TRUANT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-31 published
CHERRY, William James
William James CHERRY, longtime resident of London, Ontario and formerly of Ladner, British Columbia, passed away peacefully after a short illness at University Hospital on January 29, 2005. William, typically known to all as Bill, was 73 years young and left us much too soon. Bill is survived by his loving wife, Josephine, a lifetime resident of London, his son Wayne CHERRY and his wife Cathy, his daughter Wendy CHERRY- TRUANT and her husband Rick, and youngest son David CHERRY. Bill 's grandchildren include from oldest to youngest Lisa CHERRY, Alison CHERRY, Dean CHERRY, Samantha GRANT- CHERRY and Michael Connor TRUANT. He is also survived by many brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, and nieces and nephews on Josephine's side. Bill was part of a large close-knit family originating in Ladner, British Columbia, and his siblings are Dick CHERRY, deceased, Winifred HUBERT, deceased, Douglas CHERRY of Calgary and Mildred LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH of Kelowna, British Columbia. He is now reunited in heaven with his wonderful parents, James and Kate CHERRY and his dear aunt and uncle Leona and Clifford WRIGHT.
Bill in his younger years served as a pilot in the Canadian Armed Forces, succeeded as a sales manager for International Harvester and Silverwoods, and was a long time employee of recognition for the Ford Motor Company in Talbotville. He was well renowned in his hometown for being a high school star in basketball, boxing and lacrosse, and thoroughly enjoyed family, Friends, good conversation, hockey, construction, engineering and politics. Visitation and the funeral will both take place at the John T. Donohue Funeral Home at 362 Waterloo Street in London. Visitation will be from 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, February 2, and the funeral the next day, Thursday, February 3 at 12: 00 noon. Bill will rest at St. Peter's Cemetery on Victoria Street in London. As expression of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be greatly appreciated.

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TRUANT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-01 published
CHERRY, William James
William James CHERRY, longtime resident of London, Ontario and formerly of Ladner, British Columbia, passed away peacefully after a short illness at University Hospital on January 29, 2005. William, typically known to all as Bill, was 73 years young and left us much too soon. Bill is survived by his loving wife, Josephine, a lifetime resident of London, his son Wayne CHERRY and his wife Cathy, his daughter Wendy CHERRY- TRUANT and her husband Rick, and youngest son David CHERRY. Bill 's grandchildren include from oldest to youngest Lisa CHERRY, Alison CHERRY, Dean CHERRY, Samantha GRANT- CHERRY and Michael Connor TRUANT. He is also survived by many brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, and nieces and nephews on Josephine's side. Bill was part of a large close-knit family originating in Ladner, British Columbia, and his siblings are Dick CHERRY, deceased, Winifred HUBERT, deceased, Douglas CHERRY of Calgary and Mildred LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH of Kelowna, British Columbia. He is now reunited in heaven with his wonderful parents, James and Kate CHERRY and his dear aunt and uncle Leona and Clifford WRIGHT.
Bill in his younger years served as a pilot in the Canadian Armed Forces, succeeded as a sales manager for International Harvester and Silverwoods, and was a long time employee of recognition for the Ford Motor Company in Talbotville. He was well renowned in his hometown for being a high school star in basketball, boxing and lacrosse, and thoroughly enjoyed family, Friends, good conversation, hockey, construction, engineering and politics. Visitation and the funeral will both take place at the John T. Donohue Funeral Home at 362 Waterloo Street in London. Visitation will be from 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, February 2, and the funeral the next day, Thursday, February 3 at 12: 00 noon. Bill will rest at St. Peter's Cemetery on Victoria Street in London. As expression of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be greatly appreciated.

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TRUANT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-08 published
WAINWRIGHT, Gerald Ernest
At Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital on Monday, June 6th, 2005 Gerald Ernest WAINWRIGHT of Strathroy in his 54th year. Survived by his aunts Ruth TRUANT of London, Viola MASON of Independence Utah and Doreen LUDWIG of Indiana. Visitation will be held at the Denning Bros. Funeral Home, 32 Metcalfe St. W., Strathroy on Wednesday June 8th, 2005 from 7 to 9 p.m. with funeral service on Thursday June 9th at 2: 00 p.m. Reverend Tony VANDENENDE officiating. Interment Strathroy Cemetery. Donations to Middlesex Community Living would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Gerald.

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TRUANT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-06 published
BROWNING, Sheldon
A resident of Wallaceburg, passed away on Friday, November 4, 2005 at Sydenham Campus, in Wallaceburg, at the age of 79 years. He was a son of the late Ernest and Della (CHAPMAN) BROWNING. Beloved husband of 57 years to Doreen (JONES) BROWNING. Loving father and father-in-law of Sheldon Jr. and Deb BROWNING of Toronto. Kind brother of Sherman BROWNING of Sarnia and Ora TRUANT of Windsor. Predeceased by a brother Ken and his sisters Opal, Orma and Lois. Visitation will be held at the Eric F. Nicholls Funeral Home, 639 Elgin Street, Wallaceburg on Sunday, November 6, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held from the chapel of the funeral home on Monday, November 7, 2005 at 2 p.m. Interment will be in Riverview Cemetery, Wallaceburg. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation may be left at the funeral home.

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TRUAX o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-11 published
BOYES, Donald Thomas
Donald Thomas BOYES, of Chesley, passed away at his residence on Tuesday, November 8th, 2005 in his 69th year. Beloved husband of Bernice. Loving father to Michael and his wife Lise, of Keswick. Don will be sadly missed by his two step-granddaughters, Stephanie and Jennifer and step-great-grand_son Richard. Cherished brother of Dave and his wife Joanne, of Chesley, Doug, of Chesley, and Lynda and her husband Dave TRUAX, of Seattle. He will be fondly remembered by his sister-in-law, Joyce and her husband Keith GALBRAITH, of Keady, as well as many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents, Thomas and Dorothy (THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) BOYES. Visitation will be held at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Chesley, on Saturday, November 12th, 2005 from 12: 00 p.m. until the time of the funeral service at 2: 00 p.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Salvation Army or the charity of your choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Funeral arrangments entrusted to Cameron Funeral Home, Chesley.
Page B8

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TRUAX o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-12-27 published
TRUAX, A. Charles

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TRUAX o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-26 published
ARMSTRONG, Robert George
Robert George of R.R.#4 Saint Thomas, on Thursday, March 24, 2005, at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, in his 81st year. Beloved husband of the late Frances Jean (TRUAX) ARMSTRONG and loved father of Gordon and his wife Daryl ARMSTRONG of Lyons, Barbara WILEY and her partner Bryan BRUNSDON of Aylmer and Judy CRUICKSHANK of London. Dear brother of Kathleen McLARTY of West Lorne, Alan ARMSTRONG of R.R.#4 Saint Thomas and the late Leslie ARMSTRONG and Jean BURKS. Loved grandfather of Adam, Kristen, Rebecca, Kevin, Scott, Jessica and Matthew and great-grandfather of Madison, Emilie and Dylan. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews. George was born in Saint Thomas on July 15, 1924, the son of the late John A. and Ethel (ELSON) ARMSTRONG. He co-owned Armstrong Home Bakery in Lucknow and the Hill and Dale Bakery in Belmont with his wife. Cremation has taken place in London. There will be an open house on Sunday, April 3rd from 2-4 p.m. at the home of his daughter Barbara at 9 Hawthorne Crescent, Aylmer. Flowers gratefully declined with remembrances to the Shriners Hospital for Children. Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas in charge of arrangements.

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TRUAX o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-28 published
TRUAX, Charles A.
At Guelph General Hospital on Sunday, December 25, 2005 after a brief yet courageous fight with cancer. Charles TRAUX of Mount Forest was in his 75th year. Beloved husband and best friend of Gloria (MCFARLEN) TRAUX. Loving father of Debbie VAN DEN BROEK and husband Frank of Mount Forest, Chris WILSON and husband Robert of Owen Sound, Laurence TRAUX of London, Bob TRAUX and wife Carol of Drew, Terry NOONE and husband Dave of Mount Forest and Steve TRAUX and wife Kim of Mount Forest. Loving and cherished grandfather of 14 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren. Dear brother of Lois CAFIK and husband John of Wroxeter and brother-in-law of Betty TRAUX and Judy TRAUX both of Mount Forest. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers Rod TRAUX and Paul TRAUX. Charlie was a dedicated member of the Mount Forest Fire Department 2 months short of 43 years. He also served our community as it's secretary for 27 years and was the training officer for 12 years. He was a lifetime member of the Ontario Firefighters Association, President of the Mutual Aid Association for 3 years and was a member of the Ontario Fire Chiefs Association of Ontario for 12 years. Charles proudly served as Mount Forest Fire Chief for 12 years. At Charles request cremation has taken place and a private family gathering will be held in his honour. In lieu of flowers the family would greatly appreciate memorial donations to the Mount Forest Fire Department. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Hendrick Funeral Home, Mount Forest (519) 323-2631.

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TRUAX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-28 published
TRUAX, Keitha Lynne
Passed away at Toronto East General Hospital on November 23, 2005 after a courageous battle with cancer. Born in Fort Frances, Ontario and educated at the University of Western Ontario and the University of Toronto Library School. A long-time employee of the Ontario Government Health Policy Branch. Survived by her mother, Hazel, and her brother Michael (Anne) and family. Predeceased by her father Ellsworth "Tood".
She will be sorely missed by many Friends. Lynne's was a life well lived. Celebrate her memory. Cremation has taken place according to Lynne's wishes. Interment at a later date in Fort Frances.

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TRUAX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-17 published
TRUAX, Frances " Jane" (née DENISON)
Peacefully, at Glebe Manor on December 16, 2005. Wife of the late Albert William TRUAX. Mother of Charles and his wife Barbara, and John and his wife Robin of Cincinnati. Grandmother of Adam and Glenn, and Robert and Lauren. Sister of Margaret DENISON and Bill DENISON. Fondly remembered by Ron BEBEN. Daughter of the late Alice and Leslie DENISON. Cremation has taken place. Interment at a later date at the family cemetery, Saint John's on the Humber. The family wishes to thank Glebe Manor for their gentle care.

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TRUAX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-05 published
McCLOSKEY, Mable Josephine (SOMERVILLE)
Passed away at the Hilltop Manor in Merrickville on Sunday, October 2, 2005, Mable SOMERVILLE, in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late Richard Delamere McCLOSKEY. Loving mother of Charles of Jasper, Joanna TRUAX (Bill) of Mississauga and Jim (Pam) of Barrie. Cherished grandmother of David of Brampton and Debbie (Brian) CATER of Barrie, Jennifer and Jordon McCLOSKEY, both of Barrie and great-grandmother of Breanne, Shane and Courtney CATER and Cody TRUAX. Predeceased by her sister Daisy and by her brother Neil. Also sadly missed by her many nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Lannin Funeral Home in Smiths Falls on Wednesday, October 5, 2005 from 9 to 11 a.m. Funeral service will follow at 11: 00 a.m. in the chapel. Interment Wolford Cemetery. Inmemory of Mable, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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TRUAX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-17 published
TRUAX, Frances " Jane" (née DENISON)
Peacefully, at Glebe Manor, on December 16, 2005. Wife of the late Albert William TRUAX. Mother of Charles and his wife Barbara, and John and his wife Robin of Cincinnati. Grandmother of Adam and Glenn, and Robert and Lauren. Sister of Margaret DENISON and Bill DENISON. Fondly remembered by Ron BEBEN. Daughter of the late Alice and Leslie DENISON. Cremation has taken place. Interment at a later date at the family cemetery, Saint John's on the Humber. The family wishes to thank Glebe Manor for their gentle care.

