WHEELIHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-19 published
BONO, Jack Alex
(Of Chicago and Burlington). Former Chief Executive Officer of Underwriter's Laboratories. With sadness we announce the sudden passing, at home in Burlington, of Jack BONO, on Wednesday, November 16, 2005. Beloved husband for three and a half happy years of Marian Pearce BONO. Predeceased by his first wife Bettee. Loving father of Meri-Lane and Joe, Bette-Lynne and Alex, Steven and Rosemary, John and Lucy, and Marian's children Susan and John WHEELIHAN, David and Deanna PEARCE, and Barb and Jamie McEWAN. Also loved by 14 grandchildren. Private cremation followed by a Memorial Service in Northbrook, Illinois. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to J. Scott Early Funeral Home, 905-878-2669.

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WHEELOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-29 published
PANGMAN, Cynthia Beatrice (née FESS)
(September 12, 1912-October 22, 2005)
Cynthia Beatrice PANGMAN passed away peacefully on Saturday, October 22, 2005 at Winnipeg, Manitoba. Cynthia is survived by her son John (wife Connie) and two granddaughters Jennifer and Alexandra.
She was predeceased by her husband John E.C. PANGMAN, her parents William P. and Beatrice FESS, her sister Betty WHEELOCK and brother Bill FESS.
A memorial service will be held at St. Georges Anglican Church 168 Wilton on Wednesday, November 2nd at 1: 00 p.m. with The Venerable Donna Ball officiating.
Flowers are gratefully declined. If desired, donations in her memory may be made to St. Georges Church Memorial Foundation.
Thomson Funeral Home, 669 Broadway 204-783-7211

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WHEILDON o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.markdale.the_markdale_standard 2005-03-30 published
SUTCLIFFE, Wilbert
Peacefully, at Grey Gables, Markdale, Sunday March 20, 2005. Wilbert 'Wib' SUTCLIFFE of Markdale in his 100th year. Beloved husband of the late Edna and the late Ruth. Survived by sisters-in-law Grace WHEILDON of Markdale, Shirley DICKSON/DIXON of Mitchell and brother-in-law Maurice QUINTON of Owen Sound, and the family of the late Ruth SUTCLIFFE (HOLLEY.) Sadly missed by his extended family and Friends. Friends called at the May Funeral Home, Markdale, Tuesday evening and Wednesday afternoon and evening, where Reverend Neil PARKER officiated a funeral service held Thursday March 24, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Chaplain Kathryn HAINES gave a eulogy. Music included the congregational hymns 'Amazing Grace' and 'What A Friend We Have In Jesus', accompanied by pianist David FRIES. Arnold ROSENBURG, Will MOORE, Howard GREIG, Hob PRINGLE, Terry McKAY and Cornelius VLIELANDER served as pall bearers. Honorary bearers were George HALL, Bob HALL, Terry BUCKLEY, Ken FERGUSON, John HALVERSON and Dyson SEABROOK. A recessional honour guard was formed by the past and present members of the Councils of the Township of Chatsworth, and the County of Grey. lnterment in Markdale Cemetery. Donations were directed to Grey Gables Residents' Fund, or the charity of choice.
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WHEILDON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-03-23 published
SUTCLIFFE, Wilbert
Peacefully, at Grey Gables, Markdale, Sunday March 20, 2005. Wilbert 'Wib' SUTCLIFFE of Markdale in his 100th year. Beloved husband of the late Edna and the late Ruth. Survived by sisters-in-law, Grace WHEILDON, of Markdale and Shirley DICKSON/DIXON, of Mitchell and brother-in-law Maurice QUINTON of Owen Sound, and the family of the late Ruth SUTCLIFFE (HOLLEY.) Sadly missed by his extended family and Friends. Friends may call at the May Funeral Home, Tuesday from: 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. and Wednesday from 2:00 to 4:00 and 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m., where a funeral service will be held Thursday March 24th at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Markdale Cemetery. If desired, donations to Grey Gables Residents' Fund, or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
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WHEILDON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-22 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, William Henry
Passed away at Errinrung Nursing Home, Thornbury, Ontario on Saturday, November 19th, 2005. William THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of the Late Olga Isabel YOUNG. Dear father of Ruth (Russell) WHEILDON and Jessie FIELD of North Bay, David Chatsworth, Ronald (Sheila) of Windsor, Gordon (Roxanne) of Englehart and George and Doris MURRAY both of Meaford. Sadly missed by seventeen grandchildren and twenty-one great-grandchildren. Brother of Herb (Myrtle,) Bob (Reta,) Kenny (Devona) and Gert YOUNG. Predeceased by one brother, Frances and three sisters, Mary DEMERS, Marg DAVIS and Jean. Resting at the Gardiner-Wilson Funeral Home, Meaford, where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday Morning, November 23rd, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Markdale Cemetery. Visiting on Monday from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. and Tuesday from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. As your expression of sympathy donations to The Heart and Stroke Foundation or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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WHEILDON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-25 published
WHEILDON, Kenneth Frederick
Peacefully, at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound, on Thursday, November 24th, 2005. Kenneth Frederick WHEILDON, of Owen Sound, in his 78th year. Dearly beloved husband and best friend of Helen WHEILDON (née MORRISON.) Loving father of Penny WATSON and her husband, Blair, of London. Proud grandfather of Kristine HARDY and her husband, Chris and Erin WATSON, all of London. Ken is survived by one brother, Francis WHEILDON and his wife, Aileen, of Chatsworth. Predeceased by his parents, Richard and Jessie WHEILDON. A Funeral Service for Kenneth WHEILDON will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel of the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (376-7492) on Monday, November 28th, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Ted CREEN officiating. Visitation one hour prior to service only. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Arthritis Society as your expression of sympathy.
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WHEILDON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-26 published
WHEILDON, Kenneth Frederick
Peacefully, at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound, on Thursday, November 24th, 2005. Kenneth Frederick WHEILDON, of Owen Sound, in his 78th year. Dearly beloved husband and best friend of Helen WHEILDON (née MORRISON.) Loving father of Penny WATSON and her husband, Blair, of London. Proud grandfather of Kristine HARDY and her husband, Chris and Erin WATSON, all of London. Ken is survived by one brother, Francis WHEILDON and his wife, Aileen, of Chatsworth. Predeceased by his parents, Richard and Jessie WHEILDON. A Funeral Service for Kenneth WHEILDON will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel of the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (376-7492) on Monday, November 28th, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Ted CREEN officiating. Visitation one hour prior to service only. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Arthritis Society as your expression of sympathy.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-19 published
STAFFORD fought for the little guy
By Eric BUNNELL, Special to The Free Press
Saint Thomas -- Harold STAFFORD was remembered yesterday as a passionate advocate for the little guy, a benefactor who hid behind bluster, and a politician whose strong principals may have cost him a seat at the cabinet table. STAFFORD, a colourful and often controversial former Saint Thomas lawyer, died yesterday at his home at 83.
His was a life that his friend Bill JOHNSON, a fellow lawyer and Liberal, said yesterday may be impossible to sum up.
"He was such an intrinsically unique character that there are no parallels. There was only one mould and I think they broke it when they made Harold," he said.
"He would have been 84 on April 20. But Harold was like the Mississippi. You just expected him to continue to roll on."
Tributes yesterday came from as far away as Florida, including fellow former member of Parliament Eugene WHELAN, a prominent former agriculture minister.
"He served his country in many ways. Some people disagreed with him but to those of us who knew him, he was a darn good Canadian."
A native of New Brunswick, STAFFORD was introduced to Saint Thomas and his future wife, Betty during the Second World War. He came to the city as an air force sergeant who taught Commonwealth air crew.
