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"ANS" 2005 Obituary


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ANSARA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-04 published
ANSARA, Albert
Passed away peacefully on Friday, September 2, 2005 in his 90th year. Loving brother of Edward, Florence, Helen, Joseph and his wife Rika and the late Christine, Charles, Mary, Claire and Samuel. Beloved son of the late Sadie and McKoll ANSARA. He will be missed by his many nieces and nephews. A special thanks to the staff of Nisbet Lodge, 740 Pape Ave., Toronto, Ontario. for their excellent and caring service during his residency for the past 11 years. Friends may call at the Ralph Day Funeral Home, 180 Danforth Ave., (east of Broadview subway) on Tuesday, September 6 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Please call the funeral home for interment information, 416-463-3870. (Evening supervised parking at rear of funeral home).

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ANSARI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-16 published
HALNAN, Velma Ellen (née KNOWLES)
At Grey Bruce Health Services, Southampton, on Friday, April 15, 2005. Velma HALNAN (née KNOWLES) of Southampton, in her 91st year. Wife of the late George W. HALNAN. Dear mother of George Kenneth HALNAN of Aurora. Precious grandmother of Melodie Ann Ellen and her husband Shad ANSARI of Toronto, and Andrew HALNAN of Brampton. Beloved sister of Eileen WINTON of Unionville and Shirley Ann KNOWLES of Southampton. Also survived by her sisters-in-law, Helen KNOWLES of Toronto, Lois KNOWLES of Ajax, and Margaret KNOWLES of Oshawa. Fondly remembered by her special Friends Andrea and Alan RITCHIE of Brampton and Jean INNES of Southampton. Sadly missed by her many nieces and nephews and Friends of the community. Predeceased by her parents, Albert and Gladys KNOWLES, by her brothers, Bert, Roy, Wilfred, William, Warren, Bruce, Carl, and by her sister, Jean McPHIE. At Velma's request there will be no visitation. Cremation. A Celebration of Velma HALNAN's Life will be held in the Chapel of the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, on Saturday, April 30, 2005 at 1 p.m. A Time of Fellowship and Sharing will follow in the Family Centre of the funeral home. A Service for the interment of ashes will be held at Prospect Cemetery, 1450 St. Clair Ave. West, Toronto, on Monday, May 2, 2005 at 3 p.m. Expressions of remembrance to the Southampton United Church or to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.

