NEWFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-06 published
ATTERSLEY, Nellie
Suddenly on January 3rd, 2005 at Lakeridge Health-Oshawa, in her 93rd year. Beloved wife of the late Gordon B. ATTERSLEY. Loving mother of Sonja, Barbara and her husband Rod NEWFIELD, and the late Barry ATTERSLEY and his wife Judy. She will be sadly missed by her 9 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. Friends may call at Oshawa Funeral Service "Thornton Chapel", 847 King St. West (905-721-1234) for visitation on Thursday, January 6th from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Friday, January 7th at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Mount Lawn Cemetery. Memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWFIELD - All Categories in OGSPI

NEWHAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-04 published
NELSON, Jack W.
It is with great sorrow that we announce the passing of Mr. Jack W. NELSON in his 90th year, at the London Health Sciences Centre-Victoria Hospital, on Sunday, October 2, 2005. Beloved husband of Mrs. Audrey M. (RYAN) NELSON. Loving father of Cathy CUNNINGHAM and her companion Ron NEWHAM of Chatham. Also loved by his grandchildren Joe CUNNINGHAM and his wife Sharlene of Ilderton, Chrissy CUNNINGHAM of London and his 2 great-grandchildren Sydnie and Spencer. Predeceased by his brother Fred and by his sister Marguarite. Jack touched many lives from Windsor to London. During his time in Chatham, her was honoured to serve as the Regional Governor of the Kinsmen. The funeral service will be conducted at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, on Thursday, October 6th, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to the service. Cremation, Woodland Crematorium. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Jack are asked to consider the United Way.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWHAM - All Categories in OGSPI

NEWHOOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-12 published
THOMAS, Hettie Belle (ROBERTS)
At MarkHaven Home for Seniors, Markham. Belle quietly left us during her afternoon nap on Thursday, February 24, 2005. Born in Burlington, Newfoundland, on October 26, 1912, Belle was the first born to Edmund and Bessie (LUSH) ROBERTS. She was predeceased by her beloved husband Arch (Archibald Charles, 1967). Belle will be sadly missed by her sisters Elizabeth NEWHOOK (late Dr. Bill,) Evelyne PAYNE (Earl,) and Jeanette GIFFORD (Jim,) and her brothers Willie (Amelia READER,) and Eddie (Irene SIMPSON.) Predeceased by her sisters Daisy SKINNER (late Dick) and Mayme COOLING (Fred,) and her brothers Lawrence (Reta BAIN) and Freddie (Margaret GODWIN.) She will be fondly remembered by her many nieces and nephews. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at Chapel Ridge Funeral Home, 8911 Woodbine Avenue, (three lights north of Hwy. 7, 905-305-8508) Markham, on Saturday, March 19, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m., Reverend Karl BURDEN officiating. A reception will follow. Belle's ashes will be interred with her husband at Sanctuary Park Cemetery at a later date. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, or the Christian Blind Mission, Stouffville.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWHOOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-17 published
NEWHOOK, Robert Charles
Suddenly on August 15th, 2005, Robert Charles Newhook passed away in Brighton. He is survived by his wife of 34 years Sheila, 3 children: Terry (Jo Ann), Denise (Andre) and Rhonda, and 3 grandchildren: Charlotte, Mason and Merralees. He is also survived by 7 brothers and 2 sisters. A visitation will be held from 1-3 p.m. on August 18th at Walas Funeral Home, 130 Main Street in Brighton. A service will follow. No flowers by request. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Diabetes Association.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWHOOK - All Categories in OGSPI

NEWHOUSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-29 published
NEWHOUSE, Mary Elizabeth (née HENDERSON)
Longtime resident of the Avalon Retirement Lodge. Passed away at Shelburne District Hospital, Shelburne on Monday, April 25, 2005, in her 96th year; beloved wife of the late Frederick NEWHOUSE (1980); also sadly missed by her many nieces and nephews; predeceased by her sister Floella CATION and her brother Andrew HENDERSON. Friends may call at the Dods and McNair Funeral Home and Chapel, 21 First Street, Orangeville on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday, April 30, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Dixon Cemetery, Brampton. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Cheltenham United Church or the charity of your choice would be appreciated. (Condolences may be offered to the family at www.dodsandmcnair.com)

