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"DIX" 2005 Obituary


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DIX o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-09-20 published
BURRELL, Agnes Morrison
At Bay Haven Nursing Home, Saturday September 17, 2005, Agnes Morrison BURRELL of Collingwood, formerly of Markdale and Toronto, in her 95th year. Member Canadian Women's Army Corps World War 2. Beloved wife of the late Melville BURRELL. Dear aunt of Don, Douglas and Robert HAWKES. Also survived by her great-nieces and great-nephews. Fondly remembered by Peggy DIX and Christina HAWKES. Predeceased by brothers Clyde, Fred and Bob. A Funeral service will be held at the May Funeral Home, Markdale, Tuesday September 20, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Visitation one hour prior to service. Interment Markdale Cemetery. If desired, donations to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation or the charity of choice would be appreciated.
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DIX o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-25 published
SNELGROVE, Arthur Edward
Arthur Edward, peacefully at The Pines Long Term Care Residence, in Bracebridge on Monday May 23, 2005 in his 92nd year. Beloved husband of the late Emily. Loving father of Doug SNELGROVE and his wife Marie and Kathleen ZULAUF and her husband Werner all of Bracebridge. Grandfather of 6 and great grandfather of 4. Brother of Bernice (Mrs. Arthur DIX) of London and the late George SNELGROVE. A graveside service will be held at the Mount Pleasant Cemetery in London on Thursday, May 26, 2005 at 3: 30 p.m. Memorial gifts to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind or the Gideon Bible Society would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Reynolds Funeral Home "Turner Chapel" in Bracebridge. 1-877-806-2257.

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DIX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-13 published
KHAN, Namir Faiyaz
It is with the deepest regret and sorrow that we announce the passing of Namir Faiyaz KHAN, a brilliant teacher, writer and actor who departed suddenly from this world on Sunday, July 10, 2005. He was born in the city of Allahabad, India on January 11, 1955 to Mumtaz Jahan KHAN and Fayaz Bahadur KHAN. He received his Bachelor and Masters degrees in Political Science at Carleton University in Ottawa. He was predeceased by his brother Nasir KHAN and will be missed by his loving family including brothers Nadir KHAN of Toronto and Nazir KHAN of California, sisters Nazish DHIR (née KHAN) of Oakville and Nigat HUSSIEN (née KHAN) of Dubai, India, numerous nieces, nephews and in-laws and his close family of Friends including Cynthia ROBERTS, Arnd JURGENSEN, Suzanne ELLENBOGEN, Wendy DIX, Mark O'HARE, Greg KLYMKIW and many, many others. Namir's professional and artistic achievements are incalculable. As a writer he co-authored numerous published works including the books 'Healthy Cities', 'Sustainable Production' and 'Healthy Work'. He co-wrote the screenplay for the acclaimed feature film, 'Jack of Hearts' and served as a script editor and consultant to numerous film professionals. Namir's love for cinema was matched by his love for teaching at numerous universities and colleges and most recently and prominently as a lecturer at the Centre For Technology and Social Development in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto where hundreds of students received his passionate and learned lectures. At the Centre Namir conducted extremely valuable research and also served as the editor of the Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society. Namir was also a prolific actor and appeared in a number of legendary Canadian films including Roadkill, Highway 61, Dance Me Outside, Arrowhead and Jack of Hearts. Namir's life will be celebrated Thursday, July 14, 9: 30 a.m. at the Toronto Necropolis located at 200 Winchester Street in Toronto. Donations in lieu of flowers may be made to Greenpeace International or the Canadian Film Centre. Arrangements entrusted to The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre.

