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"AHM" 2005 Obituary


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AHMAD o@ca.on.simcoe_county.orillia.the_packet_&_times 2005-10-13 published
Body found downtown
By Amy LAZAR, Thursday, October 13, 2005
Yellow tape secured a downtown corner for more than 14 hours yesterday after a 38-year-old Stratford man was found dead on the concrete outside the OLCO gas bar.
A cab driver from A&A Taxi noticed a man lying unconscious at the gas station around 3 a.m., said Henry MacDONALD, a night dispatcher for the company.
MacDONALD phoned the Ontario Provincial Police.
Police arrived on the scene and found a man with no vital signs. Police said the man was transported to Soldiers' Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.
Calling the death suspicious, police released few details about the incident.
The Packet has learned the dead man is Liam BROADMORE, 38, of Stratford.
BROADMORE was heading home after spending Thanksgiving weekend at a family cottage near head Lake, about 30 kilometres east of Washago, a source told The Packet.
Yesterday, police roped off the corner of Peter and Colborne streets before dawn.
Around 9 a.m., the yellow police tape that ran across Peter Street at Mississaga Street was moved closer to the Colborne Street intersection.
A few businesses on Peter Street remained closed for the day. The RBC Financial Group was open but the drive-thru was blocked off.
The OLCO gas station has been closed for business since Tuesday at 10 p.m.
“It's a tragedy for everyone in town,” said the owner of the gas bar, Arfan AHMAD, from his home yesterday.
He found out about the investigation from his employee, who showed up to open the station at 6 a.m.
“I was shocked to hear that she couldn't open the store,” said AHMAD.
After receiving that phone call, he went to see for himself.
A black Ford Explorer with purple and white markings on the side, believed to be the victim's vehicle, was parked on the gas bar property.
Police marked a pool of blood and a red and black jacket, which were on the ground, close to the car's front bumper, as evidence.
There were 17 evidence markers at the blocked-off corner.
Eight Ontario Provincial Police officers surrounded the perimeter, reminding people to stay back from the scene and redirecting traffic.

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AHMAD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-07 published
BALTZAN, Dr. Marcel Alter, O.C., S.O.M., B.Sc., M.D.C.M., F.R.C.P.C., M.A.C.P., D.Sc.
October 31, 1929-January 1, 2005 Died peacefully in his sleep after a valiant battle with heart disease. He is survived by his loving wife, Nahid AHMAD, his children, Marc Jr. (Lisa,) Frances, Elizabeth, Zeba Ahmad (Jawed AKHTAR,) his grandchildren, Faraaz, Sakeena, Alexandre, Isabel and Margo, his brother, Richard (Nancy,) his cousin, Ronald (Arda,) his sister-in-law, Joan BALTZAN and nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, David and Rose BALTZAN and brother Donald. Marc attended Victoria School & Nutana Collegiate. He then obtained his medical education at McGill University, graduating in 1953. He further trained at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. He returned to Saskatoon in 1959 to set up a private practice with his father and later his brothers, Donald and Richard. Dr. Marc will always be remembered for setting up the first kidney dialysis unit at St. Paul's Hospital through a generous donation from the BALTZAN family and pioneering kidney transplantation in Canada at Royal University Hospital. Even with a busy clinical practice Dr. Marc was able to assume leadership roles as president of the Canadian Medical Association, Saskatchewan Medical Association, Saskatoon and District Medical Association and Chairman, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. Until his death he remained passionately devoted to his patients and profession. He was named an officer of the Order of Canada in 1995. Other honors include, Saskatchewan Order of Merit (1999), Master of the American College of Physicians (1999), Innovative Canadian Physician in the last 35 years, Medical Post (2000). In the spring of 2004 he received an honorary D.Sc. from the University of Saskatchewan. Marc took great pride in his many family business ventures including ownership of a great Saskatoon landmark, the Bessborough Hotel (1973-1989). Marc was involved in the community and was a leading figure in the creation of the Downtown Partnership. Marc's poignant and entertaining comments in numerous publications, radio and television will be missed. He actively participated in debate with political leaders on economic and healthcare issues. Dr. Marc BALTZAN will be remembered as an outstanding clinican-scientist, medical economist, educator and family man. The family would like to thank all those who have shown such love and concern over the past months, especially the physicians and nursing staff at Royal University Hospital, Critical Care Unit and Ward 6000. A Memorial Reception was held January 5th, 2005, 7pm at the Bessborough Hotel for all who knew and loved him. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to St. Paul's Hospital Foundation (1702 - 20th St. W. Saskatoon Saskatchewan. S7M 0Z9) and Royal University Hospital Foundation (103 Hospital Dr. Saskatoon Sk. S7N 0W8). Email condolences may be sent to mail@saskatoonfuneralhome.com. Arrangements have been entrusted to Saskatoon Funeral Home. 244-5577

