SMYTHE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-08 published
PIERCE, Col. (Ret.d) Leonard Ross, C.D., D.D.S., F.I.C.D.
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on Thursday October 6, 2005. Col. (Ret.d) Leonard Ross PIERCE, C.D., D.D.S., F.I.C.D. of Aylmer in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of Mary Theresa "Terry" (ZILER) PIERCE. Dear father of Stephen PIERCE of Calgary and Rosemary and husband David GOODCHILD of London. Loved by his grandchildren Kristin, Sarah, Rebecca, and Jason PIERCE and Sean GOODCHILD. Born in Aylmer, Ontario on November 14, 1922, the son of the late William Ross and Doris Anita (SMYTHE) PIERCE. Dr PIERCE was a retired Colonel and he served for 37 years in the Dental Corp of the Canadian Army. During the last five years of his service he was appointed Queen's Honourary Dentist. He came to Aylmer 27 years ago and was a member of Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church and a member of the Ontario Dental Association. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Monday October 10, 2005, 12: 00-1:00 p.m. where the funeral service will be held at 1: 00 p.m.with Rev Fr. Gilbert SIMARD officiating. Interment Aylmer Cemetery. Donations to the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital Foundation would be appreciated.

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-16 published
IRONSIDE, Helen (née ELLACOTT)
At Bluewater Health - C.E.E. Site, Petrolia, on Wednesday, December 14, 2005. Helen IRONSIDE (née ELLACOTT,) 84 years, of Arkona and formerly of Wyoming. Beloved wife of the late Cameron IRONSIDE (1983.) Dear mother of Bill and Barb IRONSIDE of Petrolia and Elizabeth and Bert PETERS of Arkona. Dear grandmother of Jeremy, Nathan, Kurtis and Caitlyn IRONSIDE, Douglas LEGGATE and his wife Malena and Jonathan LEGGATE and his friend Stacey WILCOX. Dear sister of Margaret BRADLEY of Petrolia, and the late Marion SMYTHE, Joseph, Jack, William and Charles ELLACOTT. Dear sister-in-law of Beatrice ELLACOTT of Delaware. Visitors will be received on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m., at the Needham-Jay Funeral Home, Petrolia, where prayers will be offered at 4: 45 p.m. The funeral mass will be celebrated at St. Philip's Church, Petrolia, on Saturday, December 17, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Mount Calvary Cemetery, Wyoming. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made by cheque to C.E.E. Hospital Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society. Memories and condolences may be sent online at www.needhamjay.com

