SEASONS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-17 published
Leonard GERTLER, Urban Planner (1923-2005)
University of Waterloo teacher was a founding father of town planning in Canada, writes Sandra MARTIN. His environment-first strategy 'made a difference to the quality of our lives and our communities'
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, December 17, 2005, Page S11
A holistic and strategic thinker, Leonard (Len) GERTLER was one of the founding fathers of urban planning in this country. He became interested in cities as a researcher and scriptwriter for the National Film Board in the late 1940s and went on to write a landmark report on protecting Ontario's Niagara Escarpment and to serve as a policy adviser to Pierre Trudeau's Ministry of Urban Affairs. A pioneer in co-operative and sustainable development abroad, he involved his students, beginning in 1970, in projects in Indonesia, Jamaica, India, Japan and Uzbekistan.
Historically, planning in Canada was undertaken and taught by people trained in Britain or the United States. Prof. GERTLER, who worked as a planner in Edmonton, Toronto and the Saint John River Valley in New Brunswick before he became the founding director of the School of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Waterloo, brought a Canadian perspective to the classroom.
"Len was Canada's guru of environment-first planning for broad geographic regions. He wanted our cities to be cities [and to work for people's well-being] and he wanted the countryside -- the farmlands, woodlands and wetlands -- to stay countryside," said Linda PIM, a conservation policy analyst with Ontario Nature.
"He was able to connect the key elements of planning theory and practice in a way that resonated with me [and many other students] and stayed with me throughout my career," said David WITTY, who studied with Prof. GERTLER at U of W in the early 1970s and is now dean of architecture at the University of Manitoba. Prof. GERTLER "brought social, ecological, economic and physical components" to planning in a way "that demanded respect."
Mark SEASONS, who was a doctoral student in the mid 1980s and is now an associate professor of planning and associate dean at the U of W, described him as "a man of few but very carefully chosen words," with "a keen intellect and insights." He did not "suffer fools gladly," but "if you gained his respect, he became a loyal friend and life-long supporter."
Prof. GERTLER's passion for planning infected not only his students, but one of his own sons. "Len never cajoled or coaxed me," Meric GERTLER, now professor of geography and planning at the University of Toronto, said in a eulogy at his father's funeral. Instead, he felt an "inexorable pull" toward planning because his father's work was "so damned interesting." It made "a difference to the quality of our lives and our communities at a time when public interest in 'the environment' and all things 'urban' was enjoying its first real flowering in this country."
Leonard Oscar (Len) GERTLER was the youngest of three children of Carl Hiam GERTLER and his wife Gertrude (SLOVER). The GERTLERs and the SLOVERs had immigrated before the First World War from what was then Austro-Hungary, with the SLOVERs settling in Ottawa and the GERTLERs working on farms in an Irish settlement outside Montreal.
Gertrude and her brother had opened a store in the market in Ottawa and Hiam and his brothers started a furniture manufacturing company called Atlas Bedding in Montreal. Mr. GERTLER always hoped one of his sons would join in the family business, but it didn't work out that way.
His eldest son, Maynard GERTLER, a Roosevelt New Dealer, studied and taught economic history in the United States and Britain before returning to Canada and founding Harvest House, a Montreal publishing firm that specialized in translating the fiction of Québécois writers (such as Jacques Ferron, Anne Hébert and Yves Thériault) and in producing books on social and economic topics.
Len was seven years younger. Still, he was "my best friend from the time he was 12 years old," said Maynard GERTLER in a telephone conversation from his home in Montreal. Len was both artistic and athletic. He wrote plays, but he also played baseball and football, skied and trained as a long-distance swimmer.
Like his older brother, Len went to Queen's University to study economics and political science. In his third year, he became the founding editor of a publication called Public Affairs, soon renamed the Queen's Commentator. He emerged with an honour's degree in 1946 and an active interest in socio-economic and political issues.
During summers he found work (through a Montreal friend) with John GRIERSON at the National Film Board, which was then headquartered in Ottawa. After graduation, he joined the staff of the World in Action unit directed by Mr. GRIERSON's Disciple, Stuart LEGGE. He was researcher and scriptwriter for The Challenge of Housing and another film on the evolving National Capital Plan for Ottawa. His script was too outspoken for the National Capital Commission and he was banished from the project.
