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"BAW" 2005 Obituary


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BAWDEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-04 published
BAWDEN, Mollie Eleanor (née ROYLE)
Mollie Eleanor, peacefully, at home on Saturday, April 30, 2005, with her family by her side. Mrs. Mollie Eleanor BAWDEN (nee ROYLE) of Kingston and formerly of Saint Thomas, in her 87th year, after a courageous battle with cancer. Beloved wife of 61 years to Walter BAWDEN. Loving mother of William and his wife Denise. Cherished gramma to Sean. Loving sister of Amy SPENCE (the late Walter) of Toronto. Predeceased by a sister Florence MURRAY and a brother Jack ROYLE. A public memorial service will be held at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas on Wednesday, July 6, 2005, at 11: 00 a.m. Memorial donations would be appreciated to the Kidney Foundation of Canada.

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BAWDEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-08 published
BAWDEN, Walter
Walter BAWDEN (Member of the Hi-Ro Shrine Club of Elgin and Life Member of the Mocha Temple of London). After a brief illness, at the Kingston General Hospital, on Friday, August 5, 2005 with his family by his side, Walter, predeceased by his beloved wife of 61 years, Mollie (ROYLE) BAWDEN (April 30, 2005.) Loving father of William and his wife Denise and cherished grandpa to Sean. A Service of Remembrance will be held in our Chapel on Wednesday, August 10, 2005 at 1 p.m. An Interment Service will be held in the Union Cemetery, Saint Thomas, at a later date. For those wishing, memorial donations to Knox Presbyterian Church, or Shriners' Hospitals for Children would be greatly appreciated. In the care of Gordon F. Tompkins Funeral Homes, Township Chapel, Kingston, Ontario. 613-546-5150. Relatives and Friends are invited to sign the Book of Condolences at www.gftompkinstownship.ca

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BAWDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-15 published
Earl CAMERON, 89, voice of the National
News anchor retired in 1976
Was announcer at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for 32 years
By Jim BAWDEN, Television Columnist, Page A18
Earl CAMERON was often called Canada's best-known anonymous man. The onetime warehouse worker from Moose Jaw became Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's " Voice of Doom" when he replaced Lorne GREENE on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's national radio news in the late 1940s and Larry HENDERSON on The National in 1959.
CAMERON, 89, one of only seven men to anchor The National, died Thursday in Royal Victoria Hospital in Barrie after a lengthy illness.
Over the years, CAMERON's uncanny resemblance to the mythical "man-in-the-street" Canadian made him a well-respected television figure. Television critic Bob BLACKBURN wrote in 1965: " CAMERON is not just the image of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation news, he is the cultivated image of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation itself: solid, patriarchal, Gibraltary!"
CAMERON took early retirement from Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1976, at age 61 and after 32 years with the corporation. Throughout his Canadian Broadcasting Corporation career, he had always been officially a staff announcer. He remained one of the regular newsreaders on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's The World At Six but had become disappointed over his decreasing role on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television.
On his last day, he simply dropped off a note for his department head and left for Florida. That was in keeping with a man who was typically "quiet, not ostentatious" said CTV anchor Lloyd ROBERTSON, who knew CAMERON from his early days at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
"I came to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1954 and we were required to do it all. A typical day for Earl involved reading weather on radio, then hosting a radio jazz show, doing station breaks, too. At 9: 30 he'd stroll over to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News' studio to begin script rehearsals for The National, which went live at 11 p.m. He had to do it all, and he did so calmly, rarely making a mistake. We were required to memorize the pronunciation of difficult names and foreign words, and Earl made it all seem very natural."
Born in 1915, CAMERON ran the gamut of business training and normal school in his Moose Jaw hometown. Local radio station CHAB hired him as a summer replacement at $20 a month.
CAMERON said in 1966 that,1" got the best advice ever from my first boss. He explained to me I was reading for just one person. He said to go into a house, and you'll find one person listening to a radio. Try to talk to just this one person."
CAMERON later moved to Winnipeg radio station CKY for a year, and in 1944 joined Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Toronto, from which he rose to top anchor status.
In 1965 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation executives began publicly grumbling that CAMERON was doing too many outside commercials. His association with Rambler cars and Crest toothpaste, though allowed by the union contract, was unseemly for the voice of The National, they said. Under intense pressure, he ended his lucrative contracts.
His television star went into eclipse the next year, when he was replaced as headliner of The National by Stanley BURK/BURKE.
There was never any doubt about CAMERON's announcing abilities his reading was impeccable, but it was the system that was at issue. He was dropped in an effort to break the union jurisdiction which dictated that newsmen could write the scripts but announcers could only read it on air.
Television critic Dennis BRAITHWAITE wrote at the time: "The national news didn't make Earl CAMERON. He made the national news."
CAMERON did not mention his departure on air. For his last broadcast as announcer he simply said, "Now this is Earl CAMERON, saying goodnight for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television News."
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation offered him a job as host of the public affairs series Viewpoint, reading viewers' letters, but that show was canned in 1976 after an 18-year run.
Retired, CAMERON moved his family to LeFroy, on Lake Simcoe. He did commercials for American Motors and Krona margarine, golfed daily and watched Global's 6 p.m. news.
His retirement didn't stop SCTV from satirizing him and Lloyd ROBERTSON as duelling, argumentative anchors Earl Camembert and Floyd Robertson in skits CAMERON liked because "in this business a little publicity always helps."
CAMERON leaves his wife, Patty; son, Hal; and three grandchildren.