Educated at the University of New Brunswick and the London School of Economics, STAFFORD was called to the bar in 1953 in Brantford and opened a Saint Thomas practice in 1955.
JOHNSON was a political science student studying Liberal fortunes in Elgin when he joined a candidate search in the riding and met STAFFORD, whom he subsequently recommended to the party.
JOHNSON, who later articled under STAFFORD, said there were two sides to the man -- gruff in public, but huge-hearted in private.
"He was a guy with a heart as big as the world. No one knows the good works he did, because of his bluff, curmudgeonly behaviour," he said.
He recalled STAFFORD once defended a 12-year-old boy hauled before the court on a charge of stealing a bicycle.
"His parents were as poor as church mice and this kid didn't have much chance of having anything. Harold not only defended the young man, but he went and bought him a bike."
JOHNSON said STAFFORD "had very strong principles and he would not vary from them."
STAFFORD's dislike of Pierre TRUDEAU was no secret, yet when the former Liberal prime minister died, STAFFORD was gracious in his tribute.
Driven to defend his clients, STAFFORD's principles also may have cost him his law practice.
He was forced in 2000 to resign from the bar as a condition of the Crown withdrawing a charge of obstruction of justice, arising from an allegation STAFFORD tried to influence a witness.
The allegation was never proved and STAFFORD continued to work as a paralegal.
After two failed bids, STAFFORD was elected Elgin member of Parliament in 1965 under then prime minister Lester PEARSON.
He retired from active politics following his 1972 defeat by Tory John WISE but maintained his interest in politics.
STAFFORD's hours and his late-night phone calls were the stuff of local legend.
JOHNSON recalled one judge giving weight to a client's alibi when the man testified he was in STAFFORD's office at 1 a.m.
WHELAN also remembered STAFFORD's ability to work long hours, as did former city lawyer Marietta ROBERTS, a former member of provincial parliament and now a judge.
"Harold had a brilliant mind and he was a very bright man," WHELAN said. "He'd stay up and work until two o'clock in the morning on cases or the work he had to do for Parliament. He had the stamina of four or five people."
Said Roberts of STAFFORD: "He lived life to the fullest and he gave his time and energy to the community for a number of years."
"Mind you," she added, "it might be 3 a.m."
Visitation hours for STAFFORD at Williams Funeral Home in St. Thomas are tomorrow from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
The funeral service is Friday at Knox Presbyterian Church at 1 p.m.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-01 published
PAKALNIS, Steve Peter
At Dearness Home, London on Sunday, January 30, 2005. Steve Peter PAKALNIS of London and formerly of Rodney in his 92nd year. A native of Lithuania, a veteran of World War 2 as well as a prisoner of war, Steve immigrated to Canada in 1948, subsequently settled in Rodney where he became a successful tobacco farmer and raised his family with his wife Katie. "Little Steve" was well known for his creation and sharing of his fine wine. Lovingly remembered by his daughters Elizabeth PAKALNIS of London, Angela FLEMING/FLEMMING of Belleville, Regina WHELAN and her husband Michael of London and son Peter PAKALNIS and his wife Dawn WHALLS of Wyoming. Loving grandfather of Steven and Megan FLEMING/FLEMMING, Sarah WHELAN, Charlie and Karina PAKALNIS. Friends may call at the Rodney Chapel on Wednesday, February 2, 2005 from 1: 00-2:00 p.m. Funeral service will follow at 2: 00 p.m., Pastor R. KARN officiating. Cremation to follow. If desired, donations to the West Elgin Nature Trust would be appreciated. Arrangement entrusted to Padfield Funeral Homes, (519-785-0810).

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-03 published
WHELAN, Constance " Ann" (née SIMES)
Peacefully, with her family by her side, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, January 1, 2005, in her 76th year. Beloved wife and best friend of Christopher for over 51 years. Sadly missed by her loving children Kimberly PIRIE, Patricia DALLIMORE (Martyn), Michael (Mary Anne), Gerry (Linda), and Richard (Alison). Loving and proud Nana of Courtney and Ryan, Ashley, Sean and Elizabeth, Christopher, Richard and Lauren. Dear sister of the late Delbert. Ann will be held dear in the hearts of her many nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends. Born in Abernathy, Saskatchewan on September 27, 1929 to Dr. Austin and Ida SIMES. In keeping with her parents vocation of health care, she studied nursing at Winnipeg General in Winnipeg, Manitoba and went on to become a Registered Nurse. Ann married Christopher on June 20, 1953 and gave up her profession to raise her five children and make a home for her family. She was very active in her children's lives while they were growing up and was an enthusiastic curler and gardener. Ann suffered for many years from Lupus which ultimately and significantly impacted her quality of life. The family would like to thank the nursing staff of Four East at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital for all their kind and tender care for their mother. Friends will be received at the Neweduk Funeral Home "Mississauga Chapel" 1981 Dundas St. W., (1 block east of Erin Mills Pkwy.) from 2-4 and 7: 30-9 p.m. on Tuesday, January 4, 2005. A Mass of Celebration and Thanksgiving of Ann's Life will be held at St. Christopher's Roman Catholic Church, 1171 Clarkson Road North (south of Truscott Dr.) in Mississauga on Wednesday, January 5th, 2005 at 10: 30 a.m. Followed by cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ann's memory to Lupus Canada.
Neweduk Funeral Home 905-828-8000 www.neweduk.com

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-11 published
Vaughn WHELAN, Advertising Executive: 1960-2005
Brilliant copywriter who combined a wicked sense of humour with bold new marketing strategies launched an audacious ad agency famous for airing an unauthorized Molson commercial, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Friday, March 11, 2005 Page S7
A creative renegade with an irreverent sense of humour, Vaughn WHELAN was a talented copywriter who loved devising controversial advertising campaigns that grabbed headlines for his clients. His innovative and aggressive approach earned him both awards and barbs, with some advertising veterans applauding his daring and others decrying his notoriety.
"It's a big loss to advertising," said his friend Simon BILLINGS of the Naked Creative Consultancy. "His company [Vaughn Whelan & Partners] wasn't big, but it was a presence. He was always thinking, always trying to find better ways to do things and always trying to shake the larger agencies out of their torpor."
"He did shake things up, but it always seemed to be for his reasons, as opposed to his clients," said Dick HADDEN, president and creative director of Cossette Communication Group West in Vancouver. "There is a certain style of humour or audacity that some people aspire to in advertising that is more a reflection of the writer than the client. For certain clients, that is a good thing, but the number of those clients is fewer than more traditional ones and it doesn't always fall in line with what most larger clients see as a brand-building approach."
Vaughn WHELAN was born in Newfoundland in 1960. His father died in a car accident when he and his younger brother, Gerard, were very small. Eventually, his widowed mother, Maudie, married John WHELAN and the family moved to Kelowna, B.C.
A short, heavyset man who loved film and music, he was reputed to have written lyrics for the Vancouver rock band Loverboy. He could have a tough bristly manner, but people who knew him well said that was armour to camouflage a sensitive and caring nature.
Mr. WHELAN began his advertising career in Vancouver before moving to Toronto in the 1980s. "He was a spark plug, a little undisciplined in his thinking, but incredibly energetic and enthusiastic," said Mr. HADDEN, who hired him as a junior copywriter at McCann Erickson in Vancouver in the mid-1980s. "He was trying to do things very differently and he aspired to great heights, which is the sort of thing you look for at that level."
Less than two years later, Mr. WHELAN moved to Toronto, where he was hired as a copywriter by Scali, McCabe and Sloves. Geoffrey ROCHE, now creative director of Lowe Roche, was working at the agency when Mr. WHELAN arrived. "I thought this guy was a ball of fire. He loved what he did and he crafted the stuff as well as he could."