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWHOUSE - All Categories in OGSPI

NEWKIRK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-19 published
McINTYRE, Donald James, P.Eng., Lt. Col. Royal Canadian Engineers (ret.)
Peacefully, at Helmeken Memorial Hospital, Clearwater, British Columbia on February 15, 2005. Born 1918 in Chatham, Ontario, son of Alexander W. and Emma (NEWKIRK) McINTYRE, and raised by Bessie (McLEOD) McINTYRE. Graduated Sci 40, Queen's University. Survived by his darling wife of 55 years, Patricia (née O'GRADY) of Fort Garry, Manitoba, his sons Douglas Edward (Kimberly) and John Carey (Terri), his daughter Sheila Jean (Sanda), and his grand_son, Kale Noah. Predeceased by his brother Doug and sister Jean. The McIntyre - O'Grady clan of nieces and nephews were a great joy to Don. Joined Canadian Officer Training Corps 1939, enlisted with Royal Canadian Engineers 1940, served overseas 1941-44, posted as Captain, 23rd Field Co., 3rd Div. Royal Canadian Engineers for Normandy landing. Wounded at Arnhem, November 1944, mentioned in dispatches and discharged April 1945. Served 3rd Field Eng. Regmt. Montreal from 1948-1957 retiring as Lt. Col. C.D. Don began his business career at Canada Metal Corp. and then British Metal Co. in Montreal. When he transferred to Noranda Sales Corp. in Toronto in 1961, he began what was for him a fascinating and fulfilling career trading secondary and pure metals, particularly copper, around the globe. He retired in 1980 as Senior Vice President, Noranda Sales. In retirement, Pat and Don moved from Elora, Ontario to Surrey British Columbia and then, in 2003, to Clearwater, British Columbia to be closer to their son, John. If desired, memorial donations may be made in lieu of flowers to a charity of your choice.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWKIRK - All Categories in OGSPI

NEWLAND o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-28 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Helen Isabel (née NEWLAND)
Passed away on Saturday, November 26, 2005 at Extendacare, Coburg, in her eighty-fourth year. Dear Mother of Gloria and Doug of Barrie, Jim and Amanda of Tara, David and Marie of Tara, and Sandy and Dail of Coburg. Cherished sister of Eileen HILL and Aunt to Jan HILL. Grandma to seven grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren. Predeceased by her loving husband Bob and wonderful parents Arthur and Lora NEWLAND. Join us to remember Helen's life on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. at the Paul H. Eagleson Funeral Home in Tara. Memorial donations to Mom's much loved “Owen Sound Day Away” would be appreciated. Condolences may be expressed online at www.paulheaglesonfuneralhome.com

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-20 published
MILLER, Patricia Meryl (formerly PETERSON, née MINCHIN)
Patricia Meryl (PETERSON) MILLER, née MINCHIN, at Stratford General Hospital on Monday, April 18, 2005 age 73 years. Beloved wife of the late Frederick Edward (Ted) MILLER of London (1998) and the late Everett Jack PETERSON of Leamington (1979.) Survived by daughter Crystal (Crys) NEWLAND of Stratford, grand_sons Everett and Graham NEWLAND and their father Bob NEWLAND all of Stratford, as well as the “son (she) never had,” Neil Young of Stratford. Also survived by her niece Frances MAY and husband Bryan McNAMARA of Barrie, nephew Dennis MAY, his wife Donna and their son Isaac of London. She will be fondly remembered by stepson Rick MILLER, wife Cheryl and family of Alberta, stepdaughter Janice STRICKLAND, husband Rick and family of London, her Aunt Treva MINCHIN of Merlin, and nieces and nephews in the U.S.A. Predeceased by sister Florence MAY, nephew Doug MAY and two infant brothers. Visitation Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 St. James St. at Richmond, London, where the funeral service will be conducted on Thursday, April 21 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Memorial contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society, Huron Perth Unit, would be gratefully acknowledged