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DIX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-04 published
Namir KHAN, Lecturer (1955-2005)
University of Toronto teacher, film buff and some-time actor who enjoyed performing in front of his classes nurtured a dark secret
By Danny GALLAGHER, Special to the Globe and Mail, Tuesday, October 4, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- Namir KHAN's life was a dichotomy. In his professional domain, he was an eloquent, fiery orator, whose speeches roused lecture rooms at the University of Toronto. In private, he was a complex, bland man, who kept many secrets to himself.
"He had a brilliant flair for performing. It contrasted with his private life of simplicity and frugality," said one of his Friends, Greg KLYMKIW.
Mr. KHAN's animated, note-less lectures puzzled the most hardened of freshmen students in the U of T's engineering department. These students were accustomed to no-nonsense, cold, hard facts in math and science and wondered why Mr. KHAN, who stood a mere 5-foot-1, sprinkled his lectures with environmental, political and psychological perspectives. The one-time supporting-role actor even interjected his love of cinema, literary and pop culture into his talks.
"He loved performing strategically and that also fed him as a lecturer," Mr. KLYMKIW said. "Seventy five per cent of his speeches had to do with movies. I watched Lawrence of Arabia with him over 20 times. He saw it hundreds of times. Lawrence as a human being was a complex person and there were parallels with Namir."
Mr. KHAN sought to make his lectures entertaining and many students stick-handled to get into his classes. His chief intellectual influences were German philosopher Martin Heidegger and French sociologist Jacques Ellul.
He would start each day drinking a cup of Earl Grey tea and tackling the cryptic crossword puzzle in The Globe and Mail. By midday, he would have finished an academic treatise, with evenings devoted to polishing off one or two mystery, science-fiction or historical books.
Born in India, Namir KHAN was 18 when he arrived in Canada. He soon enrolled at Carleton University, graduating in 1979. He got his master's in 1983 and then switched to the University of Toronto to start work on his doctorate, which he never completed. He became a teacher's assistant at the University of Toronto in 1984, teaching social sciences and engineering courses before joining the university's faculty of engineering full-time in "He was such a large part of my mind and my vocabulary," said Wendy DIX, one of his former girlfriends. "He was one of the most creative intellectuals I've ever known. I was a bit of an observer but he never condescended. He was probably the most brilliant mind in the room, and where people were not as smart or educated, he didn't exclude them."
Filmmaker Cynthia ROBERTS, another former girlfriend, recalls meeting him at Carleton University in 1981 when both were photography buffs. She was toting around a large-format Mamiya camera, prompting him to remark, "That's a big camera." He then asked her out on a date.
For all the passion he produced in front of a classroom, Mr. KHAN's real love was cinema. He not only watched movies frequently, he played roles in a number of them. In 1989, Mr. KHAN ran into Queer as Folk director Bruce McDonald and soon found himself cast as an undertaker in Highway 61. Later, Mr. McDonald used him as a bartender in Dance Me Outside, as a photographer in Elimination Dance and a cameraman in Roadkill. At Ms. ROBERTS's request, Mr. KHAN wrote a screenplay for an underground production called Jack of Hearts about a scientist involved with body implants. One of his last acts in the movie business was a voice-over in the 1997 film City of Dark.
By 1997, Mr. KHAN had decided to cut back on the movie business to spend more time teaching and to edit the U of T's Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society.
A few years ago, Mr. KHAN discovered he had Korsakoff's syndrome, a brain disorder that stems from excessive alcohol use and is usually coupled with poor eating habits. Although he was known to be a binge drinker who loved rum and coke, the news astonished his Friends. "He was the life of the party but he kept his close Friends at bay," said his friend Arnd JURGENSEN. "To find out that he had a serious drinking problem was of considerable shock."
In Korsakoff's syndrome, prolonged alcohol causes growths on the brain; eventually, Mr. KHAN was forced to give up teaching. As a lecturer who didn't take notes and relied strictly on memory, the illness came as a severe blow. However, when told the problem was reversible if he stopped drinking, and that he would be "good as new" within six months, Mr. KHAN refused to quit.
"He was very gifted but he drank himself to the grave," said one of his university superiors.
Others did not know until near the end. "I never realized Namir was so close to death," Ms. DIX said.
Ironically, near the end of his life, Mr. KHAN began working on a screenplay that involved a detective who had developed Korsakoff's syndrome.
Namir KHAN was born January 11, 1955, in Allahabad, India. He died in Toronto on July 10, 2005. A coroner's report on the cause of death proved inconclusive. He had been suffering for several years from Korsakoff's syndrome. He is survived by brothers Nadir and Nazir and sisters Nazish and Nigaf. He was predeceased by his parents Faiyaz and Mumtaz Jahan KHAN and a brother, Nasir.

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DIX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-20 published
DIX, Freda
At Peel Memorial Hospital on Friday, February 18th, 2005. Freda, of Brampton, beloved wife of the late Frank DIX. Loving mother of Doreen and Jon HARRINGTON of Brampton, Brenda and Ivan NICKLE of California, Richard and Vanessa DIX of Saskatchewan, and William and Brenda DIX of Brampton. Sadly missed by her 12 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Ward Funeral Home "Brampton Chapel," 52 Main Street South (Hwy. 10), Brampton, on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the Chapel, followed by cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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DIX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-22 published
ROMANOFF, Kathleen " Caroline" " Kay" (née BOCHNA)
Peacefully at Rouge Valley Health System on April 21st, 2005 in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late John, loving mother of Kathleen ROMANOFF- PATCHELL and her husband Brien, cherished grandmother of Nicholas (Nick) and Victoria (Tori), dear sister of Stephanie (Sally) DIX and Victoria SHELDON and the late Joseph BOCHNA, Peter ATMAN, Pauline RISELEY, and Mary INESON. Kay will be fondly remembered and greatly missed by all of her family, Friends and neighbours. No formal funeral services will be held. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Coronary Care Unit at Rouge Valley Health System would be appreciated. A celebration of Kay's life will follow at a later date. "Kay always had the right recipe for Life"

