RAY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-02-11 published
RAY, Viola (née SCHANK)
Peacefully at Summit Place in Owen Sound on Thursday, February 10th, 2005. Viola RAY (née SCHANK) of Owen Sound in her 79th year. Wife of the late George RAY and the late Sid YEE. Dear sister of Len SCHANK and his wife Shirley of Owen Sound, Florence and her husband Jim PREISZ of Allenford and Lureine McELREA of Owen Sound. Sadly missed by her nieces, nephews and her entire family. Predeceased by her parents, Herb and Margaret SCHANK and three brothers, Stan, Hilbert and Wesley SCHANK. The funeral service will be conducted in the chapel of Tannahill Funeral Home, 376-3710 on Saturday, February 12th at 11: 00 a.m., with Doctor Brad CLARK officiating. Visiting one hour prior to service time. Interment in St. Peter's Holy Family Cemetery in London. As expressions of sympathy, the family would appreciate memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Cancer Society.
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RAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-15 published
GRODZKI, Agata
At London Health Sciences Centre on Monday, February 14, 2005, Agata GRODZKI in her 85th year. Beloved wife of the late Heronim "Harry" GRODZKI (1987.) Dear mother of Stephanie GIRARD (Bernard) and Krystyna RAY of Brantford. Loving grandmother of Christopher, Andrew, Janina and Michael. Great-grandmother of Brady, Morgan and Aurora. Sister of Julian, Wincenty, Sofia and Jozefa, all of Poland. Aunt of Jozef JARMULA (Stella.) Visitors will be received on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William Street. Funeral Mass in Our Lady of Czestochowa Church (419 Hill Street) on Thursday at 10 a.m. Interment St. Peter's Cemetery. Prayers Wednesday evening at 8 p.m.

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RAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-05 published
RIGNEY, Donald Gordon (September 25, 1931-March 3, 2005)
Donald Gordon, passed away after a courageous battle with cancer at Windsor Western Hospital at 73 years of age. Beloved husband of Nancy Geraldine (née NOBLE,) with whom he celebrated 48 years of marriage. Cherished father of James Donald, Nancy Louise and Paul HAMILTON, Donna Marie and Bill RAY. Beloved grandpa of Britani and Kyle RIGNEY, Viktoria and Karl HAMILTON, Austin and Evan RAY. Dearest brother of Doreen and Wally KNIGHT, Glen and Evelyn RIGNEY, Murray and Jean RIGNEY, Norma and Bill POWERS. Also survived by 31 nieces and nephews and predeceased by one niece Lori Beth WRIGHT (1996.)
Mr. RIGNEY retired from Enwin Utilities after 36 years of service, and was a very active member at Bedford United Church. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will take place on March 19, 2005 at Bedford United Church at 11: 00 a.m. Interment of Donald's cremated remains will take place at Victoria Memorial Gardens. As an expression of sympathy, donations may be made to the Windsor Regional Cancer Centre or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Windsor Chapel Funeral Home, Windsor, Ontario (519-253-7234).

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RAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-21 published
GUNSTONE, Mary Margaret
Mary Margaret GUNSTONE of Straffordville passed away peacefully on Friday, March 18, 2005 at the age of 65 years. Loving wife and best friend of her late husband Clare GUNSTONE. Beloved mother to Kathy RAY and Michael GUNSTONE. Grandmother of Jackie; Angela and Amanda RAY. Daughter of Myrtle FORAN of Port Burwell. Sister of James MASALES; Gordon MASALES; Marion LEMAY; Donna FICK; Norma QUACKENBUSH; Ruth Ann WATERS; Debbie MASALES; and sister-in-law to Margaret UNDERHILL. " Come to me all ye who are weary and burdened and I will give you rest." Matthew 11: 28. Mrs. GUNSTONE's family will receive Friends at Ostrander's Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell Street, Tillsonburg (842-5221) on Monday March 21st, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service for Margaret will be held in the Ostrander's Funeral Home Chapel on Tuesday, March 22nd, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Dave PATTEN of Straffordville Gospel Hall officiating. Interment at Smuck Cemetery. Memorial donations (payable by cheque) may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Diabetes Association. Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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RAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-04 published
WEEKES, May (formerly ARMSTRONG, née DAVIES)
Peacefully at Meadowcroft Place Retirement Home, London, on Wednesday, March 30th, 2005, May (DAVIES) (ARMSTRONG) WEEKES of London. Beloved wife of the late John Nelson WEEKES, Q.C. and the late Russell ARMSTRONG. Dear mother of Ron ARMSTRONG and his wife Lorraine of St. Catharines, Shirley SHUTTLEWORTH of London, Marlene GLOVER of Vancouver, British Columbia, and Geoffrey WEEKES and his wife Gail of Victoria, British Columbia. Much loved grandmother of Lynda, Steve, Gerry, Jamie, Cathy, Janet, Amy, Lisa and Emily, and her 10 greatgrandchildren. Predeceased by her brothers Ted, Harold, Gerry and Stan DAVIES and her sisters Gladys RAY, Queenie NEAR and Doris NEIL. Friends will be received by the family from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London (433-5184) where a private funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Thursday, April 7th. Interment in Woodland Cemetery, London. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Diabetes Association, 442 Adelaide Street North, London, N6B 3H8 or the charity of your choice.