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ANSCOMBE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-09 published
Bob McADOREY, Broadcaster: 1935-2005
Deejay who helped determine what Toronto's youth listened to in the sixties went on to enjoy a 27-year run as a popular and irreverent figure on Global television
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, February 9, 2005 - Page S9
Toronto -- If you knew Peggy Sue, you knew Bob McADOREY. That's because, with his pile of curly hair and horn-rimmed glasses, the Toronto disc jockey was a ringer for Buddy Holly, the songwriter and singer from Texas whose song was a hit in 1959. The two men were born 10 months apart -- McADOREY in 1935, Holly in 1936 and actually met in the mid-1950s when Mr. McADOREY was a disc jockey in Guelph, Ontario, and the singer was on a tour of Canada.
"His job was to introduce Buddy Holly at a concert at Kitchener. When he went on stage, the crowd went wild, and Bob though 'Gee, I didn't know I was this popular,' " remembered his sister Pat RUSSELL. "Of course, they thought he was Buddy Holly."
For decades, Mr. McADOREY was the entertainment commentator on Global Television; he retired less than five years ago. But in an earlier era, he was a household name in Southern Ontario. In 1960, just a few months after Buddy Holly died in a plane crash in 1959, his look-alike joined Toronto's CHUM. Almost overnight, Bob McADOREY became the top disc jockey at CHUM, the No. 1 rock station in the country. He was astonished when the station paid him what he was asking for -- $7,200 a year (about $50,000 in today's money, according to the Bank of Canada's inflation calculator).
"Bob McADOREY, whose face is as well known in Toronto as Mayor Givens, has the most power to dictate what pop music Ontario teens listen to," wrote the Toronto Telegram in 1966.
Not only was he the on-air man in the key 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. slot, he was also the music director. He chose the records the other six disc jockeys played. He and the other disc jockeys decided on CHUM's Top 10, which sent kids to record stores to buy records with a big hole in the middle and a song on each side. They spun at 45 revolutions a minute and were called 45s.
"He alone commands what goes on the hit parade in Canada," wrote The Globe's Blake KIRBY in 1968. "Middle-aged squares who run record stores use the CHUM chart, the weekly list of what McADOREY is playing and plugging as a buying guide."
Along the way, he shared the footlights with such big-name visitors as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.
The CHUM hit parade made records such as The Unicorn by the Irish Rovers. Mr. McADOREY, a sentimental Irish-Canadian, pushed the record, which sold 140,000 copies in Canada and a million in the United States. But he didn't like everything on the CHUM chart. It was a business, after all.
"We're playing records here which I just can't bear to listen to, but I wouldn't let that influence what goes on the air," Mr. McADOREY once told The Globe and Mail. His sister said that when he went home after work, he was so sick of rock 'n' roll that he put earphones on and listened to classical music.
Like many successful big-city disc jockeys, Mr. McADOREY also ran dances on the weekends -- events with such names as Bob McAdorey's Canadian Bandstand or Canadian Hopville. He and a couple of other disc jockeys owned a company called Teen Scene Ltd., which put on dances in towns all over Southern Ontario.
After a long spell on CHUM, Bob McADOREY either was too old -- he was well into his 30s -- or too tired, and so he suddenly found himself fired. Unlike the regular corporate world, where people resign, in radio they are just plain sacked. Disc jockeys almost wear it as a badge of honour.
"There are no hard feelings," he told an entertainment writer in 1972 after he had been sacked from CFTR following a stint at CFGM. "I was told that it was either the station's new music-and-contests format or me." Within days, he had rejoined radio station CFGM.
A few years later, he morphed into television. No one told him that radio types, from the hot side of the Marshall McLuhan equation, are not supposed to be able to make the switch to the cool world of television. He perched on his stool in 1973 and performed for about 27 years.
Bob McADOREY was born within earshot of the Niagara Falls. His father worked as a machinist on the railway and the whole family lived near both the tracks and the roundhouse at Niagara Falls, Ontario For the rest of his life, Mr. McADOREY maintained a love affair with trains and rode them at every opportunity.
He went to high school at Stamford Collegiate. An Irish Catholic, he was one of two non-Protestants in the class. The other was Barbara FRUM, later the host of The Journal and As It Happens on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The two would spend the religious class in another room, enjoying their time off.
In Grade 12, Mr. McADOREY started work at the local radio station, doing a program in the early morning before class. "One day, the station manager told me to go on air and do the play-by-play of a local baseball game," he told the Toronto Star in 2000. "I didn't know the players' names and I didn't know much about baseball, so I sat in the bleachers and interviewed the spectators and it seemed to work."
After that, he was hooked. For a time, he worked all over -- including radio station CJDC in remote Dawson's Creek, British Columbia Even then, he was fairly outrageous. " CJDC had access to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation feeds," he said in 2000. "But nobody monitored us, so we sold everything -- the one o'clock time signal to a jewellery store, the Queen's Christmas Message brought to you by Sammy's Bar and Grill."
But it was soon after he had moved to Guelph, Ontario, that things really began to happen and he hit the big time at the age of 24 by working for CHUM.
Though he may have been at the top of the pop game in the Toronto of the sixties, he also became a national figure at Global as it expanded from a base in Southern Ontario to become the country's third network. He never applied for a job in television, it was just chance.
Bill CUNNINGHAM, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation foreign correspondent brought in to run Global News, hired him after he saw him speak during a tour of the new television station. At the time, Mr. McADOREY was working for Alan SLAIGHT, a prescient broadcaster who had run CHUM, bought CFGM and was one of the early owners of Global. Mr. CUNNINGHAM's plan was to lighten up the newscast and hire a kind of humourist-commentator. Thus, Mr. McADOREY covered entertainment and did light pieces for the newscast, heading out with a cameraman to find what he could. Once, during an Air Canada strike, he drifted out to Toronto's Pearson International Airport and happened to find Terminal 2 entirely deserted. The scene made irresistible camera fodder. The pair had time to erect an impromptu bowling alley and roll a few balls before the party was broken up by patrolling policemen.
The show was an enduring success. It helped that Mr. McADOREY was good-looking, possessed a great voice and was totally unaffected and unpretentious. Behind the scenes, though, Global was in turmoil and not just financially.
The network kept trying to reinvent itself. One idea was to bring in an untried newsreader, Suzanne PERRY, who was one of Pierre TRUDEAU's press aides and whose son, Matthew PERRY, went on to fame in the sitcom Friends. Sadly, Ms. PERRY was put on air before she was ready and that experiment failed.
A short while afterward, the network tried something called News at Noon, with Bob McADOREY doing entertainment, Mike ANSCOMBE the sports, and John DAWE, business. The three of them joked, made fun of each other, and did and said things you weren't supposed to see on television. All of a sudden, they had a huge audience, unheard of at that time of day.
"We broke new ground with 300,000 viewers at noon," said business reporter John DAWE. " Then it expanded and we did the 5: 30 news as well. We worked together for 14 years."
As he matured, Mr. McADOREY lost his Buddy Holly looks. Instead, he was often mistaken for another famous person with glasses and a mass of curly hair -- Ken TAILOR/TAYLOR, the Canadian ambassador to Iran who sheltered American colleagues during the 1979-80 hostage crisis.
At Global, the news department kept trying new things and new people, though the on-air staff remained pretty much the same. One producer didn't like the jocular format. And Mr. McADOREY didn't like him. He rebelled by being provocative on air.
"It's Friday, and I didn't really feel much like working today. The boss is out of town so I took it easy this afternoon, stretching out in my office, reading and daydreaming," he began his part of the 6 p.m. newscast on April 8, 1983. It got him fired.
"Unprofessional and insulting to the viewers," read the note from his pompous producer. The viewers thought otherwise. Phone lines buzzed and letters landed on all the right desks. Two weeks later, the producer was fired and Bob McADOREY was rehired.
As host of Entertainment Desk from 1991 to 1997, he guided it through many lively segments. Among the most memorable was the appearance of comedienne Judy Tenuta. "[She] pretty well took over the show, which bothered some viewers but not me," he once said. "Her wild style made for bizarre television. Most of the interview was done with Judy sitting on my lap making semi-lewd comments."
For all that, he never did like producers. At the time of his retirement in July, 2000, Andrew RYAN of The Globe and Mail asked him what advice he would give to aspiring young entertainment journalists. "Producers are dorks, actors are jerks," Mr. McADOREY answered. "The only ones worth talking to are directors."
Having been asked to retire, he said he had no expectations of a gold watch. Rather, "how about a gold boot up the butt? Retirement was not my idea. I always thought I had a few more good years left."
Instead, he chose to retire quietly at his home in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario His main hobby was reading and he was something of an authority on James Joyce. An Irish nationalist, he had a lifelong obsession with the great Dublin writer.
Robert Joseph McADOREY was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on July 24, 1935. He died on February 5 at St. Catharines, Ontario He was 70 and had suffered prolonged illness. He is survived by daughter Colleen, sister Pat and brother Terry. He was predeceased by his wife and by two of three children.

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ANSELL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-02 published
LEWIS, Audrey (ANSELL) (May 10, 1924-April 3, 2004)
In loving memory of my dearest sister and best friend.
A Sister,
She's the one who dreams with you, grows with you.
Shares with you some of the funniest, saddest, sweetest and most memorable moments in life.
She's one of the precious few who can see into your heart.
Your one and only Sister,
Ruth (ANSELL) WALLACE.
"I'll remember April"

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ANSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-02 published
ANSELL, Margaret A. " Curly"
Suddenly at her home in Aurora on Monday, January 31, 2005. Marg, in her 68th year, beloved wife of Alex S. ANSELL. Loving mother of Kerry and her husband Steven GARNER of Huntsville, Lynne WHITE/WHYTE and her companion Tony FITZSIMMONS of Newmarket and Scott and his fiancée Maria KURMEY of Aurora. Dear grandmother to Danielle, Kyle, Devon and Laura. Dear sister of Irene ASPIN of Aurora. Marg was very outgoing and active in the community and will be sadly missed especially by her Friends in bowling, euchre and the Optimists International organization. Friends will be received at Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421), on Wednesday, February 2 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service in the Chapel Thursday at 11 a.m. Cremation. Donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated by the family.