Scali is also where Brian SEMKULEY met him -- as a client rather than a colleague. He remembers Mr. WHELAN being part of the creative team that pitched the campaign for Labatt Blue.
"He had a unique way of looking at a communication problem and coming up with technical and strategic solutions," said Mr. SEMKULEY, who is now global marketing director for the beer conglomerate InBev. The two men became Friends after Mr. WHELAN won the advertising account in the early 1990s for Blue Star, a Labatt brand that was only available in Newfoundland. There wasn't a large advertising budget, so Mr. WHELAN advised Labatt to forget television and do a radio campaign, instead. Then he "sat down and pumped out 40 or so radio scripts," said Mr. SEMKULEY, with the tagline "Blue Star: The Shining Star of the Granite Planet."
"It was absolutely the right decision," said Mr. SEMKULEY. " Vaughn was one of the best radio writers I have ever worked with and probably one of the best radio writers in the country." The campaign doubled the beer's regional market share by promoting its Newfoundland identity and by running a contest offering a summer job with the brewery. "Originally, first prize was going to be 10 weeks of work and second prize would be 20 weeks," Mr. WHELAN told The Globe in 1992. That was too ironic for Labatt, which changed second prize to a case of Blue Star every week for a year.
With unemployment in Newfoundland running at 21 per cent compared to a national average of 11 per cent, Mr. WHELAN's humour offended Winston BAKER, then the chair of the provincial Treasury Board. "He may have been born here," he said of Mr. WHELAN, "but he's obviously forgotten what it's like to live here."
Saying the contest was "totally disgusting," Mr. BAKER complained that "they were poking fun at a very serious situation and we told them we wanted it stopped immediately." The beer company agreed to change the first prize to a postsecondary scholarship for $7,000, the value of the employment contract. Despite the political opposition, the Blue Star campaign eventually won Mr. WHELAN a Cassie award for advertising effectiveness.
"He was an unsung hero of our business because he wrote some of the best work that this country has ever seen," said Mr. ROCHE. "If you can write radio, you can write anything and, believe me, he could write like a mad demon."
In many ways, he was too much of a maverick to work in a traditional agency, Mr. ROCHE suggested. "That is probably why he went out on his own." The risk of going out on your own, however, is not being able to create enough business to keep your staff working.
On that score, he appeared to be succeeding. As president and creative director of Vaughn Whelan and Partners, his long-term clients included Radio Shack and Leon's Furniture. For Radio Shack, he had broadcaster Ralph Benmergui joking with nerdy Radio Shack managers across the country. For Leon's, he created a series of television spots showing upscale customers getting Leon's furniture dropped off at night in a ploy to hide the fact that they shopped at a discount store, only to see their truck stuck in a traffic jam with other Leon's vehicles delivering to their neighbours.
Mr. WHELAN's most recent controversy involved two unsolicited television ads that he created and aired for the Molson Canadian brand. He wasn't a big enough agency to be in the serious running for the Molson account last October, so he got the beer company's attention (and everybody else's) by shooting a commercial and running it on television without the brewer's approval. The 60-second commercial showed a bike courier persuading the Canada Revenue Agency to let him classify his daily food as "fuel" and deduct it as an expense on his income tax. The spot ended with the line: "Respect. It's a Canadian thing."
There's nothing unusual about producing an advertisement on spec, but nobody had ever bought the air time to broadcast it. After the commercial aired in Toronto and Burlington, Vermont., Molson sent Mr. WHELAN a frosty lawyer's letter. He didn't get Molson's business, but the press netted lots of attention.
Mr. SEMKULEY, who works for Beck's, one of Molson's rivals, said: "I give him a ton of credit for taking the personal and financial risk of trying to put his name forward as being the best option for the client to choose. I would have looked at his agency differently."
"It was spectacular," said Mr. ROCHE. "A lot of the people in the industry dismissed it, but that epitomized the kind of guy he was. He had balls and I had great respect for him."
Mr. BILLINGS said: "That was a classic Vaughn stunt -- something right out of the box that would generate good and bad press and get you noticed. He certainly got a lot of calls from other companies who wanted to talk to him."
All of that is for naught now. Vaughn Whelan and Partners is folding. "The creative component of the agency was Vaughn and there really isn't a company without him," said Mr. BILLINGS.
Vaughn WHELAN was born in Saint John's on April 3, 1960. He died at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto on March 3, 2005, from complications from chronic anemia. He was 44. He is survived by his wife, Eileen STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; his mother, Maudie WHELAN; one brother; and four half-brothers.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-16 published
I Remember -- Vaughn WHELAN
By Lynne DOSSETT, Wednesday, March 16, 2005 Page S7
Lynne DOSSETT of Vancouver writes about advertising executive Vaughn WHELAN, whose obituary appeared on March 11.
I knew Vaughn briefly in Halifax in the late 1980s, but I never forgot him. He was arrogant and obnoxious and brilliant and creative. I had no idea that he was only in his 20s at the time, he was such a force to be reckoned with. You either loved him or hated him; I was just fascinated. The world could use more people like Vaughn, who push the boundaries, who aren't afraid to take chances, and who believe in themselves.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-23 published
Thomas Herbert ANSTEY
By J.F. BOSHER, Friday, September 23, 2005, Page A28
Yachtsman, soldier and director of agricultural research stations. Born December 27, 1917, in Victoria. Died May 18 in Ottawa after a car accident, aged 87.
My cousin Tom ANSTEY, a lifelong benevolent force, would repair broken furniture in a friend's house, prune a friend's roses, or give away strawberry plants, potting soil, and his own home-made wine. He never counted the cost or the trouble.
It was in the same spirit that he went to Kiev in the early 1990s with his friend Eugene WHELAN, former minister of agriculture, to help the Ukrainian government with agricultural problems.
Off he went, handing out freely what he had learned in his career as a director of Canadian agricultural research stations at Agassiz and Summerland, British Columbia, Lethbridge, Alberta., and, from 1969, in the agriculture department in Ottawa.
He was a plain, practical person. It would not cross Tom's mind to mention that he was an honorary life member of the Canadian Society for Horticultural Science, held office in the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage, and had published a 400-page history of agricultural research in Canada called One Hundred Harvests.
In the Second World War, he served in Europe as an officer in a Canadian unit that was lent to the 2nd Battalion Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry of the British 6th Airborne Division and for the rest of his life he attended the annual gatherings of his fellow veterans in that "CanLoan" force.
His interest in the plant sciences had first been aroused in his childhood by an English uncle in Canada, J.E. BOSHER, who worked at the Saanichton Experimental Farm in British Columbia.
After a doctoral degree at the University of Minnesota, Tom's research added to horticultural knowledge about broccoli, strawberries, and other fruit crops.
Tom was the oldest of four children born in Victoria to a cabinet-maker from Coventry, Britain, who had followed his lady-love when she moved with her family in 1911 from Manchester to Sidney, B.C.
The children grew up in a house their father had built with his own hands, he being a trained cabinetmaker in charge of teaching woodwork and metalwork at Victoria High School.
Tom grew up playing the cello, accompanied on the piano by his mother.
His father taught the boys in the family to build boats and sail them in the sheltered waters around the Saanich Peninsula, which is why Tom sailed a 22-foot yacht on the Ottawa River at Britannia Yacht Club in Ottawa as long as he could. He named her Tilicum after the famous native dugout canoe sailed from Victoria to London in 1901 by Captain J.C. Voss.
But lest anyone imagine that Tom was spoiled during his childhood, it should be added that his parents were strict Baptists and he was often left in Sidney with grandparents who had brought strict, though well-meaning, habits with them.