Dejected, he headed back to Montreal, where fate changed his future both romantically and professionally. In his parents' house, he met Anicka (Anita) BIRNBAUM, a Holocaust survivor from the tiny town of Svalava, Slovakia. In early teens she had been incarcerated in Auschwitz with the rest of her family. Anita and one sister were all that was left of their family when the Russians liberated the camp. She made her way to England, where she worked as a dental technician and used leftover bits of medical modelling clay to make sculptures.
Len's father, who was on the board of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society, sponsored her to come to Canada. "She only weighed about 60 pounds," recalled Maynard GERTLER. "My family sent her to l'École des métiers du meuble, which was the famous art school in Montreal. She studied sculpture and graduated at the top of the class and went on to be an excellent sculptor."
Anita and Len were married in the summer of 1948. The following year, discouraged by the National Capital Commission debacle at the film board, Len GERTLER went back to school and enrolled in a master's program in economics at the University of Toronto, studying under Harold INNIS and Tom EASTERBROOK. He was thinking of going further in his studies, but his older brother said: "Don't go into economics, that's theology. Go into planning."
Coincidentally, McGill had opened its graduate department of planning in 1950, the year he graduated from the University of Toronto. Encouraged by a friend who was already in the program, he enrolled and graduated with a diploma in 1951 and went on to a job in Edmonton as a senior planner (1951), and then as director of the Edmonton District Planning Commission (from 1952 to 1957), one of Canada's first regional planning agencies. He helped develop a workable concept of regional development during the exploration/development boom of the 1950s.
Next stop was Toronto, where he was senior planner and then deputy commissioner of planning from 1957 to 1964, working on a waterfront development plan among other projects. He left municipal government to establish a planning consultancy practice for Acres Research and Planning Ltd. in Niagara Falls.
Two years later, he was invited to help establish the School of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Waterloo and became its founding director. The university administration decided that he couldn't be a full professor because he lacked a doctorate, "the magic ticket," as Len GERTLER described it. If he were good enough to be the founding director of the school, he should be qualified enough to deserve a full professorship, he wrote in his memoir Radical Rumblings: Confessions of a Peripatetic Planner (2005). "Now I know that this betrayed ignorance of the ways of academia," he wrote. "But that very ignorance stiffened my back and the University conceded."
In 1967, the Ontario government of John Robarts, worried about the effects of urban sprawl, mining and recreational skiing on the natural habitat, asked him to carry out a study of the Niagara escarpment. A year later, Prof. GERTLER produced a "seminal report," according to the Federation of Ontario Naturalists, that "not only laid out a plan for a continuous undeveloped corridor along the escarpment, but also shifted the emphasis from recreation to conservation... prompted provincial legislation to restrict quarry development and, later, to regulate all land uses." The study led to the passage of the Niagara Escarpment Act, the formation of the Niagara Escarpment Commission, and the designation of the escarpment as a World Biosphere Reserve by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in 1990. Now, if you look at a satellite photograph of southern Ontario, you can see a green ribbon of natural habitats running from Niagara Falls to the tip of the Bruce Peninsula.
Prof. GERTLER took a two-year leave (from 1972 to 1974) to serve as director general of research and policy for prime minister Trudeau's Ministry of State for Urban Affairs. "His breadth of practice and involvement spoke to the notion that the national government should have an interest in the well-being of cities, because as cities go, so goes the country, and he saw that so early on," said Prof. WITTY. "He had the ability to see ahead of his time, but I never came to appreciate it until I was out and gone from the university [of Waterloo]."
Prof. GERTLER loved to work and continued writing the second volume of his memoirs even when his health was failing precipitously. In hospital, only days before he died, he reacted with pleasure when his son Kim brought him a book on international development for which he had written the foreword.
Leonard Oscar (Len) GERTLER was born in Montreal on October 10, 1923. He died in Toronto of throat cancer on December 9, 2005. He was 82. His wife, Anita, predeceased him in June of 2004. He is survived by four sons, a daughter, four grandchildren and his brother Maynard.