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RAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-31 published
SWACKHAMMER, Frank
Born February 3, 1911, Aylmer, Ontario, died October 28, 2005, Burlington, Ontario. Ordained clergyman of the Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec for 65 years. Predeceased in 1979 by wife Hazel Jean McBETH and in 2005, by second wife Mary ROCH. Leaving two children Jane BENNETT (George) and Mac SWACKHAMMER (Cheryl RAY,) four granddaughters and six great-grandchildren. Pastor in Town of Mount Royal Baptist Church, Montreal; Centre St. Baptist Church, Saint Thomas; Temple Baptist Church, Toronto; First Baptist Church, Oshawa; Sarnia Baptist Church and many interim placements after his retirement. He received an Honorary Doctorate from McMaster University for his work on the Senate and the Board of Governors of McMaster Divinity School. Remaining strong in the Spirit until the end. In keeping with his wishes cremation has taken place. A service to commemorate his life is planned for spring.

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RAY o@ca.on.simcoe_county.barrie.the_barrie_examiner 2005-09-19 published
Barrie woman dies in crash
By Robin MacLENNAN, Monday, September 19, 2005
A 27-year-old Barrie woman was found dead in her car Sunday morning, in a Springwater Township field near Highway 26.
Huronia West Ontario Provincial Police said Amy RAY was driving a grey Volkswagen Jetta eastbound on Highway 26, east of Mayer Road in Springwater Township, Saturday night or early Sunday morning when she lost control.
The car hit the south shoulder before veering north across both lanes of traffic and entering the north ditch where it struck a culvert and rolled several times, police said.
An Ontario Provincial Police officer on routine patrol at about 4: 30 a.m. Sunday found the car in the field.
“An initial investigation revealed that a lone occupant was still inside,” police said.
“Springwater Fire Department and Simcoe County Paramedic Services attended the scene to assist, however, the lone occupant was pronounced dead at the scene,” police said.
A post-mortem examination was scheduled for Sunday, but results were not available at press time.
RAY is the ninth person to die in a crash on Simcoe county highways since early August. Eight of the victims were involved in single-vehicle collisions and the ninth was riding a motorcycle.
An Innisfil man died September 14 when his Ford Mustang went into the ditch on the 5th Sideroad of Bradford-West Gwillimbury.
South Simcoe Police also investigated a fatal crash September 7, when resident Glenn MOORE, 56, lost control of his motorcycle on the northbound Highway 400 off-ramp at Innisfil Beach Road, slamming into an eastbound pick-up truck.
Josef LUCKAS, 45, of Innisfil was not wearing a seat-belt when he lost control of his car on Big Bay Point Road September 4. the car rolled several times in a ditch and hit a tree.
Another Innisfil resident, Douglas THORN, was killed when his pick-up truck rolled into a ditch on the 10th Line of Essa Township September 5.
Two people were killed near Stayner on August 24, after the pick-up truck they were in was involved in a crash and they were thrown from the vehicle.
A teen driver was killed and two of his three passengers were also seriously injured in a car crash August 18 on the southbound ramp of the Highway 400 extension, just north of Barrie.
On August 12, a Toronto teen was killed in a crash on Highway 400 at the Highway 89 on ramp. Again, the driver lost control and none of the car's occupants were wearing seat-belts.

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RAY o@ca.on.simcoe_county.barrie.the_barrie_examiner 2005-09-20 published
Beloved teacher mourned
By Robin MacLENNAN, Tuesday, September 20, 2005
Mandy RAY spent the last two weeks getting to know the children in her Grade 6 class, thrilled to be starting a new school year.
Now the students at Alcona Glen Elementary School are learning how to deal with the sudden death of the popular teacher.
RAY, 27, was killed on the weekend when the car she was driving ran off Highway 26 near Minesing, hitting a culvert and rolling several times.
Huronia-West Ontario Provincial Police officers spotted the Volkswagen Jetta in a farm field early Sunday morning.
Mandy was pronounced dead at the scene.
“She was a lovely, lovely lady,” said Alcona Glen principal Jackie KAVANAGH.
“Everyone here is really sad today and we're trying to help the kids.&rdquo
Counsellors from the Simcoe County District School Board Crisis Response Team spent the day at the school, talking to staff and students, and encouraging them to share their grief.
“This is a young, beloved teacher on staff and it was quite a shock to hear the news,” said board communications officer Debbie CLARKE.
“The crisis counsellors are at the school to help them work through the shock and to get them to talk about their feelings.
“The school community is really like a family and a member of the Alcona Glen family has been lost.&rdquo
Mandy started her teaching career at the Alcona school five years ago as a new graduate who excelled at Nipissing University in North Bay.
“She knew she wanted to be a teacher since she was in Grade 4,&rdquo said Mandy's mom Dagmar.
“That's why she worked so hard and did so well at school. She knew what she wanted to do when she was very young.&rdquo
Graduating with marks over 90 per cent at Barrie North Collegiate, Mandy breezed through university and then returned home to Barrie where she lived in an apartment at her parents' Newton Street home.
Neighbours were devastated by news of her death.
“Everybody's shattered,” said next-door neighbour Judy HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON. “She was such a good person. We all watched her grow from an adorable child into a responsible teen and then into a lovely young woman.
“She had a beautiful smile and eyes that really lived. They sparkled.&rdquo
Police don't know why Mandy's car went off the road, but they said her wheels touched the south shoulder of the highway and then the car crossed both lanes and drove into the north ditch.
“They told us that she went on the shoulder and then over-corrected to get back on the road,” said her dad Gerry RAY. “It was just the wrong place to do that, because there was such a deep ditch and the car flipped over.&rdquo
The flags at Alcona Glen flew at half-mast Monday in the young teacher's honour.
Inside, the atmosphere was sombre as counsellors met with Mandy's distraught students.
“The counsellors helped us feel a bit better,” classmates said as they left the school. Students spent the afternoon working together with crisis counsellors to assemble photos and thoughts into a memory book that will be given to Mandy's family.
