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"HOY" 2005 Obituary


HOY  HOYLAND  HOYLES  HOYNINGEN  HOYT  HOYTE 

HOY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-01 published
ROBERTSON, George Elmer
Died, December 26, 2004, George Elmer ROBERTSON, age 77, former long time resident of Colborne Township. George was predeceased by his wife Lenore Ruth HOY, in 1991, and wife Bette Jean STOSKOPF in 1999. He is survived by three daughters; Ruth Anne STRICKLER, of Woodstock, Bethany Jane JOBB, of London and Martha Lynn ROBERTSON, of Toronto, and two sons; Stephen Elkin and John Edward, both of Goderich. Also, four grandchildren; Kathryn and Drew STRICKLER, and Sheila and Krista JOBB. Surviving, also, are two sisters Emma RIVETT and Shirley DUSTOW, and a brother, William. George farmed most of his life in Colborne and Ashfield Townships and ran a small corn drying business. In his early years, George received his Pilot's Licence and shared a small plane. Later, it was traded for his first sailboat and a long history of sailing, racing and exploration of Georgian Bay began. George and Ruth owned and operated Huron Marine, one of the few successful marine supply businesses that was more than ten miles from the nearest water. The family has requested that instead of cards and flowers, contributions be made, in George's memory, to the Alzheimer Society of Canada. A memorial service and interment will be held sometime in the spring.

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HOY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-14 published
McINTYRE, Jerry / Gerald
Jerry/Gerald (L.F.) born Glace Bay, Nova Scotia June 9, 1936 - died Nanaimo, British Columbia May 12, 2005 at N.R.G.H. after a short, but courageous battle with cancer. Survived by his beloved wife and best friend Joan, son William (Gale) McINTYRE, daughters Kathleen and Christy McINTYRE, brothers Frank (Linda) HUBLEY, Gordon (Sharon) HUBLEY, sister Cheryl (John) KOZEY, sisters-in-law Carol (George) HOY and Judy BOURDAGE, 8 grandchildren, several nieces and nephews, his Aunt Beauty, many cousins and dear Friends. Predeceased by his mother and step-father Sarah and Fred HUBLEY, and his father Lauchlin MacKAY. At Jerry's request, there will be no service. Joan asks that this man simply be remembered for his great ability to listen, his laughter and love of life, friend to many, and as he wished, leaves us and this world quietly. Thanks to Dr. Helmut Mark for always being there. Donations in his may be made to the Liver Foundation, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, or charity of choice. Cremation.

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HOY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-15 published
BROWN, George Bruce
At Alexandra Marine and General Hospital, Goderich, on Monday, June 13, 2005. Mr. George Bruce BROWN of Clinton in his 82nd year. George was born and raised at McConnell's Nursery at Port Burwell. Beloved husband for 60 years to Betty BROWN. Loving father of Sandra and John TIMPANY of Woodstock, Judith and Claude RACINE of Montreal, Shelley and Louie HARTMAN of Port Albert, and Wendy and Wayne HOY of Goderich. Cherished grandfather of 9 grandchildren and 5 great-grandchildren. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Marian and Ken MAINPRIZE of Saint Marys, Muriel and Pete WALKER of London, and Dorothy BROWN of Barrie. Also loved by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by 2 brothers Max and Allin BROWN. Friends will be received at the Falconer Funeral Homes, 153 High Street, Clinton, on Thursday from 6-8: 30 p.m. and on Friday, June 17, 2005 from 1 p.m. until the time of the funeral service at 2 p.m. Cremation with interment of ashes in Aylmer Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers memorial donations to the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #140 Clinton or the Clinton Public Hospital Foundation would be greatly appreciated. Royal Canadian Legion Branch #140 Clinton Service Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m.

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HOY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-12 published
McINTOSH, Catherine Joan
Peacefully surrounded by her daughters at Grand Wood Park, London on Saturday, December 10, 2005, in her 84th year. Beloved wife of the late Alvin McINTOSH (2004.) Loving mother of Ellen and her husband Stephen TODD of Kitchener, Martha and her husband Jack HOPKINS of Goderich, Beth McINTOSH of London, and Joanne and her husband Chris BRAITHWAITE of Kitchener. Dear grandmother of Bryan HOPKINS and Jaime HOY, Sarah TODD and Adam LEES, Heather and Jason COOK, Christina CARL and Tristan COYSH, Cameron TODD and Heather McNEISH, Shannon TODD, Patrick CARL, and Sean and Adam BRAITHWAITE. Dear sister of Frances and her husband Wallace STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Sister-in-law of Gordon and his wife Marion McINTOSH, Robert and his wife Shirley McINTOSH, all of London, Rae McINTOSH, Ivan FENWICK, Mary McINTOSH, and the late Isabel LAWRENCE, Jesse McINTOSH, Angus McINTOSH, Margaret FENWICK. Lovingly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Catherine and Alvin served as missionaries on the Bhil Field of the Canadian Presbyterian Mission in Central India from 1952 and returned to Canada in 1964. Friends may call on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 St. James Street, at Richmond Street, London. The funeral service will be conducted on Wednesday December 14 at 2 p.m. in New St. James Presbyterian Church, 280 Oxford Street, East at Wellington, London. Interment Saint John's Cemetery Arva. Memorial contributions to Memorial Fund of New St. James Prebyterian church would be gratefully acknowledged

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-04 published
BODMORE, Ella Mary (née HOY)
Peacefully, on Monday, January 3, 2005, at Good Samaritan Nursing Home in Alliston, in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Joseph. Loving mother to Frances WOOD, Gloria Jo-Anne TRIBBLING, the late Charles and the late Audrey EDGE. Mother-in-law of Rene BODMORE. Ella will be dearly missed by her 14 grandchildren, and numerous great-grandchildren. She is survived by her sisters Gladys PADLEY, Bobbee LEEDER and her brother Gordon HOY. Ella will be sadly missed by all her relatives and Friends. Family and Friends will be received at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Ave. E. (east of Kennedy Rd.) on Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the Ogden Chapel on Thursday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Highland Memory Gardens.

