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"GZO" 2005 Obituary


GZOWSKI 

GZOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-21 published
Douglas MARSHALL, Journalist 1937-2005
Toronto editor and writer was a co-founder of the journal Books In Canada and a sounding board for Margaret Atwood, Robert Fulford and Margaret Laurence
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, January 21, 2005 - Page S7
Doug MARSHALL was a writer and editor who cut his teeth in the newspaper business in the 1950s while working on a university paper with the likes of broadcaster Peter GZOWSKI. As an undergraduate at the University of Toronto, Mr. MARSHALL worked on The Varsity with the late Mr. GZOWSKI, who was then the paper's editor, and long-time Globe reporter John GRAY/GREY. Considered one of its star writers, Mr. MARSHALL eventually became editor of the student newspaper in 1958-59 and embarked on his lifelong career in the business.
"He loved the English language," said Lynda HURST, a columnist at the Toronto Star, where Mr. MARSHALL spent 20 years of his career. "He was obsessed with its proper use in newspapers."
After graduation, Mr. MARSHALL headed back to England, where he had spent much of his childhood. Based in London, he worked for several years as a reporter for The Canadian Press. On his return to Canada, he became a staff writer at Maclean's, which was then a monthly magazine. In 1971, he co-founded the monthly review journal Books In Canada with the late Val Clery. It got started after the two men, along with a couple of others, contributed $55 each. With the help of a $250 grant from the Ontario government, they set out to fill a void in the Canadian book world.
Getting the magazine off the ground didn't happen without a few rocky moments. Readers, for instance, didn't see the first issue dated May, 1971, until a month later. When Mr. Clery left less than two years after it started, Mr. MARSHALL took over and was said to have injected his own cultural nationalism into the magazine.
"We weren't out necessarily to take an adversary position but to give attention to Canadian books," he told the Toronto Star in a 1986 interview.
"Our philosophical position was clear, which was to judge Canadian books on the highest possible standards. Good, professionally written reviews create a climate for good literature. I think we provided one of the tools that kept alive the renaissance of Canadian literature, with the result that Canada now has at least a half-dozen world-class writers."
Under Mr. MARSHALL, Books In Canada provided a forum for such authors and critics as Margaret Atwood, Robert Fulford, Margaret Laurence and Pierre BERTON. It also served as a training ground for up-and-coming writers.
"He loved to read," Mr. GRAY/GREY said. "He always had a book shoved into his jacket pocket."
Born not long before the Second World War, Mr. MARSHALL was the eldest of three children to Porte and Marion MARSHALL. His father, a family doctor in Colbourne, Ontario, was in England during the war; his job was to check on the health status of those wishing to immigrate to Canada. After the war, he brought his family to England to join him. Young Douglas later returned to Canada to attend the University of Toronto.
During his university years, his interest in journalism is said to have been sparked after he noticed that the students who most liked to drink happened to be the same ones who worked at the newspaper. "He began life when the newspaper business was a hard-drinking business and maintained the tradition," Mr. GRAY/GREY said.
"There was nothing he liked more than a feisty debate in the pub," said Sandra MARTIN, a Globe and Mail writer who worked with Mr. MARSHALL at Books In Canada.
In the early 1980s, Mr. MARSHALL joined the Toronto Star and remained there until his retirement two years ago. During his five years as the paper's entertainment editor, he is credited for having created the innovative What's On section. Departing from traditional newspaper design, the new section incorporated a magazine style. He later worked as the paper's science and environment editor.
"He could be difficult to work for," said Toronto Star editorial columnist Bob HEPBURN. "It would drive him nuts if he saw typos or mistakes in the paper."
Outside of the newspaper world, Mr. MARSHALL was a founding member of the Crime Writers of Canada and the Periodical Writers Association of Canada, and author of the crime fiction novel A Very Palpable Hit. He was at work on a mystery novel set in England.
Patrick Oliver Douglas MARSHALL was born on November 25, 1937, in Cobourg, Ontario He died of liver disease at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto on Wednesday. He was 67. He is survived by his wife, Sarah MURDOCH, and by Barnaby and Benjamin, sons from an earlier marriage to Deborah MARSHALL. Funeral arrangements have not been finalized.