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BAWDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-07 published
'Mac' led heady days at CHUM
Disk Jockey Bob McADOREY as popular as music
'Bon vivant' later a Global television fixture
By Jim BAWDEN, Television COLUMNIST
Bob McADOREY helped usher in radio's rock 'n' roll era and set the musical agenda for a generation of Toronto teens.
Few today realize the power that Disk Jockeys like McADOREY exerted over Toronto popular culture 40 years ago, when radio ruled. It was a cozy time for music -- and then CHUM entered the fray, blew the cobwebs away and ushered in the crazy days of rock broadcasting.
McADOREY, 69, died Saturday at St. Catharines' Hotel Dieu hospital after a long illness.
McADOREY grew up in Niagara Falls and attended Stamford Collegiate, also the alma mater of Titanic director James CAMERON. He was in the same graduating class as Barbara FRUM, the legendary Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television interviewer.
As a teen, McADOREY won a province-wide public speaking contest and was the popular president of his high school fraternity.
He also played ragtime piano.
"Crowds would go around him," said his older brother, Terry McADOREY.
McADOREY's radio career started in 1953 when the Niagara Falls native first signed on with CHVC near the Falls, introducing listeners to his unique style of easy-going patter.
"I looked like Buddy Holly back then," McADOREY told the Toronto Star in a 1981 interview. "I weighed about 95 pounds and we played songs like 'Que Sera Sera.' Everything was a lot softer, smoother then."
After additional stops in London, Guelph, Hamilton and Dawson Creek, McADOREY wound up at Toronto's CHUM, coaxed to climb aboard by resident star Disk Jockey Al BOLISKA.
"I'd lived with Al above a variety store in London and he kept telling me to come to CHUM. I asked for $600 a month, after all Gordie TAPP was making $100 a week, and to my surprise I got the job."
Starting in 1960, McADOREY began a stint that many people consider rock programming at its finest: brash, spontaneous and pretty wild. And the Disk Jockeys were the stars.
CHUM became the rock station to listen to and McADOREY was the man who told you if a song was going places. The guy who hung out with The Beatles and The Stones when they were in town (and introduced them from the stage) was known simply as "Mac."
For years, he hosted the all-important 4 to 7 p.m. slot. CHUM's chart of the week's top records was posted everywhere: in record stores and high school lockers. Eaton's and Simpson's would only stock those 45s that were on the CHUM list. When a new record called "The Unicorn" came in, McADOREY liked it so much he immediately put it on the air and it sold 140,000 copies in Canada in two weeks and made The Irish Rovers.
Thinking back on those heady days, McADOREY said, "We kept it all clean up here. There was no payola as in the U.S. and we deliberately helped a lot of Canadians. It was personality radio. We were promoted like crazy back then. And the pressures were unbelievable. We dictated what records were going to go. And what kids would eat, drink.
"I could have written five books about what happened at CHUM. There'd be one book if I saved my memos. The most frightening thing was the British invasion. There weren't enough cops to handle the crowds -- it was out of control."
Off the air, he was a bon vivant, said 72-year-old Terry McADOREY.
"We did a lot of drinking. He was a good friend of Ronnie HAWKINS."
In 1968, the CHUM deal fizzled. When owner Al WATERS brought in American consultants, McADOREY felt the business was becoming too heavily formatted and left.
McADOREY headed to CFGM in Richmond Hill, which was trying to invade Toronto with a country music format. As morning man, he energized the station. He moved to CFTR in 1970 and after a few years returned to CFGM.
A constant listener was Bill CUNNINGHAM, head of Global television news, and he asked McADOREY to contribute satirical bits, which eventually became a full-time job.
Sample segment: during an airline strike McADOREY headed out to Terminal 2 with bowling equipment and pins to demonstrate the building was only of use as a bowling alley. Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers saw nothing funny in this and whisked him out as the piece was being filmed.
Another time during a city campaign to get dog owners to scoop up deposits, McADOREY and a cameraman went out to do field tests, which consisted of chasing terrified dogs whose owners had failed the test.
By 1980, he was entertainment editor. In 1983, Global tried to fire him when he disagreed over assignments. Global's Three Guys at noon telecast was a big hit (the others: Mike Anscombe and John Dawe) and hundreds of daily phone calls forced management to reconsider. For a time, Global even outperformed Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Midday.
McADOREY later got his own afternoon entertainment show where he'd report from movie junkets and comment on the entertainment scene.
I last chatted with him in 2000 when he was railing against Global's retirement-at-65 rule. But he looked frail and had been off for months after a fainting attack.
McADOREY had a farm at Gormley and a place in Niagara-on-the-Lake. Despite his television success he still yearned for the golden days of radio: "I'd walk into the booth in pyjama tops and jeans and talk one-on-one to people. At least that's the way I always imagined it."
McADOREY leaves daughter Colleen, her husband Jim TATTI, a Global sports broadcaster, and four grandchildren.
He was predeceased by his wife Willa, daughter Robin and son Terry.
A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at St. Patrick's Church in Niagara Falls.
With files from Gabe GONDA