In October, 1921, when Tom was four years old, his grandmother reported to one of his aunts in a letter, "He is a dear little fellow. I thought this morning he was going to be ill so I put him to bed tho' he very much objected. So I spanked him and gave him a dose of castor oil when he wakened. Seems much better now."
Trouble like that did not deter Tom. And he did not impose such discipline on the three children he had with his wife, Wynne FERGUSON, whom he married in Brockville, Ontario, during the war.
Soon after she died in 1998 he moved to an old-age home in Ottawa and three years later married a widowed neighbour there, Dorothy MOORE, with whom he lived happily until his fatal car accident.
J.F. BOSHER is Tom's cousin.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-09 published
Beland HONDERICH, Newspaper Publisher (1918-2005)
Micromanager changed the Toronto Star from a scoop-an-edition news sheet into an information-based vehicle for an emerging middle class, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, Page S9
An outsider who joined the Toronto Star as a "wartime replacement," Beland (Bee) HONDERICH worked his way up through the newsroom to become editor, publisher and ultimately chairman of the board of the country's largest and most colourful city newspaper. Its archives can boast staff bylines belonging to Ernest Hemingway (he likened it to "serving in the Prussian army under a bad general"), Pierre Berton, Gordon Sinclair and Peter Newman.
A micromanager and a curmudgeon who was feared more than he was loved, he transformed and modernized the Star, built a legendary newsroom in the late 1950s and 1960s, fought and won a newspaper war with the now defunct Toronto Telegram, bought up its circulation lists and its fleet of community newspapers, crusaded in support of diversity, national unity and cultural nationalism, and acquired Harlequin Enterprises, for many years a substantial cash cow for Torstar Corp.
"He took a paper that mattered and turned it into a great newspaper. I think his impact on Canadian journalism and his craft was huge," said his son, John HONDERICH, himself a former editor and publisher of the Toronto Star and now a member of the board of directors of Torstar Corp.
He was hard to love, but easy to respect, said Peter NEWMAN, editor-in-chief from 1969 to 1971. "I was always impressed by his wisdom, his determination and his optimistic view of the Canadian future. Unlike most publishers, his ideology went way beyond the bottom line. He never really understood the Canada that stretched beyond the shadow of the C.N. Tower, but he loved the idea of this country."
Beland (Bee) Hugh HONDERICH was born in Baden (near Kitchener,) Ontario, one of six children of John William HONDERICH, a Mennonite postmaster and railway agent, and Rae Laura (ARMSTRONG,) a Presbyterian. Religion was a contentious and omnipresent factor, according to Mr. HONDERICH's youngest brother, philosopher Edgar (Ted) HONDERICH. His father liked unusual names. He called his eldest son Loine and he named his second son after a physician named Béland in Montreal.
During the Depression, the family home was sold at auction when the mortgage holder foreclosed. Beland left school after Grade 8 to help support the family and began working as the Baden correspondent for the Kitchener Record (now The Record) in 1935 at the age of 17.
He did well covering two big fires in his community and made the move to the Toronto Star as a wartime replacement in 1943, earning $35 a week. He had been rejected from the armed forces because he had poor eyesight and a bad ear. When he got to the Star, he was told "all the good men were away fighting" and warned that there wouldn't be a job for him when they came back.
Shy, private, and insecure -- the poorly educated country man in the big city -- he "always felt he had to work twice as hard," according to his son, John.
Mr. HONDERICH told the journalist Doug (now George) FETHERLING in a 1983 interview for Saturday Night magazine that "you produced or else," explaining that he covered two speeches a day, delivering a few facts and a couple of "punchy" quotes. "It left a deep impression on my mind... what people are interested in is information." This was a lesson he would apply when he had control of the paper.
Far from being dismissed when peace was declared, he was promoted to financial editor in 1945, named editor-in-chief a decade later and elected a director of the company in 1957.
The Toronto Star is a private business like other newspapers in Canada, but it is unusual in that it is owned by a group of families and it operates according to a set of principles established by the late Joseph ATKINSON Sr. He became editor in 1899, quickly turned the struggling newspaper around and soon acquired a controlling interest. In 1911, Harry C. HINDMARSH joined the paper. He became Mr. ATKINSON's lieutenant and his son-in-law. Together, they turned the newspaper into the home of "razzle-dazzle journalism," ordering saturation coverage of big stories and indulging in huge headlines, full-page pictures and wacky stunts. They also supported the Liberal Party and social-welfare issues such as mothers' allowances, unemployment insurance, old-age pensions, minimum wages and the rights of labour unions. The combination of Christian piety, free-wheeling Fabian socialism and popular journalism was good for circulation and advertising revenues. By 1913, the Star was Toronto's largest paper and Mr. ATKINSON was its controlling shareholder.
He died in 1948, leaving an estate of more than $8-million, putting the bulk of it, including the ownership of the paper, into the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, which he had established six years earlier. In his will, he directed that profits from the paper's operations were "for the promotion and maintenance of social, scientific and economic reforms which are charitable in nature, for the benefit of the people of the province of Ontario" and he stipulated that the paper could be sold only to people who shared his social views.
Mr. HINDMARSH became president of the five-person board established to govern the paper and carry out Mr. ATKINSON's wishes. However, the Ontario government, led by Conservative Leslie FROST, and rival newspapers, including The Globe and Mail and The Toronto Telegram, argued that the foundation was merely a device to avoid paying succession duties on Mr. ATKINSON's estate.
The FROST government passed a law forbidding charitable foundations from owning more than 10 per cent of a profit-making business. The Star was given seven years to sell its business interests, with the foundation's trustees, officers and directors allowed to buy them, subject to the approval of the Supreme Court of Canada.
While this wrangling was going on, Mr. HINDMARSH dropped dead of a heart attack on December 20, 1956. The new board of the Atkinson Foundation was made up of Joseph S. ATKINSON (son of the late Mr. ATKINSON,) his sister Ruth HINDMARSH (widow of Mr. HINDMARSH), Burnett THALL, William J. CAMPBELL and Mr. HONDERICH.
In 1958, after swearing before the Supreme Court that they would uphold the principles outlined in Mr. ATKINSON's will, they were allowed to buy the newspaper. They paid $25.5-million in a leveraged buyout, which Globe business columnist Eric REGULY has called "the steal of the century." They put down $1-million in cash and secured most of the rest by selling debt and preferred shares to the public.
Mr. HONDERICH, who had been editor for three years and on the board for one, had no family money or other resources to draw upon. He was living in a duplex with his wife and three children. "We had one couch and one chair," said his son John. "The Bank of Commerce virtually put up all the money, but the security was the shares of the largest newspaper in the country."
In addition, Mr. HONDERICH took a personal loan for his 15-per-cent share, helped by advice and references from accountant, cultural nationalist and later politician, Walter GORDON. Today, Torstar Corp., the media conglomerate that owns the Star, is worth about $1.7-billion.
As editor and then publisher, Mr. HONDERICH built the great Toronto Star newsroom of the late 1950s and 1960s. He transformed the paper from a flashy, scoop-an-edition news sheet into an information-based vehicle for columnists and critics. He quickly realized, according to journalist Val SEARS, that the real market in the postwar period lay in finding readers among the young middle class in the suburbs who were moving up through the social strata.
They wanted context and information, not just headlines. Ron HAGGART worked as a columnist for the Star in the sixties. Mr. HONDERICH had the right ideas about how to change the Star, which was a stodgy, old-fashioned paper, according to Mr. HAGGART. "It was still a paper that believed the most recent event deserved a headline because it had happened in the last hour."