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GZOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-09 published
Harry J. BOYLE
By John David HAMILTON, Wednesday, February 9, 2005 - Page S9
John David HAMILTON of Keswick, Ontario, writes about Harry J. BOYLE, whose obituary ran on January 24.
I worked with Harry for many years in radio and television and saw close up his vision and great contribution to the media. One day in 1961, he called me into his office and showed me a short inside-page story in The New York Times that said president John Kennedy was increasing the number of military advisers in Vietnam from 7,000 to 16,000. I said: "So what?" Harry said, "If this isn't stopped, it will usher in one of the worst wars in history." So I asked him what we were expected to do about it? He told me to head up a documentary project to be called The Conscience of Manitoba For a year, a group of us dug into the consciences of politicians, philosophers, theologians, authors and nations, and the programs won many award.
Harry's vision was like that. Among some of his other lesser-known achievements was to "invent" daytime radio programming when he hired Bruno GERUSSI to talk to housewives in the morning. Bruno set the pattern for the late Peter GZOWSKI, and his successor, Shelagh ROGERS.
He also invented a new type of religious programming called Concern with Peter Meggs, a former Anglican minister, as host. The program continues on radio as Tapestry and is a civilized analysis and discussion of many religions and beliefs. Project, his major documentary series for radio, dug into all kinds of unusual areas from taking the 1960s temperatures of America and Canada to concerts of the Red Army Chorus and studies of the changing modern woman.
These programs, along with work done on Assignment, revolutionized the techniques of radio and had a great influence on television when it began using videotape. Earlier, he had also introduced the use of portable reel-to-reel tape recorders.
His freelancers, proudly calling ourselves Boyle's Irregulars, were cordially hated by bureaucracies, without and within the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

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GZOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-04 published
HENRICKSEN, Eleanor Ward (née SOUTHIN)
On August 1, 2005, in her eighty-third year. Norie is survived by her husband of sixty-two years, Chris; her two sisters, Madam Justice Mary SOUTHIN and Adrienne DRUMMOND- HAY; and her three daughters, Martha LABADIE, Susan FISHER (Gordon,) and Mary HENRICKSEN (Peter C. GZOWSKI.) She leaves behind loving grandchildren Paul CRAIG (Deidre), Chris CRAIG, Nicholas FISHER, and Lulu GZOWSKI, and great-grand_son, Kaiden CRAIG. She was predeceased by her son, John. No service or flowers by request.

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GZOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-05 published
HENRICKSEN, Eleanor Ward (née SOUTHIN)
On August 1, 2005, in her eighty-third year. Norie is survived by her husband of sixty-two years, Chris; her two sisters, Madam Justice Mary SOUTHIN and Adrienne DRUMMOND- HAY; and her three daughters, Martha LABADIE, Susan FISHER (Gordon,) and Mary HENRICKSEN (Peter C. GZOWSKI.) She leaves behind loving grandchildren Paul CRAIG (Deidre), Chris CRAIG, Nicholas FISHER, and Lulu GZOWSKI, and great-grand_son, Kaiden CRAIG. She was predeceased by her son, John. No service or flowers by request.

