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"FRU" 2005 Obituary


FRUCHTL  FRUETEL  FRUIN  FRUITMAN  FRUM  FRUSTAGLIO 

FRUCHTL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-30 published
NANOWSKI, Kathe
Passed away peacefully at Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket on Wednesday, September 28, 2005. Kathe NANOWSKI of Bradford, in her 81st year. Beloved wife of the late Michael NANOWSKI. Dear mother of John and his wife Mikki, and Erica and her husband Tom LENARTOWICZ. Dear grandmother of John-Paul, Michael, Joey, Annie and Katherine. Survived by her sisters Helga CASTELLS and Marita FRUCHTL. Friends may call at Skwarchuk Funeral Home, 30 Simcoe Rd., Bradford, for visitation on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held at the Holy Martyrs of Japan Church, 167 Essa Street, Bradford on Saturday, October 1, 2005 at 11 a.m. Interment Holy Martyrs Cemetery, Bradford.

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FRUETEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-09 published
LEAKER, David Thomas (September 11, 1926-July 6, 2005)
David Thomas LEAKER of Edmonton passed away peacefully with family at his side on July 6, 2005 after a long struggle recovering from heart surgery. He was in his 79th year.
Beloved husband, partner, soul mate and best friend of Shirley LEAKER (née BAILLIE,) they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in June 2005. His life and marriage remain an inspiration.
David leaves behind a world enriched by his efforts in business, in Friendship, in community service and most especially in his love and dedication to his family.
Left behind not merely to grieve in sadness but to celebrate and cherish a life well lived are daughter Cathy LEAKER and her partner Amy PHILLIPS of Great Neck, Long Island, U.S.A.; son Richard LEAKER and his wife Sandra FOY of Edmonton and son Michael LEAKER and his wife Karen FRUETEL and his three beloved grandchildren, Sarah, Ben and Hannah, all of London, Ontario. He taught us the true meaning of generosity, commitment and honesty.
He is survived by his sister Gwen HATTER, and brother John LEAKER, and will also be missed by his sisters-in-law Elsie LEAKER and Joan FINDLAY and brother-in-law Gerald HATCH; together with many nieces and nephews.
Too numerous to mention, David touched so many people through work, volunteerism, family and Friendship. His retirement years were given over to extensive community service and he was proud of his work with The Sir Winston Churchill Society (Edmonton) the Heritage Sites committee, Edmonton historical board and the Edmonton Advisory Board of the Salvation Army, to list but a few.
A private cremation and family gathering are planned. A memorial celebration for family and Friends, to be held in London, Ontario, will be announced at a later date.
If desired, in lieu of flowers, the family kindly requests that memorial donations be made to The Healing Garden Fund, c/o The University Hospital Foundation, 8440 112 Street, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2B7 or to the charity of your choice.
Appel Funeral Homes/Central Memorial Chapel, 10530 116 Street, Edmonton, Alberta T5H 3L7.
"Our family serving your family" (780) 454-8088

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FRUIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-11 published
FRUIN, Dorleen Mildred (TREMP)
Peacefully on Saturday, April 9, in her 76th year at Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital, Dorleen Mildred FRUIN (TREMP) of Aylmer, Ontario. Formerly of Stratford and Walkerton, Ontario. beloved wife of Richard FRUIN. Cherished mother of Rod FRUIN and his wife, Janet. Sister of Janis ERNEST and husband Bob and Heather MARTIN and husband Jeff. Also survived by five grandchildren Coleen FRUIN- MORRIS, Matt FRUIN, Craig FRUIN, Candice FRUIN and Emily COLE, as well as five great grandchildren. She was predeceased by her son, Steve. Family and Friends will be received on Tuesday, April 12 between 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer (773-8400). Funeral mass will be held on Wednesday, April 13 at 2: 00 p.m. at Our Lady of Sorrows Church in Aylmer. Family interment will take place on Thursday, April 14 at Avondale Cemetery in Stratford. Donations to the Elgin Lung Association. Prayers at the funeral home at 3: 45 p.m. on Tuesday.

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FRUITMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-22 published
FRUITMAN, Sarah
On Sunday, November 20, 2005 at North York General Hospital. Sarah FRUITMAN, beloved wife of Joe, loving mother and mother-in-law of Mel and Ruby, and Carolyn. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Ronny and Arlene BLATT, Naomi and the late Sydney BLATT, and the late Edith SEIGEL. Cherished grandmother of Eric and Cosimina, Elana and Malcolm WINER, Elyse and Stuart STULBERG. Beloved great-grandmother of Mathew, Lara, Rachel, and Lauren. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, November 23, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Radom section of Mt. Sinai Cemetery. Shiva will be private. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Sarah Fruitman Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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FRUITMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-24 published
SALSBERG, Danny
Suddenly, on Sunday, March 20, 2005, at the age of 43. Beloved husband and best friend of Sharon. Devoted and adored Dad to Chelsea and Rachel. son of the late Anne and the late Louis SALSBERG. Much loved son-in-law of Harry and Edith FRUITMAN. Baby brother to Michael, Robbie, and Marilee. Treasured brother-in-law to Aura ABERBACK. Loving nephew of Kitty SALSBERG and Clara SANDERS. Will be sadly missed by his many nieces and nephews. Danny found great joy in his all too short life. As a teacher and coach, the admiration of his students and colleagues was very rewarding. In return, he was an inspiration to them both inside the classroom and out. He also found great joy in Mason, his Labrador retriever. The two of them together were wonderful to watch. His greatest joy however, was his family. They were his life blood. From the moment of his daughters' births, he was hooked for life. As for his wife, he was hooked from the day he saw her in high school. His family's health was his only concern - their happiness was his happiness - and they were happy. Shiva to Saturday night. Donations can be made to C.H.A.T. at Wilmington for an annual volleyball event, 416-636-5984.