Among the stable of writers and editors Mr. HONDERICH enlisted or celebrated were: Pierre Berton as a daily columnist, Charles Templeton as managing editor, Nathan Cohen as drama critic, Milt Dunnell on sports, Gwyn (Jocko) Thomas on crime and Peter NEWMAN as Ottawa editor and editor-in-chief.
He loved to hire people, said journalist Robert FULFORD, who worked for the Star twice (from 1958 to 1962 and from 1964 to 1968), but he quickly grew bored with them. Managing editors were a notoriously endangered species, according to Mr. FULFORD, who once joked that after more than two years on the job, managing editors took on the look of "hunted animals." When he was having trouble sleeping at night, police reporter Jocko Thomas was said to recite the names of the more than 40 city editors who served during his long career at the paper.
Mr. NEWMAN spent seven years at the Star, leaving in 1971 in "frustration because [Mr. HONDERICH] was always stone-cold certain about what he didn't want, but not good at suggesting practical options."
He could be a bully. "He wasn't a particularly big man, but he looked big to his employees. He tended to tower," said Mr. SEARS, who worked for Mr. HONDERICH for about 25 years in a number of capacities, including Ottawa bureau chief and Washington correspondent. "He spoke low, but he made his position very clear. On the other hand, he was certainly the best publisher I ever worked for because he knew what he wanted and he would back you up."
Saying that he and Mr. HONDERICH fought a lot, especially when he was editor of the editorial page, Mr. SEARS said he always thought it was a mistake to try to outguess his boss. Mr. HONDERICH seemed aware of his power. "He once said to me, 'If I walk through that newsroom and I say to someone it is a nice day, by the final edition I have two full pages on the weather," said Mr. SEARS.
Stories abound about Mr. HONDERICH's tendency to micromanage. When he was editor, he behaved as though he was the publisher and when he became publisher and president in 1966, "he acted as though he owned the paper outright," Mr. FULFORD said.
Staffers were obsessed with anticipating his wishes, often with bizarre results. Somebody heard that "Bee" believed that a colour photograph had to have red in it, so Star photographers took to stowing red jackets in their cars and asking people to put them on before snapping their pictures, or so the story goes.
"Bee had a phobia about accompanying each picture in his paper with explanatory cutlines," recalled Mr. NEWMAN. "I got hell once for running an illustration of Gina Lollobrigida, the Italian film star, standing beside a male dwarf, because I had left out the 'left' and 'right' identifications."
During his years at the newspaper, Mr. HONDERICH oversaw the introduction of colour, the shift from an afternoon to a morning paper, a Sunday edition and the appointment of the first ombudsman at any paper in Canada. He was also a driving force behind the establishment of the Ontario Press Council. In 1976, he was appointed chairman and chief executive officer of Torstar Corp. He continued to serve as publisher until September, 1988.
Mr. HONDERICH married three times. His and his first wife Florence divorced in 1962. He married Agnes KING in 1968. Star legend has it that he called the paper from the airport as he and his bride were leaving on their honeymoon and asked for the front page to be read to him. She died of cancer in 1999 after a long and painful illness. "He was amazingly diligent in the way he cared for her," said his son John.
That same year he became engaged to Rina WHELAN, a widow he had met many years before (when both were married to other people) in the barbershop of the Hotel Vancouver, where she worked as a manicurist. "This is one of the great love stories," John HONDERICH said, "I have had the honour of standing up for him at two of his three weddings."
The HONDERICHs lived in the penthouse of La Carina (Rina's House,) a condominium she had developed and built on English Bay. "He was a wealthy man and she was a wealthy woman," commented Mr. HONDERICH's brother Ted, "and so both were under suspicion of being gold diggers."
Mr. HONDERICH became more left wing in his politics as he became older, said his brother. "All newspaper publishers are accused of being ruthless, but actually they are activists," he said. "They want to make things happen and they don't like things hanging on in an indecisive way."
Beland Hugh HONDERICH was born on November 25, 1918, in Baden, Ontario. He died yesterday in St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver after a massive stroke. He was 86. He is survived by his first wife Florence, his third wife Rina, three children, six grandchildren and one brother.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-03 published
WHELAN, Constance " Ann" (née SIMES)
Peacefully, with her family by her side, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, January 1, 2005, in her 76th year. Beloved wife and best friend of Christopher for over 51 years. Sadly missed by her loving children, Kimberly PINE, Patricia DALLIMORE (Martyn), Michael (Mary Anne), Gerry (Linda), and Richard (Alison). Loving and proud Nana of Courtney and Ryan, Ashley, Sean and Elizabeth, Christopher, Richard and Lauren. Dear sister of the late Delbert. Ann will be held dear in the hearts of her many nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends. Born in Abernathy, Saskatchewan, on September 27, 1929 to Dr. Austin and Ida SIMES. In keeping with her parents vocation of health care, she studied nursing at Winnipeg General in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and went on to become a Registered Nurse. Ann married Christopher on June 20, 1953 and gave up her profession to raise her five children and make a home for her family. She was very active in her children's lives while they were growing up and was an enthusiastic curler and gardener. Ann suffered for many years from Lupus which ultimately and significantly impacted her quality of life. The family would like to thank the nursing staff of Four East at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital for all their kind and tender care for their mother. Friends will be received at the Neweduk Funeral Home "Mississauga Chapel," 1981 Dundas St. W. (1 block east of Erin Mills Pkwy.), from 2 - 4 and 7: 30 - 9 p.m. on Tuesday, January 4, 2005. A Mass of Celebration and Thanksgiving of Ann's Life will be held at St. Christopher's Roman Catholic Church, 1171 Clarkson Road North (south of Truscott Dr.), in Mississauga on Wednesday, January 5, 2005 at 10: 30 a.m., followed by cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ann's memory to Lupus Canada. Neweduk Funeral Home 905-828-8000 www.neweduk. com

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-19 published
COATES, Jean Rosamond (née TANNER)
Of Mississauga, in her 78th year. Died peacefully in her sleep, January 15, 2005, at Mississauga Long Term Care Centre. Loving and devoted wife of Robert S.A. COATES, mother of Susan WHELAN and her husband David of Orangeville, Ross and his wife Michaela of Brampton, and Gay NEMETH of Toronto. Proud and loving grandmother of Sean, Theresa, Elysia, Sean, Ian and Erin. Great-grandmother of Kaitlynn, Destinee and Quinn. Preceded by mother Annie R. JEWEL, father Charles Stewart TANNER, brothers Charles and George TANNER, sisters Mary DAVISON and Margaret TANNER. Remains have been donated to the Department of Anatomy at the University of Toronto by Jean's request. She will always be remembered and live in our hearts forever. Friends will be received from 1: 00 p.m. until 2: 00 p.m., followed by a Memorial Service at 2:00 p.m. to be held at Cawthra Park United Church, 1466 Leda Ave., Mississauga on January 22, 2005. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to your favourite charity in memory of Jean.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-13 published
SULLIVAN, Mary Josephine
Passed away peacefully at her home in Brampton on Wednesday, August 10th, 2005 at age 93 surrounded by her children and grandchildren. Mary Josephine SULLIVAN, beloved wife of the late John Charles SULLIVAN (March 22, 1982.) Loving mother of Michael and his wife Jackie of Strathmore, Alberta and her daughter Eileen McMANAMON of Brampton. Beloved grandmother of Catharine and Michael McMANAMON, Dolan SULLIVAN and Michelle CYR. Dear sister of the late Frank WALSH of Guelph, Alice BUIE of Toronto, Florence STAPLES of Guelph and Ellen WHELAN (her twin) of Weston. A 70-year member of the Catholic Women's League. A Memorial Funeral Mass will be held on Monday, August 15 at 10: 30 a.m. at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church, 940 North Park Drive, Brampton. Cremation. Interment at Mary Mount Cemetery, Guelph, Ontario. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Alzheimer Society or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-28 published
LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH, Geraldine (née DOMINKO)
Passed away peacefully on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 at Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga. Beloved wife of the late Kenneth LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH (1995.) Cherished mother to Nadine LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH and her boyfriend Dave HEROD. Loving sister to Irene PERRY and her late husband Max, Margaret FITZGERALD and her husband Don, Jimmy DOMINKO and his wife Helen. Dear aunt to Lori BULMER and her husband Paul, Jamie WHELAN and her husband Pete and their daughter Tara, Lindsay PERRY and his wife Sally and their daughters Sarah and Megan. You will always be remembered for your generosity, compassion, unselfishness, dignity and strength. In addition to her unrelenting focus on her family, her love of animals, especially cats, and her time spent gardening, will never be forgotten. You were a woman who made a difference to all of us. Family and Friends are invited for a visitation at Dodsworth and Brown Funeral Home, Burlington Chapel, 2241 New St. (at Drury Lane) on Thursday, September 29, 2005 from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held on Fnday, September 30, 2005 from the chapel at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Burlington Memorial Gardens. A special thank you to the doctors and nurses in the I.C.U. of the Trillium Health Centre for their kindness and compassion.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-12 published
WHELAN, Francis " Budd" (April 18, 1931-October 9, 2005)
Sportsman, athlete, artisan, naturalist, and raconteur extraordinaire. After a valiant battle with cancer fought with dignity and strength, Budd passed away at home surrounded by his loved ones. Survived by Rita, his wife, best friend and rock of 53 years, devoted father and pal to Wendy, Randy (Michelle), Karin (Harry), and Arlene (Tony), cherished Poppa of John, Tyler, Nikki, Cassidy, Chris, and Jacques, son-in-law of Elizabeth DAWSON, brother to June (Art), Joe (Audrey), George (Faith), and Ruth (Gary), brother-in-law of Anne (Bill), Bette (John), Barbara (Cal), Alan (Margaret), Alec (Martha), Tommy (Wilma), Irene (Bobby), and Alexis (Daryl). The Whelan Family would like to extend their heartfelt gratitude to Dr. ATTALLA, Dr. THORNLOE, Dr. GAPSKI, the 4th floor staff at Trillium Health Centre and Budd's special caregivers, Linda, Gerda and Lonia for their kindness, compassion and professionalism. Until the end, Budd kept his trademark sense of humour and wit, which will be missed by all. Memorial service to be held at the funeral home of Skinner and Middlebrook, 128 Lakeshore Road East, Mississauga, 905-278-5546 on Saturday, October 15th, at 11 a.m. A reception celebrating Budd's life will follow at 1535 Lakeshore Rd. E., Mississauga (across from Marie Curtis Park). In lieu of flowers, donations to the Ian Anderson House, 430 Winston Churchill Blvd., Oakville, Ontario L6J 7X2 would be greatly appreciated.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-09 published
He made his mark on city and nation
By WARREN Gerard, Special To The Star
Beland HONDERICH rose from plain beginnings to become one of the most influential Canadians of his day, using his power as publisher of Canada's largest newspaper to influence the agenda in politics and business at every level.
At the same time he set new standards for informed, in-depth, responsible reporting.
HONDERICH, publisher of the Toronto Star for 22 of his 52 years at the paper, died in Vancouver at 86 yesterday following a stroke.
HONDERICH was a fiercely private man, almost reclusive, but that didn't keep him from being an impatient perfectionist, a leader whose principal ethic was work.
The Star was his life, his passion.
Among his many honours, and one he treasured, was his election in 1986 to the News Hall of Fame by journalists across Canada for leading "Canadian newspapers into a new direction, taking readers backstage to explore and explain the current events that shaped their lives."
HONDERICH left the publisher's office in 1988, going on to become board chairman of the newspaper and its parent company, Torstar Corp. He retired from that position in 1994, but maintained an office across from the newsroom on the fifth floor at One Yonge St. until 1999.
Beland Hugh HONDERICH was born in Kitchener on November 25, 1918, and grew up in the nearby village of Baden. He was proud of his pioneer roots -- Mennonites from Germany who found religious freedom in Waterloo County in the early 1800s.
"My father was a man who stood for religious freedom, and I am proud to follow in his footsteps," HONDERICH once said.
His father, John HONDERICH, was ostracized in the staunchly traditional Mennonite community because he and young Beland went to hear a speaker from another Amish sect. The shunning, as it was called, meant that other Reform Mennonites were forbidden to sit down to eat with them or to shake their hands.
Nor did his father quite fit in with his thrifty, hard-working neighbours in other ways. A sometime beekeeper, homespun village philosopher, printer and pamphleteer for liberal causes, he was "not a very good provider" in a community where work was next to godliness.
His mother, Rae, was the family's main breadwinner. She was the local telephone operator, a job that included the use of a train station in Baden which served as a home for the HONDERICHs and their six children. HONDERICH recalled that the family never went hungry, but there was little money for anything but food.
He gathered coal along the railway tracks to heat their home and carried water in summer to gangs of workers repairing the roads. In the mornings, he worked around the Canadian National Railway station, sweeping and cleaning up for 40 cents a day.
Despite winning a regional debating championship with his sister Ruth -- they defended the proposition that the Soviet way of life was superior to the American way -- he struggled to pass high school entrance examinations.
HONDERICH didn't do well in high school. And it didn't help that he had to hitchhike 16 kilometres to and from school in Kitchener. As a result, his attendance was spotty and his marks were poor. He was demoted in his second year to a commercial course "where at least I learned to type."
Discouraged, he dropped out of school and got a job as a farmhand at the beginning of the Great Depression, much to his mother's displeasure. "You can do better than that," he recalled her saying on more than one occasion.
The farm job didn't last. His introduction to reporting came about because his father was hard of hearing and took his son to public meetings and political rallies to take notes. It taught the young HONDERICH, who was later to battle deafness himself, to write quickly and accurately.
He inherited a Kitchener-Waterloo Record paper route from one of his brothers, which led him to become the paper's correspondent for Baden at 10 cents a column inch. He created news by organizing a softball team and covering its games for the paper.
When he was 17, fires on successive nights destroyed two barns owned by a prominent Baden farmer. Arson was suspected and the young HONDERICH's coverage so impressed his editors that they offered him a tryout as a cub reporter in Kitchener at $15 a week.
He showed up for work in a mismatched jacket and pants and with his two front teeth missing from a tough hockey game the night before. He didn't shine as a reporter.
The publisher, W.J. MOTZ, concluded after a week that HONDERICH was in the wrong line of work and told city editor Art LOW/LOWE/LOUGH to fire him. But LOW/LOWE/LOUGH saw something in the youngster and persuaded MOTZ to give him a second chance.
LOW/LOWE/LOUGH worked HONDERICH hard. He gave him an assignment each evening to go along with his day job. Ed HAYES, who worked at the Record in those days, recalled in an interview that HONDERICH (or "Bee" as he was nicknamed) was determined to succeed.
"Each reporter was supposed to turn in a story every afternoon at the end of his shift. Bee wasn't satisfied with that. He'd turn in two, three or more.
"He was the darling of the city desk."
As time went by, he improved, becoming more and more confident. He was also developing into a perfectionist. So much so, in fact, that he'd bet an ice cream with an assistant city editor that he would find nothing that needed to be changed in a HONDERICH story.
At first, he recalled, it cost him a lot of ice cream cones, but later he rarely had to pay off.