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-14 published
STEVENS, Paula Maxine (née MELLOR)
Age 59. Of Brampton. Passed away February 12, 2005 in Palliative Care, Brampton Memorial Hospital. Born in St. Stephen, New Brunswick. She was the daughter of the late Thomas and Pauline MELLOR of Halifax. A graduate of Mount St. Vincent University, she worked as a Medical Secretary to the Administrator of the Victoria General Hospital, Halifax and later with Dr. Paul SINGH, Calgary, Alberta. She was dedicated to her husband, family and Friends. She carried her long illness with strength, courage and dignity. Surviving are her devoted husband Jim, daughter Stephanie (Brad) HOY, grandchildren Katie and Owen HOY, daughter Kimberley (fiancé David BRUSSO,) Brampton. She is also survived by sister Anne (Alex MacMILLAN,) nieces Pamela MacMILLAN, Deborah (Rob COOMBS, great niece and nephew Hannah and Michael COOMBS,) Halifax. Visitation will be from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, February 16, 2005 at Snow's Funeral Home, Halifax. Funeral Mass will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, February 17, 2005 at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, Rockingham. Father Bernard O'Neill officiating. Reception to follow in the church hall. Burial to follow in Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Lower Sackville. Family flowers only. Memorial donations may be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Society.

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-21 published
KOBAYASHI, Patricia Mihoko (née KIMOTO)
Peacefully, with family by her side on Saturday, February 19, 2005, joining her beloved husband Takeshi. Loving mother of Elizabeth (Dr. Fred HOY,) Gloria, Christine (the late David Peter) and Deborah (Dr. Gordon WILLMOT.) Cherished grandmother of Jeffrey, Matthew, Lyndsay, Rachel, Lauren and Kristen. Survived by her sister Margaret SORA. Predeceased by sisters Frances OMORI and Mary MADOKORO; brothers Harold, Robert, Thomas, George, Jack and Major Kimoto. Resting at Chapel Ridge Funeral Home, 8911 Woodbine Ave., Markham (three lights north of Hwy. 7) 905-305-8508. Visitation on Tuesday, February 22nd, from 6-8 p.m. and Wednesday from 10-11: 30 a.m. Funeral Service to follow at 11:30 a.m. in the Chapel. Interment at Dixon Hill Cemetery. Donations may be made to the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre.

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-29 published
'Fearless' educator mourned
Beloved principal drowned diving in Stoney Lake
Wanted students to 'take on life with dignity'
By Hilda HOY, Staff Reporter
Students loved Althea RHOOMS.
The long-time teacher and principal had an infectious laugh and was always ready with a hug at the end of each school day.
She was also the whip-smart businesswoman who made sure students' education wasn't compromised by funding cuts, and fought tirelessly to improve her schools.
Always up for a good challenge, Rhooms was a woman described by best friend Sharon ALLEYNE as "strong, fearless."
"She could be strict in some ways, but there was always love for the students and lots of hugs," said Mike TIMOTHEOU, father of one of her students.
RHOOMS, who loved the outdoors, rowed Saturday in the Toronto International Dragon Boat Race Festival, competing on the Toronto District School Board team.
The next day, she participated in a practice dive at Stoney Lake near Peterborough with her scuba diving club. She had been diving almost weekly for a year, Friends and family said.
But on Sunday, she began having breathing problems under water and never made it up. She was 43.
The coroner's office is still probing what caused her death.
RHOOMS worked as a teacher before serving as vice-principal at McMurrich Junior Public School for two years, and then principal at Humewood Community School for three years.
She transferred to Maple Leaf Public School this past December, following her passion to the Jane St. and Lawrence Ave. neighbourhood where 65 per cent of her students have African or Caribbean backgrounds.
"She wanted them to grow up and take on life with dignity," said ALLEYNE.
RHOOMS volunteered for Women for P.A.C.E. (Project for Advancement of Childhood Education), a group promoting early childhood education in both Canada and her native Jamaica.
"She wanted to be a leader in the African Canadian community," said Trustee Josh MATLOW. "(At Maple Leaf) she found a place in the world to be a leader and provide mentorship to young students."
Principal Rita GARRY, who took RHOOMS's place at Humewood, said she took the assignment at the new school because "there were a lot of students from the black community there. She wanted to be a role model for the female students."
Flags were flying at half-mast and grief counsellors had been brought in at her former schools.
At a graduation ceremony at Maple Leaf yesterday, students spent what should have been a day of celebration, memorializing a lost friend.
RHOOMS leaves her parents, younger brothers Wayne and Jason, and her 18-year-old son, Gyasi. Funeral arrangements are still being made.