“She was really nice,” one girl said, wiping her tears. “She always listened to whatever we had to say and she was lots of fun.&rdquo
An avid sports fan and participant, Mandy coached the junior girls basketball team at Alcona Glen. She grew up playing baseball in the Barrie Minor Baseball Association along with her brother Chris and their dad who volunteered many hours to the league.
“She liked to follow her brother,” Gerry said, smiling at his wife as they sat quietly outside the family home Monday evening. “That's what she really liked to do, follow around her brother.&rdquo
Friends describe Mandy as a very focused, determined person who eagerly shared her love of learning with youngsters at her school.
“I could often look over on a Saturday night and see her on her computer working on school things,” HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON said.
“She loved her job.&rdquo
And when the neighbour looked outside at about 3 a.m. Sunday, she remembers thinking it was strange that Mandy's car wasn't in the driveway.
“Then I saw the police cruiser pull up just after 8 o'clock and I thought ‘Oh, no. What's happened?
“My husband went outside and when he came back I asked him if everything was Okay. He just bit his lip and his eyes welled up. He couldn't speak for a few minutes, and he just shook his head.&rdquo
Mandy is survived by her parents Dagmar and Gerry RAY of Barrie, brother Christian RAY of Toronto, and grandparents Edith and the late William RAY and Helga MESKENAS of Barrie.
Visitation will be held at the Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Home, Wednesday from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., and a service is scheduled in the chapel Thursday at 11 a.m.

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RAY o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2005-08-05 published
MILLER, Ernest Charles
Passed away peacefully on August 1, 2005, in his 86th year at the General and Marine Hospital in Collingwood. Loving husband of Lovina for 55 years. Father of Gloria (Brian HURCOM,) Ted (Brenda RAY, Yvonne (Brian HOBBS) all of Collingwood. Grandfather to Tonya, Lamonte, Aaron, John, Jerry, Melissa, Matt, Tracey Travis, and Jen. Great Grandfather to Cody, Cyla, Kendra, Skylar, Jacob, Masen, Jaden, Aaron, Tyler, Jonathan, and Dominic. Survived by brothers Harry, and Edward, and sisters Audrey and Estella. Predeceased by brother Elmer and sisters Rose and Eileen. A celebration of his life will be held on Monday, August 8, 2005 at 3 p.m. at the Nazarene Church, 200 Erie Street, Collingwood. He will be sadly missed and never forgotten. Donations to the General & Marine Hospital in his name would be greatly appreciated.
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RAY o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2005-09-16 published
27-year-old found dead in car
A 27-year-old Barrie woman, Amanda RAY, was found dead in her car along Hwy. 26 early Sunday morning.
A Huronia West Ontario Provincial Police officer on patrol, around 4: 30 a.m. spotted the vehicle, a grey 2003 Volkswagen Jetta, in a field off Hwy. 26, east of Meyer Road in Springwater Township.
The Ontario Provincial Police technical traffic collision investigator and reconstructionist determined the car was eastbound when it hit the south shoulder, veered north across both lanes and entered the north ditch, striking a culvert and rolling several times before coming to a stop.
The woman was a Grade 6 teacher at an Innisfil elementary school.
A post mortem was scheduled to take place at Royal Victoria Hospital in Barrie on Sunday.
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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-26 published
Allan BROMLEY, Nuclear Physicist: 1926-2005
Farm boy from the Ottawa Valley 'who was always experimenting' paid his dues at Atomic Energy of Canada before landing a job at Yale and becoming science adviser to the first President George Bush
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, February 26, 2005 - Page S7
Ottawa -- It was a case of what the scientist saw. Or how, in just a few short hours, a Canadian physicist became an American citizen.
It happened one day in 1970 when Allan BROMLEY, then a nuclear expert from Yale University and later science adviser to the first President George Bush, spied something that put his colleagues all in a panic.
"I had been shown the deepest, darkest secret known in the United States out at the Weapons Flats in Nevada," the farmer's son from the Ottawa Valley told the Toronto Star in 1992. "And just about the time it was all finished, someone said, 'Oh, my God, BROMLEY is not a citizen.'
A judge was hurriedly sent out from nearby Las Vegas and Dr. BROMLEY was sworn in on the spot so that "it became legal for me to know that deep, dark secret." To this day, no one, including his brother John, knows much about what Dr. BROMLEY laid his eyes on that day.
"It is true that he was being shown something and that someone realized there had been a security breach," says John BROMLEY. "He never did give me all of the details."
The renowned nuclear physicist's rise to the pinnacle of American science began under circumstances considerably less odd than the event that saw him suddenly become an American.
"He always liked science as a youngster, he was always experimenting with things," recalls John BROMLEY. "We had a lot of scientific equipment at our high school and one day at noon he got a concoction going and we heard the bang all the way down the street... it took the paint off the old tin ceiling in the room.
"Whenever he did something, he wanted to know why it did what it did. He was very inquisitive," says John, who with Allan, two other brothers and a sister, grew up on a family farm about 12 kilometres east of Pembroke, Ontario Today, John BROMLEY runs a farm and sawmill not far away near Westmeath, Ontario
Later in life, Allan BROMLEY's aptitude for science would elevate him to a leadership role in the national and international science and science-policy communities. In a statement made earlier this month, Mr. Bush said: "In my view he was a truly great leader in the U.S. scientific community. I know I felt privileged to have him at my side when I was president."
As Mr. Bush's top science adviser from 1989 to 1993, Dr. BROMLEY pushed for sizable increases in money for scientific research in a race to keep U. S. manufacturing ahead of Japan and Germany. He supported the expansion of the high-speed network that became the Internet, and, after years of questioning the science behind global warming, he was credited with persuading Mr. Bush to attend a summit on the issue.