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TRUBECKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-24 published
CRAIG, John Wakefield
Peacefully, at the Coleman Care Centre in Barrie, with his daughter by his side, on Wednesday, June 22, 2005. Beloved husband of the late Madeleine DOWNING. Dear father of Linda SAUNDERSON. Loving brother of Elizabeth NORMAN, brother-in-law of Audrey SPARLING and Reg JENKINS. John was predeceased by his sister Ann JENKINS and brothers Andrew and David CRAIG. He will be sadly missed by his nieces Kathleen MICUCCI, Patricia TRUBECKI, nephew Roger JENKINS, and great-uncle to Kathy MICUCCI, Paul MICUCCI, Robert TRUBECKI and Joshua, Parker, David and Jacob. Friends will be received at the Eglinton Chapel of McDougall and Brown, 1812 Eglinton Avenue West, on Friday, June 24, 2005 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service on Saturday, June 25 at 11 a.m. Interment Beechwood Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations made to the Alzheimer Society would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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TRUBY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-12 published
MAJOR, Eddy
With his family at his side at Parkwood Hospital, London, on Sunday, October 9, 2005, Eddy MAJOR in his 74th year. Beloved husband of Olga MAJOR (TRUBY) of London. Dear father of Karen LAING of London. Loving grandfather of Christopher and Mark. Brother of Kay and Shirley. Cremation has taken place. Family will receive Friends from 10 a.m. until the Memorial Mass at St. George's Catholic Church, 1164 Commissioners Road, West, London on Thursday, October 13, 2005 at 11 a.m. Expressions of sympathy or donations (Parkwood Hospital Palliative Care) would be appreciated and may be made through London Cremation Services 672-0459 or online at www.londoncremation.com

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TRUCHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-23 published
RISDAHL, Gladys Patricia Rachel (née FERGUSON)
'Mom - Grandma- Nanny' (March 17, 1915-November 18, 2005)
Peacefully after a courageous battle with cancer, on Friday, November 18, 2005 at Saint Mary's Hospital at the age of ninety years and 8 months. She was born in Spruce Grove, Alberta on March 17, 1915, predeceased by husband Gordon and survived by sisters Dorothy and Shirley. Gladys was the loving mother of June PEARCE (the late Donald,) Gabriola, British Columbia, Gerald (wife Patricia,) Fenelon Falls, Ontario, Patricia MATTHEWS (husband Jim,) Mississauga, Ontario, Darlene TRUCHAN (husband Henry,) Laval, Québec, Wayne (wife Marlene), Kanata, Ontario. She was also the proud grandmother of 14, great-grandmother of 25 and great-great-grandmother of 1. Gladys will be sadly missed by dear Friends in Orlando, Florida and Lake MacDonald in the Laurentians. Family will receive condolences on Thursday, November 24, 2005 from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. and on Friday, November 25, 2005 at 2 p.m. at: Mount Royal Funeral Complex 1297 Chemin de la Forêt Outremont, Québec, H2V 2P9 (514) 279-6540 A celebration of her life will be held on Friday, November 25th, 2005 at 3 p.m. in the chapel of the Complex. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Quebec Cancer Foundation, Saint Mary's Hospital or the charity of your choice, would be greatly appreciated.

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TRUCHON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-28 published
BREYER, Samuel
Gone to be with his Lord on Monday, December 26, 2005 at Trillium Villa Nursing Home, Sarnia, Samuel BREYER age 93 of Sarnia. Devoted member of the First Christian Reformed Church, Sarnia. Beloved husband for 60 years to Alice (MENIST) BREYER. Loving father of Ann Catharine (Henry) SLOTEGRAAF of Clinton, Samuel BREYER of Sarnia and Grace CARVER (Eric FOWLER) of Sarnia. Cherished grandfather of Lisa and Ron SUZOR, Nancy FIELD, Patricia and Ken GOODBURN, Steven SLOTEGRAAF, Shawn SLOTEGRAAF, Roy SAMUEL and Kelly BREYER, Shawn Michael BREYER, Shona and Dan TRUCHON, Davina and Darin McKELLAR, Tanya CARVER, Darryl and Tara CARVER, Kim and Tim CALLAGHAN. Great-grandfather of Sheena and Tara SUZOR, Kelsey CAMERON, Eli and Olivia GOODBURN, Jacob and Joshua BREYER, Cassandra and Everett TRUCHON, Nichole, Rachel and Ryan McKELLAR, Brody CALLAGHAN and the late Nathaniel TRUCHON. Loved brother of Dina and the late Eise WEIMA of London, Dick and Florence BREYER of Wyoming, John and the late Hilda BREYER of Thedford, Ger BREYER of The Netherlands, Ann and the late Harry BREYER of Manitoulin Island and the late Peter and Janny BREYER. The funeral service will be held on Thursday, December 29, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. at First Christian Reformed Church 1105 Exmouth (at Murphy). Interment to follow in Resurrection Cemetery. Friends and family will be received at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia on Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 5 p.m. and evening from 7 to 9 p.m. Sympathy may be expressed through donation to World Vision. Memories and condolences may be sent online at www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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TRUCHON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-31 published
BREYER, Samuel
The funeral service for Samuel BREYER was held on Thursday, December 29, 2005 at First Christian Reformed Church with Pastor Harry MENNEGA officiating. "You Are" was sung by Tanya CARVER, accompanied by Ken GOODBURN. The trumpeter was Shona TRUCHON and the organist was Edith VANDENBERG. Pallbearers were Roy BREYER, Shawn BREYER, Darryl CARVER, Shawn SLOTEGRAAF, Steven SLOTEGRAAF and Dan TRUCHON. Honourary pallbearers were Jack KEEFE and Joe KNAPPER. Interment followed in Resurrection Cemetery. Devoted member of the First Christian Reformed Church, Sarnia. Beloved husband for 60 years to Alice (MENIST) BREYER. Loving father, grandfather, great grandfather and brother. Special thank you to Trillium Villa Nursing Home for their wonderful care and compassion for Mr. BREYER. Mr. BREYER went to be with his Lord on December 26, 2005. Arrangements entrusted to Smith Funeral Home, Sarnia.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-18 published
CARD, Paul Martin
At Bluewater Health Mitton Street Site, Sarnia, on Sunday, January 16, 2005, Paul Martin CARD, age 79, of Sarnia. Paul was a member of the Antique Car Club, the Coin Club and was a retired Real Estate Broker. Beloved husband of Dorothy (BOWES) CARD. Loved father of Cheryl CARD and Daryl CARD. Dear brother of Vernon CARD and his wife Barbara of Dorchester, Alice Bertha TRUDEAU and her husband Gerald of London. Will be sadly missed by several nieces, nephews and cousins. Predeceased by his parents Rev. Verge A. and Adelaide I. CARD and brother Claude M. CARD. A funeral service will be held at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia on Wednesday, January 19, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Friends will be received at the Smith Funeral Home on Tuesday afternoon from 2 to 4 pm and evening from 7 to 9 pm. Sympathy through donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Christian Horizons or Bethel Pentecostal Church would be appreciated by the family. Memories and condolences may be emailed to smithfuneralhome@cogeco.net