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ANSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-10 published
MAGRILL, Rose
On Tuesday, February 8, 2005 at Carefree Lodge. Rose MAGRILL, beloved wife of the late Cyril MAGRILL. Loving mother of Gordon. Dear sister of the late Sarah BRONSKY, Bertha MOORE, Esther BERNSTEIN, and Jack and Louis ANSELL. Devoted grandmother of Laurie and Cedric Stone, Barry and Judy MAGRILL, and great-grandmother of Alexandra, Jamie, Haley, and Geoffrey. A graveside service will be held on Thursday, February 10, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m. at Beth David Synagogue Section at Pardes Shalom Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Rose MAGRILL Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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ANSEMS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-31 published
VANDER VLOET, John C.
Peacefully at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital on Monday, May 30, 2005 John C. VANDER VLOET of Parkhill in his 78th year. Beloved husband of Lucy (ANSEMS) VANDER VLOET. Dear father of Adrian and Lynn VANDER VLOET of Parkhill, Tony and Mary VANDER VLOET of Kerwood, Frank and Jo-Ann VANDER VLOET of Parkhill, Joanne and Simon DE GROOT of Strathroy, Pete and Annette VANDER VLOET of Parkhill. Opa to Marie and Nathan, Yvonne and Andrea, Brian, Laura, Paul and Karen, Joey, Johnny, Jennifer and Kevin, Kristine, Michelle and John, Jacob and Olivia. Brother of Frank VANDER VLOET, Elizabeth and Conrad SPECHT, Lena and Bill VAN ROESTEL, Mary and Don GOODALE. Brother-in-law of Gary YATES, Harry and Edith ANSEMS, Casey and Audrey ANSEMS, Gerard and Toosey ANSEMS, Frank and Marilyn ANSEMS, Casey and Audrey ANSEMS, Antoon ANSEMS, Jeannie MERKS and Corry COFFIN, and Peggy ANSEMS. Predeceased by his parents Adrian and Maria VANDER VLOET, sisters Corry VEEKE, Anne YATES and Klazina VANDER VLOET, mother and father-in-law Chris and Johanna ANSEMS, sister-in-law Marie VANDER VLOET, brother-in-law Jack VEEKE, John ANSEMS, Ted ANSEMS and Joe MERKS. Resting at the M. Box and son Funeral Home, 183 Broad Street Parkhill. Visitation Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at the Sacred Heart Church Parkhill on Thursday, June 2nd at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend Father Michael RYAN officiating. Prayers Wednesday evening at 6: 45 p.m. Donations to the Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital "Building Fund" would be greatly appreciated. Interment in Parkhill Cemetery. Share a memory or send condolence to www.boxfuneralhome.ca M. Box and son will plant a tree in living memory of Mr. VANDER VLOET at the Ausable-Bayfield Conservation Parkhill.

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ANSEMS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-13 published
RICHARDSON, Everett "Ev" George
At the Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital on Sunday, September 11, 2005. Everett "Ev" G. RICHARDSON of Parkhill in his 85th year. Beloved husband of Dorothy "Peg" RICHARDSON (1990.) Dear father of Judith (Joe) ANSEMS of Parkhill, James (Donna) RICHARDSON of Sarnia, William RICHARDSON of British Columbia. Also survived by 7 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Brother of Harold and Evelyn RICHARDSON of London, Helen BURNETT of London. Predeceased by grand_son Brent. At the request of Ev there will be no funeral home visitation or funeral service. Donations to the Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital: Building Fund" ould be appreciated. A celebration of Ev's life will be held Sunday, October 2 at the Parkhill Legion Branch #341 Broad Street, Parkhill from 2-4 p.m. M. Box and son entrusted to arrangements 519-294-6382. Share a memory or send condolences to www.boxfuneralhome.ca M. Box and son will plant a tree in living memory of Mr. RICHARDSON at the Ausable-Bayfield Conservation Parkhill.

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ANSLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-05 published
BRITTON, Joan (née ANSLEY)
It is with great sadness that the family of Joan BRITTON (ANSLEY) announces her passing on September 28, 2005. She had lived with a very deadly form of leukemia for over three years. The eldest daughter of Claude and Elsie ANSLEY, Joan grew up in Willowdale. She married Ted BRITTON in 1968 and the couple founded successful publishing companies in Muskoka, beginning in May of 1977. She will be missed deeply by Ted, as well as by David, Jonathan, Miranda and Emily. Also mourning her death are Jim and Donna ANSLEY, Tom and Donna SUGAR, Ken and Gail DIMSON, Holly WATT, Louise GLEESON and Scott TURNBULL. A private family memorial service took place in the home Joan loved so much in Windermere.

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ANSLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-08 published
BRITTON, Joan (née ANSLEY)
It is with great sadness that the family of Joan BRITTON (ANSLEY) announces her passing on September 28, 2005. She had lived with a very deadly form of leukemia for over three years. The eldest daughter of Claude and Elsie ANSLEY, Joan grew up in Willowdale. She married Ted BRITTON in 1968 and the couple founded successful publishing companies in Muskoka, beginning in May of 1977. She will be missed deeply by Ted, as well as by David, Jonathan, Miranda and Emily. Also mourning her death are Jim and Donna ANSLEY, Tom and Donna SUGAR, Ken and Gail DIMSON, Holly WATT, Louise GLEESON and Scott TURNBULL. A private family memorial service took place in the home Joan loved so much in Windermere.