Serving as the president's science and technology adviser and as chairman of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Dr. BROMLEY was seen as one of the most influential science advisers ever. "He gave the president his best advice rather directly. That made him a superb adviser on hard issues," John Sununu, Mr. Bush's former chief of staff, told the New York Times.
Dr. BROMLEY was an early champion of what he called the "data superhighway," now known as the Internet. "Ten years from now," he said in 1991, "I'd like it to be widely available and looked upon like the telephone network."
Mr. Sununu said that Dr. BROMLEY "understood its value" both for global communication and exchanging information.
"Everyone in the area was very proud of his achievements," said says family friend Marie ZETTLER, a former editor at the weekly newspaper in Cobden, Ontario, who had interviewed Dr. BROMLEY three times over the years. "It was my understanding that George Bush senior worked very closely with Dr. BROMLEY and took what he said very seriously."
After attending high school in Westmeath and Pembroke, he earned bachelor's and master's degrees at Queen's University and a doctorate from the University of Rochester in 1952. After graduating from Queen's, he worked for five years as a senior research officer and head of a nuclear-physics section at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories at Chalk River, Ontario
Canada is where he and some of his Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. colleagues of the day would have preferred to stay. The prize, as far as they were concerned, was an assortment of vacancies that had cropped up at the University of Toronto's physics department. Indeed, things looked truly promising until they learned that the "chairman of the physics department at Toronto had stopped off at Glasgow on his way back from a summer vacation and had hired people there to fill all the positions," Dr. BROMLEY said in a 1992 interview. "And so we all decided we were going to jump ship."
He joined the Yale faculty as associate professor of physics in 1960 and was founder and director of the A. W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale from 1963 to 1989. He carried out pioneering studies on both the structure and dynamics of atomic nuclei and was considered the father of modern heavy ion science, a major field of nuclear science. From 1972 until 1993, he held the Henry Ford II professorship in physics at Yale, and from 1970 to 1977, he served as chair of the Yale Physics Department. Dr. BROMLEY was dean of engineering at Yale from 1994 to 2000.
"Allan BROMLEY was a great scientist and a great leader. In three successive careers, he built our physics department, served the nation with distinction, and thoroughly revitalized engineering at Yale. With intelligence, energy, and enthusiasm he inspired countless students and colleagues," said Richard Levin, president of Yale. "Where he led, we willingly followed."
Dr. BROMLEY was hailed as an outstanding teacher; from 1965 to 1989, his lab at Yale graduated more doctoral students in experimental nuclear physics than any other institution in the world. Dr. BROMLEY published more than 500 papers in science and technology, and edited or authored 20 books.
As president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's largest scientific society, and of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, the world co-ordinating body for that science, he was one of the leading spokesmen for international scientific co-operation.
He received numerous honours and awards, including, in 1988, the U. S. National Medal of Science, the highest scientific honour awarded by the United States. He held 32 honorary doctorates from universities worldwide.
"What made him tick? It was his drive and his work ethic," says John BROMLEY. " Whether he was coiling hay or working around the farm, no matter what he chose to do you knew he was going to do his best."
After moving to the United States, Dr. BROMLEY continued to return to Westmeath, sometimes as often as twice a year, where he would stay at Nangor Resort and take the time to attend church and visit with family and Friends.
Occasionally, business brought him home. In 1994, he did a star turn as a guest speaker at the University of Ottawa's program of research in international management and economy. His speech revealed a certain degree of doubt about his southerly career moves. "It's a little sad," he told his audience. "I think that a great many of us at various times in our careers would have liked to have stayed in Canada and I think we could have made significant contributions."
He lamented that Canada's science and technology had long been on a starvation diet. "It is rather strange that having one of the best educational systems in the world, Canada has not been prepared to invest in the activities that will create opportunities for large numbers of the people that emerge from its educational system."
Even when they decided to stay, engineers and scientists often could not perform research and development if their employer was foreign-owned, he said. "Canada has been prepared to leave the companies who are headquartered outside of Canada with the freedom to do their research and development at their head office and not here. This has cost the country dearly."
Allan BROMLEY was born on May 14, 1926, near Westmeath, Ontario He died of a heart attack on February 10 in New Haven, Connecticut., after teaching a class at Yale University. He was 78. He is survived by his wife, Victoria SUTTON; son, David; daughter, Lynn; stepchildren, Summer Stephanie SUTTON and Remington John SUTTON; brother John and sister Dawn ANDERSON. He was pre-deceased by his first wife, Patricia.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-01 published
SWIST, Daniel J. / GALLOWAY- SWIST, Wilda (née GALLOWAY)
SWIST, Daniel J. passed away on January 13, 2005 in Henderson, Nevada. Daniel was born on August 19, 1919 in Manchester, New Hampshire to the late Emilia and Jacob SWIST. He graduated the University of Alabama where he earned a B. S. degree in Business Administration and Accounting. His entire Business School senior class enlisted in the military after Pearl Harbor and he served in the combat infantry in France, Germany and Holland, receiving several commendations. Later, he graduated from the Boston University Law School and began a career in government. He worked in Washington, D.C. for the State Department, the Department of Labor and the Treasury Department's Internal Revenue Service. Daniel married the love of his life, Wilda Ethel GALLOWAY on November 27, 1963. In 1976, he and Wilda retired to Clearwater, Florida and later moved to Phoenix, Arizona. His beloved wife Wilda died on September 1, 1998 and the light went out of his life. He is also predeceased by his sister, Wanda PIEKOS. He is survived by a host of nieces: Sonia-Kay KEIRSTEAD of Tallahassee, Florida; Janie M. RAY of Lowell, Massachusetts; Sheila HATT, Helen SAWCHUK, Edith GALLOWAY, Virginia WYLDE, Wilda MARDLIN, June EDWARDS, Mary Lou DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, Cathy GALLOWAY, and Dr. Susan Burgess NESBITT, all of Canada, and two nephews also of Canada, Charles BURGESS and Thomas GALLOWAY. A military and memorial service will take place for both Daniel and Wilda SWIST at the National Memorial Veterans Cemetery in Phoenix, Arizona on March 10, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-28 published
Jackie DUGAN, Boxer 1926-2005
Canadian middleweight champion from 1948 to 1951 never gave up his title to a challenger. He 'was a beautiful boxer... he would dance from side to side and box you to death'
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, March 28, 2005, Page S6
Ottawa -- Few Friends and acquaintances were surprised when Jackie DUGAN decided boxing was his true calling. Fewer still were taken aback when the handsome lad from Peterborough, Ontario was crowned Canada's best middleweight fighter.