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-01 published
Father to three, friend to all
Bill McGILL spent career at the Star
'He was just a delight': co-worker
By Hilda HOY, Staff Reporter
Bill McGILL loved people. A family man and a community man, he took great delight in forming relationships with other people, no matter what the context.
His son, Jamie McGILL, fondly recalls a father who loved people so much, he avoided using bank machines so he could go inside and chat with the teller.
"He loved to chat people up, he was very, very well loved by so many people. He had a wonderful ability to make people feel like they were truly special."
Said daughter Patti SMITH: "He was a capital 'G' good guy. He'd do anything for anybody. He really loved doing things for other people. That's a dying breed."
In a cruel irony, the heart that gave so freely to others would trouble him for much of his later life. On Thursday, it quietly gave out. He was 83.
McGILL loved his work, and spent his entire 41-year career working in various departments at the Toronto Star.
His affiliation with the newspaper began with a boyhood paper route, followed by a part-time office boy job during high school, Jamie said. Upon graduation, he joined the Air Force and fought in World War 2.
After the war, he rejoined the Star, working in payroll before moving into display advertising.
He cherished the close-knit office and his relationships with co-workers and clients, Jamie said. "He was very proud (that) the work he did was about relationships with other people."
His father was also proud to say he worked at the Star because the paper's ethics were in line with his strong social conscience, he added.
Bill CLARK, a long-time co-worker in advertising, recalls a hardworking, congenial friend who would good-humouredly shoot a steely glare before "just giving you this huge smile. He was just a delight to work with."
"Everyone that came in touch with him liked him very much," said Jim GILMOUR, another Star veteran, who worked with McGILL for more than 30 years. "He was a wonderful friend."
McGILL was dedicated to his community -- involving himself in his church, volunteering for Meals on Wheels and as a Boy Scout leader -- but was especially devoted to his family.
He adored his wife of 59 years, Margaret, and children David, Jamie and Patti, and doted on his nine grandchildren and one great-grand_son.
Other than his war service, McGILL stayed close to home, until he surprised his wife with two tickets to Bermuda on their 25th wedding anniversary. That trip sparked a passion for travel.
In addition to yearly trips to England, the couple visited every country in the Caribbean and fell in love with Barbados, visiting more than 30 times.
"Travelling was another opportunity to meet people," said Jamie, adding his father would strike up conversations in airport lounges, hotels or taxicabs. "He established quite a large network of Friends that way."
GILMOUR spoke yesterday for many: "Those of us who are left will miss him very much."
The funeral is today at 11 a.m., Humbervale United Church, 1447 Royal York Rd., Etobicoke.

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-09 published
Watch, don't run, riders told
Toronto Transit Commission, police launch safety drive for motorists, pedestrians
Woman, 27, struck and killed by car while running for a bus
By Sikander Z. HASHMI and Hilda HOY, Staff Reporters
Take the time to check.
Tragically, that message -- part of a safety drive by Toronto police and the Toronto Transit Commission this week -- came too late for a young woman struck and killed in Scarborough just hours before the launch of the campaign.
Bonnie HO, 26, was rushing to catch her bus just before 7 a.m. yesterday. She reportedly ran against a red light from the southeast corner of Steeles and Kelvin Grove Aves., near her home, and was hit by a taxi.
Suffering massive head injuries, HO was rushed to Sunnybrook hospital, where she was pronounced dead.
In a one-week campaign aimed at preventing such accidents, officers are paying particular attention to infractions by motorists, cyclists and pedestrians that impede transit, especially around bus and streetcar stops, high-occupancy vehicle lanes and Wheel Trans vehicles.
Toronto police Sgt. Tony LAWSON advises pedestrians to stay alert and be cautious when stepping on to roads.
"Most fatalities involving pedestrians occur on the roadway, not on sidewalks," he points out. "It's usually the pedestrian rushing to something."
Most of the time, streetcar commuters have to step on to the roadway when hopping on or off the Toronto Transit Commission. One person a month is struck while leaving a streetcar, according to Const. Barb RYAN of the traffic safety program. But it's a wonder the rate is that low, considering how many motorists don't bother to stop behind open streetcar doors as the law requires.
"Toronto Transit Commission operators, themselves, report up to 80 incidents a day where motor vehicles pass the open doors of a streetcar, I guess in an attempt to race by," RYAN says. "Those could all end up in injuries or a calamity of some description."
That's the reason the campaign is emphasizing streetcar safety, she says, "because of the fact that they're not curbside."
At least one streetcar rider thinks that should be changed.
"It'd be nice to have (the streetcars) on the other side of the street," says Vanessa LEE, 26.
witnessing one rider being hit by a car was enough to persuade Umar TURNER to make a habit to check not once, but twice, when getting off a streetcar.
"I was right behind this lady," recalls the 26-year-old, "and she stepped off. I guess she didn't really look and a car came by and hit her.
"Because of that, every time I get off the streetcar, I always make sure to double-check."
TURNER says he often sees the streetcar stop and cars speed by.
Lee ZASLOFSKY, 60, has also witnessed cars whizzing by open streetcar doors but hasn't seen anyone get hit. He welcomes the awareness campaign, saying drivers need a reminder to be careful.
"I'm glad the police are doing this," he said while waiting for a streetcar at the corner of Yonge and Queen Sts.
"The people getting off are completely innocent. They may be a little careless, but the penalty could be death, whereas the guy in the car has a lifetime of guilt."
RYAN urges commuters to just take a moment to make sure they're not stepping directly into the path of an oncoming car. "Take that extra second... to check before you're going to jump into a live lane of traffic."
She has a piece of advice for drivers as well: "If you're a motorist... give them an extra second, because lots of times, people change their minds. They're on, then they want to get off, and the Toronto Transit Commission vehicle may have to come to a sudden stop."
Lisa TAILOR/TAYLOR, who was waiting for the Queen streetcar yesterday, recently saw a man nearly hit by a car as he was leaving the streetcar.
"The drivers here in Toronto... are very erratic," says TAILOR/TAYLOR, 33. "They don't look where they're going."
If the risk to innocent pedestrians isn't enough to convince motorists to be more careful, the penalty for being careless should. Passing an open streetcar door can set you back at least $110, plus three demerit points.
How 2 letter Surnames like HO work in OGSPI

