed away peacefully on Sunday, September 25th, 2005, in his 81st year, at Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga. Beloved husband of Davina and loving father of Karen, Bob and Susan. Proud Papa to Nolan and Lauryn. Cherished brother to Gwen JAFFRAY and Doreen ZAVITZ. Jack will be fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews and Friends. The family will receive Friends at the Lee Funeral Home Limited, 258 Queen Street South, Streetsville (Mississauga Road, south of 401) on Tuesday evening 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral services to be held at Trinity Anglican Church, 69 Queen Street South, Streetsville on Thursday, September 29th, 2005 at 2 p.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Salvation Army or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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