Mr. DUGAN held the Canadian middleweight boxing title from 1948 to 1951 and was later inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame.
"Our dad was a boxer and we always had boxing gloves around the house," recalls DUGAN's younger brother Arnie. "He spent plenty of time sparring with me and Jackie in the backyard... he showed us the basics and the fundamentals, then we'd round up kids from the neighbourhood and practise on them." As teenagers, Jackie and Arnie would often punch each other hard to the stomach "to see if we could take it. We'd place a bet and hit each other... we never hurt each other because we could tense up our stomach muscles real hard," says Arnie, who went on to play senior-level lacrosse and now lives in Uclulet, B.C.
For his part, Jackie DUGAN dabbled in several sports but eventually chose boxing. He launched his fighting career in Peterborough, where he began working out at a local boxing club, before moving to Toronto, where there was more opportunity and better training facilities. In 1941, Mr. DUGAN, whose given name was John Edwin, joined the Canadian Armed Forces and, after serving with the Tank Corps, was sent overseas as infantry reinforcement for the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders. While serving in Europe, he was the Canadian Armed Forces middleweight champ in "His prowess as a boxer soon got around and he was on his way to defeating everyone in his class until he reached the top rung in the Canadian Army Overseas," reported a February 15, 1946 story in the in-house newspaper at Canadian General Electric in Peterborough, where Eddie DUGAN worked as a monotype operator. After the war, he turned pro and soon was nicknamed "Irish Jackie DUGAN." He won the Canadian middleweight title on March 11, 1947 at Port Arthur, Ontario (now Thunder Bay) and never lost a title match.
He fought 105 amateur bouts, losing only 10, and as a professional, lost only two of 46 pro fights, says Don WASSON, a spokesperson for the Peterborough and District Sports Hall of Fame.
"He was a beautiful boxer... he reminded me of Muhammad Ali, the way he would dance from side to side and box you to death," says Maxie MAYES of Toronto, who fought in the featherweight category from 1948 to 1955. "He had a great left hand, great movement and solid boxing knowledge."
As a pro, Jackie usually earned between $50 and $75 per fight. His biggest payday, according to The Examiner, was $500 in 1949 when he was on the undercard of the Tony Zale-Marcel Cerden championship fight in New Jersey. The fight was staged in Roosevelt Field, a large football stadium across the Hudson River from New York City.
In later years, Jackie DUGAN regularly sparred with rock legend Ronnie HAWKINS, a resident of the Peterborough area. "I sparred with him for 10 years," Mr. HAWKINS told the Peterborough Examiner. "You couldn't hit him with a box of rice."
When his boxing career ended in the early 1950s, Mr. DUGAN became involved in several pursuits. He was a bouncer at a Toronto club, he became director of the St. Alban's Boys Club in Toronto, he drove a bus in Toronto and, in his later years, he purchased a small acreage in Apsley, Ontario where he and a friend ran a day-care centre.
"He had a great personality, he was very outgoing and had a good gift for the gab," remembers Arnie DUGAN. "At summer camp, he would often take the boys up to Northern Ontario. He was a giving person, and the kids always looked up to him."
Jackie DUGAN was born on April 28, 1926, in Peterborough, Ontario He died of a heart attack and stroke on January 31, 2005, in Peterborough. He was 78. He is survived by his daughter Patty and by brothers Arnie and Paul and sisters Marion and Dale.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-04 published
Patrick CARDY, Composer and Teacher: 1953-2005
Open-minded, all-embracing Ottawa musician was known for bridging gaps in an area of the arts that is often strongly divided. For him, it was all about communicating with his audience
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, May 4, 2005, Page S7
Ottawa -- During a career that saw him receive more than 40 commissions from performers and institutions, including acclaimed Canadian concert pianist Angela Hewitt and Ottawa's National Arts Centre Orchestra, Patrick CARDY rarely separated himself from those who hired him to compose music.
"Patrick dispelled the stereotype of composers as introverted and dour and who do their own thing. He was always enthusiastic to work with us, and about the process of working with us," says Peter DUSCHENES, artistic director for the Platypus Theatre in Ottawa.
In 2001, Mr. CARDY was commissioned by the National Arts Centre Orchestra to co-write music for Rhythm in Your Rubbish, a Platypus Theatre production that told the story of two tramps who discover the beauty of music.
As was usually the case, Mr. CARDY took on the project with great enthusiasm, attending workshops and rehearsals, where he collaborated with actors and the director to make the music and story work well together. "He was a fantastic collaborator who was so willing to jump into the process of creating," says Mr. DUSCHENES.