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FRUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-09 published
Bob McADOREY, Broadcaster: 1935-2005
Deejay who helped determine what Toronto's youth listened to in the sixties went on to enjoy a 27-year run as a popular and irreverent figure on Global television
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, February 9, 2005 - Page S9
Toronto -- If you knew Peggy Sue, you knew Bob McADOREY. That's because, with his pile of curly hair and horn-rimmed glasses, the Toronto disc jockey was a ringer for Buddy Holly, the songwriter and singer from Texas whose song was a hit in 1959. The two men were born 10 months apart -- McADOREY in 1935, Holly in 1936 and actually met in the mid-1950s when Mr. McADOREY was a disc jockey in Guelph, Ontario, and the singer was on a tour of Canada.
"His job was to introduce Buddy Holly at a concert at Kitchener. When he went on stage, the crowd went wild, and Bob though 'Gee, I didn't know I was this popular,' " remembered his sister Pat RUSSELL. "Of course, they thought he was Buddy Holly."
For decades, Mr. McADOREY was the entertainment commentator on Global Television; he retired less than five years ago. But in an earlier era, he was a household name in Southern Ontario. In 1960, just a few months after Buddy Holly died in a plane crash in 1959, his look-alike joined Toronto's CHUM. Almost overnight, Bob McADOREY became the top disc jockey at CHUM, the No. 1 rock station in the country. He was astonished when the station paid him what he was asking for -- $7,200 a year (about $50,000 in today's money, according to the Bank of Canada's inflation calculator).
"Bob McADOREY, whose face is as well known in Toronto as Mayor Givens, has the most power to dictate what pop music Ontario teens listen to," wrote the Toronto Telegram in 1966.
Not only was he the on-air man in the key 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. slot, he was also the music director. He chose the records the other six disc jockeys played. He and the other disc jockeys decided on CHUM's Top 10, which sent kids to record stores to buy records with a big hole in the middle and a song on each side. They spun at 45 revolutions a minute and were called 45s.
"He alone commands what goes on the hit parade in Canada," wrote The Globe's Blake KIRBY in 1968. "Middle-aged squares who run record stores use the CHUM chart, the weekly list of what McADOREY is playing and plugging as a buying guide."
Along the way, he shared the footlights with such big-name visitors as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.
The CHUM hit parade made records such as The Unicorn by the Irish Rovers. Mr. McADOREY, a sentimental Irish-Canadian, pushed the record, which sold 140,000 copies in Canada and a million in the United States. But he didn't like everything on the CHUM chart. It was a business, after all.
"We're playing records here which I just can't bear to listen to, but I wouldn't let that influence what goes on the air," Mr. McADOREY once told The Globe and Mail. His sister said that when he went home after work, he was so sick of rock 'n' roll that he put earphones on and listened to classical music.
Like many successful big-city disc jockeys, Mr. McADOREY also ran dances on the weekends -- events with such names as Bob McAdorey's Canadian Bandstand or Canadian Hopville. He and a couple of other disc jockeys owned a company called Teen Scene Ltd., which put on dances in towns all over Southern Ontario.
After a long spell on CHUM, Bob McADOREY either was too old -- he was well into his 30s -- or too tired, and so he suddenly found himself fired. Unlike the regular corporate world, where people resign, in radio they are just plain sacked. Disc jockeys almost wear it as a badge of honour.
"There are no hard feelings," he told an entertainment writer in 1972 after he had been sacked from CFTR following a stint at CFGM. "I was told that it was either the station's new music-and-contests format or me." Within days, he had rejoined radio station CFGM.
A few years later, he morphed into television. No one told him that radio types, from the hot side of the Marshall McLuhan equation, are not supposed to be able to make the switch to the cool world of television. He perched on his stool in 1973 and performed for about 27 years.
Bob McADOREY was born within earshot of the Niagara Falls. His father worked as a machinist on the railway and the whole family lived near both the tracks and the roundhouse at Niagara Falls, Ontario For the rest of his life, Mr. McADOREY maintained a love affair with trains and rode them at every opportunity.
He went to high school at Stamford Collegiate. An Irish Catholic, he was one of two non-Protestants in the class. The other was Barbara FRUM, later the host of The Journal and As It Happens on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The two would spend the religious class in another room, enjoying their time off.
In Grade 12, Mr. McADOREY started work at the local radio station, doing a program in the early morning before class. "One day, the station manager told me to go on air and do the play-by-play of a local baseball game," he told the Toronto Star in 2000. "I didn't know the players' names and I didn't know much about baseball, so I sat in the bleachers and interviewed the spectators and it seemed to work."
After that, he was hooked. For a time, he worked all over -- including radio station CJDC in remote Dawson's Creek, British Columbia Even then, he was fairly outrageous. " CJDC had access to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation feeds," he said in 2000. "But nobody monitored us, so we sold everything -- the one o'clock time signal to a jewellery store, the Queen's Christmas Message brought to you by Sammy's Bar and Grill."
But it was soon after he had moved to Guelph, Ontario, that things really began to happen and he hit the big time at the age of 24 by working for CHUM.
Though he may have been at the top of the pop game in the Toronto of the sixties, he also became a national figure at Global as it expanded from a base in Southern Ontario to become the country's third network. He never applied for a job in television, it was just chance.
Bill CUNNINGHAM, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation foreign correspondent brought in to run Global News, hired him after he saw him speak during a tour of the new television station. At the time, Mr. McADOREY was working for Alan SLAIGHT, a prescient broadcaster who had run CHUM, bought CFGM and was one of the early owners of Global. Mr. CUNNINGHAM's plan was to lighten up the newscast and hire a kind of humourist-commentator. Thus, Mr. McADOREY covered entertainment and did light pieces for the newscast, heading out with a cameraman to find what he could. Once, during an Air Canada strike, he drifted out to Toronto's Pearson International Airport and happened to find Terminal 2 entirely deserted. The scene made irresistible camera fodder. The pair had time to erect an impromptu bowling alley and roll a few balls before the party was broken up by patrolling policemen.
The show was an enduring success. It helped that Mr. McADOREY was good-looking, possessed a great voice and was totally unaffected and unpretentious. Behind the scenes, though, Global was in turmoil and not just financially.
The network kept trying to reinvent itself. One idea was to bring in an untried newsreader, Suzanne PERRY, who was one of Pierre TRUDEAU's press aides and whose son, Matthew PERRY, went on to fame in the sitcom Friends. Sadly, Ms. PERRY was put on air before she was ready and that experiment failed.
A short while afterward, the network tried something called News at Noon, with Bob McADOREY doing entertainment, Mike ANSCOMBE the sports, and John DAWE, business. The three of them joked, made fun of each other, and did and said things you weren't supposed to see on television. All of a sudden, they had a huge audience, unheard of at that time of day.
"We broke new ground with 300,000 viewers at noon," said business reporter John DAWE. " Then it expanded and we did the 5: 30 news as well. We worked together for 14 years."
As he matured, Mr. McADOREY lost his Buddy Holly looks. Instead, he was often mistaken for another famous person with glasses and a mass of curly hair -- Ken TAILOR/TAYLOR, the Canadian ambassador to Iran who sheltered American colleagues during the 1979-80 hostage crisis.
At Global, the news department kept trying new things and new people, though the on-air staff remained pretty much the same. One producer didn't like the jocular format. And Mr. McADOREY didn't like him. He rebelled by being provocative on air.
"It's Friday, and I didn't really feel much like working today. The boss is out of town so I took it easy this afternoon, stretching out in my office, reading and daydreaming," he began his part of the 6 p.m. newscast on April 8, 1983. It got him fired.
"Unprofessional and insulting to the viewers," read the note from his pompous producer. The viewers thought otherwise. Phone lines buzzed and letters landed on all the right desks. Two weeks later, the producer was fired and Bob McADOREY was rehired.
As host of Entertainment Desk from 1991 to 1997, he guided it through many lively segments. Among the most memorable was the appearance of comedienne Judy Tenuta. "[She] pretty well took over the show, which bothered some viewers but not me," he once said. "Her wild style made for bizarre television. Most of the interview was done with Judy sitting on my lap making semi-lewd comments."
For all that, he never did like producers. At the time of his retirement in July, 2000, Andrew RYAN of The Globe and Mail asked him what advice he would give to aspiring young entertainment journalists. "Producers are dorks, actors are jerks," Mr. McADOREY answered. "The only ones worth talking to are directors."
Having been asked to retire, he said he had no expectations of a gold watch. Rather, "how about a gold boot up the butt? Retirement was not my idea. I always thought I had a few more good years left."
Instead, he chose to retire quietly at his home in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario His main hobby was reading and he was something of an authority on James Joyce. An Irish nationalist, he had a lifelong obsession with the great Dublin writer.
Robert Joseph McADOREY was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on July 24, 1935. He died on February 5 at St. Catharines, Ontario He was 70 and had suffered prolonged illness. He is survived by daughter Colleen, sister Pat and brother Terry. He was predeceased by his wife and by two of three children.