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SEASONS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-07 published
SPALDING, Ronald " Ron"
In hospital at Carleton Place, Ontario on Friday, February 4, 2005, at the age of 69 years. Beloved husband of Miriam "Mimi" DAVIS and his first wife the late Beverly. Loved father of Karen SPALDING (Eric SIGURDSON) and Steven SPALDING and step-father of Teresa SEASONS (Raymond) and Karen POLLAK (Gunter.) Cherished "Poppa" of Samantha, McKenzie and Gwendolyn and step-grandchildren Parker and Markus. Brother of Peter SPALDING (Alex.) Friends may call at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home 19 McArthur Avenue, Carleton Place on Wednesday from 11 a.m. until time of service in the chapel at 1 p.m. with the Reverend Hugh JACK officiating. Donations to the Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital Foundation or the Upper Canada District School Board "Ron Spalding Bursary" would be appreciated.

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SEATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-07 published
SEATH, Jessie H. (née CRAWFORD)
Peacefully at her home on Sunday, September 4, 2005 in her 91st year. Survived by Sam, her husband of 68 years, her daughter Linda, son Malcolm and his wife Marge, grand_son Trevor and his wife Julie, four great-grandchildren Taylor-Ann, Mackenzie, Jory and Kyle, and a very special friend David OJI. Predeceased by her grand_son Graeme. The family will receive Friends at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Ave. East, Agincourt (east of Kennedy Rd.) on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at Bridletowne Park Church, 2300 Bridletowne Circle, Scarborough (east of Warden, north of Finch) on Saturday at 2 p.m. Private burial. Memorial gifts to the Graeme Seath Scholarship Fund at Trinity Western University or to a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. A special thanks to the caring staff at Shepherd Terrace. Absent from the body; at home with the Lord.

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SEATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-08 published
SEATH, Douglas Melville
Electrical Eng., Aeronautical Eng., P.Eng. U of T, Royal Canadian Air Force Veteran, Squadron Leader. Peacefully, with the same great dignity as he lived his life, at the Northumberland Hills Hospital in Cobourg on Monday, November 7th, 2005. Douglas SEATH at 84 years of age. Dearly loved husband of Vivienne SEATH (nee DRAKE) for sixty years. Beloved father of Patricia MAJOR and Edward (Ted) SEATH (Mary.) Sadly missed by grandchildren Dawn MAJOR, Becky EMPIE (Doug), Brian MAJOR, Sarah SEATH, and Rebecca SEATH. Brother of Katherine, Charles, and the late John. Cremation was held with private scattering occurring at the Memorial Gardens of the Heritage Cemetery of St. Peter. Family and Friends are invited to a Memorial Reception being held at MacCoubrey Funeral Home, 30 King St. E. in Cobourg on Thursday, November 10th, 2005 at 2 p.m. Those wishing may make a memorial contribution by cheque to the Canadian Mental Health Association. Condolences received at www.maccoubrey.com