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ANSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-01 published
Richard OUTRAM, Poet 1930-2005
Writer who was a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation stagehand by day viewed the world in a grain of sand. A private and intensely emotional man, his devotion to his art was nourished by a lifelong love of his wife, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Tuesday, February 1, 2005 - Page S7
On the coldest night of the winter, poet, stagehand and widower Richard OUTRAM, having consumed a quantity of pills and drink, sat on the enclosed side porch of his house in Port Hope, Ontario, and, in a grand Blakean gesture, contemplated the universe and quietly allowed himself to die.
Everything that made his life joyful emanated from his love for his wife and collaborator, the artist Barbara HOWARD. She died in 2002 during an operation to fix a broken hip. "Devotion is not too strong a word," said writer Barry CALLAGHAN. " The two of them fed each other beautifully and with enormous intensity. They were the closing of the couplet. So, what are you going to do with a one-line couplet? He really was his work and his love for her."
Mr. OUTRAM was not the only poet to have a day job that required entirely different skills from his literary vocation. The poet Raymond SOUSTER, for example, spent his working life at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. It was Mr. OUTRAM's conscious decision to spend his days at physical labour so his mind would be free in the evenings to devote to his poetry. But unlike other working poets, such as Mr. SOUSTER, Mr. OUTRAM won very little popular or critical acclaim.
Although he published steadily for more than 40 years, he won only one major prize -- the City of Toronto Book Award in 1999 for his volume Benedict Abroad. There is only one book-length critical study of his work, Peter Sanger's "Her kindled shadow..." An Introduction to the Work of Richard OUTRAM, which was published in limited numbers by The Antigonish Review in 2001.
Instead of a popular audience, he had a series of passionate champions, such as Mr. Sanger, a retired academic. "Richard has both a physical and a metaphysical orientation that isn't compromised at either level," explained Mr. Sanger. "When Richard writes well there is absolutely no distinction between those two levels." Although Mr. Sanger agrees some poems are better than others, he says what makes Mr. OUTRAM's work stand out is its "magnificence coherence." Every poem is ultimately linked to the rest of his body of work.
Richard Daley OUTRAM was born in Oshawa, Ontario, the son of Mary Muriel DALEY, a teacher, and Alfred Allan OUTRAM, an engineer who served in the artillery in The First World War and was wounded at Ypres in Belgium. His mother's father was a Methodist minister who was deeply involved in the negotiations to form the United Church of Canada in 1925. His paternal grandfather ran the hardware store in Port Hope, the town east of Oshawa where Mr. OUTRAM and his wife moved in 2000.
Shortly after young Richard's birth, his parents moved to the Leaside area of Toronto. As a teenager, Mr. OUTRAM was already interested in music and botany, two areas that remained central to his poetry for the rest of his life. Graduating from Leaside Secondary School in 1949, he went that autumn to Victorian College at the University of Toronto to begin an honours degree in English and Philosophy. There he encountered two professors, philosopher Emil FACKENHEIM and literary critic Northrop FRYE, both of whom had a huge impact on the way he thought about the world. He also enlisted as an officer cadet in the reserve system of the Royal Canadian Navy, spending the summers of 1950 and 1951 aboard frigates in the Bay of Fundy and at H. M. C. S. Stadacona in Halifax.
After he graduated from the University of Toronto in 1953, he worked for a year at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto as a stagehand and then moved to England where he found a job in the same capacity for the British Broadcasting Corporation. It was in London that he first began to write poetry and where, in 1954, he met visual artist Barbara HOWARD. From that meeting their lives were entwined until her death in 2002.
"You can't speak of them apart," said Louise DENNYS, executive vice-president of Random House Canada. "They were so completely connected and so beloved of each other, and that is what proved in the end to be impossible for him to live without."
Four years older than Mr. OUTRAM, Ms. HOWARD was born in Toronto in 1926, began drawing as a child, graduated with honours and a silver medal from the Ontario College of Art in 1951 and then taught school to earn enough money to continue her studies in the major art centres of Europe.
They returned to Canada in 1956 and Mr. OUTRAM went back to working as a stage hand and then crew leader at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, a job he would hold until he retired at 60 in June, 1990. The late typographical designer Allan FLEMING/FLEMMING (of the Canadian National logo among other work) was the best man at their wedding in April, 1957, and also the designer and publisher of Mr. OUTRAM's first collection, Eight Poems, a chapbook with a print run of 190 copies that appeared in 1959 under the Tortoise Press imprint.
The next year, Mr. OUTRAM and Ms. HOWARD founded The Gauntlet Press, producing an elegant series of hand-printed volumes of Mr. OUTRAM's poetry over the years decorated with Ms. HOWARD's beautifully coloured wood engravings.
Early in their marriage, the OUTRAMs had a daughter who lived for only a day. His grief is encased in several poems including Sarah, which appeared in his first major collection, Exsultate, Jubilate (1966,) an elegant volume designed by Mr. FLEMING/FLEMMING and published by Macmillan Co. of Canada.
Toronto writer Barry CALLAGHAN, who was one of the hosts on Weekend, a local Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television show, met Mr. OUTRAM on the set in the late 1960s. "I became aware of this intense man standing beside the camera, dressed like a guy working on the floor but staring at me like a hawk," Mr. CALLAGHAN said in a telephone conversation. After the two men struck up a conversation, "I discovered this very isolated and intensely intellectual man who was interested in poetry and ideas."
In the middle 1970s, Mr. OUTRAM took the manuscript for Turns and Other Poems to the now defunct Clarke Irwin publishing house. Two young editors, Susan KEENE and Louise DENNYS pushed the collection, but Clarke Irwin was already in its demise and was doing very little original publishing.
"He had a shining, sharp, sense of the natural world and he was able to give it a sense of form, a sense of greatness larger than and one moment," said Ms. DENNYS. "He saw the world in a grain of sand and he did that in a way that was very beautiful and very particular to his work and to him."
Ms. DENNYS wanted to find a way to publish the book and Mr. OUTRAM suggested she meet his friend bookseller Hugh ANSON- CARTWRIGHT. Bookseller and poet had met years before, the way such people usually do, over a volume of Mr. OUTRAM's poetry that Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT was trying to sell in his bookstore. Then it turned out that they were neighbours and a lifelong Friendship ensured.
The Christmas of 1974, Ms. DENNYS took the manuscript on a visit home to her parents in England and cold-visited the Hogarth Press, a division of Chatto and Windus. She met poetry editor D. J. Enright, who eventually offered to publish Mr. OUTRAM's poems. She came back to Canada and was able to tell Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT that if he wanted to form a little publishing company, here was a British partner. That is how Turns and Other Poems was published by Chatto and Windus with the Hogarth Press in London in 1975 and by Anson-Cartwright Editions in Toronto the following year. "That moment, when I elided happily in his life back then, was a moment of great pride for Hugh and for me too," she said. "It was the first time that I was involved directly in a book's publication."
Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT published another volume of OUTRAM poems, The Promise of Light in 1979 and Mr. Callaghan's Exile Editions did a Selected Poems in 1984. "He had a fantastic sense of form and a musical ear for what he was doing that was almost perfect, but often his poems were the prisoner of his skill," said Mr. CALLAGHAN, adding that "you can't be first rate every time out and there are times when the form traps what he is trying to do."
Shortly after writer Alberto MANGUEL arrived in Canada in 1983, he met Mr. OUTRAM. "I was awed at first by the strange combination of intelligence and devastating humour," said Mr. MANGUEL. " For all the seriousness of his poetry, he was a very funny man."
After reading Mr. OUTRAM's poetry, Mr. MANGUEL says he was surprised, as he has been so many times in Canada, that "a poet of Richard's magnitude" was not celebrated around the world. "Richard's poems were very serious and complex, and in many cases they required a lot of time and patience from readers," said Mr. MANGUEL. " You had to disentangle the references and look up the words, but it was always worthwhile. When you discovered what he meant, the poem built to a different level."
The next person to publish Mr. OUTRAM was Tim INKSTER of The Porcupine's Quill, who released Man in Love (1985), Hiram and Jenny (1989) Mogul Recollected (1993) and Dove Legend (2001). "It is incredibly elegant and sophisticated and passionate and demanding and even, to a lot of people, off-putting, because verbally it is immensely clever and full of allusions and references," said writer and poetry editor John METCALF. "It is probably some of the most rewarding stuff that has been written in Canada."
Writing poetry, even life itself, lost its purpose for Mr. OUTRAM after his wife died. "Richard was always sending me poems that he loved by other people," said Mr. MANGUEL, mentioning the poem Winter Remembered by John Crowe Ransom about an "... Absence, in the heart, /" that was too great to bear and how the only way to soothe it was to "...walk forth in the frozen air/."
"He must have been thinking of that poem," concluded Mr. MANGUEL sadly.
Funambulist by Richard OUTRAM, 1975
I work on a slender strand
Slung between two poles
Braced fifteen feet apart.
My patient father coached me
From childhood to fall unhurt,
Then set me again and again
On a crude slack-rope he rigged
Out back of our caravan,
Raising the rope by inches:
Now, I'm the only acrobat
In the world to include in his act,
As finale, a one-hand-stand
Thirty feet from the ground
With no net. I married
A delicate, lithe girl
From another circus family.
We are very happy. She stands
On the circular platform top
Of one pole, to steady me
As I reach the steep, last,
Incredibly difficult slope
Near the pole: when I turn about
To retrace my steps, no matter
How quickly I spin, she is there
At the top of the opposite pole,
Waiting, her arms outstretched.
From Turns and Other Poems, published by ANSON- CARTWRIGHT Editions.
Richard Daley OUTRAM was born in Oshawa, Ontario on April 9, 1930. He died of willful hypothermia in Port Hope, Ontario, on Friday, January 21, 2005. He was 74. He was predeceased by his wife Barbara. A celebration of their lives is being planned for a later date.