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-19 published
STAFFORD fought for the little guy
By Eric BUNNELL, Special to The Free Press
Saint Thomas -- Harold STAFFORD was remembered yesterday as a passionate advocate for the little guy, a benefactor who hid behind bluster, and a politician whose strong principals may have cost him a seat at the cabinet table. STAFFORD, a colourful and often controversial former Saint Thomas lawyer, died yesterday at his home at 83.
His was a life that his friend Bill JOHNSON, a fellow lawyer and Liberal, said yesterday may be impossible to sum up.
"He was such an intrinsically unique character that there are no parallels. There was only one mould and I think they broke it when they made Harold," he said.
"He would have been 84 on April 20. But Harold was like the Mississippi. You just expected him to continue to roll on."
Tributes yesterday came from as far away as Florida, including fellow former member of Parliament Eugene WHELAN, a prominent former agriculture minister.
"He served his country in many ways. Some people disagreed with him but to those of us who knew him, he was a darn good Canadian."
A native of New Brunswick, STAFFORD was introduced to Saint Thomas and his future wife, Betty during the Second World War. He came to the city as an air force sergeant who taught Commonwealth air crew.
Educated at the University of New Brunswick and the London School of Economics, STAFFORD was called to the bar in 1953 in Brantford and opened a Saint Thomas practice in 1955.
JOHNSON was a political science student studying Liberal fortunes in Elgin when he joined a candidate search in the riding and met STAFFORD, whom he subsequently recommended to the party.
JOHNSON, who later articled under STAFFORD, said there were two sides to the man -- gruff in public, but huge-hearted in private.
"He was a guy with a heart as big as the world. No one knows the good works he did, because of his bluff, curmudgeonly behaviour," he said.
He recalled STAFFORD once defended a 12-year-old boy hauled before the court on a charge of stealing a bicycle.
"His parents were as poor as church mice and this kid didn't have much chance of having anything. Harold not only defended the young man, but he went and bought him a bike."
JOHNSON said STAFFORD "had very strong principles and he would not vary from them."
STAFFORD's dislike of Pierre TRUDEAU was no secret, yet when the former Liberal prime minister died, STAFFORD was gracious in his tribute.
Driven to defend his clients, STAFFORD's principles also may have cost him his law practice.
He was forced in 2000 to resign from the bar as a condition of the Crown withdrawing a charge of obstruction of justice, arising from an allegation STAFFORD tried to influence a witness.
The allegation was never proved and STAFFORD continued to work as a paralegal.
After two failed bids, STAFFORD was elected Elgin member of Parliament in 1965 under then prime minister Lester PEARSON.
He retired from active politics following his 1972 defeat by Tory John WISE but maintained his interest in politics.
STAFFORD's hours and his late-night phone calls were the stuff of local legend.
JOHNSON recalled one judge giving weight to a client's alibi when the man testified he was in STAFFORD's office at 1 a.m.
WHELAN also remembered STAFFORD's ability to work long hours, as did former city lawyer Marietta ROBERTS, a former member of provincial parliament and now a judge.
"Harold had a brilliant mind and he was a very bright man," WHELAN said. "He'd stay up and work until two o'clock in the morning on cases or the work he had to do for Parliament. He had the stamina of four or five people."
Said Roberts of STAFFORD: "He lived life to the fullest and he gave his time and energy to the community for a number of years."
"Mind you," she added, "it might be 3 a.m."
Visitation hours for STAFFORD at Williams Funeral Home in St. Thomas are tomorrow from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
The funeral service is Friday at Knox Presbyterian Church at 1 p.m.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-22 published
JEROME served as Speaker, federal justice
Canadian Press
Ottawa -- James JEROME, who won wide respect as Speaker of the House of Commons in the 1970s and went on to serve for nearly two decades as associate chief justice of Federal Court, has died.
The former member of Parliament for Sudbury was 72.
Prime Minister Paul MARTIN, in a statement yesterday, paid tribute to JEROME as a dedicated and able parliamentarian, noting his mastery of House procedure, his reputation for fairness and impartiality and his "deep commitment to Parliament as a fundamental institution of Canadian democracy."
Born in Kingston, James Alexander JEROME studied law at Osgoode Hall in Toronto and later opened a legal practice in Sudbury, where he served on city council.
He won a Liberal seat in the Commons in 1968 and was appointed Speaker by then-prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU in 1974. He became the first-ever member of an opposition party to preside over the House during the short-lived Conservative government of Joe CLARK in 1979.
TRUDEAU appointed JEROME in 1980 to the post of associate chief justice and head of the trial division of Federal Court.
His departure, however, was marred by controversy in 1998.
JEROME resigned after coming under fire from Justice Department lawyers for slow handling of three deportation cases against alleged Nazi collaborators. The dispute sparked reforms to streamline court administration and speed up the hearing of cases.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-29 published
HAUGHTON, Clifford, 1990
Saturday, January 29, 2005 - Page S7
Businessman born in Toronto in 1930. A man who never went beyond high school, he first learned the print trade and then, at 22, went out on his own to start the printing concern Haughton Graphics. Trained in the hardscrabble school of small business, he got his start with an old hand-fed press and $500 in the bank. He then went out and won a lucrative contract to print business forms for Volkswagen, then an fast-expanding entrant in Canada's automotive trade. In 1969, his ABF Automated Business Forms Ltd. bought Comset Business Forms of Edmonton to form ABF Automated Business Forms (Western) Ltd. Significantly, he had also become a partner of John BASSETT. Baton Broadcasting Inc. owned 52 per cent of his company and Mr. HAUGHTON retained 38 per cent. By then, he was a fierce defender of the free-enterprise system so much so that he spent $55,000 to take out advertisements in Canadian newspapers attacking then prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU. The previously unknown businessman became a national celebrity. In 1981, Baton purchased all the outstanding shares of C.F. Haughton Ltd. and Mr. HAUGHTON took early retirement and moved to his property near Markham.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-02 published
Leslie (Laci) POPPER
By George POPPER, Wednesday, February 2, 2005 - Page A16
Cabinet maker, husband, father. Born July 12, 1925, in Hungary. Died November 30, 2004, in Toronto of acute renal failure, aged Leslie POPPER was a fine craftsman. Together with some colleagues in Montreal, he made some of the finest office furniture in North America. In addition to the Senate offices in Ottawa and countless boardrooms, they made Pierre TRUDEAU's office suite in the law firm where he spent his post-political years.
However, for me, as a kid growing up in Montreal, nothing could surpass the vision of Sam Pollack, the mastermind of my beloved Canadiens, with his feet atop a desk made by my dad.
He grew up in rural Hungary, the son of a Jewish lumber dealer. His parents sent him to be apprenticed to a cabinetmaker. He had a happy childhood until the fascists rounded up his family and took them to a ghetto in May, 1944. Being young and strong, he was taken to a forced labour camp while the rest of the family was shipped to Auschwitz. His sister survived the ordeal. After the war, he courted and married Blanche HAHN and moved to Budapest. I was born in 1950.
With the failure of the Hungarian Revolution in 1956 and the Russian tanks taking over the streets of the city, a number of families decided to escape the repressive Communist regime. They left everything behind, secretly crossed the muddy fields and passed the border guards one cold night in November to escape into Austria.
Arriving in Montreal in January was a shock; the cold, the snow and the exterior stairs covered in snow and ice surprised my father. Not easily deterred, they went straight to work even though they didn't know a word of English or French. With nine other workers, my father created a new business dedicated to the manufacture of hand-crafted fine furniture. He started as one of the cabinetmakers but eventually moved into a senior management position. He always showed respect for every individual he encountered in turn he was respected for his diligence, honesty and fairness.
Laci passed on his skills and his enthusiasm by teaching cabinetmaking at a technical school for many years. He kept the craft alive and managed to entice some of the top graduates to join his firm.
During the summer, he would take us camping in Algonquin Park or some other wilderness area. Boating was a favourite activity. Even after I had grown up and left the nest, he took great pleasure in taking his nieces and nephews camping.
Eventually he found his favourite place in the world; his own island in the Thousand Islands with a charming log cabin. He would delight in showing it to Friends, many of whom thought he was a bit crazy to spend all his free time in this isolated spot. His greatest joy was spending time with his grandchildren, Niki and Adam. He had an amazing capacity to relate to his grandchildren, sending them beautifully illustrated letters that would engage them at exactly their level.
Wilderness hikes, swimming, waterskiing and sailing were the favourite activities. Or just sitting around and watching the play of light on the water. There were always lots of Friends, food and laughter. The Maple Leaf flag was proudly displayed on his little flagpole on the dock.
He enjoyed his retirement, spending winters in Florida with his close circle of Friends. In the summer, there was always a new project or repair to be undertaken at the island. He welcomed his new daughter-in-law Kim and her sons Zack and Ari into his heart and delighted in their company at the cottage.
After enjoying this last summer, his health rapidly deteriorated. He died the same way he had lived his life: with great dignity, pride and independence of spirit.
George POPPER is Leslie's son.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-07 published
Tony COSTANZA, Hairdresser: 1928-2005
Immigrant from Italy took up barbering in Ottawa; for decades, he trimmed the locks of the important and not so important
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, February 7, 2005 - Page S6
Ottawa -- For 45 years, ambassadors, prime ministers, viceroys and thousands of less-celebrated men had their hair cut by Tony COSTANZA at the Roma Barber Shop on Elgin Street in Ottawa. Holding court behind his favourite barber chair -- the first on the right when you came in -- he dispensed advice, jokes, opinions and stories to a never-ending stream of customers.
Everyone felt welcome, from working stiffs to the late Ray HNATYSHYN when he was governor-general. Pierre Elliott TRUDEAU dropped by, as well as judges from the nearby provincial courthouse and cadres of lawyers from surrounding office buildings. National Defence Headquarters isn't far away, so he served soldiers, airmen and sailors of all ranks, too.
All his clients received the same, no-fuss treatment. The interior of the tiny shop, which also houses Tony's Smoke Shop, is decorated with postcards, military cap badges and framed photos of favourite clients. The late Conservative politician George Hees is up there, along with former chief of defence General Ramsey Withers, and Paul Robinson, a former U.S. ambassador to Canada.
Retired warrant officer Roger DESPARDE was one of many clients who made Friends with Mr. COSTANZA. "I was in at least once a week. I got to like him and we got along very well. He was like a brother to me, he confided in me."
The shop is an oasis of civility in an uncivil world, a place "where people came by to talk," said David HOMA, a long-time client who recognized Mr. COSTANZA for his acts of kindness. "From time to time, someone would come in for a haircut but couldn't pay. He'd thank them for their business, even though he knew they wouldn't be back to pay. I'm sure that happened a hundred times."
Originally from Sicily, Mr. COSTANZA served in the Italian border police in the late 1940s and then spent five years working in the coal mines of Lancashire, England. In 1955, he immigrated to Canada equipped with little English and just $20. A year later, he sent for his wife, Genoveffa, and son Alex.
Settling in Ottawa, he found work wherever he could. In 1955, he took up barbering. After working for others, Mr. COSTANZA set up on his own in 1960. Nine years later, he moved across the street to the present location and never looked back.
It wasn't easy, though. Six days a week, Mr. COSTANZA opened the shop at 7 a.m. and spent the next 13 hours there. He only took a vacation twice, returning to Italy in 1976 and 1988.
On a good day, he served about 10 clients, or roughly 100,000 haircuts in a career. Now and then, he felt obliged to exert professional influence. "If a guy wanted a particular style and my father thought he didn't have the hair for it, he would tactfully suggest something else," said son Mario COSTANZA. " The guy would usually walk away happy."
The late 1960s and early 1970s weren't kind to Mr. COSTANZA. Long hair was fashionable and most males no longer wanted a "short back and sides" every two weeks. He waited patiently for better days and played a lot of checkers.
However, things changed when son Alex COSTANZA began work at the shop. "I thought it would be a good idea to learn the trade and help my father out. We got along, didn't have any disagreements."
His younger brother Mario had already come to know the shop in the 1960s. He had a job there sweeping floors after school. "It was a thrill to be there and see my father at work and listen to him shooting the breeze with his customers. At the end of the day, he'd throw me a quarter."
In 1978, Mario decided to make it a family threesome. "I liked the relaxed atmosphere [so] I decided to follow in my father's footsteps."
On January 10, Tony COSTANZA cut his last head of hair. He went home early after deciding he did not feel well, and now his chair sits unoccupied and his brushes, scissors, clippers and combs lay untouched.
Gaetano (Tony) COSTANZA was born in Sicily on February 13, 1928. He died in Ottawa on January 13. He was 76. He leaves his wife, Genoveffa, sons Alex and Mario, and his sister, Concetta.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-09 published
Bob McADOREY, Broadcaster: 1935-2005
Deejay who helped determine what Toronto's youth listened to in the sixties went on to enjoy a 27-year run as a popular and irreverent figure on Global television
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, February 9, 2005 - Page S9
Toronto -- If you knew Peggy Sue, you knew Bob McADOREY. That's because, with his pile of curly hair and horn-rimmed glasses, the Toronto disc jockey was a ringer for Buddy Holly, the songwriter and singer from Texas whose song was a hit in 1959. The two men were born 10 months apart -- McADOREY in 1935, Holly in 1936 and actually met in the mid-1950s when Mr. McADOREY was a disc jockey in Guelph, Ontario, and the singer was on a tour of Canada.
"His job was to introduce Buddy Holly at a concert at Kitchener. When he went on stage, the crowd went wild, and Bob though 'Gee, I didn't know I was this popular,' " remembered his sister Pat RUSSELL. "Of course, they thought he was Buddy Holly."
For decades, Mr. McADOREY was the entertainment commentator on Global Television; he retired less than five years ago. But in an earlier era, he was a household name in Southern Ontario. In 1960, just a few months after Buddy Holly died in a plane crash in 1959, his look-alike joined Toronto's CHUM. Almost overnight, Bob McADOREY became the top disc jockey at CHUM, the No. 1 rock station in the country. He was astonished when the station paid him what he was asking for -- $7,200 a year (about $50,000 in today's money, according to the Bank of Canada's inflation calculator).
"Bob McADOREY, whose face is as well known in Toronto as Mayor Givens, has the most power to dictate what pop music Ontario teens listen to," wrote the Toronto Telegram in 1966.
Not only was he the on-air man in the key 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. slot, he was also the music director. He chose the records the other six disc jockeys played. He and the other disc jockeys decided on CHUM's Top 10, which sent kids to record stores to buy records with a big hole in the middle and a song on each side. They spun at 45 revolutions a minute and were called 45s.
"He alone commands what goes on the hit parade in Canada," wrote The Globe's Blake KIRBY in 1968. "Middle-aged squares who run record stores use the CHUM chart, the weekly list of what McADOREY is playing and plugging as a buying guide."
Along the way, he shared the footlights with such big-name visitors as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.