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SEATON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-27 published
SEATON, Donald Francis
Donald Francis SEATON of Ingersoll, formerly of Sweaburg and Lakeside, died peacefully at his home on January 26, 2005 in his 74th year. Beloved husband of Brenda Anne (HENRY) SEATON. Dear father of Ryan Michael SEATON, Brendon Sutherland SEATON and his cherished granddaughter Micaela Scott SEATON.
Donald SEATON had retired from 42.5 years of teaching for East Nissouri and the Oxford County Board of Education. He started his career in a one room school in Brown's Corners and was a pioneer in the area of special education traveling by bus to many one room schools to assist students with special needs. He was proud of his teaching time spent at Drumbo, Hickson and Tollgate schools. As well as teaching, Don and Brenda were foster parents for C.A.S. Oxford for ten years. Don touched the lives of many children. Don also served children as a Sunday school teacher and then Superintendent of Sunday School at Old Saint Paul's Church, Woodstock.
Don is survived by his brothers Alex and Eileen SEATON (Woodstock) and Hugh and Donna SEATON (Burford) and his sister-in-law Doris SEATON (Lakeside) and his mother-in-law Geraldine HENRY (Ingersoll.) He will be remembered fondly by his nieces and nephews Elizabeth, Lucas, Mark, Barb, Tayler, Bobby, Lisa, David, Emily, Mary Beth, Donnie, John, Hugh, Connie, Francis Marianne, Frank, Sue, Hugh and families. Also his cousins John Francis and Barb SEATON (Galt) and family in United States and England. Don was predeceased by his brother John (1988) and sister-in-law Vi (2001) and his parents Don and Elizabeth SEATON. Cremation has taken place. A Celebration of Donald's life and service will be held at St. James Anglican Church, Ingersoll on Saturday, January 29, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Memorial donations to Big Sister's Big Brothers Ingersoll, Old Saint Paul's Restoration Fund, Woodstock or St. James Anglican Church, Ingersoll would be appreciated by calling McBeath-Dynes Funeral Home, Ingersoll (519-425-1600)

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SEATON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-30 published
GILMOUR, Mary Reid
Peacefully on Friday, April 29, 2005 Mary Reid GILMOUR of London in her 92nd year. Wife of the late James E. GILMOUR (2001.) Dear mother of Jim GILMOUR (Sandra.) Loving grandmother of Karen BARROWCLOUGH (Dave) and Brenda SEATON (Conrad.) Devoted great-grandma of Grace and Hannah. Dear aunt of Mary GALLOWAY (David) of Kenner, Louisiana. Funeral arrangements will be private. Expressions of sympathy and donations (C.N.I.B.) would be appreciated and may be made through London Cremation Service 672-0459 or on line at www.londoncremation.com. The family would like to thank the Staff of London Health Sciences Centre, South Street Campus for their kindness.

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SEATON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-21 published
JULL, Janet Elizabeth (1952-2005)
Surrounded by her family at Woodstock General Hospital on Saturday November 19, 2005, after a courageous battle with cancer she died peacefully. Cherished daughter of Robert and Mary JULL; loving sister of Barb and her husband Mark SEATON, David and his wife Lesley, Doug and his wife Pauline. Janet will also be much missed by her nieces and nephews Ashley, Tyler, Taylor and Bobby. Friends will be received at The Arn-Lockie Funeral Home, 45 Main St. W., Norwich on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at Norwich United Church on Wednesday, November 23 at 1: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Canadian Cancer Society in Janet's name would be appreciated. Arn-Lockie (519) 863-3020.

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SEATON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-03 published
SALPETER, Irene (née SCHWARTZ)
Died peacefully on Friday, April 29, 2005, in her 93rd year. Wife of the late Louis SALPETER. Mother of Harry (Mary Jane) and Susan (Joseph CARLTON.) Grandmother of Alanna, Tamarra, Rebecca, Jessica and the late Eric SALPETER- CARLTON. Will be sadly missed by niece Kathy (Don SEATON) and extended family and Friends. Funeral Monday, May 2, 2005 at Steeles Memorial. Shiva will be held at her residence.