Others to commission Mr. CARDY include the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, the Ottawa International Chamber Music Festival, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Vancouver Orchestra, the Vancouver Chamber Music Festival and Thirteen Strings. In addition to Ms. HEWITT, he wrote for soprano Julie NESRALLAH, flautists Robert CRAM and Jean-Guy BRAULT, and for the violin/viola duo of Jerry and Janos CSABA, who premiered his Mimesis on the National Arts Centre's Music for a Sunday Afternoon series in 1988.
Often, his support and interest in those who commissioned him did not end once his music was put to paper: When Rhythm in Your Rubbish toured Ontario, Mr. CARDY attended performances in many cities, including Kitchener, and Toronto, where the Toronto Symphony performed his score. He would often have a beer with musicians after a performance to ask how they enjoyed playing his music and to determine if revisions were necessary. Anyone who is familiar with his compositions says his music is characterized by colourful, evocative sonorities, a strong sense of dramatic gesture, an elegant lyricism and an accessible directness of expression -- traits that have captivated both listeners and performers.
Mr. CARDY's work ranged from pieces for children's theatre to liturgical music. He was just as likely to be inspired by the music of a Renaissance composer, as he was to experiment with synthetic musical scales. A Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Records disc of his work Virelai, for clarinet and string orchestra, was nominated for a Juno award in the Best Classical Composition category in 1992, and another Canadian Broadcasting Corporation disc including his Éclat for Organ, was named Best Classical Recording at the 1999 East Coast Music Awards.
Mr. CARDY, who was also a flutist and teacher, was in demand as a guest lecturer and music adjudicator Canadawide, and often visited area high schools to encourage students to consider music as a career. In 1977, he became a professor in music composition and theory at Carleton University's School for Studies in Art and Culture, where he was known as an attentive and creative teacher.
Mr. CARDY was president of the Canadian League of Composers from 1989 to 1993, and was on the Canadian League of Composers's executive council for many years, during which he was "well spoken on issues of concern to Canadian composers and very generous with his time and advice," says Canadian League of Composers president John BURGE of Toronto.
While president, he used his close proximity to the Canada Council's Ottawa office to work on a number of items, including trying to increase the amount of Canadian music performed by Canadian orchestras, says Mr. BURGE. He also oversaw the highly successful 40th-anniversary celebrations of the Canadian League of Composers in Winnipeg in 1991.
"He cared deeply about our country and wanted us all to appreciate the wealth of our musical heritage and to provide opportunities for current and future composers," says Mr. BURGE.
On March 11, the Ottawa Chamber Music Society performed a tribute concert to Mr. CARDY's work at a local church. The concert was recorded by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to be broadcast later across Canada. "It was a beautiful event," says the society's artistic director, Julian ARMOUR, noting that the society on 29 different occasions used the composer's work in its performances. The March concert included pieces written for his two children. It began with CARDY's Hope, a short, sweet piece for strings dedicated to son Michael, and also included Quips and Cranks dedicated to son Jonathan.
"He wrote music to be played and listened to," says Mr. ARMOUR. "He loved the reaction of audiences and that his music brought out strong emotions."
With his open-minded approach, Mr. CARDY, who was a devout Catholic, was known to bridge gaps in an industry that is often strongly divided. "These days there is an extremely wide spectrum of music and few composers have respect for the whole spectrum, but Patrick brought people together and he always fostered respect for what others were doing.
"He was a great, positive and healthy force in the Canadian music industry."
When he was not composing, Mr. CARDY loved to play sports and keep fit, says close friend Al MacKEY, who had known Mr. CARDY and his wife, Janet, for 20 years.
"He was a passionate debater who liked to take opposing views and provoke his Friends on just about any subject," says Mr. MacKEY, who remembers his friend as an enthusiastic curler and softball player, and a huge hockey fan who never missed his son Jonathan's games and practices.
In 1996, Mr. CARDY served as music adviser to the National Arts Centre Orchestra for its new music festival, A Tonal Departure, and more recently was a consultant on the National Arts Centre New Music Program. Over the years, he wrote a handful of pieces of chamber music for both the orchestra and its musicians and was active in suggesting new music the orchestra should add to its concert series.
"One of his roles was to serve as the voice of conscience for the National Arts Centre Orchestra in our new music program," says Christopher DEACON, the orchestra's managing director. "He gave us guidance; there was ongoing dialogue and if he felt we were not doing enough, he would nip at our heels."
Andrew CARDY was a patient collaborator, says Mr. DEACON. "He would not just say 'here is a proposal,' he would give me a very elaborate range of options. They were always very thoughtful options and he was very responsive to what we had to say."
Like the 18th-century composer Joseph Haydn, Mr. CARDY signed all his compositions with the Latin Deo gratias -- thanks be to God.
Patrick CARDY was born August 22, 1953, in Toronto. He died of a heart attack March 24 in Ottawa, after being treated for a broken arm suffered while curling. He was 51. He is survived by his wife, Janet, and two sons, Michael, 7, and Jonathan, 11. On the night he died, the National Arts Centre Orchestra dedicated its performance to him.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-07 published
Robert METCALFE, Soldier, Salesman and Volunteer: 1915-2005
British Army officer survived Dunkirk, the Bismarck and Rommel to end up engraved on Canada's $10 bill
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, May 7, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Second World War Veteran Bob METCALFE is gone but, every day, his legacy touches the lives of millions of Canadians, though most never know it.
We all know him: He is the tall soldier with the blue beret and blazer depicted on the back of the Canadian $10 bill under the words "in service of peace." How his image made it onto the bill remains a mystery to his family.
"He was contacted by someone from the government in the late 1990s who said they wanted him brought to downtown Ottawa for a photo opportunity," recalls his daughter Sue METCALFE of Toronto. "He was not told what it was for, just that they wanted a picture of a veteran... He had no idea he would be on the bill."
