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"BAZ" 2005 Obituary


BAZALLGETTE  BAZAY  BAZILLI  BAZINET  BAZIW  BAZKUR  BAZNICK  BAZOS  BAZZANA 

BAZALLGETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-05 published
BAZALLGETTE, Ian Willoughby, 1944 -- Died This Day
Friday, August 5, 2005, Page S7
Bomber pilot born in Calgary on October 19, 1918
The son of an army pensioner, his family moved to Toronto when he was 5. He attended Balmy Beach School in eastern Toronto until his family moved again, this time to England, where he finished his education at private school and by private tutor.
In September of 1940, he received a commission in the Royal Artillery but didn't stay and transferred to the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. In 1941, he completed his training as a bomber pilot and was posted to No. 115 Squadron. He was promoted to lieutenant in 1943 and became a squadron leader. The following April, he transferred to Squadron 635, a pathfinder unit.
On August 4, 1944, his Lancaster came under intense fire on a mission to Trossy St. Maxim, France. With his starboard engines destroyed and his fuselage on fire, he pressed on and completed the raid, after which he ordered the crew to bail out. Somehow, he was able to bring the crippled aircraft under control and make a forced landing, sparing a French village in the process.
The Lancaster safely came to a stop but then burst into flames. He and two of his crew died. He was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

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BAZAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-01 published
BAZAY, David J.
Peacefully, at home with his family by his side on Sunday, October 30, 2005, at the age of 66. Beloved husband of Viviane. Loving father to Dominique and Thierry. David will be lovingly remembered by many family, Friends and colleagues. A private family service has taken place.

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BAZAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-01 published
David BAZAY, Journalist (1939-2005)
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ombudsman started out as a bilingual reporter who specialized in human-interest stories. He liked to wear funny hats on camera when he disapproved of an assignment
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, November 1, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- David BAZAY was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's second ombudsman. For 10 years, he dealt with thousands of complaints from the public about everything from the contents of radio and television programs to the perceived bias of reporters.
Though he came from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation himself, Mr. BAZAY didn't always side with the network. In the last report he issued, he said the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation should follow the example of the British Broadcasting Corporation and publish a complaints page on its website.
"David always had an open mind, both as a reporter and as ombudsman. He wouldn't rush to judgment," said Vince CARLIN, who takes over as ombudsman in January and who worked with Mr. BAZAY at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Montreal in the 1970s. Mr. BAZAY was to have retired this month but had agreed to stay on until Mr. CARLIN took over.
Mr. BAZAY grew up in Elma, Manitoba, near Winnipeg, where his father ran a general store. He graduated from the University of Western Ontario in 1961 and then went to Montreal, where he studied at the Université de Montréal, perfecting his French.
He worked for The Canadian Press for three years before heading to Paris to work as a freelancer, filing reports for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, among others. He joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Montreal in 1972 as a regional reporter in local television news. He quickly graduated to the post of national reporter, covering Quebec during the 1976 election when the Parti Québécois took office.
Mr. BAZAY was not only bilingual, but had a deep understanding of French culture through his wife, Viviane, and her family. He spoke French at home with his wife and their two children.
He was also involved in a strawberry-farming business with his father-in-law and brother-in-law. During the summer, Mr. BAZAY would work on weekends and during his vacation at the family "u-pick" farm south of Montreal.
While working on his farm, Mr. BAZAY thought about how television covered the news. He felt the audience was bored with pictures of news conferences and clips of politicians. He found a way to tell stories that held people's interest and still conveyed the same information.
"He specialized in human-interest stories and would always find something to illustrate an issue," recalled Bill Casey, who, as a cameraman, worked with Mr. BAZAY in Montreal from 1976 to 1980. "David found a man in the Gaspé who was a federalist married to a separatist. He and his wife would argue in the kitchen, and it became a metaphor for the tensions in Quebec leading up to the 1980 referendum."
After the referendum, Mr. BAZAY was assigned to Paris, where he covered Europe and the Middle East.
"He was one of the first reporters to arrive after the massacre at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camp in Lebanon," said John Owen, who was foreign editor of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News at the time. "I can still remember the tone of his voice. Calm, without adjectives, just describing the horror there."
In September of 1982, Lebanese Maronite Christian militias had entered the camps and massacred hundreds of Palestinian who lived there.
Because he was fluent in French, Mr. BAZAY was able to report for both the French and English networks of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. At home and overseas, he had adopted an unusual habit of signalling whether he liked the story he had been assigned. If he disapproved of it, he would wear a funny hat -- either a tuque or a beret -- on camera. In those days, he filmed his pieces at the last minute, so editors couldn't change the shot.
When he returned to Canada, Mr. BAZAY became a producer, eventually becoming executive producer of the national news and chief news editor in 1993. He became ombudsman on November 1, 1995.
Away from work Mr. BAZAY was a keen golfer and skier. He enjoyed fly-fishing and would often go salmon fishing with a friend near Bathurst, New Brunswick He spent much time of late at a family cottage north of Kingston, Ontario
David BAZAY was born in Winnipeg on July 12, 1939. He died of a heart attack in Toronto on October 30, 2005. He was 66. He leaves his wife, Viviane, and his children Dominique and Thierry.