The CHUM hit parade made records such as The Unicorn by the Irish Rovers. Mr. McADOREY, a sentimental Irish-Canadian, pushed the record, which sold 140,000 copies in Canada and a million in the United States. But he didn't like everything on the CHUM chart. It was a business, after all.
"We're playing records here which I just can't bear to listen to, but I wouldn't let that influence what goes on the air," Mr. McADOREY once told The Globe and Mail. His sister said that when he went home after work, he was so sick of rock 'n' roll that he put earphones on and listened to classical music.
Like many successful big-city disc jockeys, Mr. McADOREY also ran dances on the weekends -- events with such names as Bob McAdorey's Canadian Bandstand or Canadian Hopville. He and a couple of other disc jockeys owned a company called Teen Scene Ltd., which put on dances in towns all over Southern Ontario.
After a long spell on CHUM, Bob McADOREY either was too old -- he was well into his 30s -- or too tired, and so he suddenly found himself fired. Unlike the regular corporate world, where people resign, in radio they are just plain sacked. Disc jockeys almost wear it as a badge of honour.
"There are no hard feelings," he told an entertainment writer in 1972 after he had been sacked from CFTR following a stint at CFGM. "I was told that it was either the station's new music-and-contests format or me." Within days, he had rejoined radio station CFGM.
A few years later, he morphed into television. No one told him that radio types, from the hot side of the Marshall McLuhan equation, are not supposed to be able to make the switch to the cool world of television. He perched on his stool in 1973 and performed for about 27 years.
Bob McADOREY was born within earshot of the Niagara Falls. His father worked as a machinist on the railway and the whole family lived near both the tracks and the roundhouse at Niagara Falls, Ontario For the rest of his life, Mr. McADOREY maintained a love affair with trains and rode them at every opportunity.
He went to high school at Stamford Collegiate. An Irish Catholic, he was one of two non-Protestants in the class. The other was Barbara FRUM, later the host of The Journal and As It Happens on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The two would spend the religious class in another room, enjoying their time off.
In Grade 12, Mr. McADOREY started work at the local radio station, doing a program in the early morning before class. "One day, the station manager told me to go on air and do the play-by-play of a local baseball game," he told the Toronto Star in 2000. "I didn't know the players' names and I didn't know much about baseball, so I sat in the bleachers and interviewed the spectators and it seemed to work."
After that, he was hooked. For a time, he worked all over -- including radio station CJDC in remote Dawson's Creek, British Columbia Even then, he was fairly outrageous. " CJDC had access to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation feeds," he said in 2000. "But nobody monitored us, so we sold everything -- the one o'clock time signal to a jewellery store, the Queen's Christmas Message brought to you by Sammy's Bar and Grill."
But it was soon after he had moved to Guelph, Ontario, that things really began to happen and he hit the big time at the age of 24 by working for CHUM.
Though he may have been at the top of the pop game in the Toronto of the sixties, he also became a national figure at Global as it expanded from a base in Southern Ontario to become the country's third network. He never applied for a job in television, it was just chance.
Bill CUNNINGHAM, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation foreign correspondent brought in to run Global News, hired him after he saw him speak during a tour of the new television station. At the time, Mr. McADOREY was working for Alan SLAIGHT, a prescient broadcaster who had run CHUM, bought CFGM and was one of the early owners of Global. Mr. CUNNINGHAM's plan was to lighten up the newscast and hire a kind of humourist-commentator. Thus, Mr. McADOREY covered entertainment and did light pieces for the newscast, heading out with a cameraman to find what he could. Once, during an Air Canada strike, he drifted out to Toronto's Pearson International Airport and happened to find Terminal 2 entirely deserted. The scene made irresistible camera fodder. The pair had time to erect an impromptu bowling alley and roll a few balls before the party was broken up by patrolling policemen.
The show was an enduring success. It helped that Mr. McADOREY was good-looking, possessed a great voice and was totally unaffected and unpretentious. Behind the scenes, though, Global was in turmoil and not just financially.
The network kept trying to reinvent itself. One idea was to bring in an untried newsreader, Suzanne PERRY, who was one of Pierre TRUDEAU's press aides and whose son, Matthew PERRY, went on to fame in the sitcom Friends. Sadly, Ms. PERRY was put on air before she was ready and that experiment failed.
A short while afterward, the network tried something called News at Noon, with Bob McADOREY doing entertainment, Mike ANSCOMBE the sports, and John DAWE, business. The three of them joked, made fun of each other, and did and said things you weren't supposed to see on television. All of a sudden, they had a huge audience, unheard of at that time of day.
"We broke new ground with 300,000 viewers at noon," said business reporter John DAWE. " Then it expanded and we did the 5: 30 news as well. We worked together for 14 years."
As he matured, Mr. McADOREY lost his Buddy Holly looks. Instead, he was often mistaken for another famous person with glasses and a mass of curly hair -- Ken TAILOR/TAYLOR, the Canadian ambassador to Iran who sheltered American colleagues during the 1979-80 hostage crisis.
At Global, the news department kept trying new things and new people, though the on-air staff remained pretty much the same. One producer didn't like the jocular format. And Mr. McADOREY didn't like him. He rebelled by being provocative on air.
"It's Friday, and I didn't really feel much like working today. The boss is out of town so I took it easy this afternoon, stretching out in my office, reading and daydreaming," he began his part of the 6 p.m. newscast on April 8, 1983. It got him fired.
"Unprofessional and insulting to the viewers," read the note from his pompous producer. The viewers thought otherwise. Phone lines buzzed and letters landed on all the right desks. Two weeks later, the producer was fired and Bob McADOREY was rehired.
As host of Entertainment Desk from 1991 to 1997, he guided it through many lively segments. Among the most memorable was the appearance of comedienne Judy Tenuta. "[She] pretty well took over the show, which bothered some viewers but not me," he once said. "Her wild style made for bizarre television. Most of the interview was done with Judy sitting on my lap making semi-lewd comments."
For all that, he never did like producers. At the time of his retirement in July, 2000, Andrew RYAN of The Globe and Mail asked him what advice he would give to aspiring young entertainment journalists. "Producers are dorks, actors are jerks," Mr. McADOREY answered. "The only ones worth talking to are directors."
Having been asked to retire, he said he had no expectations of a gold watch. Rather, "how about a gold boot up the butt? Retirement was not my idea. I always thought I had a few more good years left."
Instead, he chose to retire quietly at his home in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario His main hobby was reading and he was something of an authority on James Joyce. An Irish nationalist, he had a lifelong obsession with the great Dublin writer.
Robert Joseph McADOREY was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on July 24, 1935. He died on February 5 at St. Catharines, Ontario He was 70 and had suffered prolonged illness. He is survived by daughter Colleen, sister Pat and brother Terry. He was predeceased by his wife and by two of three children.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-19 published
Royce FRITH, 81
High commissioner fought fish wars
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, March 19, 2005 Page S9
Toronto -- Diplomat, senator and proudly partisan Liberal, Royce FRITH was Canadian high commissioner to Britain during the fabled fish wars of the mid-1990s. Appointed to the Senate in 1977 by Pierre TRUDEAU, he sat in the Upper Chamber as government deputy leader (1980-84) and then as opposition leader (1991-93) during the Brian MULRONEY era. In his political prime he was known as the man who could always deliver Ontario for the Liberals. Before that he served as on the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism.
He was born November 12, 1923 in Lachine, Quebec, and trained as a lawyer at Osgoode Hall in Toronto. He practised on Bay Street with the firm Magwood, Frith and Pocock.
Mr. FRITH died at home in Vancouver of pneumonia on March 17. He was 81. He is survived by his daughter Valerie FRITH and by his friend Hillary HAGGEN.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-26 published
Royce FRITH, Lawyer, Politician, Diplomat 1923-2005
As canny as he was charming, he never seriously ran for office and instead horse-traded his way into the Senate before being sent to London as High Commissioner, writes Sandra MARTIN. An enthusiastic amateur thespian, he above all relished the drama of the 1995 turbot wars against Spanish fishermen
Saturday, March 26, 2005, Page S9
Tall, patrician, and impeccably dressed, Royce FRITH was a natural communicator who moved through life with charm and grace. A lawyer by training, a Liberal by avocation, and a performer by instinct, he had the potential to be either chief justice of the Supreme Court or prime minister. That he was neither was a mystery to many, but the most likely explanation was fourfold: He was intensely private; his many talents, which included acting and singing, tempted him to enjoy life in the broadest sense; he needed to make a living; and, although he relished influence, he wasn't hungry enough to seek real power.
Mr. FRITH suffered two great tragedies in his life -- the breakdown of his marriage followed by his estranged wife's premature death in 1976, and the death four years later of his son Greg from malignant melanoma at age 25 -- but he kept his anguish to himself and never really spoke about these losses even with his closest Friends. He maintained the same strict privacy in the last few years about his own struggle with cancer. Even many of his closest Friends did not know the extent of his illness.
He served his country as a member of the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism, as a Senator during the Trudeau and Mulroney eras, and perhaps most famously as the High Commissioner to England and Northern Ireland who saved Canada House and who rallied British fishermen to the Canadian cause during the "turbot war" with the Spanish in the mid-1990s.
Earlier this week, senators from all sides of the Upper Chamber rose to pay tribute to Mr. FRITH. Liberal Joyce FAIRBURN noted that he had "cut a swath through this place with a potent mix of intellect, talent, humour, stubbornness, skill and commitment that challenged the rest of us to think and act well beyond the boundaries of this chamber." Conservative Lowell MURRAY, who had often "crossed swords" with Mr. FRITH, especially during the 1990 G.S.T. filibuster, praised him as "a model of bilingualism," and an "enjoyable, engaging and interesting companion and a great raconteur." Long-time political strategist Dorothy DAVEY, speaking on behalf of herself and her husband, former Senator Keith DAVEY, said, "he brought intelligence and élan to every position he held and joy and warmth to every Friendship he graced and every room he entered,"
Royce Herbert FRITH was born in Lachine, Quebec, the only son of George Harry FIRTH and Annie Beatrice ROYCE. He was educated at Lachine High School and transferred to Parkdale Collegiate after the family moved to Toronto in the mid-1930s. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1946 and Osgoode Hall in 1949 and then did a Diplôme d' études supérieures (droit) at the University of Ottawa. By then, he had married Elizabeth DAVISON, a professional singer whom he had met through The Toronto Mendelssohn Choir.
Back in Toronto, the FRITHs lived in Leaside and Mr. FRITH practised law on his own for nearly two years before joining two colleagues to form the firm of Magwood, Frith and Pocock. He made his political affiliation to the Liberal party early, serving as national treasurer of the Young Liberal Association in 1949. He got involved in local politics by sitting on Leaside town council in 1951 and 1952 and serving as reeve in 1953. He won the nomination as the provincial Liberal candidate for York East in 1955, but lost by more than 7,000 votes to Hollis BECKETT, the Conservative candidate.
He never ran for public office again. Former Senator John NICHOL thinks of Mr. FRITH as a Renaissance man. He speculates that he didn't actively pursue a career in elected politics because "his interests were so broad, in the arts and music, that I don't think he wanted to limit himself to the treadmill existence of an member of Parliament, or worse, a cabinet minister."
Instead he became a strategist and an organizer, becoming president of the Ontario Liberal Association in 1960, a position he held until 1962. By then, he was one of the key members of Cell 13, a group organized by Keith DAVEY, then national director of the Liberal Party, to build up electoral support for Lester PEARSON and his brand of reform liberalism throughout the country after the party's disastrous showings in the 1957 and 1958 federal elections. One of Cell 13's key activities, as described by Christina McCall-Newman in her book Grits, was "travelling show-and tell demonstrations of canvassing, speaking, and advertising methods" for novice candidates, collected under the rubric of the School of Practical Politics. Mr. FRITH, was a key trainer in these "campaign colleges."
Before the 1963 election that gave Mr. PEARSON his first minority government, the perfectly bilingual Mr. FRITH was a practising lawyer, the host of a television program called Telepoll on the newly formed CTV network, and an applicant before the Board of Broadcast Governors for a licence to establish a private radio station in Windsor, close to the border with the United States.
He got the licence, much to the annoyance of Windsor member of Parliament Paul MARTIN, who thought it should go to a local, and four months later relinquished it in favour of his silent partner, media czar Geoffrey STIRLING.
Mr. DAVEY was not pleased at these public rufflings of Liberal party solidarity, which provided John DIEFENBAKER with fuel for his scathing wit. In his 1986 book, The Rainmaker, he wrote: "Though never quite a dilettante, Royce was not prepared to commit totally to anything, least of all a political career." He went on to say that he regarded Mr. FRITH as "a squandered political resource" who might even have been prime minister. "Too often, however, he slid by on his remarkable personality."
Mr. PEARSON did not share that view. One of his first acts as Prime Minister was to establish the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism, with Mr. FRITH as one of ten commissioners. He served the Commission faithfully and well, saying at one point in the hearings that: "If one section of the country sees it as consisting of a majority and a minority while the other sees it as an equal partnership, this does not provide a fertile ground for the exchange of culture. Until we can find ways to change these attitudes, the present conflict will continue."
Earlier this week, Keith SPICER, who was appointed Canada's first Commissioner of Official Languages by Pierre TRUDEAU in 1970, paid tribute to Mr. FRITH who served as his legal adviser. "Royce's advice, in those days when language was still a minefield of anger, misunderstanding and prejudice, was fundamental to the success of the Official Languages Act."
As canny as he was charming, Mr. FRITH struck himself an advantageous deal when the Liberals wanted him to be Ontario campaign manager in the late 1970s. Perhaps Mr. FRITH knew how hard it would be to deliver Ontario to the Liberals in the wake of Mr. TRUDEAU's imposition of the War Measures Act and wage and price controls. He was willing to give up his lucrative law practice to serve the party but he asked for, and received, an appointment to the Senate in 1977. He then took on running the Ontario campaign in the 1979 election, the election that saw Mr. TRUDEAU trounced by Joe CLARK's Progressive Conservatives.
In the Senate, Mr. FRITH was an active and gifted debater and served as deputy leader of the government from 1980 to 1984, deputy leader of the Opposition from 1984 to 1991 and leader of the Opposition from 1991. Working in Ottawa gave him the opportunity to spend more time in nearby Perth, his mother's ancestral home in the Ottawa Valley, and to indulge his passion for amateur theatricals, including playing Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady. "Quite frankly," said Senator David SMITH, "he was better looking than Rex Harrison and he had a real polish and flair."