In those early days at the Record, HONDERICH knew he had a country bumpkin image. So when he had saved enough money, he went to a quality menswear store and asked the manager to show him how to dress. He bought a dark pin-striped suit, complete with vest, and that look became his uniform in life.
A fellow staffer at the Record recalled HONDERICH borrowing a bike from a delivery boy and speeding off to an assignment in his pin-striped suit.
And co-workers described him as a loner who rarely headed for the beer parlour with the boys after work, though he was known to sip a scotch on special occasions. Mostly, he went to Norm Jones' restaurant for a milkshake.
Though he spent most of his time working, he taught Sunday school at a Presbyterian church, and served as secretary for a minor hockey league.
This involvement brought him into contact with Milt DUNNELL, the legendary Star sports columnist, who had made a name for himself at the Stratford Beacon Herald before heading for Toronto. He told HONDERICH that the Star was looking for reporters to replace those who had enlisted to serve in World War 2. HONDERICH, who had been rejected by the Royal Canadian Air Force and merchant marine because of poor eyesight and hearing, applied to the Star in 1943 and was hired as a reporter for $35 a week.
He was proud that the Kitchener city council gave him a vote of thanks for his fair reporting. And MOTZ, the publisher who thought he would never make it in the newspaper business, begged him not to go.
Stepping into the grandly marbled lobby of the Star's building at 80 King St. W., HONDERICH recalled that he was "scared as hell." But he was in the right place. This was the world of Joe ATKINSON.
As publisher, Joseph E. ATKINSON had guided the paper through most of the first half-century and was seen by friend and foe alike as one of the country's leading reformers. It turned out that the publisher and his new employee had some things in common.
Both had come from large, impoverished, God-fearing families in small-town Ontario, and quit school early to put food on the table. "One thing I had in common with Joe ATKINSON," HONDERICH recalled, "is that I knew need."
There was a major difference, however. ATKINSON was a star of Canadian journalism in 1899 when the new owners of the Toronto Evening Star hired him at 34 to run the paper. HONDERICH was 24 when he arrived at the paper, an unproven asset at the time.
But he didn't take long to prove himself. His work was soon noticed by Harry C. HINDMARSH, ATKINSON's son-in-law and the man who ran the newsroom.
HINDMARSH sent HONDERICH to Saskatchewan for the election that brought Tommy Douglas and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (later to become the New Democratic Party) to power in 1944.
The next year he was sent back to do a progress report on North America's first socialist government. His stories were so enthusiastically some thought naively -- positive that the Saskatchewan government asked permission to reprint them.
They also caught the eye of Joe ATKINSON, whose reform ideas were at home with the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation's, although he never endorsed the party at election time. HONDERICH was marked as someone worth watching. He was asked to fill in as an editorial writer, the newspaper job he enjoyed most of all.
Some critics said HONDERICH's writing lacked flair or style. But it was clear. He explained complicated matters in simple, accurate terms. His idea was to dive right into a story, delivering the promise of the headline in the first paragraph.
In his reporting career, HONDERICH covered a wide variety of assignments, collecting his share of scoops, enough to impress HINDMARSH. In 1946, he called in HONDERICH, congratulated him on a story, then remarked, "Oh, by the way, the financial editor left today. I'd like you to start as financial editor on Monday."
"But I don't know the difference between a stock and a bond," HONDERICH replied.
"You'll learn," HINDMARSH said.
HONDERICH told HINDMARSH he would take the job on the condition that he be allowed to go back to feature writing if it didn't work out.
"If you don't make a go of it, you'll go out the door," HINDMARSH said in a menacing way.
It goes without saying that HONDERICH made a go of it.
One of the first things he noticed from his new desk was a tailor at work in a building across King St. He decided his business section would write for that tailor, for the ordinary person.
His News Hall of Fame citation noted: "He led in turning the writing and presentation of financial news into a readable subject in terms that interest the average reader." He criticized the stock exchange, questioned banking methods, recommended profit sharing, and supported credit unions and other co-operatives.
But when there were major stories to be covered, HINDMARSH often took HONDERICH out of his financial department and sent him all over the globe -- to Newfoundland on the eve of its joining Canada, to Argentina where press freedom was under attack, to Asia with Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent for the first round-the-world trip taken by a Canadian prime minister, and to Britain for the funeral of George VI.
In 1948, HONDERICH, along with 12 other employees, chartered the first Canadian local of the American Newspaper Guild. As president of the union, he signed the first contract with the Star.
Some members of the union were suspicious, however, thinking that as financial editor he was "a company stooge" trying to make sure the Guild didn't fall into the hands of disgruntled left-wingers.
They weren't aware, however, that he knew all about bad working conditions because he had done both day and night assignments as a young reporter in Kitchener.
He served three terms as Guild president and helped win better pay and working conditions. Later, on the other side of the negotiating table, he continued to believe in the need for an organized newsroom, although that view was severely tested in a bitter strike in HONDERICH had become a major force in the newsroom when ATKINSON died in 1948 after nearly 50 years as publisher of a racy paper with principles.
His death, however, created a crisis at the paper. ATKINSON's will had left the Star to a charitable foundation to be administered by his trustees. However, the Ontario Conservative government passed the Charitable Gifts Act, which said no charity could own more than 10 per cent of a business.
The government may have viewed the will as an attempt to escape death duties, but more likely the legislation was an attempt to muzzle the Star, a liberal thorn in the Tory side.
Nevertheless, it became a distinct possibility the paper might be sold to outside interests. Bidders, including beer baron E.P. TAILOR/TAYLOR, were lining up for a chance to buy what had become Canada's most profitable daily.
The Star was granted stays of execution however, and HINDMARSH, the founder's son-in-law, succeeded ATKINSON until his own death in 1956. In the HINDMARSH years, the paper seemed to lose direction and much of its fairness, particularly in the reporting of politics. The paper's reputation was going downhill.
Meanwhile, HONDERICH had been appointed editor-in-chief in 1955 and a couple of years later he was appointed to the board, after HINDMARSH's sudden death. It put him in the position of becoming an owner of the paper.
Walter GORDON, an accountant who was to become finance minister in Lester Pearson's Liberal government, worked out a plan for the trustees to buy the Star by putting up $1 million among the six of them, including HONDERICH. The paper was valued at $25.5 million.
At the time, the sale price was the most ever paid in Canada for a newspaper, and it turned out to be a steal. Under HONDERICH's leadership, Torstar, the Star's parent company, would become a more than $1 billion enterprise over the next 30-plus years.
For readers and the staff, the HONDERICH years had begun, although he didn't take over as publisher until 1966. Immediately, however, he went about remaking the paper. Headlines didn't scream any more, and the silly and the sensational disappeared from the paper.
HONDERICH was putting his stamp on the Star. Reporting only the facts wasn't good enough. He demanded thorough backgrounding of stories to make them understandable to the average reader. Or, as he said, for "my barber."
He created a great newsroom that included sports columnist DUNNELL and leading Canadian writers such as Pierre BERTON, Peter NEWMAN, Charles TEMPLETON and Nathan COHEN, as well as award-winning cartoonist Duncan MacPHERSON.
HONDERICH returned the Star to the principles of Joseph E. ATKINSON, including a reform-centred editorial policy. Unemployment, affordable housing, adequate welfare benefits, medicare, pensions, minority rights, the need for an independent Canada -- these became subjects he demanded be dealt with on a daily basis.
In one of his rare public appearances, he told a group of editors in 1961 that "the basic function of a newspaper is to inform, to tell the public what is happening in the community, in the nation and in the world. You will notice I did not use the word, entertain." He felt that television had made entertainment a secondary function for newspapers. "How much better then, to concentrate on what we can do best, and that is to inform the public."