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BAWES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-24 published
PEARCEY, Eleanor Gertrude - Estate of
Ontario Superior Court Of Justice
at 3 Dominion Street, Bracebridge,
Ontario P1L 2E6
Notice To: Debbe BLANEY, Betty BAWES, Myrna GREER/GRIER, Sherry MOVITTIE, Linda SPEEDIE, Carylon NELSON, Paul LYNN, Danny LYNN, Jeane TOTTEN, Pat TOTTEN
Re: The Estate Of Eleanor Gertrude PEARCEY
An application has been commenced for directions re: the estate of Eleanor Gertrude PEARCEY at the Court located at 3 Dominion Street, Bracebridge, Ontario P1L 2E6.
The next court date is May 9th, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. or as soon as possible after that time at 3 Dominion Street, Bracebridge, Ontario P1L 2E6.
The court may make an order in this case that will affect your rights in relation to any and all claims you may have against the estate of Eleanor Gertrude PEARCEY. You can get more information about this case from the Court Office at the above address. You may also get information about this case from Hugh A. TAILOR/TAYLOR, Sugg, Fitton and Taylor LLP, 5 Chancery Lane, Unit #1, Bracebridge. Ontario P1L 2E3. 1-705-645-5211, Solicitors for Barry Howard LYNN.
Page B21

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BAWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-01 published
MARSHALL, Margaret Bawn (née AUSTIN)
90, Chester, died September 13, 2005 in Surf Lodge, Lockeport. Born in Toronto, the daughter of Alfred Henry and Margaret BAWN) AUSTIN. Margaret is survived by her daughter Dorothy "Dolly" (Jim) DIMITROFF, Chester, son Austin (Margaret) MARSHALL, Yellowknife, grandchildren Kelly, Jayme (Connie) DIMITROFF, Allison and Sean MARSHALL. Predeceased by her husband John Fraser, sisters, her twin Dorothy and Edna. Memorial service will be 11 a.m. Friday, October 7th, 2005 in Chester United Baptist Church with Rev. Dan GREEN officiating. Burial at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Chester United Baptist Church Building Fund. Arrangements entrusted to Davis Funeral Home, Chester, Nova Scotia (902-275-3811).

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BAWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-29 published
YOUNG, Marie Ann
Passed away at St. Joseph's Health Centre on Sunday, March 27, 2005. Beloved wife of the late James YOUNG. Dear son of Ronnie YOUNG. Loving grandmother of Jimmy, Carol, Carley and Ronnee and great-grandmother of Michael, Sarah and Rebecca. Survived by brother Glen BAWN and predeceased by brothers Harold, Roy and Jack BAWN. Loved by many nieces and nephews. A Service of Remembrance will be held at the Turner and Porter "Yorke" Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., Toronto, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Saturday, April 2, 2005 at 3 p.m. with visitation beginning at 2 p.m. For those who wish, donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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