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DIX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-13 published
KHAN, Namir Faiyaz
It is with the deepest regret and sorrow that we announce the passing of Namir Faiyaz KHAN, a brilliant teacher, writer and actor who departed suddenly from this world on Sunday, July 10, 2005. He was born in the city of Allahabad, India on January 11, 1955 to Mumtaz Jahan KHAN and Fayaz Bahadur KHAN. He received his Bachelor and Masters degrees in Political Science at Carleton University in Ottawa. He was predeceased by his brother Nasir KHAN and will be missed by his loving family including brothers Nadir KHAN of Toronto and Nazir KHAN of California, sisters Nazish DHIR (née KHAN) of Oakville and Nigat HUSSIEN (née KHAN) of Dubai, India, numerous nieces, nephews and in-laws and his close family of Friends including Cynthia ROBERTS, Arnd JURGENSEN, Suzanne ELLENBOGEN, Wendy DIX, Mark O'HARE, Greg KLYMKIW and many, many others. Namir's professional and artistic achievements are incalculable. As a writer he co-authored numerous published works including the books "Healthy Cities", "Sustainable Production" and "Healthy Work". He co-wrote the screenplay for the acclaimed feature film, "Jack of Hearts" and served as a script editor and consultant to numerous film professionals. Namir's love for cinema was matched by his love for teaching at numerous universities and colleges and most recently and prominently as a lecturer at the Centre For Technology and Social Development in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto where hundreds of students received his passionate and learned lectures. At the Centre Namir conducted extremely valuable research and also served as the editor of the Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society. Namir was also a prolific actor and appeared in a number of legendary Canadian films including Roadkill, Highway 61, Dance Me Outside, Arrowhead and Jack of Hearts. Namir's life will be celebrated Thursday, July 14, 9: 30 a.m. at the Toronto Necropolis located at 200 Winchester Street in Toronto. Donations, in lieu of flowers, may be made to Greenpeace International or the Canadian Film Centre. Arrangements entrusted to The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre.