He resigned his Senate seat in 1994, five years before mandatory retirement at age 75, to become High Commissioner to London, his final and most triumphant period of public life. He waged two major campaigns. Under his predecessor Fredrik EATON, appointed by Brian MULRONEY, there was a serious danger that the lease on Canada House in its flagship location in Trafalgar Square in London, was going to be allowed to lapse. Mr. FRITH was appalled and did his utmost to point out that losing Canada House was going to be a blow to Canadian tradition and prestige. He also discovered that under the terms of the lease, Canada had to restore the building to its original condition before handing it back to the Crown. Instead of saving money, giving up Canada House was going to cost a great deal. That proved a winning argument in those cost-conscious days.
Former Liberal Cabinet minister Brian Tobin, now a lawyer in the private sector, had trained as a young candidate with Mr. FRITH in one of the many campaign colleges. He appreciated Mr. FRITH's brand of Liberalism. "He understood the private sector very well, but he also had a huge heart and understood that not only did you have to produce wealth in this society, you have to be fair to those who have fewer advantages."
But what really endeared Mr. FRITH to him was the role he played in the turbot wars when Mr. Tobin was federal minister of fisheries. Members of the fishing community in Cornwall started flying Canadian flags because they were upset by the over-fishing that they themselves were seeing by the Spanish and the Portuguese and they sympathized with Canada's position. Mr. FRITH went to visit them to say thank you. "He did a marvellous job," said Mr. Tobin. "He was such an articulate, persuasive personality that he could walk into a community he had never been in before in his life at a time like that and really embody Canada in the most positive sense of the word."
When asked if he had a favourite memory of Mr. FRITH, he said, "I see this big tall guy in a bow tie with chiselled features, big grin, flashing eyes looking for the next big cause, bare knuckles and all, to embrace. And that's Royce."
If Mr. FRITH was disappointed when he was recalled in 1996 to make way for former Cabinet minister Roy MacLaren to succeed him in London, he kept it to himself.
The Vancouver law firm now called Borden Ladner Gervais invited him to join them as a consultant on British and European affairs. The climate was better than in Ottawa and he had Friends there, especially former Senators John Nichol and George Van Roggen. He quickly became the centre of a social circle that revolved around the Vancouver Symphony, the board of Pearson College and the Vancouver Club. "Royce would walk in every day," said David Smith, "looking like he had just come off Jermyn Street, tailored by Savile Row. I never needed to book anything [when I went to Vancouver], all I had to do was go to the Vancouver Club and there he would be looking like a million dollars."
Mr. FRITH's daughter Valerie also moved to Vancouver where she taught for a number of years in the publishing program at Simon Fraser University. He never remarried, although he had many close women Friends, most notably Hillary Haggan in recent years.
Royce Herbert FRITH was born in Lachine, Quebec, on November 12, 1923. He died of pneumonia as a complication of malignant myeloma at home in Vancouver on March 17, 2005. He was 81. He is survived by his daughter Valerie and her family.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-28 published
Award-winning political writer McCALL, 70, dies
Author published two volumes on Trudeau
By Oliver MOORE and Sandra MARTIN, Thursday, April 28, 2005, Page A8
Christina McCALL, the political writer who helped coin the phrase "he haunts us still" about Pierre Trudeau, died yesterday morning after a long illness. She was 70.
Ms. McCALL combined a journalism career with literary non-fiction writing, winning several awards for her work and, at one point, challenging her then-former-husband Peter C. NEWMAN in a duel played out at the top of the bestseller lists.
It was with her second husband, University of Toronto political economist Stephen CLARKSON, that she published two volumes on Mr. Trudeau, establishing the oft-used phrase about the former prime minister's ability to haunt Canadians.
Last night Mr. CLARKSON said Ms. McCALL had been seriously ill for more than a year with three progressive, incurable illnesses. She had found out about them one after the other, he said.
"But I don't want to concentrate on the illnesses," he said. "She was the premier political analyst of her generation.
"She was a perfectionist," he said. "What she loved was getting a letter from a carpenter who said she got it right. She was writing for her fellows, and by that I mean her fellow Canadians."
She died in the Providence Healthcare centre in Toronto. Her funeral is tomorrow.
In addition to her books, Ms. McCALL wrote about Canadian politics for years in senior positions at the magazines Saturday Night and Maclean's and at The Globe and Mail. She also held a position as assistant editor at Chatelaine magazine.
It was at Maclean's that she met Mr. NEWMAN, who at the time was married, but admitted recently in print to being "bowled over" by the editorial assistant. He suggested separation to his first wife and then, finding she was pregnant, said that he would remain until the birth, but could promise no more.
Mr. NEWMAN and Ms. McCALL were married in the autumn of 1959. Theirs was a literary as well as a marital partnership, with Ms. McCALL helping shepherd his 1963 book on Diefenbaker through the editing process.
Mr. NEWMAN once said she was his best editor.
The Diefenbaker book sent Mr. NEWMAN's reputation soaring, in a period during which Ms. McCALL continued writing. She received several Press Club Awards for magazine writing
She produced her own book nearly two decades later, several years after she and Mr. NEWMAN had parted company in 1977. The next year she married Mr. CLARKSON.
The 1982 publication of Grits: An Intimate Portrait of the Liberal Party peeled back layers of the governing party, offering Canadians telling glimpses of their leaders.
In one anecdote, she described Mr. TRUDEAU hearing over the phone that a hockey game was in progress.
There was an "awkward pause at the other end of the line and then Trudeau said, 'Oh, I see. What inning are they in?' "
Critics loved the book, which beat out a work from Ms. McCALL's former university professor, Northrop FRYE, for the 1983 non-fiction prize from the Canadian Authors Association. It was also nominated for a Governor-General's Award.
Grits -- praised as "one of the most important Canadian books of the 1980s" -- was locked in an end-of-year battle in 1982 with Mr. NEWMAN's biography of Conrad Black, The Establishment Manitoba
Nearly a decade later Ms. McCALL published the first volume of her two-volume work on Mr. Trudeau, collaborating with Mr. CLARKSON. The first volume won the Governor-General's Award in 1990.
Other works include The Man From Oxbow (1967) and The Unlikely Gladiators: Pearson and Diefenbaker Remembered (1999).
Ms. McCALL leaves her husband and three children, Ashley McCALL, Kyra CLARKSON and Blaise CLARKSON.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-17 published
Evelyn HORNE, Civil Servant and Volunteer: 1907-2005
Ottawa secretary worked for Mackenzie KING and was acquainted with a succession of prime ministers. From her vantage point at the centre of power, she saw everything and knew everyone
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Tuesday, May 17, 2005 Page S9
Ottawa -- Everyone came to see Evelyn HORNE to pick her brains on people and policy, including Jean CHRÉTIEN. She spent 30 years at the centre of political power. Starting with Mackenzie KING, Miss HORNE knew five prime ministers in a row, including Louis SSAINTURENT, John DIEFENBAKER, Lester PEARSON and Pierre TRUDEAU.
From 1941 to 1973, Miss HORNE perched just off centre stage as a perceptive spectator of some of the most tumultuous events in recent Canadian history -- from the anxious years of the Second World War to the new welfare state that came later. Surrounded by statesmen, politicians, governors-general and civil servants, Miss HORNE knew practically all of them, many on a first-name basis.
"She told me that she knew CHRÉTIEN when he was a young pup who came and sat on the corner of her desk and talked politics," said her nephew, Robert PIKE of Ottawa.
Other Ottawa mandarins who valued Miss HORNE for her administrative skills during the '40s and '50s included Prime Minister Paul MARTIN's father, Paul MARTIN Sr., Jack PICKERSGILL and C.D. HOWE.
For all that, Miss HORNE never forgot the years she spent working for Mackenzie KING. Getting that job was a "case of being in the right place at the right time and knowing the right people though I would be selling myself short if I didn't admit that I had some native intelligence and was willing to go the second mile into overtime when it was necessary," she said in 1997.
Miss HORNE first attracted Mr. King's attention when, as a provincial civil servant, she was secretary of the committee organizing the Nova Scotia segment of the 1939 visit to Canada of King George Virgin Islands and Queen Elizabeth.
"When Mr. KING asked to meet me during his tour of East Coast defences in the fall of 1940, I knew I was to be interviewed for a job. And what an interview! Presumably, someone had told him that I could write a fairly good letter; he asked me nothing about my work capabilities," said Miss HORNE.
Instead, Mr. KING quizzed her about the architectural features of the room they were sitting in at Nova Scotia's Province House, Canada's oldest seat of government. "[It was] the most perfect example of Adam architecture in North America. He asked me to explain the symbolism of the bas-relief around the fireplace and recount the history behind the life-size portraits of kings and queens that adorned the walls," she said.
Fortunately, Miss HORNE knew all the answers and found herself in Ottawa in January of 1941. "My first reaction was disappointment. I found the city dull and boring -- after Halifax. There was no immediate awareness that there was a war on. And I was very disappointed in [my new] job. I was assigned to do the 'routine correspondence.' "
It was so simple and repetitive, she was "bored to tears. When I could stand it no longer, I complained to the boss -- not Mr. KING, of course, but [to his] principal secretary. I said I wanted to go back home. The work was too easy -- there was no challenge I didn't have enough to do. As a result, I was given the responsibility for the whole of the Prime Minister's correspondence."
That task was not without its lighter moments, Miss HORNE told her niece, Frances PIKE. " One day, she reached an envelope addressed 'To the Biggest Prick in Canada.' There was nothing inside except an unused condom. 'Mr. PICKERSGILL,' she said, 'what do I do with this'? He said, 'Miss HORNE, I'll take care of it. As far as the contents are concerned, you may do with it what you will.'"
Although Miss HORNE rarely saw Mr. KING during the war, the Prime Minister's Office "was an exciting place to be, right at the heart of government, during those increasingly intense years of war. There were so many pressing concerns, and all kinds of people wrote to the Prime Minister about all kinds of problems. I had to find the answers, or find the people who could.
"I learned so much, not only about government, but also about the people of this country, who showed so much courage, stoicism, and forbearance in the face of all the tragedy and the hardships that affected us all during those terrible years."
In 1946, Miss HORNE moved from the East Block to Laurier House, Mr. KING's home, where she handled his personal correspondence and did some speechwriting. "I became acquainted with [him] as a person, and I liked him."
In 1950, Miss HORNE struck an early blow for women's rights after she went to work for the assistant private secretary to Robert WINTERS, then minister of reconstruction and supply. Despite all her experience, Mr. WINTERS "wouldn't take her on trips because he thought that was unseemly. So he hired a man, whom she had to train. He was hopeless, but making more money than her," said Mr. PIKE, the nephew.
When Miss HORNE complained to her boss that she should be earning as much as the new man, he retorted that he saw no reason for a raise -- she was making excellent money "for a woman."
"So she packed up and went home," said Mr. PIKE. " Then she called Jack PICKERSGILL, who told her to sit tight for a few days and he'd see what he could do. Very soon after, she went to work for Ellen FAIRCLOUGH at the Department of Citizenship and Immigration."
Miss HORNE finished her career with the federal government in 1973 when she retired from the National Film Board. Awarded the Coronation Medal in 1953 and the Centennial Medal in 1967, she received a Governor-General's Caring Canadian Award in 2004 for her years spent as a volunteer.
Miss HORNE first started volunteering during the First World War, when she knitted scarves for the troops. "I distinctly remember the outbreak of the war in 1914, and I recall many occasions when I went to the train station in Truro with my mother to meet the troop trains to present gifts of food and cigarettes and warm knitted items."
When the Second World War broke out in 1939, Miss HORNE's volunteering became a "way of life. I worked as a check-girl for the weekly dances at the famous North End Services Canteen, and playing the odd game of snooker with the boys who didn't feel like dancing. Many times, I would best serve by lending a sympathetic ear or looking at pictures of sweethearts or wives and children back home."
Life in Halifax during the war was grim, she recounted. "The most vulnerable spot in all of Canada, the city was actually at war and everyone pitched in to help. I can laughingly say that my war work was entertaining and being entertained by the officers of the great battleships that anchored in Halifax harbour. We had a lively social life.
"But the shadow of war was always close at hand; and more than once, men I had danced with one night were brought back two days later, burned beyond recognition when their ship was torpedoed by German U-boats just beyond the harbour headlands. Volunteer visits to Camp Hill, the [military] hospital, were a high priority for me at that time."
Evelyn Annie Ethel HORNE was born on February 23, 1907, in Truro, Nova Scotia She died of heart failure on March 21, 2005, in Ottawa. She was 98. She leaves her niece, Frances; nephews Robert, David, Peter and Donald; 16 great-nieces; and 11 great-great-nieces and nephews.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-11 published
BERGER, Bennie
Peacefully and with great dignity in Montreal, on Friday, June 10, 2005. Devoted husband of Sheila ROTH and the late Anita LANDA. Beloved father and father-in-law of Ilana BERGER and Pierre TRUDEAU, Reena BERGER, Shoshana and Mark JAMIESON. Loving step-father of Mitchell and Naomi MOSS, Laurie and Daniel TURNER, Cindy and Michael GERTIN. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Minnie BERGER, Sol and Marilyn BERGER, and brother-in-law of Marion and Michael WILANSKY, Arthur LANDA. Cherished grandfather of Alexandre TRUDEAU Matthew, Kaylie and Sydney MOSS; Carly and Rebecca TURNER; Joshua and Emily GERTIN. He will be sadly missed by his family and Friends. Funeral service from Paperman and Sons, Montreal, on Sunday, June 12 at 10: 45 a.m. Burial in Montreal. Due to the festival of Shavuot, shiva at his home on Sunday only. Contributions in his memory may be made to the "Bennie Berger Memorial Fund" c/o Jewish General Hospital Foundation (514) 340-8251, or to Quebec Cancer Foundation (514) 527-2194.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-02 published
Jack COYNE, Lawyer: 1919-2005
A specialist in international trade and administrative law, he served on a panel that resolved disputes in the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement, writes Sandra MARTIN. As an Royal Canadian Air Force pilot, he won the Distinguished Flying Cross
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, July 2, 2005, Page S9
Rhodes Scholar, decorated veteran and distinguished tax lawyer, Jack COYNE loved the law, history and his family. Although intensely private, his life merged with the public interest because of his own achievements and the controversies that flared around his brother James when he was governor of the Bank of Canada and his daughter Deborah when she was romantically involved with Pierre TRUDEAU.
He was the youngest of three children of James Bowes COYNE, a prominent Winnipeg judge, and Edna Margaret ELLIOT/ELLIOTT. Jack was nine years younger than his brother James, and four years younger than his sister Sally (now GOUIN.) "I was very fortunate," she said this week, "because I grew up with my older brother Jim, and my younger brother Jack grew up with me."
Remembering her brother as a very charming young man who was extremely good looking and intelligent, she said he was always popular because he played the piano. "And you know how it is when you're young and there's a gathering and there's a piano and somebody knows you play and you spend the rest of the time there." Years later, it became a family tradition for Mr. COYNE's five children, all of whom took piano lessons, to give their father recordings of their playing on his birthday.