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-04 published
3 reservists face murder charges
Homeless man beaten to death in Moss Park
By Hilda HOY, Staff Reporter
Three members of the Canadian Armed Forces Reserves are facing second-degree murder and assault charges after a homeless man was beaten to death in a downtown park and a woman coming to his aid was attacked.
Paul Richard CROUTCH, 59, died at St. Michael's Hospital on Wednesday as his case manager stood nearby. An autopsy performed Friday found the cause of death was trauma to the head, and the injuries were consistent with being punched, kicked or stomped.
Police were called to an assault in Moss Park, near Sherbourne and Shuter Sts., shortly before 5 a.m. on Wednesday. An unconscious CROUTCH was rushed to hospital but died later that morning.
A woman who witnessed the beating and intervened was treated for soft-tissue damage and bruising, police said.
CROUTCH had been a resident of the Salvation Army's Gateway Shelter, around the corner from the park on Jarvis Street, since 2002. Gateway will host a funeral next week.
He has family on the West Coast who have been notified.
"He was very mild-mannered and soft-spoken," said Gateway director Dion OXFORD. "He was harmless."
Last time he saw CROUTCH, he was watching the Gateway softball team play in the park.
"He kept to himself most of the time," remembered Gateway chaplain Ron FARR.
Brian DEGANIS, 21, Jeffery HALL, 21, and Mountaz IBRAHIM, 23, all of Toronto, were arrested and charged Friday after a joint investigation by Toronto police and the army's National Investigation Services.
The three men are part-time members of the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada, a reserve infantry unit that trains at the Moss Park Armoury adjacent to the park where CROUTCH was found.
Each has received at least two years of combat training, although the exact length of their service could not be confirmed. They had attended a "social function" at the armoury that evening but were not in uniform, investigation services spokesman Capt. Mark GILES said.
"Uniform or no uniform, these are very serious charges and we take it very seriously," said GILES.
Because the incident took place in the park and not on armoury property, the investigation falls under city police jurisdiction. The National Investigation Services provided support and will continue to do so as needed, GILES said.

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-23 published
Questions haunt slain man's family
James MALTAR shot by Ontario Provincial Police in holding cell during struggle
Siblings wonder why non-lethal weapons or pepper spray not used
By Hilda HOY, Staff Reporter
The siblings of a man who died after being shot in the head in an Ontario Provincial Police holding cell on Sunday are reeling from the loss of their "Jimmy," the big brother they could always count on.
James MALTAR had just celebrated his 45th birthday last Tuesday, five days before he was killed during a struggle with police.
"I haven't felt this empty since we lost our parents 11 years ago," said Rob MALTAR, 41.
He last saw his brother on his birthday, when the two met near their Bowmanville-area homes. James MALTAR, a painting contractor who had a bipolar disorder, spoke with excitement about his plans for the future, which included moving west and finding new work.
MALTAR was pulled over on Highway 403 near Erin Mills Parkway in Mississauga around 10 p.m. Sunday and taken into custody when he refused to identify himself, police said. An officer was attempting to put him into a holding cell at the Port Credit detachment when a struggle broke out. A second officer ran in to help and shots rang out moments later. MALTAR was pronounced dead at hospital a short time later.
Rob and his sisters Anna and Margaret can't believe anyone could harm their brother. Throughout a tough childhood -- there was no food on the table half the time, said Anna -- James took responsibility for his younger siblings while their parents worked.
He also faced his own personal struggles, including an ongoing battle with bipolar disorder, and spent many years on and off medication. The condition causes extreme shifts in mood and energy level, from manic highs to depressive lows, and can lead to impulsive or erratic behaviour.
Anna knew something was wrong when her 40th birthday went by this past Tuesday without a phone call from her brother, but the family wasn't notified by police of his death until Wednesday afternoon, nearly three days after he was killed. Other questions haunt the family. They want to know why non-lethal weapons, like Tasers or pepper spray, weren't used, and why their brother was shot in the head instead of an arm or leg.
He'd had minor encounters with police, they said, including a traffic violation in Oshawa, but the 5-foot-9, 170 pound man had no history of aggression. "Our brother was not violent by any means. He was afraid of conflict," said sister Margaret tearfully. "(Did police have) no other option?"
With his mental illness, Anna said, it's possible he was disoriented enough when stopped by police that he was unable to identify himself.
The Ontario Provincial Police said MALTAR was stopped because his car had no licence plates, but Rob said the car had plates on it from Illinois, where his brother recently lived with his American wife and her five children. The renewal sticker on the plates had expired, he said.
The Special Investigations Unit is investigating.

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-24 published
Did man shoot himself in cell?
Special Investigations Unit looking at 'several scenarios' in Ontario Provincial Police case
Man shot in head in custody a week ago
By John DUNCANSON, Staff Reporter, With files from Hilda HOY, Page A2
Civilian investigators are looking at several scenarios in the custody death of James MALTAR, including the possibility the 45-year-old man wrestled the gun away from an Ontario Provincial Police officer and shot himself in the head.
Almost a week after MALTAR died in the holding cell of the Ontario Provincial Police's Port Credit detachment, the chain of events leading to the tragedy last Sunday is still not clear.
What investigators are sure of is that MALTAR died from a "close contact" gunshot wound to the head. He was also shot several other times, but investigators with the Special Investigations Unit aren't releasing exact details about those wounds.
"We are looking at several scenarios," said Special Investigations Unit spokeswoman Rose BLISS. MALTAR's family is sure, however, that the "Jimmy" they knew and loved would not have been able to turn the gun on himself. "My brother is petrified of guns. He wouldn't even know how to take the safety off a gun," said MALTAR's brother Rob, 41. "There is no way he could have shot himself."
The Special Investigations Unit has not interviewed the two officers designated as subjects of the probe. Two other officers, who have been deemed witnesses: in the fatal shooting, have no choice but to be interviewed by investigators.
MALTAR was pulled over by Ontario Provincial Police officers Sunday about 10 p.m. on Highway 403 near Erin Mills Parkway in Mississauga because he had no licence plates on his car. When he refused to identify himself, he was taken into custody. Rob MALTAR says the car did have plates, only the sticker had expired.
According to the Special Investigations Unit, when one of the Ontario Provincial Police officers was attempting to put him in a cell at the Port Credit detachment, MALTAR started struggling. Another officer ran to assist his colleague and that's when shots were fired.
MALTAR's family is struggling to understand what happened to their loved one, who they say suffered from bipolar disorder. The condition can cause extreme mood swings, although MALTAR's family said he wasn't a violent man and avoided confrontation.
They say MALTAR may have been disoriented when stopped by police.
He recently lived in Illinois with his wife and her five children.