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FRUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-14 published
Bill CAMERON, Journalist And Teacher 1943-2005
'Thinking-man's anchor' who was one of public broadcasting's true believers seemed destined for greatness until 1999 when he was among Canadian Broadcasting Corporation staffers cut by corporation number crunching, writes Joe FRIESEN
By Joe FRIESEN, Monday, March 14, 2005 Page S9
On the day he had brain surgery, Bill CAMERON, ever the consummate newsman, roused himself from the anesthetic to set the record straight. He had already started an argument with the nurses for taking his books away, and wasn't supposed to be reading or doing anything strenuous. But as he lay there, his head bandaged, listening to his neurosurgeon discuss the day's news, he couldn't help but interject to fill in the missing details.
"They were discussing something that had happened that day, and Bill seemed to know all about it," his wife Cheryl HAWKES said yesterday. "I said, you've been under anesthetic all day. How did you do that? How do you keep up like that?
"Somehow, he must have read the paper."
Originally from British Columbia, Mr. CAMERON spent his high-school years in Ottawa. His father was a prominent oceanographer and his mother died of cancer when he was a teenager. He attended the University of Toronto from 1962 to 1965, and spent much of his energy as a young man trying to forge a career as an actor and writer.
He got his start in journalism doing freelance work for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio, and at 25 was on the editorial board of the Toronto Star. In 1970, he was part of a breakaway group that wrote the Real Poverty Report in response to what they felt was a misreading of the situation by the Senate Committee on Poverty.
He moved to Maclean's magazine before eventually being hired by Global television in Toronto. Bill CUNNINGHAM, who was vice-president of television and current affairs at Global, said Mr. CAMERON came highly recommended. "I've often wondered if by taking him into television I didn't do him a bit of a disservice."
"It's not the kind of thing you win Pulitzer prizes for, turning out copy for an anchor, but he sure did it better than almost anyone I've ever seen," he said. "He could really turn a phrase."
By the mid-1970s, Mr. CAMERON had established himself in television, becoming a reporter and anchor for Global at a time of ambitious expansion at the station.
In 1978, Moses ZNAIMER at the upstart CityTV was looking to add some intellectual weight to his newscast. He leapt at the chance to hire Mr. CAMERON, who brought a natural gravitas with his Walter Cronkite-like delivery.
"Because we had the only 10 o'clock newscast [in Toronto], I wanted to make it more dignified, and Bill was perfect," Mr. ZNAIMER said. "Bill was a guy who believed that ideas matter and who believed that wrapping up the day's events in a pithy and elegant way was worthwhile."
It was not long after that Mr. CAMERON met Ms. HAWKES, a freelance journalist. It was August 15, 1980. She had been assigned to write a profile of the handsome, broad-shouldered anchor.
They met at the Blue Angel restaurant, and as she left at the end of the interview, Mr. CAMERON chased after her and said "I don't need a profile written about me. I need to marry you."
Later, he told her that he knew from the moment they first spoke on the telephone that he would ask her to marry him.
A few days after the interview, she watched him on television, looking for material for her story. She remembers seeing one of the short editorials he used to do at the end of the newscast. That night, he talked about his experiences at summer camp.
"I thought he was handsome, smart and really weird," she said. "I was just intrigued, I guess. He represented everything I thought I wanted in a partner."
It was a whirlwind romance. They were married four months later in December, 1980. The profile Ms. HAWKES submitted was published in Star Week the day of their wedding.
Mr. CAMERON left CityTV in 1983, after station executives decided his formal style was no longer a good fit for the hip urban market they coveted.
He was snapped up almost immediately by Mark STAROWICZ, executive producer of The Journal, and worked there during the heady days when the show was at the forefront of international current-affairs reporting.
He travelled to war zones in Mozambique, Croatia and the Persian Gulf with The Journal, producing work that colleagues said ranked with the best ever done at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Robin BENGER was a producer at The Journal who worked with Mr. CAMERON on a report on the civil war in the former Yugoslavia. He said Mr. CAMERON exuded a sense of calm even-handedness that allowed him to connect with people from all sides.
"He could interview a peasant in a potato field with the same equanimity and fairness as the president of a country," Mr. BENGER said. At one point, as shelling broke out around them while Mr. CAMERON was taping a direct-to-camera piece, he calmly worked his way into an ad lib, describing the shell bursts as the sound of giants dropping sandbags.
Away from the camera, Mr. CAMERON was a shy and private person who didn't covet the spotlight. He was a voracious reader who constantly had three or four books on the go. His wife said he would often roll out of bed clutching a book, ready to start the day.
"We have a picture of him floating on the Dead Sea, when he was on assignment with The Journal, reading. He could read in the most extraordinary circumstances," she said. "I think he had a great fear of getting caught somewhere without a book in his hand."
She said Mr. CAMERON felt he always had to be prepared for any kind of assignment, and so tried to know as much about everything as he possibly could. "It was like being married to my own Google search engine," she said.