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-29 published
NOVAK, Sylvia
It is with great sorrow that Dr. Emilie NEWELL and Zorka SMET of London, announce the death of their beloved sister Sylvia NOVAK in her 55th year on October 14, 2005 in Hilden, Germany. She will be remembered by other family members especially her brother-in-law Eddy SMET, her niece Nicole NEWELL, and cousins in U.S.A. and Slovenija. Many Friends in Germany including her special friend Ken HARDING and her longtime friend Christine NEWLAND in London will miss her.
Sylvia was born in London on February 9, 1950 to Vinko NOVAK (deceased 2003) and Ella NOVAK (deceased 1993.) An excellent scholar, she attended Sir Adam Beck Collegiate and the University of Western Ontario graduating with an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Music. A promising career as a violinist was cut short when she developed rheumatoid arthritis in her early twenties. Ever resilient and adventurous, she emigrated to Dusseldorf, Germany in 1975 to teach English and learn German. A hardworking perfectionist, she eventually ended up working at 3M in Hilden where, since 1988, she used her talent for languages and her organizational skills.
In January 2004, she was diagnosed with lung cancer. In her typical stubborn way, she grabbed the tiger by the tail. She immediately quit smoking, educated herself about the disease, and then devoted one hundred percent of her time fighting her disease. She stayed well until August 2005.
With the help of family, Friends and palliative care personnel, Sylvia was able to remain in her home until the last five days of her life. She passed away quietly in a hospice attended by Zorka and hospice staff.
A memorial service will be held in Hilden on November 27, 2005. Private family interment of ashes will take place in Canada at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society will be greatly appreciated by her family.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-24 published
BANKS, Mary Rose (née CHALK)
Of Saint Thomas, on Friday, December 23, 2005, at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late Henry Edward " Harry" BANKS and dearly loved mother of Carol and her husband Robert HELMER of Sparta, Marilyn and her husband Leonard KALIN of Woodstock and John and his wife Sharyn BANKS of Toronto. Dear sister of Agnes CHALK of Aylmer and Ruth NEWLAND of Tillsonburg. Sadly missed by 8 grandchildren, 7 great grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews. Mary was born in Calton on December 2, 1915, the daughter of the late Norman and Florence (LIDDLE) CHALK. She has lived in Saint Thomas since 1989 and formerly of London for over 60 years. She was a retired Registered Nurse at Vicitoria Hospital. She was of the Baptist Faith. A private family service will be held at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas on Tuesday. Interment to follow in Mount Pleasant Cemetery. No public visitation. Remembrances may be made to the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital Foundation (Palliative Care Patient Care Bed Program) or the Saint Thomas Public Library (Talking Book Program).