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HOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-02 published
GRANDETT, Ana Victoria
Passed away at the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga on Monday, October 31, 2005. Beloved mother of Maruja and her husband Antonio HOY, Nohora and her husband Aurelio LUJAN, Beatriz SALAZAR, Edith SALAZAR, Patricia and her husband Jim KEFALAS, Ana MIREYA and her husband Richard ROOPNARINE. She will be sadly missed by her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10 North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Thursday from 5-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held at St. Catherine of Siena Church, 2340 Hurontario Street, Mississauga on Friday, November 4, 2005 at 9: 30 a.m. Interment Meadowvale Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Trillium Health Centre Foundation.

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HOYLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-05 published
HOYLAND, Jack
Suddenly at his residence in Ingersoll on Tuesday, May 3, 2005, Jack HOYLAND, in his 90th year. Husband of the late Luella (JOHNSTON) HOYLAND (1950.) Dear father of Reta and her husband Arie BOLL of Innerkip, Ed and his wife Louise of Ingersoll, Jim and his wife Frances of Woodstock, Don and his wife Vicki of Ingersoll, Jackie and her husband Al PURCHASE of Omemee and Stephen of Brantford. Brother of Winnie WILSON of Ingersoll and Arthur HOYLAND of Tillsonburg. Also survived by grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Friends will be received at the McBeath-Dynes Funeral Home, 246 Thames Street South, Ingersoll, Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where service will be held on Friday, May 6, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. Reverend Carmen HOLBROUGH officiating. Interment Kintore Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Alzheimer Society of Oxford would be appreciated.

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HOYLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-27 published
GRAY/GREY, John Chauncey
Peacefully, in his sleep, at home, on September 26, 2005. John Chauncey GRAY/GREY of Mt. Brydges in his 75th year. Loved husband of Elinor Ann GRAY/GREY. Dear father of Patti and Jim COPPARD, Randy and Sylvia GRAY/GREY, Diane and Lee WHITESIDE and Tena GRAY/GREY all of Strathroy, and foster son Blake and Audrey HUGHES of Mt. Brydges. "Pa" to 8 grandchildren, 2 great-grandchildren, 3 foster grandchildren and 6 foster great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Mary and J.B. SAUNDERS of Pt. Rowan, Betty and George FRIEDRICKS of Tillsonburg and sister-in-law Joanne KENNEDY of Aylmer. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his mother Leila (FINCH) (1980,) his father Jack GRAY/GREY (1965,) sister Barbara HOYLAND (2003) and brothers-in-law Ray LIDSTONE (1967) and J.B. KENNEDY (2003.) Visitation at the Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy on Wednesday, September 28 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where funeral service will be held on Thursday, September 29 at 1 p.m. with Reverend Charles SEED officiating. Interment in Strathroy Cemetery. Donations to the Strathroy Hospital Foundation would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to John.

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HOYLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2005-09-27 published
GRAY/GREY, John Chauncey
Peacefully, in his sleep, at home, on September 26, 2005, John Chauncey GRAY/GREY of Mt. Brydges, in his 75th year. Loved husband of Elinor Ann GRAY/GREY. Dear father of Patti and Jim COPPARD, Randy and Sylvia GRAY/GREY, Diane and Lee WHITESIDE and Tena GRAY/GREY, all of Strathroy, and foster son Blake and Audrey HUGHES of Mt. Brydges. Pa to 8 grandchildren, 2 great-grandchildren, 3 foster grandchildren, and 6 foster great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Mary and J.B. SAUNDERS of Pt. Rowan, Betty and George FRIEDRICKS of Tillsonburg and sister-in-law Joanne KENNEDY of Aylmer. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his mother Leila (FINCH) (1980,) his father Jack GRAY/GREY (1965,) sister Barbara HOYLAND (2003,) and brothers-in-law Ray LIDSTONE (1967) and J.B. KENNEDY (2003.) Visitation at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy, on Wednesday, September 28 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where funeral service will be held on Thursday, September 29 at 1 p.m. with Reverend Charles SEED officiating. Interment in Strathroy Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to John.

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HOYLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-09 published
ALLAN, Donald Sutherland, P.Eng.
Peacefully at Meighen Manor, surrounded by family, on February 7, 2005, in his 86th year. Graduate of U of T, Mechanical Engineering, 1941. Served on H.M.S. "Victorious" / H.M.S. "Meon," World War 2. Longtime employee of EMCO and member of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Survived by his beloved wife Dorothy (née HOYLAND.) Missed by family Anne, Rob and Kirk ALLAN, Pattie and Steve HASKELL, Dorothy and John McGINN, Kathy and John BLACK, Michael DOYLE and Gaston COMEAU, Pam DOYLE and Glen EASTON. Cherished Papa of 8 grandchildren. Special thanks to the caring staff at Isabel and Arthur Meighen Manor, Davis Wing. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), for a memorial service at 11: 00 a.m. on Saturday, February 12. Private interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Salvation Army or a charity of your choice.