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ANSTEAD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-07 published
SENSABAUGH, G. Edward " Ed"
A resident of R.R.#1 Ridgetown, G. Edward (Ed) SENSABAUGH, died at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance on Wednesday, May 4, 2005 at the age of 56. Born in Cumberland, Maryland, son of the late Grover N. and Betty Jane (WHITEMAN) SENSABAUGH. Beloved husband of Nancy (SIMPSON) SENSABAUGH. Loving father of G. David SENSABAUGH and his wife Sherri of Maryland, and Katie J. SENSABAUGH at home. Grandfather of Bradley and Annie. Brother of Peggy ISAACS and her husband Steve of Pennsylvania. Survived by his step-mother Betty SENSABAUGH of Maryland, nephew Fred ISAACS and wife Tina, step-sister Sharon GOETZ and her husband Greg of Maryland and step-nephew Ian BOYER. Also survived by Nancy's families, Max and Marjorie SIMPSON of Ridgetown, John and Sonia of Ridgetown, Bob and Maryanne of Blenheim, Gordon and friend Mary DAWN of Chatham and their families.
Ed was an active member and Elder in the Christian Church and Superintendent of the Sunday School, with a special interest in the church campground. He was a Board Member of the Ontario Assembly of Christian Churches. He enjoyed sports, particularly golf and his tennis clinic for youth. Ed was a veteran of the U.S. Army having served as an officer overseas in Germany. Family will receive Friends at the McKinay Funeral Home, Ridgetown on Saturday from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. and Sunday from 2:00-4:30 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted at the Christian Church, Ridgetown on Monday, May 9, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. with Pastor Janet ANSTEAD officiating. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery, Ridgetown. Donations made by cheque to Disciples Conference Grounds, The Christian Church, Ontario Heart and Stroke or Kidney Foundation would be appreciated. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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ANSTEAD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-04 published
SACHS, Nancy Diane (née KELLY)
At London Health Sciences Centre-Westminster Campus on October 2, 2005. Nancy Diane SACHS of Lyons in her 54th year. Beloved wife of Larrie SACHS and loving mother of Heather and Curtis SACHS of London and Pamela, Laura and Lisa SACHS of Lyons. Dear daughter of Lillian BUHROW of Lyons and the late Francis KELLY. Sister to Cheryl BRENNAN and husband Bud of Mississauga, Glenn KELLY and wife Lorraine of Lucan and Brenda KELLY of Lyons. She will be sadly missed by a number of nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins. Born in Walkerton, Ontario on October 4, 1951 Nancy was a former employee of the Matthews Group in London. She was Past President of the South Dorchester Optimist Club and Past Lt. Governor for the District, Past President of the Aylmer Girls Basketball Assoc., Past President of the Belmont Figure Skating Committee, a former coach of Aylmer Ladies Slo-pitch and a former trustee of the Elgin County Board of Education. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Tuesday 7-9 p.m., Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday. The funeral service will be held on October 06, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. at the Christian Reformed Church, 194 South Street West, Aylmer with Reverend Janet ANSTEAD of the Mapleton Church of Christ officiating. Interment Necropolis Cemetery. Donations to the S. Dorchester Optimist Club or Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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ANSTEE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-12 published
ANSTEE, Viola May (née FISHBACK)
On Tuesday, January 11, 2005, Viola May ANSTEE (FISHBACK) in her 78th year, passed away peacefully at her home in Salford with her family by her side after a courageous battle with cancer. Loving wife of Albert ANSTEE for 57 years. Greatly loved and will be sadly missed by her children, daughter Patricia KUHLMAN (Ingersoll,) daughter Janis and Mike POIRIER (Ingersoll,) son Ken and Patti ANSTEE (Salford,) son Dan and Judi ANSTEE (Ingersoll,) daughter Kathy and Sherwood BURWELL (Courtland,) son Gary and Linda ANSTEE (Ingersoll,) daughter Susan and Jim McADAM (Ingersoll,) daughter Brenda and Mike ROBINSON (Wahnapitae) and son Michael at home. Special grandmother of Frank, Chris, John, Angela, Kelly, Eric, Shawn, Stacey, Fred, Tracy, Sarah, Brian, Amanda, Matthew, Ryan, Dexter, Keith, Kerri, Clarissa and Tyler. Great-grandmother of Chantelle, Brandon, Michael, Jordan, Tanner, Madison, Tika, Conner, Madison, Kyle and Megan. Survived by Aunt Elsie SCOTT (Ingersoll,) brother Harold and Marilyn FISHBACK (Salford,) Sister Flora and Ross WALTERS (Ingersoll) and several nieces and nephews and sisters-in-law and also known as gramma to all the Salford neighbours. Predeceased by her parents James FISHBACK (1966) and Mae FISHBACK (1970.) Friends will be received a the McBeath-Dynes Funeral Home, 246 Thames Street South, Ingersoll Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where funeral service will be held on Friday, January 14, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. Reverend Gary CARRUTHERS officiating. Interment later Harris Street Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Brain Tumor Foundation, Canadian Diabetes Association, Community Care Access Centre or Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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ANSTEE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-10 published
HUPMAN, Gertrude (POLHILL)
At Alexandra Hospital, Ingersoll on Sunday, May 8, 2005, Gertrude (POLHILL) HUPMAN, of Ingersoll, in her 83rd year. Wife of the late Carl HUPMAN (1973.) Dear mother of Carolyn and husband Barry ANSTEE of Ingersoll, Barbara WHITTAKER of Ingersoll, Julie and husband John THERIAULT of Ingersoll, Crystal and husband Norman JOHNSTON of Woodstock and Robert and wife Jackie of Frankfort. Dear sister of Eileen of Woodstock, Vivian of Bayfield and Evelyn of Peterborough. Also survived by 17 grandchildren and 25 great grandchildren. Predeceased by one daughter Sharon (1991), one sister Gladys, one brother William and dear friend Nancy Anne MURPHY. Friends will be received at the McBeath-Dynes Funeral Home, 246 Thames Street, S., Ingersoll Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where service will be held on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Captain Tina Paddock officiating. Cremation to follow. Memorial donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation or Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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ANSTETT o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-01-06 published
ARNETT, Victor Charles