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-29 published
Reginald 'Red' HORNER, National Hockey League Hockey Player: The bad-boy captain of the prewar Toronto Maple Leafs shared the ice with such legends of defence as 'King' CLANCY and established a record for penalties that stood for 20 years
By James CHRISTIE, Friday, April 29, 2005, Page S7
The night of December 13, 1933, was a landmark night in the history of the National Hockey League. The career of Toronto Maple Leaf Irwin (Ace) BAILEY was ended with a life-threatening head injury suffered when he crashed to the ice following a hard check by Boston Bruins' Eddie SHORE.
What is not always mentioned is the fact that Mr. BAILEY was not the only man carried off the ice at Boston Garden that night. He had an avenger, a flame-haired bad boy named "Red" HORNER, the prototype of hockey's "policeman."
Red HORNER was the oldest Toronto Maple Leaf captain and oldest living member of the Hockey Hall of Fame. Red HORNER embodied Toronto Maple Leaf history. He was on the ice for the very first shift played at Maple Leaf Gardens in 1931 and was involved in ceremonies at the closing of the Gardens on February 13, 1999.
On the dangerous night in Boston Garden, Mr. BAILEY recalled in a 1985 interview with The Globe and Mail's Paul PATTON that "SHORE took my feet from under me. I wasn't facing him and when I fell, my head hit the ice and I went into convulsions.
"SHORE was standing over at the other side of the rink when Red went over and said, 'Put up your hands, I'm going to hit you.' And HORNER did. One punch was all he needed. The boys told me afterwards that they carried SHORE out feet first, just moments after they carried me out, and they needed seven stitches to sew him up."
While Ace BAILEY was still unconscious and recovering from surgery done at Boston City Hospital to relieve pressure on his brain, "My dad went to Boston and he checked into the Copley Plaza hotel because he knew that was where Conn SMYTHE (the Leaf manager) was staying. He had a.45 revolver with him and wanted to know where he could find SHORE. SMYTHE said, 'Let's go up to my room and have a chat.' SMYTHE got two of the hotel policemen to come up, and they must have slipped dad a couple of mickeys. SMYTHE put him on the train back to Toronto and Dad didn't wake up until he was back in Canada. Two weeks later, he got his gun back through the mail."
Fortunately, Red HORNER was all the avenger the Toronto Maple Leafs needed most nights during his 12-year career. Hockey feuds were serious matters and Mr. HORNER was hockey's version of the blunt instrument.
"Red" HORNER was born in a small rural community near Brantford, Ontario He was the son of a farmer. The HORNER family moved first to Ancaster, where he started school, then to Hamilton and eventually to Toronto. He was playing bantam hockey with North Toronto by his early teens, living with his half-brother who was a grocer, and his wife.
He was one of 72 players trying out for Frank SELKE's Marlboro juniors in 1926 and although young Red did not distinguish himself in that first practice, Mr. SELKE felt that he would be as patient as possible with him. The fact that Red was Mr. SELKE's grocery boy didn't hurt his chances.
Leafs founder Conn SMYTHE was a builder and well acquainted with Mr. SELKE, who was business manager of the electrical union. Mr. SELKE's autobiography recounts how Mr. SMYTHE was tiring of his Leafs being manhandled by the likes of the Montreal Maroons but couldn't pry any strong physical talents away from other National Hockey League teams.
Mr. SELKE's suggested solution was for Mr. SMYTHE to unload his vulnerable veterans and fill the lineup with robust kids from the Marlboros. Red HORNER made his National Hockey League debut on Saturday, December 22, 1928. He had already played a Friday night game with the Marlboro juniors and a Saturday afternoon match with a senior team when he was informed he'd be suiting up as a Toronto Maple Leaf that night at Arena Gardens on Mutual Street, the predecessor of Maple Leaf Gardens.
In a 2003 interview with the Internet site legendsofhockey.net, he recalled his debut: "He said, 'I'll tell ya what I'm gonna do. I'll pay you $2,500 for the balance of the season.' I thought about it and it sounded pretty good because I was making $25 a week as a clerk at the Standard Stock Exchange.
"I said, 'Well Mr. SMYTHE, I've only seen two pro games in my life before, I don't know any of your players, I haven't a car but if you'd like to pick me up and take me down tonight, I'll take you and introduce you to my mother and father.'
"He said, 'That's a deal,' and we shook hands on it. No signing or anything, just a handshake."
He was not a graceful skater but could move the puck quickly and possessed a gift for concentration under pressure. He could make a pinpoint pass while two forecheckers were zeroing in on him.
His tough, physical style of play earned him the league leadership in penalty minutes for eight of his 12 National Hockey League seasons. He set a record for penalties that lasted 20 years.
Mr. SMYTHE dispatched Mr. HORNER to a summer camp to work out and to put on weight in the summer of 1931. He was trained by Olympic pole-vaulter Ed ARCHIBALD. By the end of the summer, Mr. HORNER had gone from a soft 180 pounds to a solid 190.
In 1932, he was on a Stanley Cup winner with Toronto. For seven of his seasons, he played alongside another Toronto legend on defence, Francis Michael (King) CLANCY. Mr. HORNER played his entire career with the Maple Leafs and served as team captain from 1938 until his retirement in 1940. In 490 regular season games, he scored 42 goals and added 110 assists for 152 points. But his scoring statistics pale beside the fact he collected 1,264 penalty minutes during that time. He once collected 17 penalty minutes in the first 20-minute period of a game.
The scuffles didn't end when he retired as a player. Mr. HORNER, like Mr. CLANCY, turned to officiating and was an National Hockey League linesman for two seasons. On January 11, 1943, at Maple Leaf Gardens, he was working a game between the Maple Leafs and Detroit Red Wings when Detroit manager Jack ADAM/ADAMS berated him, alleging he had missed an icing call. Later in the game, Mr. HORNER lined up for a faceoff near the Detroit bench and Mr. ADAM/ADAMS reached out and shoved him, claiming he was blocking the view. Mr. HORNER swung around with an elbow that grazed his chin. Mr. ADAM/ADAMS shoved him again. Detroit player Syd ABEL took a swing at Mr. HORNER, who shoved Mr. ADAM/ADAMS hard before referee Bill CHADWICK stepped in.
Mr. HORNER went on to a business career managing North American Coal in Cleveland, Ohio, where he was the majority owner.
George Reginald (Red) HORNER was born in Lynden, Ontario, on May 28, 1909. He died in Toronto on April 27, 2005. He was 95. He was predeceased by his wife.