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-29 published
NOVAK, Sylvia
It is with great sorrow that Dr. Emilie NEWELL and Zorka SMET of London, announce the death of their beloved sister Sylvia NOVAK in her 55th year on October 14, 2005 in Hilden, Germany. She will be remembered by other family members especially her brother-in-law Eddy SMET, her niece Nicole NEWELL, and cousins in U.S.A. and Slovenija. Many Friends in Germany including her special friend Ken HARDING and her longtime friend Christine NEWLAND in London will miss her.
Sylvia was born in London on February 9, 1950 to Vinko NOVAK (deceased 2003) and Ella NOVAK (deceased 1993.) An excellent scholar, she attended Sir Adam Beck Collegiate and the University of Western Ontario graduating with an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Music. A promising career as a violinist was cut short when she developed rheumatoid arthritis in her early twenties. Ever resilient and adventurous, she emigrated to Dusseldorf, Germany in 1975 to teach English and learn German. A hardworking perfectionist, she eventually ended up working at 3M in Hilden where, since 1988, she used her talent for languages and her organizational skills.
In January 2004, she was diagnosed with lung cancer. In her typical stubborn way, she grabbed the tiger by the tail. She immediately quit smoking, educated herself about the disease, and then devoted one hundred percent of her time fighting her disease. She stayed well until August 2005.
With the help of family, Friends and palliative care personnel, Sylvia was able to remain in her home until the last five days of her life. She passed away quietly in a hospice attended by Zorka and hospice staff.
A memorial service will be held in Hilden on November 27, 2005. Private family interment of ashes will take place in Canada at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society will be greatly appreciated by her family.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-16 published
MOFFATT- SCHAFFNER, Beverly Jean (CROCKER)
It is with great sadness that the family of Beverly Jean MOFFATT- SCHAFFNER (CROCKER) announces her death on February 15, 2005, in her 63rd year. Bev faced her short but difficult battle with Inflammatory Breast Cancer, the way she faced life - head on, with courage, determination and pride - never thinking about herself, but worrying about those around her. Bev always introduced herself as "an extreme introvert", yet she managed to touch the hearts of everyone she met. Bev leaves behind her life-partner of 11 1/2 years, Sami, with whom she loved to explore the back roads of Ontario, and spend weekends cross stitching and watching movies; her daughter, Christine, her husband Christopher BOAL, and their children Nicholas, Ashley-Rose, and Anthony, who were Grandma's pride and joy; and her daughter Susan, and her husband Marc DE LEON and "The Munchkin," due August 23rd. Also left to mourn Bev are her mother-in-law Dorothy MOFFATT; her chosen sister and brother-in-law Sue and Bob NITTOLY, and her best friend Lisa FAKHOURIE, both who cared so lovingly for Bev; her feline babies Sweetums, Treya, Molly, Merlin, Billy and LilSpooks; her spiritual family at St. Dunstan of Canterbury Anglican Church; and her former co-workers, family and Friends. She is predeceased by her parents, Jean and Alfred and her step-father Jack. The family would like to thank Drs. Akbar KHAN, Arnold TEPPERMAN, Michael CHAN and Dina ZAYID, for the wonderful and supportive care they gave Bev throughout her illness; her special nurse, Shawn, who visited daily and gently tended to her needs; the Palliative Care team from Scarborough Centenary Hospital; Fr. Richard NEWLAND whose visits were filled with spirituality and humour; and "The Prayer Team", who encompassed most the world and supported all of us through their prayers, cards, phone calls and emails. A celebration of Bev's life will be held at St. Dunstan of Canterbury Anglican Church (56 Lawson Road, Scarborough), on Saturday, February 19, 2005. Visitation and reception will begin at 7: 30 p.m., followed with the Funeral Service at 9: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to PALIN "The Weekend to End Breast Cancer"; or, 4 women 4 ever team, in Bev's name would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to the McEachnie Funeral Home, 905-428-8488.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-25 published
SIMPSON, Lionel Edwin
At the Brockville General Hospital on February 24, 2005 in his 85th year. Beloved husband of the late Doris FALCONER. Dear father of Merle COSTIN (Bruce) of Uxbridge and Rick SIMPSON (Janice) of Brockvllle. Dear grandfather of Myles COSTIN, Neal COSTIN (Dawn,) James COSTIN (Franca) and Christopher NEWLAND. Great grandfather to Matthew, Rachel, Liane and Sara. Family and Friends may pay their respects at the Irvine Funeral Home and Chapel, 4 James Street East Brockville from Saturday after 1 p.m. until 2 p.m. when funeral services will be held in the chapel. Interment will follow at Oakland Cemetery. In memoriams to St. Lawrence Lodge will be gratefully acknowledged. Message of condolence may be sent online at: www.irvinefuneral home.com

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLAND - All Categories in OGSPI