At Rockwood Terrace, Durham, on Tuesday, January 4th, 2005. Victor ARNETT, of Durham and formerly of Glenelg Township, in his 86th year. Beloved husband of Grace (née VOLLETT.) Loving father of David (Lorraine,) of R.R.#1, Priceville, Mary Ellen ARNETT- THORNE, of Owen Sound, Cheryl (Don) HOFFMAN, of Kitchener and Joan (Gary) McNABB, of Nobel. Dear brother of James ARNETT and Dorothy MOONEY, both of Toronto. Mr. ARNETT will be sadly missed by his grandchildren, Landis (Barry) ANSTETT, Aaron ARNETT, Brett (Felicity) HOFFMAN and Brodie, Linden and Garrett McNabb, his great-granddaughter, Lauren ANSTETT and several nieces and nephews and their families. Predeceased by his brothers, Reginald and Frederick and his sister, Anne TOMLINSON. The family will receive Friends at Rockwood Terrace, Durham, on Friday from 11: 00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Rockwood Terrace, Durham at 2: 00 p.m., Friday, January 7th, 2005. Interment, Trinity Anglican Cemetery, Durham. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Trinity Anglican Church, Durham or the Durham Medical Clinic would be appreciated.
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ANSTETT o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-03-23 published
KING, Thomas William
Of Port Elgin, and formerly of Walkerton, passed away at South Bruce Grey Health Centre, Walkerton, on Monday, March 21st, 2005, in his 92nd year. Survived by his children, Elizabeth and Jack O'HAGAN, of Walkerton, Thomas and Agnes, of Walkerton, Beverley and James HILBORN, of Cambridge, Anne KING, of Waterloo, Susan KING and Fred CREED, of Kitchener, Nancy and Al YAECK, of Oshawa, James and Donna, of Smithfield, Edward and Aya, of Ottawa; Joan and Vince VAN EMPEL, of Milton. Grandfather of eighteen grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren and his sister, Rosanne FLETCHER, of Burlington. Tom will also be missed by Peter and Joan McCANNEL and family, of Port Elgin. Predeceased by his wife, Rita ANSTETT brothers, Frank and Owen; parents, William and Margaret (McGLYNN) KING and dear friend and companion, Edith MIDDLETON . Private family visitation and service will be held at the Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton. Interment, Calvary Cemetery, Walkerton. Memorial donations to The Lung Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.
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ANSTETT o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-05-05 published
POWERS, Kathleen Marie (née LANG)
Of Walkerton, passed away at South Bruce Grey Health Centre, Walkerton, on Wednesday, May 4th, 2005 in her 89th year. Survived by her children, Gerrard and Marilyn, of Owen Sound, John and Doris, of Chepstow and Mary KOEBEL, of Walkerton; grandchildren, David POWERS, Crystal POWERS, Stephanie McQUEEN and Chad CULBERT, Jacob and Melinda KOEBEL; great-grandchildren, Brittany KOEBEL, Isaac KOEBEL and Brayden McQUEEN. Also survived by her sisters, Rita FRITZ, of Chepstow and Joan and Edgar BESTER, of Walkerton. Predeceased by her husband, Stephen; brothers, Nicholas, Joseph and Peter; sister, Irene BECHBERGER and parents, Peter and Mary (ANSTETT) LANG. Visitation at Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton, on Friday from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. C.W.L. Service will be held at 2: 30 p.m., followed by Knights of Columbus Rosary, at 8: 45 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, May 7th, at 11: 00 a.m. at Sacred Heart Church, Walkerton. Interment in Mary Immaculate Cemetery, Chepstow. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Brucelea Haven - Disability Van would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.
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ANSTEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-23 published
Thomas Herbert ANSTEY
By J.F. BOSHER, Friday, September 23, 2005, Page A28
Yachtsman, soldier and director of agricultural research stations. Born December 27, 1917, in Victoria. Died May 18 in Ottawa after a car accident, aged 87.
My cousin Tom ANSTEY, a lifelong benevolent force, would repair broken furniture in a friend's house, prune a friend's roses, or give away strawberry plants, potting soil, and his own home-made wine. He never counted the cost or the trouble.
It was in the same spirit that he went to Kiev in the early 1990s with his friend Eugene WHELAN, former minister of agriculture, to help the Ukrainian government with agricultural problems.
Off he went, handing out freely what he had learned in his career as a director of Canadian agricultural research stations at Agassiz and Summerland, British Columbia, Lethbridge, Alberta., and, from 1969, in the agriculture department in Ottawa.
He was a plain, practical person. It would not cross Tom's mind to mention that he was an honorary life member of the Canadian Society for Horticultural Science, held office in the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage, and had published a 400-page history of agricultural research in Canada called One Hundred Harvests.
In the Second World War, he served in Europe as an officer in a Canadian unit that was lent to the 2nd Battalion Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry of the British 6th Airborne Division and for the rest of his life he attended the annual gatherings of his fellow veterans in that "CanLoan" force.
His interest in the plant sciences had first been aroused in his childhood by an English uncle in Canada, J.E. BOSHER, who worked at the Saanichton Experimental Farm in British Columbia.
After a doctoral degree at the University of Minnesota, Tom's research added to horticultural knowledge about broccoli, strawberries, and other fruit crops.
Tom was the oldest of four children born in Victoria to a cabinet-maker from Coventry, Britain, who had followed his lady-love when she moved with her family in 1911 from Manchester to Sidney, B.C.
The children grew up in a house their father had built with his own hands, he being a trained cabinetmaker in charge of teaching woodwork and metalwork at Victoria High School.
Tom grew up playing the cello, accompanied on the piano by his mother.
His father taught the boys in the family to build boats and sail them in the sheltered waters around the Saanich Peninsula, which is why Tom sailed a 22-foot yacht on the Ottawa River at Britannia Yacht Club in Ottawa as long as he could. He named her Tilicum after the famous native dugout canoe sailed from Victoria to London in 1901 by Captain J.C. Voss.
But lest anyone imagine that Tom was spoiled during his childhood, it should be added that his parents were strict Baptists and he was often left in Sidney with grandparents who had brought strict, though well-meaning, habits with them.
In October, 1921, when Tom was four years old, his grandmother reported to one of his aunts in a letter, "He is a dear little fellow. I thought this morning he was going to be ill so I put him to bed tho' he very much objected. So I spanked him and gave him a dose of castor oil when he wakened. Seems much better now."
Trouble like that did not deter Tom. And he did not impose such discipline on the three children he had with his wife, Wynne FERGUSON, whom he married in Brockville, Ontario, during the war.
Soon after she died in 1998 he moved to an old-age home in Ottawa and three years later married a widowed neighbour there, Dorothy MOORE, with whom he lived happily until his fatal car accident.
J.F. BOSHER is Tom's cousin.