Although not a natural athlete, he delighted in winter sports, especially hockey, which he learned to play on frozen ponds in Manitoba, and skiing, which he did with his own family every weekend in Ottawa. He was tall, about 6 feet, and slim with a short trunk and long legs and arms -- a bit like a daddy-long-legs. "He had a long stride which he used to full effect, partly because he had been taught to march during the war," says his son John.
An able student, he finished high school at 16, earned an honours degree in history and economics from the University of Manitoba four years later and won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford in 1940 as his older brother Jim had done before him in 1932. "It was a little diminishing," said Mrs. GOUIN. "I graduated from university without any great distinction, but I was very proud of my brothers."
Mr. COYNE always played down this achievement. "There weren't a lot of people in Manitoba back then, so your odds of getting one were pretty good." Besides, in 1940, he was much more interested in donning a uniform than an academic gown. He postponed the Rhodes Scholarship and found a job with the Bureau of Statistics (now Statistics Canada) while he figured out how he could get overseas and fight in the war.
In late 1941 (again like his older siblings), he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force. Both COYNE men became pilots, each graduating at the top of his class, while their sister trained recruits and later worked in an administrative capacity at headquarters. When Jack qualified as a pilot, his sister's boss decided it would be "terrific publicity" if she, wearing her air force uniform, pinned the wings on her little brother.
After Mr. COYNE went overseas in 1942, he was stationed in northern Scotland and flew reconnaissance and bombing missions against German shipping off the coast of Norway. On one of these strikes, his squadron leader's plane was destroyed and his own plane, a Bristol Beaufighter, was hit and turned upside down. "He was able to right the plane and led his fellows back safely to home port," said his older brother Jim. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for "skill, courage and resolution."
After the war, he took up his Rhodes Scholarship at Queen's College, where he showed off his skating skills as captain of the university hockey team in the Spengler Cup tournament. He graduated with a first-class bachelor's degree in law in 1947 and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in London. The next year, he qualified to practise in Manitoba and Ontario; he settled in Ottawa, where he became a partner in the firm Herridge, Tolmie, Gray, Coyne & Blair. It later merged with Osler, Hoskin and Harcourt.
Unlike his older brother, who quickly abandoned law for the intricacies of monetary policy at the Bank of Canada (where he served as governor for a tumultuous period when John DIEFENBAKER was prime minister,) Mr. COYNE stuck with the law, but honed his practice to suit his interests in history, business and Canada's place in the world.
He specialized in international trade and administrative law and "very quickly carved out a real niche for himself in the 1960s as the acknowledged expert in Canada on anti-dumping," said his son John, general counsel for Unilever Canada. Another huge early case was his involvement in the trans-Canada pipeline debate. His specialty allowed him more scope than the straightforward practice of corporate law and got him closer to the business world than many of his colleagues.
"He was always interested in the inter-relationship between Canada and the rest of the world, which was probably an outgrowth of his experience during the war and at Oxford," said his son. Mr. COYNE represented some of the largest firms in North America and served on the Canadian roster of panelists for dispute settlement procedures under Chapter 19 of the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement.
Lawyer Ron CHENG, who worked closely with Mr. COYNE at Oslers in the early 1980s, described his mentor as an old-school lawyer who set an example by doing rather than by telling. "He was one of the hardest-working lawyers I have ever come across. He was thorough down to the last detail, exploring every facet of an issue or problem and anticipating arguments from the other side," said Mr. CHENG. "He was a wonderful advocate who spoke compellingly and had the ability to draw an analogy from everyday life to give immediacy to a dry and arcane aspect of the law."
He had an impetuous side, too. "He had a sense of fun and he was a fast driver, a fact that was confirmed by everybody who drove with him," said Mr. CHENG. "He drove his car the way I'm sure he used to fly his Beaufighter."
If the law was Mr. COYNE's profession, his family was his passion. In 1952, he married Margery Joan DANIELS. They had five children Jennifer, Deborah, Barbara, John and Ryland. Jennifer remembers the family codes, such as MIK (more in the kitchen) or FHB (family hold back) that were invariably delivered with a wink at the dinner table. She says her father fostered independent thought and freedom of choice in his children, loved them all unconditionally, and taught them to always be there for each other, as he had been for them.
Two of his children followed him into law. Deborah, now a judge with the Immigration and Refugee Board, figured on the public stage in the 1980s because of her political affiliation with then Newfoundland premier Clyde WELLS in the move to abort the Meech Lake accord and her romantic liaison with Pierre TRUDEAU, which culminated in the birth of their daughter Sarah in 1991.
In his early 70s, Mr. COYNE began showing early signs of Alzheimer's disease, an affliction that gradually erased his prodigious memory and his independence. "It is a terrible disease," said his sister. "Not only does it rob the individual of all of his intelligence, but how devastating it must be to see your father disintegrating before your eyes."
Mr. COYNE's son John divides the progression of his father's Alzheimer's into three stages, beginning in the early 1990s when his mother became alarmed at his father's forgetfulness. Within a couple of years, Mr. COYNE himself knew something was amiss, "but it was one of those things he didn't want to talk about," his son says, explaining that silence is one of the concomitant tragedies of this "terrible affliction." The third stage came when the children realized their father was seriously impaired. He continued to go to his law office every day until the time came when he could no longer remember how to get home. That was when his family made the decision to put him into an institution, in 2000.
"That's a day I won't forget," said John COYNE, "because I was the one who had to take him to the home [Perley Rideau Veterans' Health Centre] and sit chatting with him as all of the kids left the room one by one, and him not really knowing at that point that this was where he was going to be spending the rest of his days."
John (Jack) McCreary COYNE was born in Winnipeg on June 20, 1919. He died of Alzheimer's disease in Ottawa on June 28, 2005. He was 86. His wife, Joan, predeceased him, on July 3, 2002.
He is survived by his five children, their partners, nine grandchildren and his siblings James COYNE and Sally GOUIN.
His life will be celebrated at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church in Ottawa on Tuesday.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-29 published
GOLDENBERG, Carl, 1996 -- Died This Day
Friday, July 29, 2005, Page S7
Lawyer and politician born in Montreal in 1908.
Initially a constitutional expert, he enjoyed a long career working in public service. In 1936, he played a part in the Royal Commission on Dominion-Provincial Relations, and in 1968 became a constitution adviser to Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU. However, he was best known to the public as the Henry Kissinger of Canadian industrial relations. For 30 years, he helped resolve some of the country's most contentious labour disputes, from the 1943 Montreal Tramways strike to the 1972 strike at Sydney Steel Corp. In 1971, he was appointed to the Senate. He stepped down 11 years later, after which he lived and worked in Toronto.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-15 published
William SOMERVILLE, Mover And Shaker 1921-2005
Poor farmer's son rose to the corporate boardroom and maintained a lifelong passion for politics
By Stephen STRAUSS, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, August 15, 2005, Page S11
Every summer when he went to the family cottage for a vacation, William SOMERVILLE would bring the same book to re-read. It was Dale Carnegie's classic self-improvement text: How To Make Friends And Influence People.
In retrospect, the book's central message -- work relentlessly at getting people to do what you want them to do by having them think it is what they want to do -- captures much of the reason for Mr. SOMERVILLE's highly successful forays into business, government and the voluntary sector.
"He understood, when you deal with government, you don't go and ask what you can do for me. You understand that they have problems and they want help in solving their problems," recalled Hal JACKMAN, the Toronto financier for whom he worked for 20 years.
That, an affable manner, a firm handshake and a photographic memory for names helped Mr. SOMERVILLE rise to chairman and Chief Executive Officer of National Trust Co., chairman of the Ontario Pension Fund, and president of the Stratford Festival, among other things.
The work ethic came naturally to a poor farmer's son in Saint Marys, Ontario, whose poverty worsened when at 5, his father died.
The SOMERVILLE family's poverty meant that, unlike his brother, Mr. SOMERVILLE couldn't go on to any higher education after high school, but instead joined his brother's drug store. The two brothers then went into the wholesale drug trade until Mr. SOMERVILLE joined British Mortgage and Trust Co. in Saint Marys in 1965. The main reason seemingly was the challenge of doing something different, as he would joke afterward that it took him 20 years in the trust business to achieve his drug-business salary.
All the while he was indulging in his other favourite activity after work -- politics. Born into a big-L Liberal family, married to the daughter of another Liberal family, Mr. SOMERVILLE had grown up in a small-town Ontario atmosphere in which politics was not only discussed but so intensely scrutinized that everyone's probable vote was dissected after each election.
The political bent meant, first of all, that Mr. SOMERVILLE was elected mayor of Saint Marys in the 1960s. In 1963, a young John TURNER came to town to open a dam and the two hit it off immediately. The result was a 40-year Friendship with a man Mr. SOMERVILLE told his family was the most impressive politician he had ever met. The feeling was reciprocated.
"He had a dedicated work ethic, a fine sense of detail, a personal warmth for those of us he dealt with," is how former prime minister John TURNER summed up Mr. SOMERVILLE.
In 1968, Mr. SOMERVILLE tried to launch himself onto the national political stage by running for Parliament as part of Pierre Trudeau's election steamroller. While Mr. TRUDEAU swept the country, even Trudeaumania could not get Mr. SOMERVILLE elected in Conservative, rural, southwestern Ontario. However, after the election, Mr. TRUDEAU came to the SOMERVILLE house for a get-together and galvanized the neighbourhood.
"It was the biggest jam of people you ever saw," said his wife Jean. A picture of the time shows Mr. SOMERVILLE beside Mr. TRUDEAU beaming a characteristic cherubic smile.
Mr. SOMERVILLE found time to be the chairman of fundraising for both the Liberal Party of Ontario and the Liberal Party of Canada. His behind-the-scenes abilities led to him to be described as one of the most important people in Ontario politics who didn't hold a seat in Parliament.
According to Mrs. SOMERVILLE, while her husband always had high political aspirations for himself -- at his retirement he mused to a local newspaper that he always wanted to be prime minister his growing business interests meant he couldn't pursue full-time politics.
In mid-1965, Atlantic Acceptance Corp. collapsed with $150-million in uncollected debts. British Mortgage and Trust Co. was part of the same company, and Mr. SOMERVILLE feared he would lose his job. However, he wangled a supposed five-minute interview with Walter HARRIS, who had been the federal minister of finance in Louis SSAINTURENT's Liberal government, and who was the head of Victoria and Grey Trust, which had taken over British Mortgage after the debacle.
The two men immediately clicked, both professionally and politically, and after a three-hour interview, Mr. SOMERVILLE was offered the head of British Mortgage's office in Stratford, Ontario
In Stratford, he soon found himself involved in the promotion of the Stratford Festival, an organization of which he became chairman in 1985/86. His participation was more an example of his sense of what a public-spirited person should do than a result of his great love of theatre. "He was not necessarily a Shakespeare person," said his wife, dryly. But he was exactly what a festival that was running a million-dollar yearly deficit needed -- a sound businessman. Within a few years of his taking over, Stratford was turning a profit.
In 1970, Victoria and Grey was taken over by Mr. JACKMAN, who also found Mr. SOMERVILLE to be an astute businessman with a genius at making and keeping Friends. He was particularly impressed with the affinity for the small businessmen and farmers of rural Ontario that Mr. SOMERVILLE maintained while working on Bay Street.
The relationship with Mr. JACKMAN, a well-known supporter of the Conservative Party, underscored something about Mr. SOMERVILLE's Liberalism. He was what you might call a blue Liberal. "Dad liked the Liberals as a Tory party with a social conscience," said his son, John.
Eventually, Mr. SOMERVILLE became head of National Trust, Canada's third-largest trust company, when it merged with Victoria and Grey in the 1980s. Not only did the merger initially mean working 18-hour days and seven-day weeks, but he had to both cut staff and increase the workload. He was so cost-conscious at the time that the story floated about that he had cancelled the office Christmas party. No, no, he later told a journalist. He had given the job of organizing the party to one of his lieutenants who had become miffed with the post-merger politics of the workplace. "The guy... was planning to leave and he walked and did nothing about [the party]," he explained sadly.
For a man who often told his family that work was his hobby, his retirement from National Trust in 1989 was hardly a retirement at all. Two days later he was approached by David Peterson's Liberal government to become chairman of the Ontario Pension Board. He was so successful at this that he was reappointed both by Bob Rae's New Democratic Party government and Mike Harris's Conservative one after that.
He also served as chancellor of Windsor University and was honorary chancellor for life at Assumption University, a small Catholic school in Windsor.
At the end of his life the true-blue Liberal had become a simply blue Conservative. Upset with what he saw as Liberal arrogance in power, in the past few elections he had begun to vote Tory. He was a great admirer of Ontario premier Mike Harris, who he thought ran the government with business smarts, but in an even more right turn, the formerly blue Liberal was lavish in his praise for the federal Conservative Party's bluest of leaders Stephen Harper.
William Henry SOMERVILLE was born in Perth County, Ontario, on April 25, 1921. He died of the effects of Parkinson's disease in Stratford General Hospital on July 23. He was 84. He is survived by wife Jean, son John, daughter Karen and four grandchildren.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-22 published
Former Speaker JEROME dies at 72
Canadian Press, Monday, August 22, 2005, Page A8
Ottawa -- James JEROME, a respected former Speaker of the House and associate federal chief justice, has died. The former member of Parliament for Sudbury, he was 72.
Mr. JEROME was appointed Speaker of the House in 1974 by then-prime-minister Pierre TRUDEAU. He later became the first Speaker from the opposition when the Progressive Conservative Party won a minority in 1979 and kept him in the position.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-31 published
James JEROME, Politician and Judge: (1933-2005)
He was king of the hill as Speaker of the House of Commons but less successful as a federal judge. Appointed in a blip of election-day patronage, he encountered unaccustomed criticism
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, August 31, 2005, Page S9
James JEROME was a popular Speaker of the House of Commons who seemingly could do no wrong until he became a federal judge.
Mr. JEROME was the first Speaker chosen from an opposition party, he introduced television coverage of the Commons and he wielded a fair but firm hand during Question Period. Then, in an unusual spasm of election-day patronage, he was made associate chief justice of the Federal Court of Canada, where he came under unfamiliar attack. He stepped down in March of 1998 after his slow handling of war-crimes cases.
James JEROME spent his early years in Kingston, Ontario, where his father was a construction engineer. Later, the family moved to Toronto, where James went to high school, the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School.