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HOYLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-09 published
ALLAN, Donald Sutherland (P.Eng.)
Peacefully at Meighen Manor, surrounded by family, on February 7, 2005, in his 86th year. Graduate of UofT, Mechanical Engineering, 1941. Served on H.M.S. "Victorious" / H.M.C.S. "Meon", World War 2. Longtime employee of EMCO and member of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Survived by his beloved wife Dorothy (née HOYLAND.) Missed by family Anne, Rob and Kirk ALLAN, Patti and Steve HASKELL, Dorothy and John McGINN, Kathy and John BLACK, Michael DOYLE and Gaston COMEAU, Pam DOYLE and Glen EASTON. Cherished Papa of 8 grandchildren. Special thanks to the caring staff at Isabel & Arthur Meighen Manor, Davis Wing. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) for a memorial service at 11: 00 a.m. on Saturday, February 12. Private interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Salvation Army or a charity of your choice.

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HOYLES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-20 published
KEATING, Blair Louis
With family by his side at Parkwood Hospital Palliative Care, on Wednesday, January 19, 2005, Blair Louis KEATING of London in his 77th year passed away peacefully in his sleep to be with God. Beloved husband of Edith L. KEATING for 54 years. Loving father of Brenda ZADORSKY and her husband Bill, Wally and his wife Carol, Belinda KEATING- CORCORAN and companion Daryl McLEOD, Bevan and his wife Kira, Brent and his wife Tara, and Beth Denise KEATING; honourary father of Doreen McDONALD and her husband Mark. Cherished grandfather of Bill ZADORSKY Jr. and his wife Sarah, Katie SPENCE and her husband Jack, Rebecca and Justin ZADORSKY, Blair KEATING, III and his girlfriend Joanne HOYLES, Ryan KEATING and fiancée Jeannette MATTHEWS, Jason KEATING, Sean, Sarah and Stephanie CORCORAN, Lauren, Danielle and Leah KEATING and Paige and Keanna KEATING; great-grandfather of Amy and Julianna SPENCE and Thomas ZADORSKY; honourary grandfather of Tiffany and Travis McDONALD. Beloved son of the late Ralph and Jessie KEATING. Dear brother of the late Myles KEATING and his wife Bernice, Doris BAILES and her late husband John, Ralph KEATING and his wife Donna, Connie and her husband Carl SIMPSON, and Wilf KEATING and his wife Donna. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews and extended family. We welcome family and Friends to celebrate Blair, a man whose life's greatest success centred around his beloved wife and family, at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North (2 blocks north of Oxford), on Friday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at St. Paul's Cathedral, 472 Richmond Street, on Saturday, January 22nd, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment to follow at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, those wishing to make a donation in memory of Blair are asked to consider the Daily Bread Program at St. Paul's Cathedral, Heart and Stroke Foundation, or the Palliative Care Units at both the London Health Sciences Centre and the St. Joseph's Health Centre. We wish to express our sincere gratitude for the loving care given to Blair by Dr. John Swift and the Palliative Care Unit Staff. They were remarkable.

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HOYLES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-11 published
STEVENS, Mark Alexander
Mark Alexander, a resident of the Southwestern Regional Centre, passed away on Wednesday, February 9, 2005. son of Gertrude (HOYLES) STEVENS and the late F. Lyle STEVENS (1998.) Loved by brother Philip and his wife Joyce of Sarnia, niece Amanda and nephew Andrew. Dear nephew of Rex BISHOP, Kay and Ron CARR, Maxine and Norman ABRAMS all of London, Eileen and John SKIPPER of Chatham and several cousins. Predeceased by two aunts and an uncle. A private visitation will be held at Living Fai th Community Church, 530 Victoria Avenue, Chatham, (Crerar Dr. Entrance) on Saturday, February 12th, 2005, from noon til 1: 00 p.m with a private funeral to follow at 1: 00 p.m. with Reverend Gloria JOSHUA officiating. Contributions to the S.R.C. Auxiliary would be appreciated. Interment in Maple Leaf Cemetery, Chatham. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Bowman Funeral Home, Chatham 352-2390. Online condolences may be left at www.obituarierstoday.com.

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HOYLES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-12 published
STEVENS, Gertrude Elizabeth (née HOYLES)
Gertrude Elizabeth (HOYLES) of Wallaceburg and formerly of Chatham, passed away at Fairfield Park, Wallaceburg. Born in Tupperville, 83 years ago, daughter of the late C. Arthur HOYLES and Bertha May (WHITMARSH.) Predeceased by her beloved husband F. Lyle STEVENS (1998) and her dear son Mark Alexander STEVENS (February 2005.) Surviving are a loving son Philip L. STEVENS and his wife Joyce of Sarnia, her cherished grandchildren Amanda and Andrew. Fond sister of Eileen and her husband John SKIPPER of Chatham. Sister in law of Rex BISHOP, Kay and Ronald CARR, Maxine and Norman ABRAMS all of London. Lovingly remembered by several close nieces and nephews. Gertrude is also predeceased by her sister and brother in law, Dorothy (HOYLES) and Elwood BIRD of Sombra and sister in law, Gwen BISHOP of London.
Gertrude was a member of the United Church Women of St. Andrew's Church and Past Matron of the Blue Bell Chapter Order of the Eastern Star No. 145, Chatham. Family and Friends will be received at the Bowman Funeral Home, 4 Victoria Avenue, Chatham (519-352-2390) for visitation on Sunday, March 13, from 2-4 and 7-9 and where the funeral service will be conducted on Monday March 14, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Michael BROOKS of St. Andrew's United Church officiating. Interment at Maple Leaf Cemetery, Chatham. Contributions to the Arthritis Society would be appreciated. Members of the Blue Bell Chapter 145, Order of the Eastern Star will conduct a memorial service at the funeral home on Sunday at 3: 30pm. Online condolences may be made at www.obituariestoday.com