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ANSTEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-11 published
ANSTEY, Susan Jane (née SCOTT) (1946-2005)
Susan Jane ANSTEY (née SCOTT) passed away peacefully after a short but courageous battle with cancer on November 9, 2005 at her home, Wyndstone Farm in Nobleton, Ontario with Michael and Jennifer by her side. She is survived by her daughter, Jennifer ANSTEY, her sister, Alice FERRIER, her loving partner of 24 years Michael VAN EVERY and their families. An avid horsewoman, she competed and judged hunters/jumpers, bred and raced Thoroughbreds, published Canada's leading horse magazines including Horse Sport, Horse-Canada and Canadian Thoroughbred and was a life long member of The Toronto and North York Hunt. Susan Jane made a significant contribution to horse sport nationally and internationally serving as a director of Jump Canada, chair of the Media Advisory Committee of the Federation Equestre International and for the last 12 years, President of the International Alliance of Equestrian Journalists. A memorial service will be held on Monday November 14, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. at the Aurora United Church, 15186 Yonge St. (south of Wellington) in Aurora, Ontario. Donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation or Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation would be welcomed.

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ANSTEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-26 published
ANSTEY, Susan Jane -- Dispatch:
By Judith TENENBAUM, Saturday, November 26, 2005, Page M5
Susan ANSTEY's horizons were never constrained. Raised on a horse farm in Scarborough, she followed her lifelong passion for horses to international competition, and a junior hunter and jumper championship in 1961.
After earning a B.A. in economics and political science at the University of Toronto, she joined Merrill Lynch, where she met future husband Tom ANSTEY. Her later stint with the Economic Council of Canada ended when they headed to Vancouver in 1976. Two years later, now a single parent, she returned to Toronto with her horse and two-year-old daughter Jennifer.
With her sister, Alice FERRIER, she created the Horse Publications Group and in 1994 was elected president of the International Alliance of Equestrian Journalists. But it was her involvement with the Canadian Equestrian Team that linked her to Michael VAN EVERY, her life partner since 1981. They shared a love of riding, bred and raced thoroughbreds and established a horse farm in Nobleton, Ontario.
Ms. ANSTEY showed her bedrock of courage when she was diagnosed with cancer in April. She died on November 9 at the age of 59.
"I loved her tenacity," Mr. VAN EVERY says. "She made a decision, never regretted it and got things done."

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ANSTEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-16 published
GRIECO, Samuel
Suddenly, at home, after a lengthy illness, on Friday, April 15, 2005. Sam, beloved husband of Filomena for 49 years. Loving father of Gail (Ralph ANSTEY,) and Gary. Cherished grampa of April (Robert MERSON,) Andrew, and Amber. Sam will be missed dearly and remembered by his brothers, sisters, extended family and Friends. Visitation will be on Sunday from 7 to 9 p.m. and Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Funeral Service will be held at the Chapel on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Interment to follow. Condolences www.rskane.ca

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ANSTEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-13 published
HARVEY, Eliza Mary Reeves (formerly WOOLRIDGE, náe ANSTEY) (1933-2005)
On Thursday, August 11, 2005 after a long courageous battle with cancer, in her 73rd year. Predeceased by her first husband Wallace WOOLRIDGE (1967) and her second husband John Norman HARVEY (2005,) her parents Annie BAUMAN/BOWMAN and Charles ANSTEY. Survived by her daughters Elizabeth (Michael) SMITH, Karen (Michael) HULAN, Shirley (Glenn) SMITH and her son Bill, her sister Maria (Wallace) WARREN and her brother Charles (Rolly) ANSTEY. She will also be greatly missed by her grandchildren Chris, Michelle, Jennifer, Jody, Nicole, Dustin and her 7 great-grandchildren. Family and Friends will be received at the Low and Low Funeral Home, 23 Main St. South, Uxbridge, (905) 852-3073, for visitation on Sunday, August 14, 2005 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Service to be held in the chapel on Monday, August 15, 2005 at 2 p.m. Visitation 1 hour prior to service. Interment Uxbridge Cemetery. In Eliza's memory, donations made to the Canadian Cancer Society or to the charity of choice would be appreciated.

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ANSTEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-11 published
ANSTEY, Susan Jane (née SCOTT) (1946-2005)
Susan Jane ANSTEY (née SCOTT) passed away peacefully after a short but courageous battle with cancer on November 9, 2005 at her home, Wyndstone Farm in Nobleton, Ontario with Michael and Jennifer by her side. She is survived by her daughter, Jennifer ANSTEY, her sister, Alice FERRIER, her loving partner of 24 years, Michael VAN EVERY and their families. An avid horsewoman, she competed and judged hunters/jumpers, bred and raced Thoroughbreds, published Canada's leading horse magazines including Horse Sport, Horse-Canada and Canadian Thoroughbred and was a life long member of The Toronto and North York Hunt. Susan Jane made a significant contribution to horse sport nationally and internationally serving as a Director of Jump Canada, chair of the Media Advisory Committee of the Federation Equestre International and for the last 12 years, President of the International Alliance of Equestrian Journalists. A Memorial Service will be held on Monday, November 14, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. at the Aurora United Church, 15186 Yonge St. (south of Wellington) in Aurora, Ontario. Donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation or Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation would be welcomed.