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SEATON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-07 published
George SALVERSON, Playwright: 1916-2005
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's first drama editor wrote a thousand radio plays, switched effortlessly to television and wrote a hit musical
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, May 7, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- He was Canada's king of radio drama in its golden age. George SALVERSON wrote about a thousand radio plays in a career that began in 1945 and lasted until long after the arrival of television. He was a volume man who never kept count and, in fact, held few copies of his work. Week after week, Mr. SALVERSON generated a one-hour Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio play with a careful story line and perfect dialogue. The phrase "writer's block" didn't exist for him; he was a freelancer and he had to eat.
He did have a routine, though. For many years he worked for Stages, the main Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio drama of the week. His work week started on a Tuesday or a Wednesday with an idea. It could be something in the news, such as prison reform or mental health. Radio dramas were used to deal with social issues the same way television documentaries or long news items are today.
After the idea was nailed down, Mr. SALVERSON would write one act a day, with almost all his plays having three acts. That left him ready for the rehearsal, which took all day Saturday. During and after the rehearsal, he and the director, either Esse LJUNGH or Andrew ALLAN, would work polishing the script.
"The live performance was on Sunday," remembers Alfie SCOPP who was one of the actors. "We could come dressed casually for the rehearsal, but when we went live at 5 o'clock on Sunday we had to be dressed in a suit and a tie."
Studio G on Jarvis Street in Toronto would be filled with as many as 20 actors, including such well-known names as John DRAINIE, Aileen SEATON and Bud KNAPP. No matter how long their part, actors were all paid $45 a performance.
One example of the radio play as social commentary was a series called Return Journey, which Mr. SALVERSON wrote in 1951. It was based on research done at Kingston Penitentiary on how hard it was for a released prisoner to make it on the outside. The story tells how a prisoner was afraid of the outside world but also afraid of failure and a return to behind bars.
He did much of the research for that particular play while on his honeymoon in Kingston, Ontario His wife Olive SCOTT, went by the stage name of Sandra SCOTT, and acted in many of his productions. "George was always amazed that this glamorous actress married him," remembers his friend Mr. SCOPP.
The work on his honeymoon showed how an idea could be plucked from the headlines. In a recent e-mail to his daughter, Julie, he said the early Canadian Broadcasting Corporation almost invented documentary drama for radio. "Now it's routine in Law and Order."
Later when Mr. SALVERSON moved to television, he used the same techniques for coming up with story ideas. Once he met a man he knew who had been a successful advertising executive but could no longer find work because he was over 45. "The trouble is, I'm over-age and over qualified," the man told Mr. SALVERSON.
The same line came out of the mouth of Walter, the fictional version of the ad man in the television play, The Write-Off. Mr. SALVERSON spoke to people in the business world, talked to employment agencies and tried to find out just how many Walters there were in Canada. He figured there to be at least 500,000 under-employed older people.
"The real Walter attended one of the taping sessions and he walked into the control room as Rudi [director Rudi DORN] was directing the firing scene," recalled Mr. SALVERSON in a 1968 interview. "When I asked him was this anything like the way it really happened, he gave me a long look and remarked, 'Have you ever been through a nightmare twice?' "
George SALVERSON's early life read like an improbable script for a radio play. His father, the son of Scandinavian immigrants, worked for the Canadian National Railway and the family lived, at one time or another, in Port Arthur, Ontario, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Kamloops, British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria. Fortunately, he spent enough time in Port Arthur to go to high school there. His mother, Laura Goodman SALVERSON, wrote and published 10 books. She won the Governor General's Award twice -- for her novel The Dark Weaver in 1937 and then for her autobiography Confessions of an Immigrant's Daughter in1939.
Even so, George SALVERSON never wanted to be a playwright. He set out to be a newscaster and was headed in the right direction when he got his first job at CFAR in Flin Flon, Manitoba He performed every role at the tiny radio station, including writing and reading the news. The highlight of his newscasting career occurred on December 7, 1941, when he told the 7,000 people of Flin Flon of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and he did it dressed in a suit.
His second job came along in what was then the biggest city in Western Canada -- Winnipeg. But at CKRC, they had other plans. He could read the occasional newscast if he liked, but it wasn't news readers they wanted. They had plenty, thanks. What they needed was a playwright, someone who could knock off a quickie radio drama and also take a part or two.
His first play was a success, and Mr. SALVERSON soon found himself doing the writing, acting, producing and sound effects. He resolved to perfect his dramas, drifting over to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to pick up pointers on how to write believable dialogue and interesting story ideas.
For a couple of years, Mr. SALVERSON wrote, produced and directed plays for Eaton's, when the department store used radio dramas to sell its wares. Then, in 1948, he was given work by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and moved to Toronto. Among his first shows was Paper Railroad, a play based on his father's work life.
From the time he arrived in Toronto he was never short of works or awards. He won a first in the Canadian Radio Awards of 1948 and, the following year, received another from Ohio State University. In 1949, he adapted Dracula for radio, a play that starred Lorne GREEN, Alan KING and Lister SINCLAIR.
When the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation turned to television in the fall of 1952, Mr. SALVERSON was soon writing both radio and television plays and he became the network's first drama editor. One of his plays, The Discoverers, was performed on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and on Kraft Theatre in the United States. The play was about Banting and Best's discovery of insulin.
Later on he wrote documentaries as well as dramas for television. Perhaps his most famous was Air of Death. "That changed the course of public affairs programming on television," said Jane CHALMERS, vice-president of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio. "In October of 1967, this documentary report, written by George, and dealing with air pollution in Canada, aired on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television, pre-empting the top-rated The Ed Sullivan Show."
His script laid the subject bare and resulted in a lawsuit.
"Dad worked for six months helping the lawyers and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with the lawsuit. They won their case," said Julie SALVERSON. "He used to joke it was the only time he had such steady work."
He wrote one production for the stage, the musical The Legend of the Dumbells, which was produced at the Charlottetown Festival in 1977. It was about a Canadian troupe of First World War entertainers and used songs from the era. It travelled to the National Arts Centre in Ottawa and the Elgin Theatre in Toronto and continues to be staged.
When Studio G closed in July 1993, before the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation moved to its new Toronto headquarters, he wrote a 10-minute sketch for radio. It was called End Credits.
For many years, Mr. SALVERSON taught writing at Ryerson University in Toronto and, in the process, found that some people were unteachable. He told his daughter Julie, in one of their many e-mails, the story of a 50-year-old novelist who wanted to turn one of his books into a screenplay. He just couldn't do it.
"When I dramatized, I always went into the scene myself. I was sitting there doing the acting. And away went the characters, whooping it up. My writer friend remained a writer. He stood outside the scene and tried to tell you what was going on. And nobody felt anything."
As he grew older, George SALVERSON kept his mind in shape with mental exercises. One of them was memorizing The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. He could recite any verse on command, and was working on memorizing it backwards. He also wrote a lot of limericks. On the Saturday before he died, he had a new one for Alfie SCOPP. It went like this:
A well-endowed woman from Brussels
Had a veritable plethora of muscles,
She said with some pride,
There are others I hide,
And bring them out only in tussles.
He also wrote a book called Around the World in 80 Limericks, with bits of doggerel for each of the world's major cities. He wrote until the end.
George SALVERSON was born in St. Catharines, Ont, on April 30, 1916. He died on April 9, 2005, after a fall at his apartment at the Performing Arts Lodge in Toronto. He was 88. A public memorial service will be held there at 6 p.m., Monday, May 9. He is survived by his daughter Julie and son Scott. His wife died in 2000.