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DIX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-01 published
Performance was gift of rock star of a prof
U of T academic talented speaker
Charismatic man mad about films
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
Namir KHAN was such a performer -- not just in bit parts in the films of his Friends Bruce McDonald and Peter Lynch, but also in the classroom at University of Toronto where he taught engineering students.
His first-year course about sustainable development, technology's history and its role in creating a brave new environmentally sensitive world was never popular with freshmen. Accustomed to almost perfect papers in maths and sciences, they were suddenly being asked by this tiny guy (KHAN was 5 foot 1) with two degrees in political science to think laterally, make connections and put it all down in essay form.
But KHAN was a charismatic man, a rock star of a prof who used to ride a motorcycle in a black leather jacket. More to the point he was a gifted speaker, someone who could -- and did -- stand in front of 250 students in Room 1105 in the engineering school's Sandford Fleming Building and without notes integrate their world with the thoughts of Martin Heidegger (his personal muse) along with ideas from David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia (a film he'd watched hundreds of times) and then throw in references to pop culture, The Terminator and Toronto's bicycle paths.
He was a magus, pacing, gesticulating, his rich voice enveloping his entranced students, who would then clamour to get into the second- and third-year courses he also taught as a professor for the school's Centre for Technology and Social Development in the mechanical and industrial engineering department.
"He faced a bit of resistance from faculty and students. This was a course that had a less than positive effect on a grade point average," said his friend and teaching colleague Arnd JURGENSEN.
"But he was brilliant, simply brilliant, and he had an amazing ability to make complex arguments relevant and easily understood."
It helped that there were always a couple of students who would approach him after class to tentatively ask if he was indeed the undertaker in McDonald's Highway 61 or the East York landlord in Lynch's Genie-winning short film, Arrowhead.
On Sunday, July 10, Friends found KHAN dead in his Chinatown apartment. He was 50. He had stopped teaching last fall after being diagnosed with Korsakoff's syndrome, a brain disorder, but there was no conclusive cause of death stated in the coroner's report.
"He liked centre stage: in the movies, at lectures and at dinner parties, where at some point we would all be listening to Namir and enjoying every minute of it," said Wendy DIX, a former girlfriend. "He wore his knowledge lightly. He had fun with it."
"He would leave you charged," said his nephew Meraj DHIR, who is working on a doctorate in film at Harvard University in good part because of his uncle's influence. KHAN used to take DHIR, 29, and his younger brother Eshwin to all sorts of movies, and talk to them about the mise en scène, the historical underpinnings, the narrative arc, the director's eye, the rhythm and pulse of the piece.
Born and raised in India where he used to sneak out every Saturday to watch movies, KHAN was the youngest of six children. His Oxford University-educated father, the minister of education for his state, sent his children to Jesuit school and would often invite Hindu and Jesuit priests to dinner to broaden his children's education.
KHAN came to Canada when he was 18 and a year later enrolled at Carleton University for his undergraduate and master's degrees. That's where Toronto filmmaker Cynthia ROBERTS met him 25 years ago.
"Namir introduced me to great movies," she said. He took her to see Apocalypse Now on their first date.
In 1989 she introduced him to director Bruce McDonald. The two hit it off and McDonald hired KHAN on the spot to play a cinematographer in a movie. It wasn't a stretch for the movie-mad academic. Soon he became part of McDonald's regular coterie, playing the undertaker in Highway 61, a bartender in Dance Me Outside and a photographer in Elimination Dance.
In 1990 ROBERTS encouraged KHAN to write a screenplay with her three years later Jack of Hearts was produced. His last official credit occurred in 1997 when he did a voiceover in a film Called City of Dark, after which he recommitted himself to his academic work. He co-authored the books Healthy Cities, Sustainable Production and Healthy Work. He also edited the Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society.
But he was as passionate as ever about movies at the time of his death. He was working on a screenplay and developing a mystery featuring a sleuth with Korsakoff's syndrome.
In his eulogy, DHIR said that had KHAN had time to complete any of those projects, he was convinced his uncle would have become a "nobel laureate for literature, or an Academy Award-winning screenplay writer, an internationally renowned celebrity professor, or a perennial inhabitant of The New York Times bestseller list."
Perhaps, but in the meantime, his true art was in his performances: the ones he gave to his students, his family and, always, his Friends.

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DIX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-05 published
DIX, Stefanie (née BOCHNA)
Sally died peacefully in her sleep on August 1st, 2005 at the age of 88. Beloved wife of the late Helmut FRENCHY, she will be greatly missed by her children - Walter DIX, Nancy JANITSCH, Richard DIX and Linda DIX- GIBSON, and her grandchildren - Emily, Sarah, Heather, Billy, Jessica, Hailee, Andrew and Carolyn. Sally's two great-grandchildren, Nolan and Fiona, also brought joy into her last difficult years. She was the dear sister of Victoria SHELDON and the late Joseph BOCHNA, Peter ATMAN, Pauline RISELEY, Mary INESON and Kay ROMANOFF. Sally will be fondly remembered by her extended family, old Friends, fellow antique collectors and her caregiver, Svyatoslav LOBODA. There will be no formal funeral service. A celebration of Sally's love, strength, and long life will be held at a later date. Donations in her memory may be made to Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.

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DIX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-07 published
LOCKWOOD, Annette L. (née BREAU) (1937-2005)
The death of Annette L. LOCKWOOD, 68 years, wife of Jim LOCKWOOD of Shediac, occurred following a period of failing health, with her family at her side at the Villa Providence on Tuesday, December 6th, 2005. Born in Moncton on February 6, 1937 she was the daughter of Milanie and Alalnee BREAU. While living in Toronto she worked for several years with Northern Telecom. After a lifetime of lighting up this world by touching so many with her love, kindness and humour, she taught us the nature of a good heart and unconditional love. Annette will be sadly missed by her husband of 48 years Jim (James); her children Joanne LOCKWOOD (Marion PETITE) of Moncton, Darlene DIX (Michael) of Oakville, Ontario and David LOCKWOOD (Teresa) of North Carolina. She was a loving grandmother to five grandchildren. She is also survived by three sisters and several nieces and nephews. Memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Bernard's Roman Catholic Church, Moncton, New Brunswick on Friday the 9th of December at 10 a.m. Interment will be in Our Lady of Calvary Cemetery in the spring. Memorial donations in Annette's name may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Arrangements are under the direction of Cadman Bowness Funeral Home, 114 Alma Street, Moncton. (506-857-1110) www.cadmanbownessfh.com

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