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ANSTEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-05 published
Susan Jane ANSTEY, 59: A passion for horse riding
Passion for horses led to successful magazine career
Had wanted to create museum for equestrian sports
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
To Susan Jane ANSTEY, it was simple and always so: A horse is the most glorious, awe-inspiring, wondrous creature on the planet.
And so she built her whole life around them.
She grew up with them, rode them, jumped them, hunted on them, showed them, judged them, bought them, broke them. Later, as publisher of three important horse publications, she documented their wins, losses, owners, organizations, riders and regimens.
But most of all, she believed in them.
For ANSTEY, who died of cancer on November 9 at the age of 59, there was no such thing as a casual Sunday ride along the 16th Concession Rd. outside her home, Wyndstone Farm, in King Township.
Michael VAN EVERY, her partner for 24 years, described it this way: "She was a nut about the turnout of a horse. She couldn't ride down our road without spending a half-hour cleaning the tack, brushing the horse, the mane, flipping it over to the right-hand side. Her horses were always impeccable."
Added her daughter, Jennifer ANSTEY: "It was an issue of respect with my mother."
And love.
Susan Jane SCOTT grew up on the original Wyndstone Farm, a horse and cattle farm that was expropriated for what was going to be the Pickering Airport and ended up functioning as the holding barn for new animals of the Toronto Zoo. Her father, Lewis SCOTT, was a hard-driving developer who served as Master of the Hunt of the Toronto and North York Hunt, a fox-hunting club, for many years.
Everyone in her family rode -- it would have been unnatural not to -- but ANSTEY rode with passion, precision and panache. It helped that she was tall and blonde, but most people always said that no one looked better on a horse.
"She was so graceful on a horse," said Judy JONES, a friend since the two met in 1957 at the Eglinton Pony Club junior show. "She was poetry in motion and always upright, as if she had followed our mothers' advice to walk with your shoulders back, as if you had a book on your head."
After marrying broker Tom ANSTEY and moving to Vancouver, ANSTEY used to tell JONES she was fed up with the rain and having to ride indoors. When the marriage ended, she moved back east with her horse and Jennifer, then 2.
With her sister, she purchased The Corinthian magazine, an ailing publication at the time but still the newsprint Bible for most of Canada's horsey set. ANSTEY renamed it Horse Sport and took it to a slick, full-colour glossy monthly that rapidly took up pride of place on many coffee tables. Its circulation is 20,000, its influence much more.
Later, ANSTEY started Canadian Thoroughbred (circulation 15,000) and Horse Canada, a horse magazine for families and a huge hit with a circulation base of 35,000.
"Susan Jane saw what was and what was not working well, and through the magazines she used to lay out the issues for the equestrian community," said Jeff CHISHOLM, a horse owner, former chair of the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair and member of Jump Canada. "Her articles were always well-researched and she was an excellent writer. She could crystallize issues."
When ANSTEY was elected president of the International Alliance of Equestrian Journalists in 1994, she became the first woman and the first non-European to obtain that position, which she held for 11 years.
For eight years, she also chaired the media advisory committee of the Fédération Equestre Internationale, the international ruling body for equestrian sport. She belonged to its Nations Cup committee, despite representing a country that failed to qualify to field a show-jumping team at the last Olympics. (Canada was able to send only one show-jumping rider, Ian Millar of Millarbrook Farms.)
ANSTEY chaired a task force that led to the reorganization of the Canadian Equestrian Federation into Equine Canada, an organization that functions as a governing body and from which Jump Canada which sets standards around the jumping competitions -- was created.
"Jump Canada has done an awful lot. We have more good horse-and-rider combinations now in this country than we have had in the last 20 years," CHISHOLM said.
Bold, efficient ("there will be no lollygagging," she used to say to her daughter) and indefatigable, ANSTEY managed to also fill her days with riding, no matter where she was. She would often drive from Heathrow Airport near London to the English countryside for a fox hunt on a rented horse, en route to or from a meeting in Paris or elsewhere in Europe.
She loved the hunt, riding over fields and through forests as morning was breaking. She told JONES it was good for the horse's soul to get out and streak through the cool, crisp air. For years, she would join the Toronto hunt, twice a week every spring and fall, then go home, shower and arrive at her Aurora office by 9: 30 a.m. She stopped only when the hunt started later in the mornings.
When Jennifer was in Grade 9 at Toronto's Havergal College, her mother's alma mater, ANSTEY bought her a horse. "It was really nice, the best I've ever had," she recalled.
ANSTEY would leave work in Aurora, drive to Havergal, pick up her daughter and drive her to the barn in Schomberg to ride, before heading back to Aurora to work for a few hours before repeating the circuit to pick up and return Jennifer to school.
"She did it twice a week for two years," Jennifer said.
There are currently a dozen horses (plus a pony and a donkey) at Wyndstone Farm, many of them horses ANSTEY bought off the track to develop into show jumpers or field hunters.
"She always had young horses, she loved to watch them develop," Jennifer said. "Fun was something you had to work on, a life you are shaping and moulding."
After her mother gave her an ultimatum -- either she could work with her or the magazines would be sold -- Jennifer went to work for ANSTEY six years ago, gradually assuming greater responsibility at Canadian Horse Publications Inc., so much so that ANSTEY was planning to retire next year.
At the time of her death, she wanted to create a museum for equestrian sports and was considering writing a book on its history. She had been diagnosed with cancer only in April.
By the summer, she was failing and gave Jennifer her horse to ride in competition. VAN EVERY, ANSTEY's partner, had bought Baroness, a huge horse, the summer before and ANSTEY had competed on Baroness in the 1.2-metre circuit in the senior division in Collingwood then.
"Typical Mom," Jennifer said. "Riding a 7-year-old fairly green horse against experienced, schooled horses."
This past summer, Jennifer rode Baroness in eight horse shows, in the 1.3-metre junior amateur jumpers A or highest level circuit. "I had never jumped this big before," she said. "It was a big move for both of us."
The organizers of the Palgrave, Ontario, competition allowed VAN EVERY to drive his car to the north end of the grandstand, usually off-limits to spectators, so ANSTEY could watch her daughter compete.
Jennifer, in part, was competing so her mother could watch.
"She loved watching. We'd talk afterward about why I had a rail. She loved the training process and the horse's moods. She just really understood them."

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ANSTICE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-08 published
ANSTICE, Olive D. (née BROOM)
Peacefully at the Babcock Community Care Centre, Wardsville on Saturday, February 5th, 2005, Olive D. ANSTICE, formerly of R.R.#1 Muirkirk, in her 77th year. Born in Tilbury East Township, daughter of Clarence and Gladys BROOM, she was predeceased by her husband Charles (1982). Dearly loved by her son Gary and his wife Arlene of Saint Thomas, grandchildren Melissa (Jeremy) ROBERTS of Ridgetown and their sons Trevor and Tyler, Bill and Charles of Chatham brother Donald (Dorothy) BROOM of Rodney, sister Alice (Arthur) MANNING of R.R.#1, Highgate and several nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Rodney Chapel on Tuesday, February 8th from 7-9 pm and 2 hours prior to the service which will be held there on Wednesday at 2: 00 pm with Reverend Tom GODFREY officiating. Interment Duart Cemetery. If desired, donations to Babcock Community Care Centre would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to the Padfield Funeral Home, Rodney (519) 785-0810

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