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SEATON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-03 published
SEATON, Marlene Charlotte (née WHITE/WHYTE)
Suddenly, on Monday, January 31, 2005, while on vacation in Cancun, Mexico. Marlene (née WHITE/WHYTE,) in her 59th year, was the devoted wife of Ralph of Little Britain. Loving mother of Ken, Sean and his wife Christine, Leslie and her husband Ron WALKER, and Brenda and her husband Roger PIERS. Cherished grandmother of Brandon, Tyler, Aidan, Madyson and MacKenzie. Much loved daughter of Constance (John) COMSTIVE and Lorne (Ruth) WHITE/WHYTE, and granddaughter of Lottie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Treasured sister of Karen and Calvin. Marlene will be forever missed by Mark and many other extended family members and Friends. Visitation at the Mackey Funeral Home, 33 Peel Street, Lindsay (705-328-2721) on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service from Little Britain United Church, 1022 Little Britain Road, on Saturday, February 5th at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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SEATON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-05 published
SEATON, Marlene Charlotte (née WHITE/WHYTE)
Suddenly, on Monday, January 31, 2005, while on vacation in Cancun, Mexico. Marlene (née WHITE/WHYTE,) in her 59th year, was the devoted wife of Ralph of Little Britain. Loving mother of Ken, Sean and his wife Christine, Leslie and her husband Ron WALKER, and Brenda and her husband Roger PIERS. Cherished grandmother of Brandon, Tyler, Aidan, Madyson and MacKenzie. Much loved daughter of Constance (John) COMSTIVE and Lorne (Ruth) WHITE/WHYTE, and granddaughter of Lottie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Treasured sister of Karen and Calvin. Marlene will be forever missed by Mark and many other extended family members and Friends. Visitation was held at the Mackey Funeral Home, 33 Peel Street, Lindsay (705-328-2721) on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service from Little Britain United Church, 1022 Little Britain Road, on Saturday, February 5th at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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SEATON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-15 published
SAUL, Elizabeth " Sue" (née THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON)
Passed away on Thursday April 14, 2005, at Oak Terrace Home, Orillia, in her 60th year after a lengthy battle with Alzheimer's disease. Beloved wife of Art SAUL of Oro Station. Survived by her children Sherrie (Dan BEAUGRAND) of Huntsville, and Gregory (Catherine BICKRAM) of Peterborough, her granddaughters Jessica and Cassidy, and her sisters Mary (Ray SEATON) of Angus, and Clara of Scarborough. Predeceased by her sisters Jean and Norma, and brother Bill. In accordance with Sue's wishes, there will be no visitation or service. Cremation. If so desired, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated, and may be made through the Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Homes, Barrie. Condolences may be forwarded through www.steckleygooderham.com.