The change was most evident in the Star's treatment of politics and economics. The background feature gradually became commonplace in North American journalism, and a poll of U.S. editors rated the Star one of the world's 10 top foreign papers.
Critics of the HONDERICH way -- many of them highly placed in the paper -- couldn't wait for HONDERICH's grey, humourless Star to fail, but they were doomed to disappointment, just as surely as the Star's competitor -- the unchanging Telegram -- was doomed to extinction.
Not only did the Star's circulation grow, so did its profits.
Honesty and integrity were words that most people associated with HONDERICH. But many on his staff found him a demanding taskmaster, an uncompromising and often difficult man to deal with. There was never any doubt that Beland HONDERICH was the boss. He wasn't one for chit-chat.
Early in his career as publisher, he all but cut himself off from the social whirl of movers and shakers. He admitted to becoming almost reclusive after finding himself challenged at social functions and parties to defend Star policies he felt needed no defence, especially since he had put them into place.
But he never felt that way about the public at large. The so-called Little Guy could get him on the phone more easily than a celebrity could. His home number was in the book. And in the days when the Star was an afternoon paper, it wasn't unusual for an evening editor to get a call from HONDERICH, who in turn had received an irate call at home from a reader whose paper hadn't been delivered.
The paper would be delivered by taxi, and the taxi company was instructed to report to the editor the moment the paper had arrived. Then HONDERICH would phone the reader to make sure he was satisfied.
The first part of his 12-hour working day was spent poring over page proofs, quarrelling about leads of stories, questioning something in the 25th paragraph, asking for more background, and demanding follow-ups.
He was articulate, often painfully so for the person at the other end of his complaints. His editors took great pleasure when he demanded "antidotal" leads. He meant anecdotal leads.
Notes with the heavy-handed BHH signature on them rained from his office.
The difficulty everyone had in pleasing him and the way he prowled the newsroom won him the nickname "The Beast." And he was called "Drac" by some editors who thought he, like the vampire, sucked the staff dry.
When the paper departed from what the reader had come to believe was a Star tradition, he took to the typewriter to explain the reasons himself. In 1972, for example, he put his initials on an editorial that explained why the Star was supporting Progressive Conservative Robert Stanfield over Liberal Pierre Trudeau in the federal election.
In his rare public appearances, the nasal flatness of his voice often disguised the passion he felt for a subject. However, he was an effective spokesman for the causes he championed. In defending the Star's strong stand on economic nationalism, he told the Canadian Club it was based on the need to preserve the differences between Canada and the United States.
"I think our society tends to be more compassionate, somewhat less extreme and certainly less violent," he said. "We put more emphasis on basic human needs such as health insurance and pensions."
He warned that increased U.S. ownership of Canadian resources would endanger our ability to maintain those differences.
In a 1989 speech at Carleton University in Ottawa, he caused a stir when he argued that objectivity in newspapers was neither possible nor desirable.
"No self-respecting newspaper deliberately distorts or slants the news to make it conform to its own point of view," he said. "But you cannot publish a newspaper without making value judgments on what news you select to publish and how you present it in the paper.
"And these value judgments reflect a view of society -- a point of view if you will -- that carries as much weight, if not more, than what is said on the editorial page."
Just as ATKINSON used the news pages to popularize reform ideas, HONDERICH used them as a weapon in his own causes.
One example was his reaction to a document leaked to him outlining then-prime minister Brian Mulroney's government strategy on free trade. It said the communications strategy "should rely less on educating the public than getting across the message that the free trade initiative is a good idea -- in other words a selling job."
HONDERICH made sure all aspects of free trade were put under the kind of scrutiny the government wanted to avoid, particularly the possible effects on employment and social benefits.
Simon REISMAN, the bellicose chief trade negotiator, accused HONDERICH of personally waging a vendetta against free trade. He said HONDERICH used the Star "in a manner that contradicts every sense of fairness and decency in the newspaper business."
In reply, the unrepentant publisher said: "The role of a newspaper, as I see it, is to engage in the full and frank dissemination of the news and opinion from the perspective of its values and particular view of society. It should report the news fairly and accurately, reflect all pertinent facts and opinions and not only what the official establishment thinks and says."
As publisher, he demonstrated an impressive business savvy for a man who once said he hardly knew the difference between a stock and a bond. In 1972, he moved the paper to new quarters at One Yonge St.
And later, in his position as chief executive officer of the parent company, Torstar Corp., he acquired Harlequin Enterprises, the world's largest publisher of romance books, and 15 community newspapers to add to the 14 the Star already owned in the Toronto area.
At the same time, HONDERICH still was very much making his mark in journalism. He was the first in Canada to introduce a bureau of accuracy and to appoint an ombudsman to represent the reader in the newsroom. In a wider sense, he was the main force behind the establishment of the Ontario Press Council, where readers can take their complaints to an independent body.
As well as his election to the News Hall of Fame, he was honoured in other ways, receiving doctors of law degrees from Wilfrid Laurier and York universities, and the Order of Canada in 1987.
HONDERICH was married three times, the last time on New Year's Day 2000 to Rina WHELAN of Vancouver, the city where he lived until his death. He had two sons: John, who followed in his father's footsteps to become publisher of the Star, and David, an entrepreneur and one daughter, Mary, a philosophy and English teacher. He also had six grandchildren.
Even into his eighties, HONDERICH exercised daily and loved to play bridge, golf and fish.
Charles E. PASCAL, executive director of the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, recalled golfing with HONDERICH after he had entered his eighties. PASCAL was in his mid-fifties.
"I expected to be slowed down by playing with a couple of guys in their seventies and one in his eighties," PASCAL said. "Bee, as with everything else, played golf with determination, focus and tenacity. I was quite impressed with his golfing. He was very competitive."
After HONDERICH stepped down as publisher in 1988, and as a director of Torstar in 1995, he lost none of his zeal for pursuing causes. He did this through the Atkinson Charitable Foundation and his own personal philanthropy.
"His role on our board was absolutely essential, forceful, radical," PASCAL said.
"I had the sense that the older he got he became more and more impatient. He was impatient, just impatient, about all that is yet to be done by governments and others to reduce the inequities for those who are disadvantaged through no fault of their own."
He was generous in his giving and, as was his character, he had no interest in public recognition or praise.
"He just had no time whatsoever for personal recognition," PASCAL recalled.
"I think he would have liked to have been around forever if for no other reason than to contribute more."
At HONDERICH's request, there will be a cremation, after which the family will hold a small private gathering to celebrate his life.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-19 published
QUIGLEY, Dr. Merv " Doc"
Peacefully at Caressant Care Nursing Home, Lindsay on Thursday, November 17, 2005. Merv QUIGLEY, in his 104th year, was the beloved husband of the late Estelle Nelles QUIGLEY. Dear father of Patricia WHELAN and husband Dennis WHELAN, John N. QUIGLEY and wife Kathy Deegan QUIGLEY, Suzanne McDONALD and predeceased by Robert M. QUIGLEY. Father in law of Marion QUIGLEY. Loving grandfather of Katherine, Andrew, Steven, Jamie, Peter, Jenifer, Michael, Paul and Brian. Great grandfather of Brian, Jennifer, Heather, Michelle, Michael, Jasmine, Tara, Mackenzie, Austin, Chase, and Caylee. Uncle to Marie, Marguerite and Ronny. Private family service will be held at Jardine Funeral Home, "Illman-Platten Chapel", 8 Princes' St. W., Fenelon Falls. Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Lindsay. Memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. On line condolences and donations can be made at www.jardinefuneralhomes.com

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