Those who knew Mr. METCALFE say his legacy will live on for reasons that go far beyond his likeness on Canada's ten-spot.
The son of a Yorkshire lumberman and grain miller, he was a proud soldier, an author, a forward-looking municipal politician, and a man of strong ethics and high standards for civility.
Raised in Yorkshire, he joined the British Army with war on the horizon. He graduated from Sandhurst military academy to begin a military career that would be the basis for his book No Time for Dreams: A Soldier's Six-Year Journey Through World War 2, which was written when he was 80. A member of the famed Green Howards, he was among the 400,000 members of the British Expeditionary Force who faced the new German approach to warfare, the Blitzkrieg. He was near the Canadian First World War memorial at Vimy Ridge when the Allied retreat began. On May 27, 1940, "a day I shall never forget," he wrote, heavy mortar fire erupted. Applying a field dressing to a wounded comrade, Mr. METCALFE was hit in the legs by shrapnel. Later, a German tank opened fire on his ambulance, then, miraculously, ceased fire. He survived the mass evacuation from Dunkirk on the H.M.S. Grenade, yet saw two of its sister ships torpedoed.
Once recovered from his wounds, he went on to fight in North Africa, Sicily and Italy. He was chased by the German battleship the Bismarck, went around the Cape of Good Hope and ended up in the Middle East, serving in Operation Desert Fox under the command of General Bernard Law Montgomery where he developed great respect and appreciation for German Field Marshal Irwin Rommel.
In Italy, he met and married his wife, Lieutenant Helen PORTER, a physical therapist with a Canadian hospital. They were married twice on October 28, 1944 -- once in the morning by the mayor of a small Italian town and again in the afternoon by a British Army padre. Mr. METCALFE ended the war a major attached to the U.S. army in France.
In 1948, the METCALFEs settled in the Chatham, Ontario, area where he sold steel and hardware until his retirement. Along the way, he served as reeve of Wallaceburg, Ontario, became a warden of Kent County and served on the Wallaceburg Industrial Commission where he was instrumental in attracting industry to the area. He also helped establish a Wallaceburg group home.
Yet he never forgot his fellow veterans. On the 30th, 40th and 50th anniversaries of D-Day he and his wife organized tours to Europe, not forgetting Sicily and Italy. In 1977, Mr. METCALFE received the Queen's Jubilee Medal. About 20 years ago, the couple moved to Ottawa to be near family and became involved in service work, often visiting schools to share their knowledge.
Bob METCALFE was born in Richmond, Yorkshire, England on January 25, 1915. He died of a heart attack in Ottawa on April 6, 2005. He was 90. He is survived by his wife Helen and daughters Sue and Sharon.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-06 published
SHRIVE, Anthony N. " Tony"
A lifetime in aviation, Royal Canadian Air Force Veteran World War 2 and a truly professional pilot. At Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital on March 4, 2005 after a battle with Parkinson's Disease in his 80th year. Survived by wife Ruth (née RAY,) son Peter (Judy), son Paul (Jeanie), daughter Jane (Steve), son Philip (Karen). Phil died on duty May 2003 while serving as an Ontario Provincial Police officer. Proud grandfather of 13 and even more proud great-grandfather of 10. Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home "Oakville Chapel", 109 Reynolds Street, Oakville on Tuesday, March 8, 2005 for a memorial service at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a donation to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-14 published
JEFFRIES, Sydney Simpson
(Member Mount Forest Lodge Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons No. 200, Member Havelock Belmont Legion Branch No. 389). At Pleasant Meadow Manor, Norwood, on Thursday, October 13, 2005, Sydney JEFFRIES of Alma Street, Norwood, in his 85th year. Beloved husband of Florence SUTHERLAND. Dear father of Gary and his wife Madeleine of Havelock, Janis and her husband Randy RAY of Ottawa, and Kenneth and his friend Anne of Frankford. Lovingly remembered by 8 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren. Brother of the late Albert and Alexander. Resting at the Brett "Havelock" Chapel, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday. Service Monday at 1: 00 p.m., Reverend David WAINWRIGHT officiating. Final resting place, Maple Grove Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made (by cheque only) to the charity of your choice.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-18 published
RAY, James Richard
Born in Ottawa, Ontario on November 1, 1944 to his dear late parents Walter George and Juliette Irene (DENNIS) RAY. Entered into rest at the Toronto East General Hospital on Monday, October 17, 2005. Jim, dear brother of Vivian (Mrs. R. HORAN,) Joyce (Mrs. E. DUFOUR), Gail (Mrs. R. McCOY), Shirley (Mrs. J. OSZENARIS), Michael (Margaret,) Beverley (Mrs. J. STOLZ) and Bruce (Annie.) Sadly missed by his many nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Trull "East Toronto" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1111 Danforth Ave. (one block east of Donlands Subway), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday. Mass of the Resurrection will be held in the St. Catherine of Siena Church (1099 Danforth Ave.) on Thursday at ten thirty o'clock. Interment to follow. Memorial donations may be made to the Lung Association.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-31 published
SWACKHAMMER, Frank
Born 3 February, 1911, Aylmer, Ontario, died 28 October, 2005, Burlington, Ontario. Ordained clergyman of the Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec for 65 years. Predeceased in 1979 by wife Hazel Jean McBETH and in 2005, by second wife Mary ROCH. Leaving two children Jane BENNETT (George) and Mac SWACKHAMMER (Cheryl RAY,) four granddaughters and six great-grandchildren. Pastor in Town of Mount Royal Montreal, Centre St. Baptist Church, St. Thomas Church, Temple Baptist Church, Toronto, First Baptist Church, Oshawa, Sarnia Baptist Church and many interim placements after his retirement. He received an Honorary Doctorate from McMaster University for his work on the Senate and the Board of Governors for McMaster Divinity School. Remaining strong in the Spirit until the end, in keeping with his wishes, cremation has taken place. A service to commemorate his life is planned for spring.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-20 published
'He died as a man. He died as a friend'
The Victim, Father, role model, passionate reggae dancer, Amon BECKLES was a centrepiece in his family
By Jessica LEEDER and Dale Anne FREED Staff Reporters
Amon BECKLES was a star reggae dancer with dreams of going professional, a daddy to an 18-month-old daughter, and a Central Tech student on the brink of adult life.