After law school, Mr. JEROME moved to Sudbury, Ontario His first step into politics was winning a seat on city council. He then ran for the Liberals in a by-election in May of 1967 and lost but won in the 1968 general election, the year of Trudeaumania. He was re-elected in 1972, 1974 and 1979. Though the Liberals lost that election, he retained his seat with a majority of 12,000 votes.
Along the way, he had taught himself French to advance his political career and it probably helped land what some call the best job in the House of Commons. The post of Speaker comes with a staff of 3,000 and includes a rent-free, country estate called Kingsmere and a social life as glittering as that of the Governor-General.
The Commons first elected Mr. JEROME the Speaker in September of 1974 after the Liberals had won a majority government. Yet it wasn't a unanimous vote for the new Speaker. In an interesting footnote, Robert STANFIELD, leader of the opposition, refused to second his nomination.
Mr. JEROME remained in power through the long Trudeau Parliament. His most lasting change to the House of Commons was bringing in television coverage in 1978, which he said led to "a far higher quality of journalism in reporting the proceedings of the Commons." His ground rules for broadcasters were eventually copied by other parliaments, including the British House of Commons.
As Speaker, he managed to steer clear of problems. He was involved in only a few major battles while ruling as arbiter of taste and as master of debates in the Commons. He did, however, get into a fierce war of words with The Globe and Mail when the Speaker sided with a 1976 vote by the parliamentary press gallery to bar Canadian Press managers who were working as reporters during a strike. Parliamentarians said The Globe had committed a "gross libel" against the Speaker. The newspaper's view, as expressed in two editorials, was that the Speaker shouldn't be allowed to decide who can or cannot sit in the press gallery.
In October of 1979, during the short-lived Tory government of Joe CLARK, Mr. JEROME refused to recognize Warren ALLMAND after the former Liberal cabinet minister showed up in the House wearing a turtleneck sweater under a tweed jacket. Mr. ALLMAND wasn't happy, but before he get to his feet to complain, he first had to rush out and borrow a tie.
"Men in this House should have the same freedom of dress as women," Mr. ALLMAND eventually responded, pointing out that cabinet minister Flora McDONALD was not wearing a tie. The Speaker was not moved and cries of "Wear a dress, Warren," arose from the government side.
Mr. JEROME's election as Speaker during a Conservative government had been a minor triumph. In June of 1979, the Tories won a minority government and, in a surprise move, prime minister Joe CLARK allowed Mr. JEROME to remain in the Speaker's chair.
It was the first time in Commons history that a Speaker had been chosen from an Opposition party, a testament to the high esteem in which Mr. JEROME was held on all sides of the House and a recognition by the Tories of the benefits of reducing potential Opposition votes by one in a minority situation.
As it turned out, the arrangement did not last. The Clark government was defeated in a no-confidence vote that December.
A general election was called for February 18, 1980, and Mr. JEROME chose not to run. Instead, as Canadians went to the polls, Mr. CLARK named him associate chief justice of the Federal Court of Canada. Since the Conservatives were, in theory, still in power, they likely made the appointment at the request of the Liberals. It was a most unusual development, as outgoing prime ministers seldom make appointments on election day. In this case, it seemed all parties had agreed to making a judicial appointment for the sake of the retiring Speaker.
His new job, however, was not so cozy. As a judge, he soon found his decisions open to criticism. His biggest troubles arose during his last years as a Federal Court judge. Two incidents exposed the question of whether former senior politicians and government officials should be named to the bench.
In 1996, the chief justice of the Federal Court, Julius ISAAC, had a dinner meeting with a senior official of the department of justice who complained that Mr. Justice James JEROME was taking too long in the deportation hearings against three alleged Nazi war criminals.
The chief justice then intervened privately with Judge JEROME. Later, the Supreme Court ruled that Judge JEROME and another judge could not have any further connections with the case. Around the same time, Judge JEROME became involved in another controversy, related in part to the war-crimes case.
In making a comment about a case involving an aboriginal band, Judge JEROME was reported to have said he would never put a native judge on a native case and would never put a Jewish judge on a war-crimes case. This remark caused outrage from Jewish and aboriginal leaders, and a rebuke by the then-justice minister, Anne McLELLAN.
Both incidents led to a reform of how judges were named by the federal cabinet. For a time, at least 10 judges in the federal court's trial and appeal divisions had been former federal members of Parliament or government employees -- including Judge ISAAC, who was a former employee of the Department of Justice.
The appointments had been made by the Liberals during their long run in power from the 1960s to the early 1980s. On his last full day as prime minister in 1984, Pierre TRUDEAU appointed two cabinet members to the court. Two weeks later, his successor John TURNER appointed another former cabinet minister. The practice had made the court the object of criticism over its independence from the government.
In 1998, changes were finally made to the way judges are named.
"Now, it would appear to be impossible to name a cabinet minister as a judge," said Ian BUSHNELL, a retired law professor from the University of Windsor who wrote the history of both the Supreme Court and the Federal Court. "He [Mr. JEROME] was caught up in the patronage binge of the Trudeau/Turner era. No one who was appointed was a dud or a failure. As a judge, Mr. JEROME was certainly adequate."
Even so, it was as Speaker that he had shone. After his retirement from the Commons, Mr. JEROME wrote a memoir titled Mr. Speaker. In a review of the book, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reporter Larry ZOLF recalled Mr. JEROME's years in the House: "Few parliamentarians have ever been as popular with members of Parliament, reporters or constituents as the Toronto Irish Liberal member from the mining constituency of Sudbury.... JEROME's sensibilities are certainly missed in the carnival atmosphere into which the House, alas, has lately degenerated."
In his private life, Mr. JEROME was very much the family man. After he moved to the Speaker's house north of Ottawa, he bought a family cottage on Ramsey Lake near Sudbury. Mr. JEROME was an accomplished piano player and loved card games, especially bridge and gin. He was a keen golfer and he and his family skied at Camp Fortune near Ottawa.
James Alexander JEROME was born on March 4, 1933. He died in Ottawa on August 21 of Huntington's disease. He is survived by his wife Barry Karen and his children, Mary-Lou, Paul, Jim and Megan. Another son, Joseph, died in an accident in 1986.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-03 published
Gus CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, Sergeant-At-Arms (1935-2005)
The House of Commons' longest-serving sergeant-at-arms presented the image of a man one would not wisely cross. He ran Parliament Hill as a 'private fiefdom'
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, September 3, 2005, Page S7
Gus CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER paraded daily into the House of Commons with a military bearing befitting a retired major-general. As sergeant-at-arms, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER handled responsibilities ranging from security to the allotment of parking slots. His duties that gave him much control over the day-to-day lives of members of Parliament, a power exercised out of public sight.
More conspicuous was Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER's role in leading the parades that open and close a day's sitting. In preceding the Speaker on entering and leaving the House, the sergeant-at-arms carries the ceremonial mace, a symbol of authority.
Dressed in a black court coat and a tricorne hat, the mace gripped by his right hand as it rested on his right shoulder, a ceremonial sword carried at his left hip, with service ribbons on his breast adding a dash of colour, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER presented the image of a man one would not wisely cross. For all that, his long tenure as sergeant-at-arms coincided with a breakdown in traditional parliamentary behaviour. On two occasions, members grabbed the mace, a shocking breach of decorum considered a gross contempt of Parliament.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was the longest-serving sergeant-at-arms since Confederation. His 27-year tenure surpassed that of the other seven men to have held the position.
A long climb through the ranks of the armed forces prepared him well for doing battle with civilians, as Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER proved a wily adversary in bureaucratic squabbles.
Born in Drummondville, Quebec, Maurice Gaston CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was educated at Mount Allison University at Sackville, New Brunswick, and, later, at the University of Liege in Belgium. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1952 while still a teenager, and married Joan CAHILL of Summerside, Prince Edward Island, before he was 20.
Serving as a navigator with Maritime Air Command, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER became an air instructor at the Air Navigation School at Winnipeg in 1960. He was appointed resident staff officer at Laval University at Quebec City two years later.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER relocated to Europe in 1964, serving as protocol chief for the armed forces. He was also appointed executive assistant to the commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force air division. After graduating from the Canadian Forces staff college in 1969, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was named bilingual policy adviser to the personnel chief. He was promoted to the rank of major-general in 1975.
He became executive assistant to Liberal defence minister Donald MacDONALD in 1970, remaining in the post under Edgar BENSON, C.M. (Bud) DRURY, James RICHARDSON and Barnett (Barney) DANSON.
The retired general was appointed sergeant-at-arms on April 27, 1978, by Pierre TRUDEAU, the first of seven prime ministers for whose security on Parliament Hill he was responsible. Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER succeeded David CURRIE, a decorated war hero awarded the Victoria Cross who had been sergeant-at-arms for 18 years.
As the official Commons guard, the sergeant-at-arms places the mace on a table before the Speaker. He then sits patiently throughout proceedings adjacent to the entrance to the House. The role of sergeant-at-arms carries with it a centuries-old responsibility for security, hence the mace and sword.
Yet, one of Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER's first public statements regarded the diminished size of the Christmas tree installed in the lobby of the House. Several controversies generated headlines in his first years. A stern report from the auditor-general was highly critical of Parliament's administration, noting an annual $3.5-million deficit from restaurants and cafeterias.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was soon embroiled in a public squabble over spending with Speaker Jeanne SAUVÉ. Without her knowledge, he had ordered $10,000 of riot gear, including vests, helmets, handcuffs and 12-gauge shotguns. He had also neglected to inform her of the creation of a new restaurant to address overcrowding in Parliament's main dining room. Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER opened an elegant, 70-seat restaurant for senior bureaucrats in the South Block in 1980. The first-class restaurant served $2.75 gourmet meals, a bargain for top mandarins as each meal served cost $12 in subsidies.
The Speaker called the restaurant scandalous, ordered it closed (after having allowed it at first to remain open), and issued a public rebuke of the sergeant-at-arms' spending habits.
An attempt soon after to end wasteful spending left Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER with egg on his face. A special Commons-Senate committee decided laying off 30 cafeteria workers would save money. But members of Parliament and bureaucrats proved sadly incapable of tidying up after themselves, and the federal health department sent a letter of reprimand to the sergeant-at-arms insisting the unhygienic practice not continue.
Over the years, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER has also had to sweep offices for bugging devices, and ordered walls rebuilt to prevent eavesdropping among rival caucuses and research staffs.
Two incidents in 2002 raised questions about security in the wake of the previous year's attacks on New York and Washington. A protester crashed the official unveiling of former prime minister Brian Mulroney's portrait. Two weeks later, a man left a grenade at the front desk of the Langevin Block, across the street from Parliament Hill and outside of the sergeant-at-arms' jurisdiction.
At the adjournment of the House on October 30, 1991, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER shouldered the mace when rushed by an member of Parliament. Angered by a ruling by the deputy speaker, New Democrat Ian WADDELL tried to grab the mace from the sergeant-at-arms.
An apologetic Mr. WADDELL was called to stand at the bar of the House the next afternoon, where he was reprimanded for a breach of privilege and gross contempt of the House.
In 2002, member of Parliament Keith MARTIN, then with the Canadian Alliance, touched the mace in protest the loss off his private member's bill on marijuana decriminalization. He was censured by the House.
In 2002, all five parties in the House paid tribute to Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER for his 50 years of public service. (By coincidence, the honour came 11 years to the day after the WADDELL incident.) The unanimity among the speakers led Progressive Conservative leader Joe CLARK to quip: "Mr. Speaker, it is a good thing there are only five parties in the House or these tributes could cause an outbreak of order."
Earlier that month, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER co-ordinated the royal visit to Canada as the Canadian Secretary to the Queen. He became the longest-serving sergeant-at-arms since Confederation last year, surpassing the 26-year tenure of Henry Robert SMITH (1892-1917.)
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER took his responsibilities most seriously. In December, 1995, a Liberal member of Parliament in a Santa Claus costume and accompanied by an elf arrived on the floor of the House to spread bonhomie. Hansard reporters captured the interruption in typically understated fashion, inserting a note in the account of daily proceedings. It read: "Editor's note: Whereupon a visitor in red entered the Chamber."
The sergeant-at-arms, perhaps not fully appreciating the spirit of the season, gave the bum's rush to Santa, ushering Stan DROMISKY off the floor.
Gus CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was born on June 6, 1935, at Drummondville, Quebec He died of colon cancer on Tuesday at the Elizabeth Bruyere Health Centre at Ottawa. He was 70. He is survived by his partner, Mary-Lynn GALLANT. He also leaves son Michael, and daughter, Nancy, as well as their mother, Joan, from whom he was separated.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-12 published
GIBSON, James MacAndrew "Andy"
(December 13th, 1937-December 9th, 2005)
Peacefully at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie on Friday December 9th, 2005 in his 68th year. Beloved husband of Cecile and the late Jane. Loving father of Robin (Todd) PARRY, Carrie (Mark) PYATT, Duff (Jen) GIBSON, Susie GIBSON and his step-children Ian MOSLEY and Janine (Dan) TRUDEAU. He will be sadly missed by his granddaughter Rachel PYATT. Dear brother of Doug (Sue,) Susan (Mark), Ted and Donald. Also survived by his step-mother Elizabeth GIBSON, his dear friend Carole GIBSON and many other relatives and Friends. Friends may call at the Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Home (201 Minet's Point Road at Yonge Street) Barrie on Tuesday evening from 7-9 p.m. Service of Remembrance will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday December 14th, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation. Inurnment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto.
Andy courageously battled cancer for more than a decade and overcame many obstacles to do so. Those who have been fortunate enough to be near him during his battle considered him a Miracle. In lieu of flowers and in memory of Andy, donations to the R.V.H. Regional Cancer Care Centre would be appreciated. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.steckleygooderham.com