And even with all the travelling his job required, he was always very close to his family. Mr. BENGER remembers his colleague, in the middle of a war zone, being anxious to get back to the hotel to hear how his son had fared on a math test that day.
Mr. CAMERON once described a 1983 documentary he did on the civil war in Mozambique as his best work. But it also raised doubts for him, which he expressed in an essay for the book The Newsmakers: Behind the Cameras with Canada's Top television Journalists.
He wrote about feeling the dreadful suspicion "that we dip into the surface of deep events, paddle with our feet, guard our comforts, patronize our contacts, exploit great tragedies for the good of our careers, and get the story wrong.... Maybe the real reporter is not necessarily the most talented but the one who can survive all this guilt, doubt, shame and suspicion, and get at least some part of the story home."
Mr. CAMERON was also one of the alternate anchors of The Journal who shared time with the late Barbara FRUM. But while Ms. FRUM was given glamorous interviews with the likes of Margaret Thatcher, Mr. CAMERON would be relegated to grilling Alan MacEachen in the show's second half.
Mr. STAROWICZ described him as the "thinking-man's anchor." And he was even given the chance to share his sense of humour in the Journal Diary segments, which Mr. STAROWICZ describes as "a cynical tour d'horizon, or Michael Moore before there was a Michael Moore."
Mr. CAMERON had been chosen to succeed Ms. FRUM as host after her death in 1992, Mr. STAROWICZ said, but the show was cancelled as a result of a power struggle at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Mr. STAROWICZ remembers the Journal staff gathering at a pool hall in Queen Street in Toronto and crowding around the television to hear Mr. CAMERON utter the show's final words: "Thank you for letting us serve you."
Mr. CAMERON considered himself one of public broadcasting's true believers, and was bitterly disappointed when he was eventually pushed out of the network in 1999 by a take-it-or-leave-it contract offer that promised a massive pay cut.
After having accepted assignments to host Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's local news in Toronto, where he won a Gemini award, and for a spell as Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Newsworld's morning anchor, he left the corporation for a short-lived public-relations job with American Gem Corp.
Friends say it's a shame that Mr. CAMERON never got the recognition, or the high-profile anchor job, that he deserved. "If he had a problem, it was that he was very bright, and appeared that way on camera," one former Journal staffer said.
In 2003, Mr. CAMERON became the media ethics chair at Ryerson University in Toronto. It was a good fit, Friends said, for he always took seriously his responsibility to his subjects.
Mr. HENDERSON remembers that Mr. CAMERON, before every televised interview, carefully warned his subjects that the tape was rolling and whatever they said could now be used against them. "He was a guy who was always in search of fairness. He was inquisitive, as every good journalist should be. But if he thought somebody was treated unfairly, it really hurt him."
His latter years were spent mainly on his writing, including a column in the National Post.
He was known as the best documentary writer in the country, and was called in to rescue scripts on some of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's highest-profile successes.
"His writing was just superb. It lifted up anything you were working on," Mr. HENDERSON, a senior producer for Canada: A People's History, said. In 2002, Mr. CAMERON directed his own documentary The Season, chronicling the harvest in Biggar, Saskatchewan.
He also published a novel, Cat's Crossing, a dark, literary portrait of Toronto, and before he died had finished a draft of his second novel, which centres around a freelance travel writer.
Mr. CAMERON, 62, died at his home in Toronto on Saturday, March 12, of esophageal cancer. He was surrounded by his family.
Bill CAMERON was born in Vancouver on January 23, 1943. He died of esophageal cancer at his home in Toronto in the early hours of Saturday morning. He was 62. He is survived by his wife, Cheryl HAWKES, and their children Patrick, 22, Rachel, 21, and Nick A Teacher Full Of Insight And Curiosity
When I walked into Bill CAMERON's class at Ryersen for the first time in the fall of 2003, I was shocked to see that my ethics teacher wasn't just the Mr. B. CAMERON listed on the timetable, but a genuine star of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. More astonishing, was that he lacked the celebrity attitude we've all come to expect from a star. Instead, what we got was a teacher full of insight and curiosity.
He didn't seek the spotlight; he was respectful; and he cared about what his students had to say. And when his class discussed the media business, he was never condescending, despite his wealth of experience. For someone who had been around the world and covered many of the great conflicts of the late 20th century, he was surprisingly interested in what a group of aspirants thought.
Of course, there was plenty of his own wisdom as well. In a discussion of the ethical implications of journalists carrying weapons in war zones, he casually mentioned that he had never thought it was a good idea. In Africa, it had once came up as an option but he dismissed it. He thought that any interview conducted by someone holding a lethal weapon was probably compromised.
I once approached him to ask about the ethics of going undercover to expose a professional essay-writing service used by university students. Bill discussed how it could be done in the most honest, straightforward way. He was adamant that the owners of the service could be persuaded to tell their side of the story, and eventually they did.
On the morning the story was published, Bill had already carefully read the student paper by the time I arrived. He said he thought we had got the ethics just right.
It was a compliment I will always treasure. -- Joe FRIESEN