To his four younger siblings, who grew up in awe of everything from his PlayStation and basketball prowess to his addiction to mayonnaise "sangwiches", he was a family centrepiece.
"He was a role model in my life," one brother said.
The likeable 18-year-old's dreams were cut short Friday when he was shot in the neck just outside the Toronto West Seventh-day Adventist Church on Albion Rd. where he had come to mourn his best friend, Jamal HEMMINGS, 17, his reggae partner and a homicide victim.
Nadia BECKLES, Amon's mother, was in the church when she heard gunshots. "I didn't know it was my son," she said. "I just heard somebody say his name."
A day later, she's planning for his funeral.
"I want them to know his death will not go in vain. He died as a man. He died as a friend."
BECKLES's family, gathered to mourn their own in the cramped living room of his grandmother's west Toronto house last night, spoke out on the condition none of their names be used. But not because they're scared. "We are handling it in our own way," said an aunt. "I don't know what to think right now. I'm in shock."
Even in his absence, BECKLES brought laughter to his family, many of whom grew up dancing at his side in a group run by two aunts called No Mercy.
"We'd dance in the gym, outside, in the back streets, everywhere," said one of BECKLES's cousins. "We loved to dance. We'd do it instead of doing nothing. We're still close as a family. Since the death happened, we're just..." she trailed off.
The teen was with her cousin at HEMMINGS's funeral. She said HEMMINGS was "pretty much a part of our family" and grew up dancing reggae with them.
"Jamal and Amon were best Friends; wherever Jamal was, you'd find Amon. They were like brothers," said Jamal's father, Michael HEMMINGS.
BECKLES was with HEMMINGS the night of November 9 when HEMMINGS was fatally shot, said Det. Sgt. Mario DITOMMASO. Just over a week later, BECKLES himself became a homicide statistic -- number 69 for the year -- gunned down outside the church where he'd gone to mourn his friend.
"Friends of his were trying to give him cardio-pulmonary resuscitation," said Const. Ewan MacLEOD, who arrived on scene just before 1 p.m. Friday.
Minutes before Pastor Andrew KING began the funeral service, he said he was told "shooters are in the church."
Even though KING knew there could be violence, he decided not to call police on advice from members of a community housing group who gave him the grim news, he told the Star.
"Two people from the community housing group came up and whispered to me that shooters were in the church," KING said yesterday outside a church service held at a nearby high school while forensic identification officers finished their probe of his Seventh-day Adventist Church.
He said he and the housing workers spoke about what to do. "They advised me not to call the police. I was apprehensive."
But KING thought they would all be safe inside the church. "We were terrified of the situation but we put our safety in the Lord Jesus Christ and we were protected.
"At the end of the service I realized there were guns in the church, more than I'd like to know. At lot of people were in there packing (guns)."
Suddenly the church filled with "popping noises," the sound of gunfire, the pastor recalled. "All of a sudden there was pandemonium. We realized someone had been gunned down outside the church.
"We asked everyone to lie down quietly inside the sanctuary and not to move. We didn't know what was going on outside," he said. "I was looking at a casket in front of me. I realized there's another dead person outside the front of the church."
Det. Colin RAY said KING should have called police. "If he knew ahead of time there were guns in the church -- guns can only lead to disaster -- he should have called police."
BECKLES's grandmother said police "failed my grand_son. They can't correct that failure. He's dead.
"Anybody with any kind of sense at all would know there should have been somebody (from the police) there. In my opinion they did not serve and protect my grand_son."
Police Chief Bill Blair said BECKLES had spoken to homicide officers about HEMMINGS's slaying, but said police had no reason to believe the man was at any risk. "There was no indication that he was attending that funeral service or that he was at any risk, otherwise steps would have been taken."
Blair's spokesman Mark Pugash could not say if police will attend BECKLES's funeral. "Assessments are made in each case on what is necessary. Clearly one of our greatest concerns... is protecting public safety."
BECKLES's family said yesterday they believe he died simply because he knew what happened the night HEMMINGS was shot.
"They've got who they wanted," BECKLES's grandmother said, adding she does not know if her grand_son knew the shooter's identity. But she did offer one guarantee: "There was absolutely no gang activity. None."
Police confirmed yesterday that BECKLES was a "potential material witness" to HEMMINGS's killing. But DITOMMASO said he was more than a witness: police had also been looking into BECKLES's own activities. He was known to police and was "the subject of an ongoing investigation," DITOMMASO said, adding the teen was interviewed once after HEMMINGS's death.
"His information was not very accurate," DITOMASSO said.
"If he had been more forthcoming to police, it's entirely possible the people responsible for the original homicide (of HEMMINGS) would have been arrested," said Pugash.
Although the shooting occurred in the heart of Crips gang territory DITOMMASO said the death was not gang related.
DITOMMASO said police have narrowed witnesses' descriptions to a single suspect. He was described as wearing a three-quarter-length blue, hooded coat, a dark baseball cap and dark pants.

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