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GZOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-13 published
I Remember -- Peter JENNINGS
By Peter DESBARATS, Saturday, August 13, 2005, Page S11
Most of the public recollections of Peter JENNINGS have cited his generosity, particularly when it came to other journalists. I experienced an outstanding example of this.
It was near the end of the 1980s. I had been the journalism dean at the University of Western Ontario since 1981. A large part of this job, and similar positions in academia, was raising money. Someone came up with a brilliant idea -- we would gather together a dozen of the top Canadian journalists from home and abroad for a public celebration of their talent. It would be truly a "Gathering of the Giants."
From the outset it was evident that we would need the support of the "giant of giants," Peter JENNINGS. Clearly, he had achieved that status among Canadian journalists working in Canada, in the United States and elsewhere. He was in a class by himself.
So I flew to New York to have lunch with him. This had been surprisingly easy to arrange, despite the fact that our paths had not previously crossed. There is a camaraderie among journalists that I had experienced on assignment in many countries and Peter was a prime example of this.
We enjoyed an unpretentious lunch in the ABC network's cafeteria and chatted about mutual Friends before I made my pitch. After a minimum of discussion he agreed to be one of our giants. The rest soon followed: the two other Peters, MANSBRIDGE and GZOWSKI the two Barbaras, FRUM and AMIEL; Morley Safer from 60 Minutes, Lloyd ROBERSTON of CTV, Allan FOTHERINGHAM, Sydney Gruson of The New York Times, Jeffrey SIMPSON of The Globe and Mail, Henry CHAMP of CTV, Robert McNeil of PBS and Richard GWYN of the Toronto Star, for a total of 13.
Months later, after a tremendous amount of work by my committee in Toronto, we were approaching the big night at Toronto's Metro Convention Centre. There had been a few minor bumps along the way, but Peter JENNINGS was still on board. By this time I had learned to appreciate how unusual this was.
Peter gave me to understand that ABC wasn't particularly keen on anything that highlighted his Canadian background and citizenship. I also got the impression that his prominent role in this fundraiser was unusual and probably would not have been undertaken for a journalism school in the United States.
In the final weeks I began to worry about some major news event conflicting with our gathering and taking Peter to some far-flung but newsworthy corner of the world. He couldn't guarantee that this wouldn't happen but simply repeated that he would make every effort to attend.
My nightmare came true when the destruction of the Berlin Wall in November, 1989, unleashed a whole series of European events. I can't remember exactly which one conflicted with our gathering, only that it was significant enough to make me almost abandon hope. But Peter arrived on schedule in a private plane from New York, stopping for our event in Toronto before flying immediately that night to some European capital or other.
I watched him on the screen the following night in amazement, not so much for his profound professionalism but for his amazing Friendship and generosity.
But there's more. After our Oscar-type celebration of the 13 giants on the convention centre's main stage -- complete with video highlights of their careers and mini-interviews by 13 awestruck journalism students -- and after a lavish buffet supper ("food from the news capitals of the world"), the entertainment consisted of a mock newscast anchored by Peter JENNINGS, Lloyd ROBERTSON and Peter MANSBRIDGE. The rest of the 13 were in a nearby studio supposedly reporting from Washington, London, Moscow and other impressive datelines.
Peter gave my script for this tomfoolery his full attention, reading it carefully beforehand, underlining certain parts and rehearsing under his breath. The other two anchors quickly rose to the challenge, providing our audience with a hilarious display of competitive news delivery as they worked shamelessly to milk laughs from their appreciative audience.
The only restriction placed by Peter on this unique performance was that no one in the control room would make an unauthorized pirate tape of it. And as far as I know, no one did, because I'm sure it would have turned up by now.
We raised about $80,000 for the journalism school that night and I always felt that I had never thanked him properly. So thanks, Peter. You stood for everything that was thoughtful, professional and generous about journalism at its best.
Peter DESBARATS, a former Global television anchor, was dean of the graduate journalism program at the University of Western Ontario from 1981 to 1996.

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GZOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-03 published
James Frederick HICKLING
By Sara HICKLING, Thursday, November 3, 2005, Page A24
Psychologist, management consultant. Born February 20, 1921, in Welland, Ontario Died May 21 in Toronto of natural causes, aged 84.
Who would have thought that a poor boy from Depression-era Toronto would have such an adventurous life? Jim was a self-made man, a pioneer in his work and an unabashed lover of life. If you had told him when he was young that he would not only see the world, but also live in such far-away places as Africa and Indonesia, it would have been beyond his wildest dreams.
Jim grew up in east-end Toronto long before it became fashionable Riverdale. His father died when he was 7 and left his mother and two siblings to soldier on during the Depression. To make ends meet, my grandmother ran a boarding house in their small home on Logan Avenue. Some of my father's earliest memories were of sharing the dinner table with characters as diverse as an evangelical minister and a founding member of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. It made for lively dinner conversation and gave my father a broad view of the world that stayed with him forever.
He was by all accounts an enterprising young boy who managed multiple paper routes and delegated delivery to his somewhat reluctant younger brother. This was a sign of things to come, as Jim was always a big-picture person who delegated the detail whenever possible.
Education was my grandmother's mantra and in 1939, aided by a church scholarship, my father entered Victoria College at the University of Toronto. There he met my mother, then Ruth E. SMITH, whom he described as the smartest and most beautiful girl in the class. Somehow he managed to persuade her to pay for their first date to a tea dance and they were together for the next 60 years until her death in 1999.
In 1944, Jim joined the Irish Regiment of Canada as an infantry officer. He served in the Italian campaign and was in the Netherlands on the day the war ended. Most of his war stories involved card games where drunken soldiers had "lost their shirts" but occasionally you could tell that he had seen many young men die around him and that the experience had been profound.
After the war, Jim considered every day "a bonus." He completed his master's degree in psychology and set up his own career placement business in 1952. At the time, the field of industrial psychology and executive placement was virtually unknown in Canada. His early work involved psychological profiles and testing to match individuals to a suitable career. A few years ago, I was surprised to hear a discussion on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio between Peter GZOWSKI and Robert FULFORD about how they had been tested or "Hickled," as they called it, by my father in their early days at publisher Maclean Hunter Ltd.
Jim went on to set up many international consulting companies that operated in countries throughout the developing world. He consulted in Malaysia, Nigeria, Indonesia, Burma (now Myanmar), Thailand and Britain, just to name a few. His goal was to see every country on Earth and at the age of 80, after recovering from a serious operation, he went by himself to most of the places he had never seen.
At home, Jim was surrounded by women: my mom and his three daughters. Our mother was his muse and no important decision was ever made without her advice. My Dad loved to quote a line from Patrick Dennis's Auntie Mame that summarized his view of the world: "Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death."
Jim was never starving or even hungry where life was concerned. He filled his 84-plus years with more experiences than most people will ever know. His zest for life is a lesson to us all.
Sara is Jim's daughter.