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FRUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-28 published
ROSBERG, Florence
On Sunday, March 27, 2005 at Mt. Sinai Hospital. Florence ROSBERG, wife of the late Harold ROSBERG. Mother of Susan and Hershel OKUN, Gerald and Laura ROSBERG, and the late Barbara FRUM; and mother-in-law of Murray FRUM and Nancy LOCKHART. Grandmother of David and Danielle, Linda and Howard, Stephen and Jess, Elana and Paolo, Deanna and Michael, Sharon, Leslie and Sudeep. Great grandmother of Miranda, Nathaniel, Beatrice, Barbara, Samuel, Ellie, Aleksandar, Benjamin, and Manuel. At Holy Blossom Temple, 1950 Bathurst Street (south of Eglinton) for service on Wednesday, March 30th at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Lundy's Lane Cemetery, Niagara Falls. Shiva Wednesday and Thursday evening between 7: 00 p.m. and 9: 30 p.m. at 50 Prince Arthur Avenue.

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FRUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-12 published
SOKOLOWSKI, Henry
On Monday July 11, 2005 at North York General Hospital. Henry SOKOLOWSKI beloved husband of Eva, loving father and father-in-law of Howard SOKOLOWSKI and Linda FRUM and Marcia SOKOLOWSKI. Dear brother of the late Kalman SOKOLOWSKI, dear brother-in-law of Manya GARFINKEL. Devoted grandfather of Joshua, Ben, Corey, Ellie, Sam, and Barbara. Beloved son of the late Avram and Mindl. Much adored uncle of Merle and Harold NUDELMAN, Allan and Marla SOKOLOWSKI, Honey and Jack APTER, and Barb and David PETERS. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday July 12, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Keltzer Society Section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva 24 Renoak Drive. If desired, donations may be made to the Henry SOKOLOWSKI Memorial Fund c/o United Jewish Appeal 416-631-5685.

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FRUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-13 published
I Remember -- Peter JENNINGS
By Peter DESBARATS, Saturday, August 13, 2005, Page S11
Most of the public recollections of Peter JENNINGS have cited his generosity, particularly when it came to other journalists. I experienced an outstanding example of this.
It was near the end of the 1980s. I had been the journalism dean at the University of Western Ontario since 1981. A large part of this job, and similar positions in academia, was raising money. Someone came up with a brilliant idea -- we would gather together a dozen of the top Canadian journalists from home and abroad for a public celebration of their talent. It would be truly a "Gathering of the Giants."
From the outset it was evident that we would need the support of the "giant of giants," Peter JENNINGS. Clearly, he had achieved that status among Canadian journalists working in Canada, in the United States and elsewhere. He was in a class by himself.
So I flew to New York to have lunch with him. This had been surprisingly easy to arrange, despite the fact that our paths had not previously crossed. There is a camaraderie among journalists that I had experienced on assignment in many countries and Peter was a prime example of this.
We enjoyed an unpretentious lunch in the ABC network's cafeteria and chatted about mutual Friends before I made my pitch. After a minimum of discussion he agreed to be one of our giants. The rest soon followed: the two other Peters, MANSBRIDGE and GZOWSKI the two Barbaras, FRUM and AMIEL; Morley Safer from 60 Minutes, Lloyd ROBERSTON of CTV, Allan FOTHERINGHAM, Sydney Gruson of The New York Times, Jeffrey SIMPSON of The Globe and Mail, Henry CHAMP of CTV, Robert McNeil of PBS and Richard GWYN of the Toronto Star, for a total of 13.
Months later, after a tremendous amount of work by my committee in Toronto, we were approaching the big night at Toronto's Metro Convention Centre. There had been a few minor bumps along the way, but Peter JENNINGS was still on board. By this time I had learned to appreciate how unusual this was.
Peter gave me to understand that ABC wasn't particularly keen on anything that highlighted his Canadian background and citizenship. I also got the impression that his prominent role in this fundraiser was unusual and probably would not have been undertaken for a journalism school in the United States.
In the final weeks I began to worry about some major news event conflicting with our gathering and taking Peter to some far-flung but newsworthy corner of the world. He couldn't guarantee that this wouldn't happen but simply repeated that he would make every effort to attend.
My nightmare came true when the destruction of the Berlin Wall in November, 1989, unleashed a whole series of European events. I can't remember exactly which one conflicted with our gathering, only that it was significant enough to make me almost abandon hope. But Peter arrived on schedule in a private plane from New York, stopping for our event in Toronto before flying immediately that night to some European capital or other.
I watched him on the screen the following night in amazement, not so much for his profound professionalism but for his amazing Friendship and generosity.
But there's more. After our Oscar-type celebration of the 13 giants on the convention centre's main stage -- complete with video highlights of their careers and mini-interviews by 13 awestruck journalism students -- and after a lavish buffet supper ("food from the news capitals of the world"), the entertainment consisted of a mock newscast anchored by Peter JENNINGS, Lloyd ROBERTSON and Peter MANSBRIDGE. The rest of the 13 were in a nearby studio supposedly reporting from Washington, London, Moscow and other impressive datelines.
Peter gave my script for this tomfoolery his full attention, reading it carefully beforehand, underlining certain parts and rehearsing under his breath. The other two anchors quickly rose to the challenge, providing our audience with a hilarious display of competitive news delivery as they worked shamelessly to milk laughs from their appreciative audience.
The only restriction placed by Peter on this unique performance was that no one in the control room would make an unauthorized pirate tape of it. And as far as I know, no one did, because I'm sure it would have turned up by now.
We raised about $80,000 for the journalism school that night and I always felt that I had never thanked him properly. So thanks, Peter. You stood for everything that was thoughtful, professional and generous about journalism at its best.
Peter DESBARATS, a former Global television anchor, was dean of the graduate journalism program at the University of Western Ontario from 1981 to 1996.