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-14 published
Neil YOUNG's father was an icon in own right
Sports journalist also a noted author
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, June 14, 2005, Page S1
With reports from William HOUSTON and Canadian Press
The labels that people attach to the name of Scott YOUNG inevitably mention prominently that he was the father of pop music icon Neil YOUNG.
But YOUNG, who died Sunday in Kingston, Ontario, at the age of 87, deserved the title of icon in his own right as a journalist, author, colleague and spinner of big-league dreams for kids who grew up in the 1950s and 1960s.
YOUNG's trilogy of hockey books for boys, Scrubs on Skates, Boy on Defence and Boy at the Leafs' Camp, were food for fantasy for the youth of a hockey-loving country. They were only a part of a body of work that included 40 books of fiction and autobiography drawn from a career in which YOUNG travelled the world covering everything from the Second World War to the assassination of John F. Kennedy and nearly every major sporting event in North America.
In his own field, he was just as big a star as the heroes he covered working for The Globe and Mail, the Winnipeg Free Press, The Canadian Press, the Toronto Telegram and Maclean's and Sports Illustrated magazines. He loved his craft. He was skilled in the telling of stories, and lessons were more important than the vanity of embellished prose. He made a reader comfortable, involved.
"He was someone who preferred to be at home," Margaret HOGAN, his wife of 25 years, said yesterday from Kingston in an interview with the Peterborough Examiner. "He went to bed early, he got up early. He wrote early in the morning. He was a writer, he was a kind, hospitable person who loved to walk in the country and follow the seasons."
YOUNG was born April 14, 1918, in Cypress River, Manitoba He lived with his mother and other relatives in several Prairie towns after his parents split up when he was 13. As an adult, YOUNG would follow a similar path.
He married three times, to Edna Blow RAGLAND, Astrid Carlson MEAD and HOGAN and had a total of seven children and step-children.
YOUNG began his journalism career officially at age 18 as a sportswriter at the Winnipeg Free Press in 1936. He also supported the family selling short stories published in Collier's, Argosy and the American magazines.
He moved to The Canadian Press in Toronto, where he would cover both news and sports, at the age of 23 after the paper refused to give him a raise.
YOUNG told Canadian Press in 1994 that Free Press managing editor George FERGUSON told him, "You will never be worth more than $25 a week to the Winnipeg Free Press."
YOUNG covered the Second World War for Canadian Press from London, then served in the Royal Canadian Navy 1944-45.
In 1957, YOUNG joined The Toronto Globe and Mail as a sports columnist.
He covered Grey Cups, World Series, Stanley Cups, the Olympics and appeared on Hockey Night in Canada broadcasts.
A talented and resourceful reporter, he was seconded to cover a Royal tour and write a general column, leaving an opening on the sports page that would be filled by Dick BEDDOES. He jumped to the Telegram in the 1960s, then made his way back to The Globe in the 1970s.
YOUNG said in his memoir A Writer's Life that his hockey books for boys "were based on hockey as I had known it in Winnipeg high schools and junior teams."
Hockey, as YOUNG knew it, was the brand espoused by Toronto Maple Leafs founder Conn SMYTHE and Stanley-Cup-winning coach George (Punch) IMLACH, for whom he would also author books.
He gave up newspapers in 1980, dismayed by what he saw as a twist in the journalistic profession, away from reporting facts and quoting real contacts to scandal hunting via "unnamed sources."
His novels and non-fiction work included The Flood, the two Arctic thrillers Murder in a Cold Climate and The Shaman's Knife, and 1984's Neil and Me, about his relationship with his famous rock 'n' roll son.
HOGAN said her husband hadn't written for several years.
Peterborough Mayor Sylvia SUTHERLAND said YOUNG's death left a void in the landscape of Canadian journalism.
"He was one of the outstanding journalists of his time," she said. "He had an incisive intelligence. He knew how to get a good story. I love Scott. I miss him a lot, everybody will. He's one of the great legends of Canadian journalism and it's a loss to those of us who love journalism."
SUTHERLAND said she first met YOUNG in the mid-1960s, when she worked at the Toronto Telegram. "We became close Friends in the '70s when we all moved to Peterborough," she said.
HOGAN said she and her husband moved to Kingston last October to be closer to her family. But they kept the family farm in Cavan.
"We still use and love the farm," HOGAN said.
"In the late '60s he was looking for property. He settled on this property in the Cavan hills."
The couple were there only two weeks ago, the last time SUTHERLAND saw her friend.
"Right until the end he was a very graceful and gracious man," she said. "He had been ill for a number of years, but he was still the same sweet Scott. He loved to talk about the old days in journalism and it was fun to do that with him."