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BAZILLI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-14 published
BAZILLI, Barbara (née WALLACE)
Passed away on Friday, February 11, 2005 at the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital. Beloved wife of the late Michael BAZILLI. Loving sister of Doug WALLACE and his wife Shirley and Mary HAWLEY. Fondly remembered by her nieces, nephews and stepchildren. Cremation. Private family interment to take place at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Lung Association or to a charity of choice. Arrangements entrusted to the Ward Funeral Home, Oakville Chapel, 905-844-3221.

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BAZINET o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-15 published
MILLIKEN, Isabella
Suddenly at University Hospital on Sunday, December 11th, 2005, Mrs. Isabella MILLIKEN of London, age 86 years. Beloved wife of the late Norman Benjamin MILLIKEN. Loving mother of Robert (June) MILLIKEN, Isobel (Richard Sr.) BAZINET and Campbell (Michele) MILLIKEN. Predeceased by her daughter Williamina ("Billie") SWEENEY. Also survived by her 7 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Lloyd R. Needham Funeral Chapel, 520 Dundas Street, London on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service from the chapel on Friday at 11 a.m. with visitation an hour prior, Reverend MCINNES/MCINNIS officiating. Interment Woodland Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Kidney Foundation would be appreciated. Tributes may be left at www.mem.com

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BAZINET o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-17 published
TOCHER, Dorothy (née TOWERS)
Peacefully at Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, on Monday, May 16, 2005. Dorothy TOCHER (née TOWERS) of Sutton, beloved wife of the late Edward (Ted) TOCHER. Dear mother of John of Newmarket, David of Sutton and Connie BAZINET and her husband Mike of Aurora. Loving grandmother of Billy, Robbie, Kenny, Cailee, and Samantha. Dear sister of Reg TOWERS, Doug TOWERS, Alice DRAPER and Mary INGHAM. Predeceased by her brothers Dave TOWERS and Bill TOWERS, and her sister Ruth SMERCIAK. Resting at the Taylor Funeral Home, 20846 Dalton Road, Sutton, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday. Funeral Service in the chapel on Thursday at 1: 30 p.m. Cremation to follow. Donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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BAZINET o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-26 published
BAZINET, Lucien "Luke, Lou" (January 1, 1947-November 24, 2005)
Passed away at Trillium Health Centre on November 24, 2005 with his wife of 38 years at his side. Lucien, a loving husband to Marlene and father to Luke, Michelle, Monique and Roger. He will be fondly remembered by his grandchildren Stephen, Chloe, Kaitlyn, Ryan, Hannah, Nathan and Ashley. Lucien will be sadly missed by his brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, brothers and sisters-in-law, and a lengthy list of Friends and family. His jokes and sense of humour will not be forgotten. A special thank you to Central Graphics and Containers for their support and to Trillium Health Centre for all of their efforts. Viewing will take place at GoodFellow Funeral Home in Parham, Ontario, Saturday November 26th from 7-9 p.m. Sunday November 27th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass to follow on Monday, November 28th at St. James Major in Sharbot Lake at 2 p.m.

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BAZIW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-12 published
SPINA, Frank
Family and Friends reflect with love gratitude and sadness on the life and loss of Frank SPINA who passed away on Sunday, February 6, 2005 at Humber River Regional Hospital Finch Site. Entombment was in Westminster Mausoleum on Wednesday, February 9, 2005. He is lovingly remembered by his common-law wife Lori BAZIW and many loving relatives and Friends. When those we love have stepped across the threshold of God's love, they leave behind those memories which make us love them more.