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FRUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-07 published
'Mac' led heady days at CHUM
Disk Jockey Bob McADOREY as popular as music
'Bon vivant' later a Global television fixture
By Jim BAWDEN, Television COLUMNIST
Bob McADOREY helped usher in radio's rock 'n' roll era and set the musical agenda for a generation of Toronto teens.
Few today realize the power that Disk Jockeys like McADOREY exerted over Toronto popular culture 40 years ago, when radio ruled. It was a cozy time for music -- and then CHUM entered the fray, blew the cobwebs away and ushered in the crazy days of rock broadcasting.
McADOREY, 69, died Saturday at St. Catharines' Hotel Dieu hospital after a long illness.
McADOREY grew up in Niagara Falls and attended Stamford Collegiate, also the alma mater of Titanic director James CAMERON. He was in the same graduating class as Barbara FRUM, the legendary Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television interviewer.
As a teen, McADOREY won a province-wide public speaking contest and was the popular president of his high school fraternity.
He also played ragtime piano.
"Crowds would go around him," said his older brother, Terry McADOREY.
McADOREY's radio career started in 1953 when the Niagara Falls native first signed on with CHVC near the Falls, introducing listeners to his unique style of easy-going patter.
"I looked like Buddy Holly back then," McADOREY told the Toronto Star in a 1981 interview. "I weighed about 95 pounds and we played songs like 'Que Sera Sera.' Everything was a lot softer, smoother then."
After additional stops in London, Guelph, Hamilton and Dawson Creek, McADOREY wound up at Toronto's CHUM, coaxed to climb aboard by resident star Disk Jockey Al BOLISKA.
"I'd lived with Al above a variety store in London and he kept telling me to come to CHUM. I asked for $600 a month, after all Gordie TAPP was making $100 a week, and to my surprise I got the job."
Starting in 1960, McADOREY began a stint that many people consider rock programming at its finest: brash, spontaneous and pretty wild. And the Disk Jockeys were the stars.
CHUM became the rock station to listen to and McADOREY was the man who told you if a song was going places. The guy who hung out with The Beatles and The Stones when they were in town (and introduced them from the stage) was known simply as "Mac."
For years, he hosted the all-important 4 to 7 p.m. slot. CHUM's chart of the week's top records was posted everywhere: in record stores and high school lockers. Eaton's and Simpson's would only stock those 45s that were on the CHUM list. When a new record called "The Unicorn" came in, McADOREY liked it so much he immediately put it on the air and it sold 140,000 copies in Canada in two weeks and made The Irish Rovers.
Thinking back on those heady days, McADOREY said, "We kept it all clean up here. There was no payola as in the U.S. and we deliberately helped a lot of Canadians. It was personality radio. We were promoted like crazy back then. And the pressures were unbelievable. We dictated what records were going to go. And what kids would eat, drink.
"I could have written five books about what happened at CHUM. There'd be one book if I saved my memos. The most frightening thing was the British invasion. There weren't enough cops to handle the crowds -- it was out of control."
Off the air, he was a bon vivant, said 72-year-old Terry McADOREY.
"We did a lot of drinking. He was a good friend of Ronnie HAWKINS."
In 1968, the CHUM deal fizzled. When owner Al WATERS brought in American consultants, McADOREY felt the business was becoming too heavily formatted and left.
McADOREY headed to CFGM in Richmond Hill, which was trying to invade Toronto with a country music format. As morning man, he energized the station. He moved to CFTR in 1970 and after a few years returned to CFGM.
A constant listener was Bill CUNNINGHAM, head of Global television news, and he asked McADOREY to contribute satirical bits, which eventually became a full-time job.
Sample segment: during an airline strike McADOREY headed out to Terminal 2 with bowling equipment and pins to demonstrate the building was only of use as a bowling alley. Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers saw nothing funny in this and whisked him out as the piece was being filmed.
Another time during a city campaign to get dog owners to scoop up deposits, McADOREY and a cameraman went out to do field tests, which consisted of chasing terrified dogs whose owners had failed the test.
By 1980, he was entertainment editor. In 1983, Global tried to fire him when he disagreed over assignments. Global's Three Guys at noon telecast was a big hit (the others: Mike Anscombe and John Dawe) and hundreds of daily phone calls forced management to reconsider. For a time, Global even outperformed Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Midday.
McADOREY later got his own afternoon entertainment show where he'd report from movie junkets and comment on the entertainment scene.
I last chatted with him in 2000 when he was railing against Global's retirement-at-65 rule. But he looked frail and had been off for months after a fainting attack.
McADOREY had a farm at Gormley and a place in Niagara-on-the-Lake. Despite his television success he still yearned for the golden days of radio: "I'd walk into the booth in pyjama tops and jeans and talk one-on-one to people. At least that's the way I always imagined it."
McADOREY leaves daughter Colleen, her husband Jim TATTI, a Global sports broadcaster, and four grandchildren.
He was predeceased by his wife Willa, daughter Robin and son Terry.
A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at St. Patrick's Church in Niagara Falls.
With files from Gabe GONDA