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-22 published
SMYTHE, Berniece (née HILLIARD)
Of Simcoe, at the Norfolk Hospital Nursing Home on Saturday, August 20, 2005, in her 91st year. Born in Hagersville, December 3, 1914, youngest daughter of Charles and Susan HILLIARD. Predeceased by her husband Frederick Joseph SMYTHE (1993,) brothers Clifford and Oscar HILLIARD and sisters Gwen WHITE/WHYTE and Ethel VANDUSEN. Survived by son Robert of Simcoe, daughter Mary (Dennis) GOLDSBERRY and two grandchildren, Eleanor (Dan) SMITH all of Hamilton and Gregory GOLDSBERRY of Toronto; niece Mary Ethel UILDERSMA of Caledonia; great-nephews William and Brian HILLIARD of Painted Post, New York. A member of St. Paul's Anglican Church, Port Dover, she was active in the Washington. A graduate of Hamilton Normal School, she began teaching at Etonia School, Oxford County 1933-1936; subsequently at Doans Hollow (Norfolk County), South School, 3B Woodhouse and West Lynn (Simcoe), retiring in 1974. Visitation for Mrs. SMYTHE will be Tuesday, August 23, 2005, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at Thompson Waters Funeral Home, 102 First Avenue, Port Dover (519) 583-1530. Funeral Service will be at St. Paul's Anglican Church (Market and St. George Streets), Port Dover, on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 at 11 a.m. Rt. Reverend Clarence MITCHELL officiating. Interment Saint John's (Woodhouse), Simcoe. For those wishing, donations made to St. Paul's Anglican Church Memorial Fund or a charity of choice would be greatly appreciated.

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-08 published
SMYTHE, Bradley
Bradley SMYTHE passed away at home to spend eternity with God on Friday, February 4th, 2005 at the age of 48 years after battling cancer for the past two years. He will be lovingly remembered by his daughter Whitney, his son Matthew, his mother Reta, two brothers Sterling and Steve as well as two sisters Tanya and Nancy. Also survived by his father Harry. He was an accomplished singer and actor in his early years appearing as the young Patrick in Mame. He went on to a successful horse racing career as a jockey and trainer where he was recognized as the leading apprentice jockey in Canada, in 1977, and was awarded the "Sovereign Award". In closing this chapter of his life Brad wanted to extend his love and appreciation to his family and especially his Mum for all their support and caring in these last days. At Brad's request there will be no Service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Brad's memory directly to H.B.P.A. Backstretch Fund, 401 - 255 - 17th Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2S 2T8. Condolences may be e-mailed to: firstmfs@telusplanet.net Arrangements and Cremation in care of First Memorial Funeral Services, Calgary, Alberta, 403-216-2222.

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-11 published
SMYTHE, Bradley
Bradley SMYTHE passed away at home to spend eternity with God on Friday, February 4th, 2005 at the age of 48 years after battling cancer for the past two years. He will be lovingly remembered by his daughter Whitney, his son Matthew, his mother Reta, two brothers Sterling and Steve as well as two sisters Tanya and Nancy. Also survived by his father Harry. He was an accomplished singer and actor in his early years appearing as the young Patrick in Mame. He went on to a successful horse racing career as a jockey and trainer where he was recognized as the leading apprentice jockey in Canada, in 1977, and was awarded the "Sovereign Award". In closing this chapter of his life Brad wanted to extend his love and appreciation to his family and especially his Mum for all their support and caring in these last days. At Brad's request there will be no Service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Brad's memory directly to H.B.P.A. Backstretch Fund, 401 - 255 - 17th Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2S 2T8. Condolences may be e-mailed to: firstmfs@telusplanet.net Arrangements and Cremation in care of First Memorial Funeral Services, Calgary, Alberta, 403-216-2222.

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