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HOYNINGEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-19 published
Nancy OAKES, Heiress: 1924-2005
The Toronto-born socialite's courtroom testimony helped save her playboy husband from the gallows. He had been accused in the sensational 1943 murder of her father, the Ontario mining magnate Harry OAKES
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, February 19, 2005 - Page S9
A young Nancy OAKES faced a tragedy beyond comprehension. Her millionaire father, Sir Harry OAKES, was bludgeoned and set afire at his beachfront mansion in the Bahamas; her playboy husband, a Mauritian-born count, was charged with the murder.
Police described to her in sordid detail a killing about which they had no doubt as to guilt. The widow, Eunice Lady OAKES, believed police had fingered the culprit. The opinion was shared by her peers in Bahamian high society, who at last found an excuse for their lingering dislike of the foreigner with a French title.
In the face of overwhelming animosity, with evidence weighing against her husband, Nancy OAKES chose to believe the word of the man with whom she had eloped a scant 14 months earlier. The love affair scandalized her parents, who harboured great antipathy for a son-in-law they suspected of being a gigolo and a gold digger. The daughter's marriage put at risk her inheritance of one of the world's greatest fortunes, created from gold found in Northern Ontario.
Blessed with the good fortune to be born the beautiful daughter of a multimillionaire, with auburn hair that turned heads at the yacht club, Nancy OAKES accepted the role of faithful and trusting wife with a sang-froid beyond her years. She agreed to be the final witness for the defence at her husband's trial.
Her testimony could determine his fate -- freedom, or the gallows. She was just 19.
The murder and subsequent trial bumped war news from the front page of newspapers around the English-speaking world in 1943. The teenaged bride would forever after be known for what happened in those days, a legacy that she would carry to her death, on January 16 in London, at the age of 80.
The case has inspired a television mini-series, as well as Hollywood films and several true-crime books. Novelists also have delighted in the characters: a wealthy gold miner, his beautiful (but spoiled) daughter, her louche lover, and, irresistibly, the Duke of Windsor, the abdicated Edward VIII appointed governor of the colony, who was to have golfed with Mr. OAKES on the day of his murder and whose inexplicable interference with the investigation raises questions that remain unanswered to this day.
Born in Toronto, Nancy OAKES was the first of Harry OAKES's five children. Their father was a gruff and irascible man whose ample generosity did not always extend to his offspring.
Mr. OAKES, who was born and raised in Maine, quit medical school as a young man to join the Klondike gold rush in 1898. He laboured in poverty for years before staking a successful claim near Swastika, Ontario He later sold his share in the claim to finance what would become the greatest gold discovery in the Western Hemisphere, the Lake Shore Mine at Kirkland Lake.
Soon, he was the richest man in the land, owning a lakeside chateau near the mine as well as a hilltop estate on 20 acres overlooking the Niagara River. These would be Nancy OAKES's first homes.
In 1934, he abandoned Canada for the British West Indies to avoid taxes levied on his great fortune by the Conservatives. Five years later, he was granted a baronetcy by the king for his philanthropy.
His eldest daughter was schooled at Heathfield in Ascot, England the Fermata in Aiken, S. C.; and the French School for Girls in New York. She spent holidays with her family on the Bahamian archipelago. On one of those visits she danced with Marie-Alfred Fouquereaux DE MARIGNY, known as Count MARIGNY of Mauritius to the newspapers and as Freddie MARIGNY to his Friends. Majestic at 6-foot-5, dark-skinned from many hours aboard his yacht, he was possessed of many flamboyant skills.
On May 19, 1942, two days after Nancy OAKES attained her majority, she was married to her dashing suitor by a county-court judge in a ceremony in the Bronx. News of the elopement shocked her parents, who disapproved of the groom, who, at 32, was already twice divorced. (Sir Harry seemed to forget he was 48 when he married Eunice McINTYRE, 26, following a whirlwind romance.) Relations were frosty.
On the morning of July 8, 1943, Sir Harry was discovered on his back in bed in his second-floor chambers at Westbourne, a seaside estate surrounded by hibiscus and bougainvillea. He was found by his best friend, Harold CHRISTIE, a wealthy real-estate agent risen from poverty who was the baron's only house guest that night.
As court would be told, Sir Harry's face was blackened by soot, his groin and left hand burned. He had four small puncture wounds above his left ear. Blood from his ear had dried across the bridge of his nose. The body was covered in small pillow feathers, which waved grotesquely from the stirrings in the room.
As governor, the Duke of Windsor decided not to entrust the investigation into the murder of the colony's wealthiest citizen to the local constabulary, nor to Scotland Yard. Instead, he called in two detectives from nearby Miami. If the duke wished a quick resolution, he got it. Within hours, the detectives arrested Mr. DE MARIGNY, announcing they had found his fingerprints on a Chinese bed screen at the murder scene.
The count's wife, who, like her mother and siblings was in the United States at the time of the killing, returned home convinced of her spouse's innocence. She visited him in jail twice a week. "I do all I can to make my husband comfortable," she told a reporter. "I send linens and special dishes to him -- chicken and fish and things like that. I suppose Freddie is what you'd call a gourmet."
Meanwhile, Sir Harry's will was filed for probate shortly before the opening of what was billed as the trial of the century. Rumours of disinheritance proved wrong. The will, representing Nassau holdings only, disposed of £3,671,700. The widow was awarded one-third, with the remainder to be divided among the five children. The countess was to receive two-fifteenths of her father's fortune on turning 30, with an annual living allowance until then.
A Bahamas Supreme Court jury heard the Miami detectives present the Crown's only physical evidence against the count, a single print from the pinky finger of his right hand, introduced as Exhibit J.
The count wept silently in the dock before composing himself as his wife began testifying on November 9, 1943. She was dressed in a black suit with white polka dots, wearing a white hat and white gloves, "an appealing figure," one writer noted, "composed but pale."
The defence wished to use her testimony to rebut the Crown's suggested motive for murder.
"Mrs. DE MARIGNY," asked defence counsel, "at any time during your married life has the accused ever attempted to obtain money from you?"
"No," Nancy replied.
"Has the accused ever made a statement of hatred toward your father?"
"No."
The defence had demolished earlier the Crown's fingerprint evidence, proving the print had come not from the bed screen but likely from an opaque drinking glass, or the cellophane wrap from a pack of cigarettes. Both had been handed to the count by the Miami detectives, raising questions as to their competence, if not criminality.
The jury deliberated for one hour, 55 minutes before reaching a verdict of not guilty on a 9-3 vote. The verdict was cheered in the courtroom, yet the jury had also called for the count's expulsion from the colony.
With the baron's estate tied up in court, the young couple auctioned household goods to finance their exile in Cuba, where they stayed with Ernest Hemingway.
By 1945, they had separated, the count signing an agreement reneging on claims on her inheritance. He came to Montreal and enlisted in the Canadian Army. In 1949, the New York Supreme Court ruled the count's second divorce had not met statutory requirements at the time he married the heiress. Their marriage was annulled.
In April, 1946, the heiress flew to Copenhagen after receiving news of the death of Joergen Edsberg, a Danish Royal Air Force pilot she planned to marry as soon as each obtained a divorce. She arrived the day after a military funeral attended by the pilot's wife and son, leaving a bouquet of lilacs at a grave left open at the request of the pilot's mother.
Nancy OAKES's life was filled with tragic loss, her father's savage murder being only the best known. An aunt drowned in the sinking of the liner S.S. Mohawk off the New Jersey coast in 1935; a brother, William Pitt OAKES, died of a heart attack complicated by a liver ailment at 27 in 1958; brother Sydney, who inherited Sir Harry's title, was killed at 39 in 1966 when his Sunbeam Alpine failed to negotiate a curve. A sister, Shirley, spent the final years of her life in a coma following an accident.
After the war, Nancy OAKES provided fodder for gossip columnists by being squired by dashing Hollywood stars. "Heiress Nancy OAKES and Philip Reed are Movietown's Big Talk," Walter Winchell wrote in an item typical of what was also to be found under the bylines of Dorothy Kilgallen and Hedda Hopper.
In a candlelight church ceremony performed by the Lord Bishop of Nassau before a society crowd on December 29, 1952, Nancy OAKES wed Baron Ernst Lyssardt VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE of Oberammergau, Germany, a union that would end in divorce less than four years later.
On March 1, 1962, she married Patrick Claude Henry Tritton, a Cambridge-educated importer of typewriters and firefighting equipment. Her third wedding was held before a handful of close Friends at the British ambassador's residence in Mexico City. Mr. Tritton was said to have been the model for the Anthony Powell character Dicky Umfraville, a likeable rogue.
After that marriage failed, she resumed using her second husband's name, not discouraging the practice of being called the baroness.
Erle Stanley Gardner, the creator of Perry Mason, called the baffling case "the greatest murder mystery of all time." Sent by Time magazine to cover the trial, he maintained Sir Harry was not killed in bed, but was moved there after death, as the burns on the bedding did not match those on the body. As well, the dried blood across the bridge of the nose indicated the body had been rolled over after death. The writer raised the spectre of the baron being tortured.
The murder has been attributed to a love triangle, to a voodoo ritual killing, and to mobsters Meyer Lansky and Lucky Luciano, whose dreams of casinos in the colony might have been thwarted by the powerful Sir Harry. Even the Duke of Windsor is not above suspicion.
Count DE MARIGNY, who died in Houston in 1998, wrote a book accusing Mr. OAKES's best friend, Mr. Christie, later Sir Harold, of ordering the murder. The crime remains unsolved 61 years after Nancy OAKES successfully asserted her husband's innocence.
Nancy Oakes VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE was born in Toronto on May 17, 1924. She died in London on January 16, aged 80, and was buried in Nassau, the Bahamas, on January 28. She leaves a son, Baron Alexander VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE, known as Sasha; a daughter, Patricia Oakes LEIGH- WOOD; and a younger brother, Harry OAKES.