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FRUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-13 published
Cancer battle claims admired journalist
By Antonia ZERBISIAS, Media Columnist
The wonder is, Bill CAMERON did not author his own obituary.
For here was a man who is acknowledged as the greatest writer of his generation of Canadian journalists, whose words graced the page, the stage, the screen, the classroom and, of course, the airwaves.
CAMERON, 62, died at his Toronto home just after midnight yesterday, after a 20-month struggle with esophageal cancer, surrounded by his wife, Cheryl HAWKES, and his children Patrick, 22, Rachel, 21, and Nick 15.
"He was trying to hold us in his arms," said HAWKES yesterday. "But he was too weak."
Respected, admired, and loved, CAMERON was, what friend and former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation colleague Fred LANGAN called yesterday, "a triple threat," the consummate anchor, journalist and writer.
But he was more than that.
From his start as a freelance entertainment critic for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and CTV, to penning an editorial column at the Toronto Star at the age of 25, to editing for the nascent Global news, to anchoring at Citytv in the 1970s, to covering foreign assignments and co-hosting for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's nightly newsmagazine The Journal, to anchoring Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television's local news, to fronting Newsworld's morning show, to writing novels and ghosting documentary scripts for others, to playing the anchor on the Comedy Network's Puppets Who Kill, there was no journalism job CAMERON could not do -- and do well.
"Who the hell is good at all those things?" asked Mark STAROWICZ, the producer who hired CAMERON in 1983 to report and fill in as an anchor on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's The Journal and Midday.
Which is why, when the Journal went off the air in 1992, it was CAMERON, tapped to succeed the late Barbara FRUM as host, who delivered the eloquent goodbye to viewers: "I'd like to leave you with the words you find on the back of the cheque you get at any coffee shop in Canada. Thank you for letting us serve you."
What CAMERON had was a voice, and even at the end, when he could barely use it, he still slapped on his make-up to host his i-channel talk show, as well as act as fill-in interviewer on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's As It Happens.
His last big interview was with the Dalai Lama, for the documentary The Dalai Lama: The Power of Compassion that aired last week on i-channel.
"He was a master of the interview," said Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Peter MANSBRIDGE, who recalled CAMERON giving him some pointers last fall at a party in his honour.
About 200 Friends and colleagues, from all the networks and the print media where CAMERON had worked, gathered at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to show their support.
"He really kept his sense of humour," said Global's Peter KENT. "He'd go through the chemo sessions -- and was brutalized by them -- but then he'd come up for air and talk to Friends and inquire about others."
"Everybody has this idea that he was such a serious guy," said Valerie PRINGLE, with whom he worked on Midday. "But I remember when the opportunity came up to interview Big Bird, he wrestled me to the ground and said, 'It's mine.'
"I can remember he was doing an interview, with a cop or something, and he said, 'Well, I've shoplifted, I've smoked dope,'" PRINGLE laughed. "We all just dropped our coffees."
What CAMERON cared about was his family and journalism.
"He worshipped his wife and children," said PRINGLE, describing a Valentine's Day tribute that CAMERON had published. "It just made you cry. I thought this guy was so madly in love with Cheryl, I can't even stand it."
In fact, it was love at first sight.
HAWKES met him in 1980, when she was doing a freelance profile on him for Star Week magazine.
"He followed me out of the restaurant and tried to talk me out of writing the story," she said yesterday. "He said 'I don't need publicity; I need to marry you.'"
They were wed four months later. But he would leave her often to take on dangerous assignments for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, flying in and out of the hellholes of the world.
STAROWICZ described one assignment in which CAMERON was talking to the camera, with bombs exploding around him, but he barely flinched.
In fact, "he was talking in perfect paragraphs."
But it seems that CAMERON, who has held the journalism ethics chair at Ryerson University, also worried about the ethical hazards of war reporting.
As he wrote in 1990, "That's the dreadful suspicion: That we dip into the surface of deep events, paddle with our feet, guard our comforts, patronize our contacts, exploit great tragedies for the good of our careers, and get the story wrong."
CAMERON wanted to get the story not only right, but also exactly, perfectly, precisely right.
"He had one of the most discerning ears," said Citytv's Mark DAILEY, who worked with CAMERON when he was the anchor of the 10 p.m. newscast. "He was a very important part of our early conscience at Citypulse."
MANSBRIDGE remembered one evening co-hosting with CAMERON on the Journal. It was a time of intense rivalries between the National and the newsmagazine and few people expected the pairing to go well.
But, said MANSBRIDGE, in the middle of a technical interview on a financial story, CAMERON slipped him an idea, which improved the segment.
"That underlined that this was a guy who cared about the product, who cared about how we did things," MANSBRIDGE said.
"He studied acting which is one of the reasons he could be a little arch on television," LANGAN said. "He knew how to manipulate words more than the average announcer."
A journalist to the end, CAMERON documented his battle with his cancer for an upcoming feature in Walrus magazine. His most recent piece was a witty look... at caskets.
That's why it is so surprising he didn't leave some notes for the occasion of the death, one he knew was coming much too fast and too soon.

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FRUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-12 published
SOKOLOWSKI, Henry
On Monday, July 11, 2005 at North York General Hospital. Henry SOKOLOWSKI, beloved husband of Eva, loving father and father-in-law of Howard SOKOLOWSKI and Linda FRUM and Marcia SOKOLOWSKI. Dear brother of the late Kalman SOKOLOWSKI, dear brother-in-law of Manya GARFINKEL. Devoted grandfather of Joshua, Ben, Corey, Ellie, Sam, and Barbara. Beloved son of the late Avram and Mindl. Much adored uncle of Merle and Harold NUDELMAN, Allan and Marla SOKOLOWSKI, Honey and Jack APTER, and Barb and David PETERS. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday, July 12, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Keltzer Society Section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva 24 Renoak Drive. If desired, donations may be made to the Henry SOKOLOWSKI Memorial Fund c/o United Jewish Appeal, 416-631-5685.