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SEATON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-13 published
COMSTIVE, John " Jack"
At home on Thursday, May 12, 2005, John (Jack) COMSTIVE of Oak Shores, Bobcaygeon. Loving husband of Connie COMSTIVE. Father of Dawn KOTLAN of Belleville, Keith COMSTIVE of Toronto, Gail GOULD of Belleville and Karen MICHEAU (Edward MORGAN) of Omemee. Grandfather of Jessica CONAHAN, Sean SEATON and Mark URQUHART. Great-grandfather of Christian. Brother-in-law of Marrion (Tony) SAMS. Brother of the late Dolly, Betty and Ronnie. Loving uncle of Bill (Barb) COMSTIVE. Family and Friends will be received at Monk Funeral Home, 6 Helen Street, Bobcaygeon (1-866-393-0063) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Friday. Funeral service in the Monk Chapel on Saturday, May 14, 2005 at 2 p.m. Memorial donations to the Peterborough Humane Society would be appreciated. The COMSTIVE family would like to thank the Peterborough Regional Health Centre Dialysis Unit, Dr. CHUNG and family physician Dr. James FAGAN. Messages of condolence may be sent to www.monkfuneralhome.com.

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SEATON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-18 published
SEATON, Micheline
On Friday, September 16, 2005 at Baycrest. Micheline, beloved wife of the late Albert. Loving mother and mother-in-law to Boris and Danielle WISEMAN, Renee and Gerry STARKMAN, Claire SEATON- MARKS, Meyer and Shelly SEATON, and Richard and Tari SEATON. Survived by brothers and sisters Nicholas, Antoine, François, Marie, Lucie and Anna. Grandmother to Lisa, Dafyyd and Andree, Brandon, Stephen and Stephanie, Alexandra, Sean, Samantha, Joshua, Jessica and Jamison. For time and place, call Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 416-663-9060. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Micheline Seaton Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 416-780-0324.

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SEATON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-29 published
SEATON, Edith Cavell
Peacefully, at Leisure World Nursing Home, on Thursday, October 27, 2005, in her 87th year. Edith, beloved wife of the late Allan Kenneth SEATON. Loving mother of Ralph and his late wife Marlene, Ross and his wife Lillian. Dear grandmother of Leslie, Kenneth, Brenda, Sean and Karen. Dear great-grandmother of Brandon, Aiden, Tyler, Madyson, McKenzie, Jessica and Emily. Friends will be received at the Ingram Funeral Home, 1055 Gerrard Street East (at Jones Ave.), on Saturday and Sunday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. Mass of the Resurrection to be held at St. Joseph's Parish, 172 Leslie Street (north of Queen St.), on Monday at 10 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to a charity of choice. Parking adjacent to the front and rear of the funeral home.