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AHMED o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-09 published
Downtown shooting leaves 2 dead
Mayor calls Prime Minister's Office over growing problem of gun smuggling from United States
By Unnati GANDHI, Tuesday, August 9, 2005, Page A8
Homicide investigators combed through Toronto's latest crime scene yesterday, still finding shell casings hours after a downtown shooting left two people dead and sent one to hospital during another weekend of gun violence.
At the intersection of Maitland Place and Homewood Avenue, police forensic officers placed seven pylons on a patch of grass indicating new evidence by a blood-soaked white jersey with flies hovering over it.
One investigator found a shell casing in a gutter by the jersey and took it away for testing, while others analyzed a bullet hole in the side wall of a house next to the crime scene.
Just before 4 a.m. yesterday, gunfire erupted near the popular Phoenix nightclub on Sherbourne Street, where police found 19-year-old Ali Mohamud ALI, the city's 41st homicide victim, shot in the head and a 20-year-old man with non-life-threatening injuries.
Minutes later, a police cruiser was flagged down at nearby Jarvis and Bloor Streets. Inside a car was 23-year-old Loyan Mohammed AHMED suffering from multiple gunshots. He died later in hospital.
While certain neighbourhoods in Toronto have been the scene of more than 20 shootings in the past two weeks, resulting in six homicides, Mayor David MILLER maintained that the increased gun violence in the city is an anomaly.
"What is happening with these shootings is not Toronto," he told a news-media briefing yesterday afternoon, which Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair also attended.
"And Torontonians are not going to tolerate a city where guns are used to settle disputes between people."
While mayor and the chief said steps are being taken to prevent more gang-related violence, there have been no arrests in the three most recent slayings.
Efforts such as redeploying about 50 uniformed police officers to the northwest corner of the city since last Thursday has left Chief Blair looking to fill gaps in other neighbourhoods after yesterday's incidents.
"We also want to assure those in our most vulnerable communities that officers will be redeployed from across the city and from across the service, without depleting resources in all of our neighbourhoods because public safety in all of our neighbourhoods of Toronto is important," he said.
"We are finding ways within our organization to move officers in uniform into these neighbourhoods."
Chief Blair reported that police have seized 2,170 guns since the beginning of the year. Half of the guns used in crimes in the city had been smuggled from the United States, underscoring an issue Mr. MILLER brought up during a spate of violence last week that saw one person killed and five wounded by gunfire, including a four-year-old boy.
"There's no question that there are more guns being used in crimes and it's a serious issue," Mr. MILLER said yesterday, adding that he had spoken to the Prime Minister Paul Martin's office yesterday.
"The Prime Minister's Office assured me that they're already working to try to deal with the issue of gun smuggling."
On Sunday night, two men aged 27 and 17 were taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries after what police said may have been a drive-by-shooting in the Markham Road and Eglinton Avenue East area.
On Friday night, 27-year-old Melbourne WHITTICK was shot and killed in the city's northeast while waiting for a bus on Victoria Park Avenue. He had become involved in an altercation with two men and died of a single shot to the abdomen.
"We have seen that there's a significant increase in the number of homicides that have taken place in the city as a result of firearm use and we're also seeing a great deal of that increase in that much of that violence is taking place in very public places," Chief Blair said.
He stressed that in these cases, the public's help is still what is going to catch the offenders, citing a fourfold increase in the number of calls to Crime Stoppers in the past week.
"We have received a record number of calls to Crime Stoppers and I think that reflects the concerns that the community and the citizens of Toronto have about the violence we have experienced."
Near the Maitland-Homewood crime scene yesterday, with the beeping of a police metal detector in the background, area resident Joanne BRIGDEN said violence was bound to have affected her neighbourhood sooner or later and there is nothing anyone can do about it.
"It was a matter of time before our area was hit," said Ms. BRIGDEN, whose house backs onto the Phoenix nightclub.
But the gun violence of the past few weeks is not scaring her, she added.
"Maybe there's a little increase in crime, but unless you assign a cop to every criminal," it's not going to stop any time soon, she said.