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FRUSTAGLIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-04 published
INGLIS, Gerry
With his family holding his hands and sharing stories of his life, Gerry passed away on July 2nd, 2005 after a truly heroic battle with cancer. He will be greatly missed by his beloved wife Cathy (née FRUSTAGLIO,) loving children Sandra, Deana, Suzanne and David, their spouses Jeffrey, Jim, John and Nicole, his grandchildren, James, Victoria, Matthew, Gabrielle, Danielle and Hanna, his sister Sandra and many others. Our hearts are broken but we take comfort knowing you will watch over all of us. Already, we miss you so much. You will always be loved and never forgotten. Friends and family may call at the Tuner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel 2180 Hurontario Street Mississauga (Hwy 10 N of Qew) From 7-9 p.m. Tuesday, 2-4,7-9 p.m. Wednesday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday July 7, 2005 at 11: 00 o'clock. Cremation.

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FRUSTAGLIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-04 published
INGLIS, Gerry
With his family holding his hands and sharing stories of his life, Gerry passed away on July 2nd, 2005 after a truly heroic battle with cancer. He will be greatly missed by his beloved wife Cathy (née FRUSTAGLIO,) loving children Sandra, Deana, Suzanne and David, their spouses Jeffrey, Jim, John and Nicole, his grandchildren James, Victoria, Matthew, Gabrielle, Danielle and Hanna, his sister Sandra and many others. Our hearts are broken but we take comfort knowing you will watch over all of us. Already, we miss you so much. You will always be loved and never forgotten. Friends and family may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10, N of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 7-9 p.m. Tuesday, and 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, July 7, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Cremation.

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FRUSTAGLIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-11 published
POTALIVO, MARY (née SGRO)
God called Mary home peacefully on July 9th, 2005 during her final stay at Princess Margaret Hospital where she fought her battle with leukemia like a champion. She will be sadly missed by her loving husband Mike, children Joanne (Mike FRUSTAGLIO,) Susan (Richard McGUIGAN,) Nick, the late Gino (Debbie,) and Christina. Proud nonna of Angela, Samantha, Samuel, Sophia and Espen. Survived by her mother Liberata, she will also be missed by her sisters Caterina (Angelo), Rose, Yolanda (Robert), Rita (Nick), and brother Sam (Debbie). Dear sister-in-law to Amelia (Dave), Mary (late Pat), Irma (Carl), and Linda (Robert). She will be held dear in the hearts of her nieces, nephews, cousins, relatives, RBC colleagues and many Friends. She touched the lives of everyone she ever met with her warm loving heart and endless generosity - even trying to entertain visitors from her hospital bed. The family would like to thank her nurses and doctors at Princess Margaret Hospital, especially those from 14A and the transfusion clinic for all of their love and support since October. Friends will be received at the Fratelli Vescio Funeral Home (8101 Weston Rd., south of Langstaff) on Tuesday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. Her life will be celebrated at St. Clare of Assisi Parish (Weston and Rutherford) on Wednesday at 9: 30 a.m. followed by a service at Holy Cross Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Leukemia Research Fund would be greatly appreciated.

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FRUSTAGLIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-21 published
FRUSTAGLIO, Domenic
God called Domenic peacefully on November 19th, 2005, at the age of 80. He will be sadly missed by Anna, his loving wife of 56 years. He will forever be cherished by his dear children Louie and Nancy, Rina and Galli (TIBERINI,) and Rose and Domenic (COLALILLO.) Proud nonno of Anthony, Daniel, Daniella and Christopher, and now is re-united in Heaven with his loving granddaughter Laura. Domenic, the youngest of 9 children is predeceased by siblings Rosaria (Antonio), Antonio, Anna Maria (Antonio), Gregorio (Domenica) and brothers-in-law Giuseppe, Domenico and Nicola. He is survived by his siblings Giuseppe (Antonietta), Ralph (Filomena), Liberata, Sam (Rose) and sisters-in-law Filomena, Antonietta and Milvia. He will also be held dear in the hearts of his many nieces, nephews, cousins, relatives, and Friends. The family would like to thank his dedicated caregivers Vangie and Lisa and a special thank-you to George and Lisa, Louie and Concetta, and his neighbour Nick for all their love and support. Family will receive Friends at the Fratelli Vescio Funeral Homes Ltd. (8101 Weston Rd., south of Langstaff Rd., 905-850-3332) on Monday from 6-9 and Tuesday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Wednesday at 10: 00 a.m. from St. Clare of Assisi Roman Catholic Church (off Rutherford Rd., west of Weston Rd.). Entombment to follow at the Queen of Heaven Catholic Cemetery (on Hwy. 27, south of Hwy. 7.) If desired, donations may be made to the Ontario RETT Syndrome Association or the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children.

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FRUSTAGLIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-01 published
FRUSTAGLIO, Filomena
It is with great sorrow that we announce the passing of our mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, Filomena FRUSTAGLIO, on November 28, 2005 at the age of 93. Predeceased by her husband Antonio FRUSTAGLIO and mother to Caterina (Joe,) Vittoria (Romano,) Luigi (Concetta), Gina (Peter), Teresa (Joe), and Sam (Mila). She will be sadly missed, yet fondly remembered, by her 18 grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren. A special thank you in appreciation to her caregiver Lucy. Friends and family are invited to gather on Thursday, December 1 from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. at Jerrett Funeral Home, 1141 St. Clair Ave. W., Toronto. A celebration of her life will be held 10 a.m. Friday, December 2 at St. Clare Roman Catholic Church, 1118 St. Clair Ave. W. Donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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