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SEAVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-13 published
SEAVER, Ronald Arvon " Sliv"
(Retired Ontario Provincial Police Detective and Private Investigator) Peacefully with his family by his side on Thursday August 11th, 2005 at the Scarborough General Hospital. Ronald Arvon SEAVER of Scarborough (formerly of Cornwall, Ontario) in his 59th year. Dearly loved son of the late Fred and Edith SEAVER. Beloved husband of Marilyn (née MIESKE.) Dear brother of Larry (Diane,) Terry, Cathy (Don) HALLING, and Morley (Gisele.) Dearest son-in-law of Lucy MIESKE and the late Harry MIESKE. Fondly remembered by his sister-in-law Faye and her husband Harold O'BRIEN. Ronald also leaves behind many aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews, many Friends and colleagues. Visitation will be held on Sunday August 14th from 1-9 p.m. at the "Scarborough Chapel" of McDougall and Brown 2900 Kingston Road (one block east of St. Clair Ave. E.), 416-267-4656. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be greatly appreciated. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date at Port Darlington Marina Complex in Bowmanville.

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SEAWARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-08 published
SEAWARD, Daisy Jean (née LENEHAN)
Passed away in her 85th year on Monday, November 7, 2005. Daisy, beloved wife of the late John (Jack) SEAWARD. Cherished mother of Wayne (Cheryl) and Jackie (Jim). Much loved grandmother of Brent (Joanne), Tracey (Dan), Laura and Jamie. Adoring great-grandmother of Jessica, Connor and Ella Daisy. Daisy will be sadly missed by her sisters Nora (Peter) and Frances (Fred). Predeceased by her brother Kenneth. Friends may call at the Jerrett Funeral Home, 6191 Yonge Street, North York (2 lights south of Steeles), on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service on Wednesday at 11 a.m. Interment Elgin Mills Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals - Newmarket would be greatly appreciated. "In Our Hearts Forever"

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SEAWRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-23 published
MARSHALL, Lois Eleanor (née SEAWRIGHT)
Peacefully on August 22nd, 2005 at the Trillium Health Centre. She was in her 73rd year. Beloved wife of Robert for 49 years. Loving mother of Kerry MARSHALL (David MOYMAGH) and Wendy WALKER (Russell). Cherished Grandma and Nanna to Meagan, Ryan and Dustyn. Friends may call at the Ward Funeral Home "Brampton Chapel," 52 Main Street South (Hwy. 10), Brampton on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held on Thursday, August 25th, 2005 at 2 p.m. in the Chapel. Interment Brampton Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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SEAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-12 published
BALDWIN, Margaret
Died of natural causes in Toronto on October 5, 2005. Born in 1910, Margaret was the daughter of Edward ANDERSON and Alberta McALLISTER of Welland. Graduating in 1932 from University College Toronto, she taught high school in Welland before marrying Dr. William Wesley BALDWIN in 1936. They moved to Brooklin, Ontario, where Bill practiced medicine for over 40 years and Margaret devoted her life to serving others, both in her family and the community of Brooklin/Whitby/Oshawa region. After Bill's death in 1988, she lived in their Brooklin home until 2002 before moving to Toronto. Margaret will be remembered for her lively and affectionate interest in all the people with whom she came in contact, for her wide-ranging volunteer commitments and for the strong support she gave to Bill's medical career. Margaret leaves her children Dr. William BALDWIN of Toronto and Anne POTTER (Richard) of Milford, Ontario; her grandchildren Jennifer EIELSON (John) of Boston, David POTTER (Deb) of Toronto, Carolyn POTTER (Lori SEAY) of Vancouver and Andrew BALDWIN (Tara CASE) of Ottawa, as well as four great-grandchildren in Toronto and Boston. Cremation has taken place. At Margaret's request no service will be held. Friends will be received by the family at The Baldwin Center, 5959 Anderson Street, Brooklin Village from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on October 30, 2005. Many thanks to Providence Centre Staff for their kindness to Margaret.

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