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GZOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-11 published
Sir Casimir GZOWSKI: A great engineer
Built roads, canals, bridges and railways
By Sharda PRASHAD, Staff Reporter
This is the first in a regular series on the stories behind statues and sculptures in the Greater Toronto Area.
Before Peter, there was Casimir.
A drive along the lakeshore will take you to his park. His bust overlooks the city. Although Canadians are more apt to know his great-great grand_son, Canadian broadcaster extraordinaire Peter GZOWSKI, Sir Casimir Stanislaus GZOWSKI is a great Canadian in his own right.
Knighted by Queen Victoria in 1890, GZOWSKI trained as a lawyer but is best known as one of the country's greatest engineers. The son of a Polish count, GZOWSKI built the Grand Trunk Railway that runs from Toronto to Sarnia, Yonge St. from Toronto to Lake Simcoe, and the International Bridge that connects Fort Erie and Buffalo. He also founded the Ontario Jockey Club and Wycliffe College and co-founded the Toronto Stock Exchange. He was president of the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers; the Gzowski Medal annually recognizes outstanding written contributions to engineering. He was the first chairman of the Niagara Parks Commission, which was responsible for the park system on the Falls' Canadian side.
Born to Polish nobility in 1813 in St. Petersburg, GZOWSKI was the eldest of eight children. He was interned in an Austrian prison and then exiled to the U.S. in 1833 for his role in the Polish revolt against the Russians. GZOWSKI arrived in Massachusetts, learned English -- his sixth language -- and earned his law degree in 1837. But GZOWSKI quickly decided he favoured the mechanics of engineering to the legalese of law. His reputation as an engineer flourished as he built a name for himself working on canals and public works projects. He became a U.S. citizen and married a debutante from Erie, Pennsylvania. His first trip to Canada was in 1841, a business trip to bid on a contract involving the Welland Canal.
On that trip, governor general Sir Charles BAGOT, who knew GZOWSKI's father from St. Petersburg, appointed 29-year-old GZOWSKI to the Department of Public Works. GZOWSKI worked to improve waterways and canals and build roads, bridges and harbours. Not content to serve only as a civil servant, he established Gzowski and Co. to build the era's longest railway. The Grand Trunk ran from Rivière-du-Loup on the St. Lawrence to Sarnia on Lake Huron.
By the 1860s, GZOWSKI was one of Toronto's wealthiest residents, living here with his wife and eight children. U.S.-Canadian border issues spurred by the American Civil War re-ignited his interest in the military. From the 1870s until he died, he sent Canadian teams to England to compete in militia rifle training.
In 1879 he was named an aide-de-camp to Queen Victoria, and was knighted in 1890 for his military and engineering services.
GZOWSKI died in 1898.
His great-great grand_son carried on the family tradition of Canadian greatness.

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