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AHMED o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-09 published
Shootings claim two more lives
'Gun crime is not the Toronto that any Torontonian expects'
By Betsy POWELL with files from Vanessa L: UQQ, Crime Reporter
The group of Friends had just left the Phoenix Concert Theatre on Sherbourne St. in downtown Toronto after enjoying its weekly reggae music and hip hop night.
They were heading to a car parked on a nearby street just before 4 a.m. yesterday, when a man came up to them and fired several shots. Two men died and another was hurt.
Police don't believe the gunman knew the victims. What they do know is that guns have been used in more slayings this year than in all of 2004.
Ali Mohamud ALI, 19, died instantly in the shooting early Monday near Homewood Ave. and Maitland Pl. A 20-year-old man was also hit.
Friends tried to drive Loyan Mohammed AHMED, 23, to a nearby hospital. A few blocks away, near Bloor and Jarvis Sts., they waved to police for help. An ambulance came but paramedics weren't able to save him.
Twenty-three people have been shot in Toronto in the past two weeks, including a 4-year-old boy.
"It's a very serious concern," Mayor David MILLER told a news conference yesterday at police headquarters that was also attended by police Chief Bill Blair and members of the police services board.
"Gun crime is not the Toronto that any Torontonian expects," the mayor said.
"We do not expect to have shooting incidents of the kind that happened last night behind a popular nightclub to happen in this city."
Police don't know if the gunman was in the nightclub and they don't know what motivated the shooter.
While police believe many recent shootings in the city are "retaliatory" and are part of gang wars, there is nothing to suggest the deaths of ALI and AHMED were gang-related, said homicide Staff Insp. Jeff McGUIRE.
Seven men have been killed with guns since July 30. Just one arrest has been made.
"They are the most difficult to solve and they are the ones most often related back to gang-related violence," said McGUIRE.
Police have seized 2,470 firearms so far in 2005, said Blair. The majority of the handguns that were used in crime have been traced to the United States.
MILLER repeated his pledge to push the federal government for action on firearms smuggling, saying authorities have a difficult time catching gun runners. The mayor said he has even heard of snowbirds -- the Canadians who flock to sunnier climes in the winter -- bringing guns into this country illegally.
No weapon was recovered after early yesterday's shooting.
Yesterday there were three areas cordoned off by yellow police tape in the downtown core, one at Maitland Pl. and Homewood Ave., another at Jarvis and Bloor Sts., where a green Malibu straddled the southbound lanes of Jarvis with its two doors ajar.
Yellow tape was also in front of the Phoenix, though McGUIRE emphasized police don't believe anything happened there.
One resident of a highrise on Wellesley St. overlooking Homewood, got up shortly before 4 a.m. and looked out the window after hearing voices.
"I thought it was just hookers out there having another hooker fight," said the man, who asked that his name not be used.
He said he spotted what looked like two groups of men facing each other.
"Then there was four quick pops and then two pops and the noise sounded like a cap gun... and kaboom, one's down," he said, adding he didn't see who pulled the trigger or from which direction it came.
He called 911 and went on to his balcony and saw one man splayed over another lying on the ground, bleeding and with some clothing clumped to the side of his neck.
"He was screeching 'Call police, call an ambulance.' "
Yesterday, there was a pool of blood on the roadway, beside a white windbreaker-style jacket.
Another resident of the building, Bruce McCUBBIN, was sleeping in his apartment when his girlfriend awoke after hearing the sound of four or five gunshots. They got up and went to the balcony, which also faces south, and watched what happened next.
"One man was lying on the ground with another crouched over him holding what looked like a towel to his head and there was blood coming from him."
He saw another man leaning against a post who appeared to be hit in the arm. "It was difficult to see because it was so dark."
He heard someone yelling, "Call the cops, call the cops," and others panicking. "There was voices all over the place but... there was people screaming up the street."
McCUBBIN, an ex-police officer in Glasgow, contrasted the recent "crazy" period of gun violence in Toronto to what he saw back home.
"Glasgow is a violent city in a way but more stabbings, slashings, and people don't really carry guns because there's strict gun laws in Britain," he said. "But here, I've never seen anything like what I saw last night, even with two years on the police force, I didn't see anything as bad as I saw last night on the street. It was terrible."
Yesterday police officers combed the area and used a metal detector on the grass around a large Victorian brick home at the corner of Homewood and Maitland that was hit by a bullet.
The occupants declined to speak to reporters.
In the past five days, the Toronto Police Service has redeployed approximately 50 officers from throughout the service up into the northwest part of the city, which has had a number of shooting incidents, but also into Scarborough and downtown neighbourhoods plagued with gun violence, Blair told the news conference.
Both he and McGUIRE, however, said the city is not collapsing with gun or youth violence and blamed "a small few" for terrorizing neighbourhoods.
Back near Homewood Ave., a woman who identified herself as Lisa, and didn't want her last name used, was walking with her two children past the police tape on Wellesley St. She said she is sickened by the violence but looks to understand what is driving it.
"Toronto is segregated and they are marginalized, not part of society. They're bad guys, suffering mental illness, who grew up in poverty and have little hope of finding jobs so they turn to the underworld and guns."

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