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BAZKUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-08 published
Solly CANTOR, Boxer: 1928-2005
Canadian lightweight who was more artful practitioner than brawler skillfully put away a parade of champions but never won a title himself
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, March 8, 2005 - Page S9
Solly CANTOR fought his way into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame despite never having won a professional title. Not blessed with knockout power, yet clever in using a debilitating left fist, Mr. CANTOR was more boxer than brawler. He won 41 professional fights, only six by knockout. He lost 14 and drew eight.
His nemesis in the ring was Montrealer Armand Savoie, against whom he had four fights in 1951 that were remembered for their spilt blood, much of it Mr. CANTOR's. He twice battled Mr. Savoie for the Canadian lightweight championship, losing both by decisions. One of those verdicts was widely considered to have been a travesty.
Mr. CANTOR earned his place among boxing immortals with non-title victories over a talented selection of lightweight titleholders Frank Johnson (a Commonwealth champion); Billy Thompson (British and European); Elis Ask of Finland (European); and Tommy McGovern (British).
A stinging left hand was Mr. CANTOR's calling card in the ring. He was adept at delivering a jab, a hook or a cross with that hand, a skill learned as a cocky amateur fighting out of the Central Young Men's Christian Association in his hometown.
Solly Cantor BONAPARTE was born in Toronto, the son of a taxi driver. His father, Louis CANTOROVICI, was a Romanian native whose family name had been altered to Bonaparte by a mischievous immigration officer. The Bonaparte children -- there would be four in all -- were born and raised in a house on Parliament Street south of Queen. Their Corktown neighbourhood was one in which it was advantageous to know how to punch.
The boy took up fighting after admiring boxers at a gym. His parents disapproved and never watched any of his matches; his siblings attended bouts at Maple Leaf Gardens, but would wait in the corridor, unable to bear the sight of Solly being hit. Happily, he was more likely to administer punishment than absorb it. That fast left fist allowed 17-year-old Solly BONAPARTE to score a close decision over Joe McPHEE -- one of the Fighting McPhees from Oshawa, Ontario -- to claim the Ontario amateur title in the 126-pound division on May 16, 1946.
Turning pro later that year as Solly CANTOR, he moved to Paterson, New Jersey, from where he was often added to the undercard of programs at Madison Square Garden in Manhattan. After building an impressive 24-4-2 record, Mr. CANTOR moved to London, where he defeated Mr. Thompson, Mr. McGovern and Mr. Ask, all by decision.
A dispute with his manager led to a nine-month layoff. Mr. CANTOR returned to his hometown, where his fortunes became a staple of the sports pages. The reporters often called attention to the size of his nose, playing to a racial stereotype in common currency at the time.
Mr. CANTOR's boxing trunks bore a Star of David on the left leg, a sign not only of pride but also a nod to the unsubtle marketing of his sport. Some fans came to cheer a Jewish champion, others to see him beaten.
The first of four battles with Mr. Savoie in 1951 ended after the eighth round, with Mr. CANTOR needing six stitches to close a gash across the bridge of his nose. The losing fighter said a head butt had caused the wound; the victor insisted the cut came courtesy of "a stinging right cross." In any case, Mr. CANTOR had suffered only the second knockout of his career.
Mr. CANTOR won a rematch in June, setting the stage for a much-anticipated third showdown, this one before Mr. Savoie's fans in Montreal, with the Canadian championship in the balance. Mr. CANTOR scored often with his left, staggering Mr. Savoie with a straight-arm right in the sixth round.
As the bell rang at the end of the 12th and final round, the conclusion seemed clear, as boxing promoter Frank Tunney, sitting at ringside, would later describe: "The fight was so one-sided in CANTOR's favour that when the announcer first said, 'Winner by a unanimous decision...,' a bunch of us at ringside were busy talking and took it for granted the decision was CANTOR's, as it should have been. But when he added 'Savoie,' we nearly fell off our chairs. Then he had to correct himself to say it was a split decision. The partisan French fans booed the judges for minutes on end. Solly was jobbed."
The unpopular decision made necessary another obligatory rematch, held in Toronto six weeks later. Having lost the previous fight at ringside, Mr. CANTOR was not eager to allow the judges to settle the match. "I'm going out for a knockout," he said. "Maybe this one won't go the scheduled 12 rounds."
With an uncharacteristic aggressiveness, Mr. CANTOR lunged toward the champion in the opening round. The strategy was at first successful, but Mr. Savoie was soon crowding the challenger, absorbing his best shots with his gloves. A unanimous decision in the champ's favour was regarded as a just verdict.
"Solly is a terrific boxer, but he fought my kind of fight tonight," Mr. Savoie said. "I know if I tried to box him, I was beaten before I started. You have to work all the time against him. You have to stay inside him. And when you do hit him, he fights back and he won't fold."
After losing two fights in Alberta to George Dunn, an American who once arrived at Toronto airport and asked a cabbie to take him to Edmonton, Mr. CANTOR returned to England, where he ended his professional career and took up permanent residence.
His final bout came on October 4, 1955, when he scored a victory on points over Frank Johnson, the Manchester lightweight who had briefly held the Commonwealth title two years earlier.
Only 11 of Mr. CANTOR's 63 fights were held in Canada.
Mr. CANTOR worked as a court clerk after leaving the ring. A first marriage ended in divorce. He became a Methodist when he married his second wife.
In recent years, the old fighter found a renewed sense of purpose by joining the Croydon Ex-Boxers' Association. The group was "one big, happy family," Mr. CANTOR wrote Vancouver Sun boxing columnist Graham Houston seven years ago. "We were all part and parcel of each others' past."
Mr. CANTOR continued to attend meetings last year, even as he lost the use of his limbs from the motor-neuron disease that would claim his life. No one expected any less; he had answered the bell for every round of every fight but for four.
Solly CANTOR was born in Toronto on September 18, 1928 (although some boxing references put his birth date two years earlier). He died at his home in suburban Mitcham, outside London, England, on January 28, 2005. He leaves his second wife, Miriam; Brenda RAWSON, a daughter from his first marriage; brother Harold BONAPARTE and sisters Toby BAZKUR and Sarah MARCHILDON.