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-31 published
HANDSCOMBE, Richard James
Died on December 24, 2005, after several years of poor health, aged 70. Only child of Dorothy and James HANDSCOMBE (deceased,) husband of Jean, father of Matthew and Suzannah, father-in-law of Krista JACKSON and Stefan TRUDEAU and grandfather to Liam.
As a professor at Glendon College, York University for three decades, he shared his fascination with how the English language works, both in everyday life and in texts ranging from metaphysical poetry to Winnie-the-Pooh. His other great passion, a life-long interest in birds, took him around the world. More recently, he has been content to raise his binoculars in his own backyards, here in Toronto and in Montserrat, W.I.
His funeral took place privately, but Friends, former students and colleagues are invited to a drop-in reception on Sunday, January 22, 2006, between 3 and 8 p.m. Please email mhandsco@matthewhandscombe.com or call (647) 436-0506 for directions. To those who would otherwise send a floral tribute, our family suggests you plant yourself a flower, shrub or tree and watch, quietly, to see what lands there. He would have loved that.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-29 published
TRUDEAU, Daniel R.
It is with great sadness that our family announces the passing of Daniel at age 72 years, on Sunday, March 27, 2005 at Credit Valley Hospital. His family and wife Shirley of 50 years were by his side through his brave struggle with cancer to the end. He will be forever missed by his daughter Peggy CHUANG and her husband Denny and his son Dan TRUDEAU and his wife Carol, Ottawa. He will be forever remembered in the hearts of his 4 grandchildren Nichole and Kaitlyn TRUDEAU and Tyler and Bailey CHUANG. Dear brother-in-law to Marlene and Jim MAHONEY (their travel companions,) Lorraine and Bill PORTER, Jerry LAMORE, and the late Clara and Jake REMPEL. Loved by nieces and nephews Debbie, Patty, J.J., Jason, Jeff, Blake and Brian. The family would like to thank the many Friends who offered love and support to us through this difficult journey. Especially the doctors and nurses on 2C at the Credit Valley Hospital. Extra thanks to Dr. Sam REMTULLA for always being there for us. The family will receive Friends at the Lynett Funeral Home, 3299 Dundas St. West (east of Runnymede Rd.) on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held on Thursday, March 31, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. from St. Francis Xavier Church, 5650 Mavis Rd. Interment Assumption Cemetery. Family dog Potter will keep your rocking chair warm.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-30 published
TRUDEAU, Daniel R.
It is with great sadness that our family announces the passing of Daniel at age 72 years, on Sunday, March 27, 2005 at Credit Valley Hospital. His family and wife Shirley of 50 years were by his side through his brave struggle with cancer to the end. He will be forever missed by his daughter Peggy CHUANG and her husband Denny and his son Dan TRUDEAU and his wife Carol, Ottawa. He will be forever remembered in the hearts of his 4 grandchildren Nichole and Kaitlyn TRUDEAU and Tyler and Bailey CHUANG. Dear brother-in-law to Marlene and Jim MAHONEY (their travel companions,) Lorraine and Bill PORTER, Jerry LAMORE, and the late Clara and Jake REMPEL. Loved by nieces and nephews Billy, Debbie, Patty, J.J., Jason, Jeff, Blake and Brian. The family would like to thank the many Friends who offered love and support to us through this difficult journey. Especially the doctors and nurses on 2C at the Credit Valley Hospital. Extra thanks to Dr. Sam REMTULLA for always being there for us. The family will receive Friends at the Lynett Funeral Home, 3299 Dundas St. West (east of Runnymede Rd.) on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held on Thursday, March 31, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. from St. Francis Xavier Church, 5650 Mavis Rd. Interment Assumption Cemetery. Family dog Potter will keep your rocking chair warm.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-22 published
JEROME served with 'dignity'
Canadian Press
Ottawa -- James JEROME, a well-respected former Speaker of the House of Commons and associate federal chief justice, has died.
The former member of Parliament for Sudbury was 72.
Prime Minister Paul MARTIN said he was saddened to learn of the death, calling JEROME "a dedicated and extremely able" parliamentarian.
JEROME was appointed Speaker of the Commons in 1974 by prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU. He later became the first Speaker from the opposition when the Progressive Conservative party won a minority in 1979 and kept him on in the position.
In 1980, JEROME was appointed associate chief justice of the Federal Court of Canada, where he stayed until his retirement in 1998.
Funeral details have not yet been announced.
"James JEROME brought more than competence and impartiality to his duties as Speaker," MARTIN said yesterday in a release. "He also brought dignity, an abiding respect for rules and traditions and a deep commitment to Parliament as a fundamental institution of Canadian democracy."
Born in Kingston, JEROME studied law at Osgoode Hall and later opened a law practice in Sudbury.
He served on Sudbury's city council in 1967 and won a Liberal seat in the Commons the next year.
During his federal political career, JEROME also served as chairman of the standing committee on justice and legal affairs, which dealt with controversial bills, including the abolition of capital punishment and wiretap legislation.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-17 published
McCANN, Jeanne Theresa (née RONDEAU)
Passed peacefully in her sleep while at home on Thursday, September 15, 2005 at 9: 30 a.m. Beloved wife of the late Francis McCANN. Loving mother of Carol, Anthony, Ernie, Mary, Sharon, Shawn, Patrick, and Jamie. Also dearly missed by their spouses and grandchildren. Survived by her brother Bob RONDEAU and her sister Marie JAMIESON. Her memory will be greatly cherished by all of her nieces and nephews. She will be missed by Ruth TRUDEAU and her many Friends at Glen Stewart Acres. Friends may call at Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Road (west of Victoria Park Ave.), Toronto (416-698-2861) on Sunday, September 18, 2005 from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated from Saint John's Roman Catholic Church on Monday, September 19, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Cremation to follow. If desired, memorial contributions may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-11 published
GIBSON, James MacAndrew "Andy"
(December 13, 1937-December 9, 2005)
Peacefully, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie on Friday, December 9, 2005, in his 68th year. Beloved husband of Cecile and the late Jane. Loving father of Robin (Todd) PARRY, Carrie (Mark) PYATT, Duff (Jen) GIBSON, Susie GIBSON and his step-children Ian MOSLEY and Janine (Dan) TRUDEAU. He will be sadly missed by his granddaughter Rachel PYATT. Dear brother of Doug (Sue,) Susan (Mark), Ted and Donald. Also survived by his step-mother Elizabeth GIBSON, his dear friend Carole GIBSON and many other relatives and Friends. Friends may call at the Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Home (201 Minet's Point Road at Yonge Street), Barrie on Tuesday evening from 7-9 p.m. Service of Remembrance will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, December 14, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation. Inurnment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto. Andy courageously battled cancer for more than a decade and overcame many obstacles to do so. Those who have been fortunate enough to be near him during his battle considered him a Miracle. In lieu of flowers, and in memory of Andy, donations to the R.V.H. Regional Cancer Care Centre would be appreciated. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.steckleygooderham.com

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-26 published
CLARKE, Jean Margaret
Passed away at age 83 on Saturday, December 24, 2005 at Belleville General Hospital, following a difficult battle with cancer. Predeceased by her loving husband Frank, caring mother of Hilary (Robert) McEWEN and Heather (René) TRUDEAU. Nicole, Christopher, Andrew, Ian and Trevor will sadly miss their Grandma. At her request, no service will be held. Cremation arrangements entrusted to Quinte Cremation.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-27 published
CLARKE, Jean Margaret
Passed away at age 83 on Saturday, December 24, 2005 at Belleville General Hospital, following a difficult battle with cancer. Predeceased by her loving husband Frank, caring mother of Hilary (Robert) McEWEN and Heather (René) TRUDEAU. Nicole, Christopher, Andrew, Ian and Trevor will sadly miss their Grandma. At her request, no service will be held. Cremation arrangements entrusted to Quinte Cremation.

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TRU surnames continued to 05tru002.htm