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HOYT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-14 published
TACKABERRY, Elizabeth " Betty" (née HOYT)
Passed away peacefully, May 11, 2005, at the Village of Erin Meadows Nursing Home, Mississauga. Predeceased by her husband Jack. She will be sadly missed by family and Friends. Cremation has taken place. Remember Betty in your own way. Friends are invited to a Memorial Service at the Glen Oaks Memorial Chapel and Reception Centre, 3164 Ninth Line (at Dundas), Oakville, on Monday at 3 p.m.

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HOYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-23 published
HOYTE, Dennis Winfield
Peacefully at St. Joseph's Health Centre on Wednesday, June 22nd, 2005. Beloved husband of Suzanne, son of Amy and the late George OUTRAM. Loving father of Terry, Ronald and Kim (Eric.) Brother of Dorothy (Charles), Joyce, Sheila (Errol), Shirley (Keith), Anthony (Joycelyn), Douglas, Frank (Grace), Carl (Cheryl) and the late Percy. Grandfather and uncle to many. Friends may call at the Giffen-Mack "Danforth" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2570 Danforth Ave., (at Main St. subway), 416-698-3121, on Friday, June 24th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service to be held in the Giffen-Mack Chapel on Saturday, June 25th at 11 a.m. Interment to follow in Pine Hills Cemetery. If desired, donations to the Canadian Lung Association would be appreciated by his family.

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