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BAZKUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-31 published
CANTOR, Solly (BONAPARTE)
Died in London, England, Friday, January 28, 2005, at the age of 77. Survived by wife Miriam; in Toronto, by sister Sarah and husband Marcel MARCHILDON, brother Harold BONAPARTE and wife Rosie, sister Toby and husband Ron BAZKUR, and many nieces and nephews.

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BAZNICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-31 published
JOBSON, Margaret Mathieson (née GILLIES)
(Adherent of Knox Presbyterian Church, 630 Spadina Ave., past president of The Daughters of Scotland in Canada, past member of "Faith Chapter" of The Order of the Eastern Star, past member of Knox Presbyterian Church Willing Workers, past member of the Prisoner of War Association of Canada, past member of Woodgreen Community Centre Senior Citizens and East Toronto Salvation Army Over 60 Club). Born in Toronto on November 24, 1907, to dear late parents, Alexander and Sophia (DODDS) GILLIES. Entered into rest at the Ina Grafton Gage Nursing Home, on Friday, October 28, 2005. Margaret, beloved wife of the late George JOBSON. Cherished mother of George Alexander JOBSON. Dear sister of Neil GILLIES, the late George, Alexander, William, John, and Jean GILLIES. Survived by her sister-in-law Jesse GILLIES. Predeceased by her sisters-in-law Jacobyna, Nancy, Phyllis, Irene and Nora GILLIES. Fondly remembered by her niece Marion GUTHERSON of Luton, England, and sadly missed by her many other nieces, nephews and their families. Friends may call at the Trull "East Toronto" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1111 Danforth Avenue (one block east of Donlands Subway), from 5: 00 p.m. Wednesday, November 2, 2005, until commencement of celebration of life services in the Chapel at five-thirty o'clock. Memorial refreshments to follow in the Chatham Lounge. Private cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 525 University Avenue, 14th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2L3 or The Knox Presbyterian Church Children's Camp Fund, 630 Spadina Ave., Toronto, Ontario M5S 2H4. Many thanks to her nieces Sandra BAZNICK, Barbara BROOKS and very special thanks to her devoted friend Margaret BROOKS for all of their love and care of my dear mother.

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BAZOS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-19 published
PITTOCK, Gladys Dorothy (PICKARD)
Peacefully surrounded by her family at London Health Sciences Centre Victoria Campus, after a courageous battle with cancer, Gladys Dorothy (PICKARD) PITTOCK, of Ingersoll. Daughter of the late Charles and Gladys PICKARD. Beloved wife and best friend for 52 years of James PITTOCK. Dear mother of Charles and his wife Gabriela of Toronto, Susan and her husband Gus BAZOS of London and Mary and her husband Roger MOYER of London. Doting and loving grandmother of Daniella and Benjamin PITTOCK, Adam and Katrina BAZOS and Laura and Scott MOYER. Dear sister of Maxine and her husband Albert JONES of Thamesford. Sister-in-law of Robert and June PITTOCK of Woodstock. Also survived by nieces, nephews, cousins and many Friends. Gladys was an avid Bridge player, member of St. Paul's Presbyterian Church as well as a long time member of the Coffee Club. Gladys was a devoted wife, daughter, mother, grandmother and friend who always put others before herself. Friends will be received at the McBeath-Dynes Funeral Home, 246 Thames St. S., Ingersoll Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where service will be held on Tuesday, September 20, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. Reverend Dr. Lonnie ATKINSON officiating. Interment Ingersoll Rural Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, St. Paul's Memorial Fund or charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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BAZZANA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-13 published
BAZZANA, Silvia
Passed away at Humber River Regional Hospital - Church site on September 11, 2005, at the age of 47. Beloved daughter of Tarcisio and Lucia. Cherished sister of Tom and his wife Suzanne, and Sandra and her husband Julio. Loving aunt to Nicholas, Ryan, Julia, Sarah, and Adam. Fondly remembered by many aunts, uncles, and cousins. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Bernardo Funeral Homes, 2960 Dufferin St. (2 streets south of Lawrence Ave.), on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial in St. Fidelis Church (33 Connie Street, off Rustic Rd.) on Thursday, September 15, 2005 at 10 a.m. Entombment in Holy Cross Cemetery (Yonge Street, south of Hwy. 7). Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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