NEWLOVE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-21 published
WILSON, Dorothy May (NEWLOVE)
Peacefully at the King Nursing Home, Bolton, after a brief battle with cancer, Dorothy NEWLOVE, born Albion Township, January 4, 1916, beloved wife of the late Hudson H. WILSON. Dear mother of David and the late Evelyn WILSON, Walkerton; Doris and the late Don GIBSON, Gull Lake, Saskatchewan and dear mother of Beryl and Gordon GOODFELLOW, Bolton; Bill and Gail WILSON, Alliston Hudson and Eunice WILSON, Bolton. Sadly missed by her 13 grandchildren, 33 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren. Predeceased by her 2 grand_sons, Paul GIBSON and Tim GOODFELLOW. Dear sister of the late Marion, Macil, Ethel, William and Daisy. Dear sister-in-law of Pearl NEWLOVE, Bolton. A special thank you to the staff of King Nursing Home for their excellent care. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen St. S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213), Sunday afternoon 2-4 and evening 7-9 o'clock. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Monday, January 24 at 2 o'clock. Interment Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bolton. If desired memorial donations may be made to King Nursing Home, Patio Fund, 49 Sterne Street, Bolton L7E 5T1. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLOVE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-11 published
BELYEA, Henry Albert " Harry"
Peacefully, at Meadowcroft Place, Mississauga, on the morning of June 7, 2005. Born January 23, 1911. Predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Velma (née GRASS,) his father Albert Edward BELYEA and mother Chloe Ella NEWLOVE, and sister Ella TEASDALE. He will be sadly missed by dear wife Vail, loving daughter and son-in-law Carol and Wally HEGGUM, and grandchildren Greg and Susan MAGUIRE, and his many Friends and relatives. Graduate of Humberside Collegiate Institute, and the University of Toronto (Civil Engineering). Employed by the Province of Ontario in fire prevention and medical engineering, and later was Director of the first air pollution control authority of Metropolitan Toronto. As president of the Air and Waste Management Association he influenced the U.S. government to create the Environmental Pollution Association. An avid bridge player, he won several Ontario and international tournaments. Enjoyed tennis, and took up flying of small aircraft at the age of 81. Our family would like to thank Dr. Michael GITTERMAN, and the kind staff at Meadowcroft Place (Constitution) for their wonderful care. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 2: 00 p.m. Monday until the time of the Funeral Service in the Chapel on Monday, June 13, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. Private interment on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 at Park Lawn Cemetery. Everyone who know him will never forget his friendly smile, his generous spirit, and especially his famous hugs.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWLOVE - All Categories in OGSPI

NEWMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-03-01 published
PATERSON, Edith
Peacefully, at Lenark Heights Long Term Care Centre, Kitchener, on Friday, February 25th, 2005. Edith PATERSON, of Kitcherner and formerly of Wiarton, in her 93rd year. Daughter of the late Ewart and Lillie (NEWMAN) PATERSON. Dear sister of Newman and his wife, Beverley PATERSON, of Stratford. At Edith's request, cremation has taken place. Spring interment of cremated remains in the PATERSON family plot, Bayview Cemetery, Wiarton. Donations to the Wiarton Hospital would be appreciated and may be made through the George Funeral Home, Wiarton. (519) 534-0240. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com
Page A2

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-03-04 published
HARRISON, Stanley Roy
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Wednesday, March 2nd, 2005, of Markdale, formerly of Proton, in his 89th year. Beloved husband of the late Martha OSTRANDER. Loving father of Marilyn (Bill) GIBBS, of Burlington, Wayne (Donna) HARRISON, of Brampton and Linda (John) LAVALLEE, of Markdale. He will be loved and remembered by his grandchildren, Trudy (Scott) OVERELL, Dwayne (Jenn) HOOD, Sean (Stacey) GIBBS, Janel (Colin) NEWMAN, Craig HARRISON and seven great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Isabelle OSTRANDER, of Priceville, Joyce ROBINSON, of New Brunswick, the late Hilda NICHOLSON, Jones and Ralph HARRISON. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton, on Friday, March 4th, from 3: 30 to 5:30 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Service will be held in the chapel on Saturday, March 5th at 11: 00 a.m. Spring interment, Salem Cemetery, Proton. Memorial contributions to the Centre Grey Health Services Foundation would be gratefully appreciated.
Page A2

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.kent_county.wallaceburg.wallaceburg_courier_press 2005-03-23 published
MONINGER, Beulah Mae (née FERGUSON)
Beulah Mae MONINGER a resident of Wallaceburg passed away peacefully on Friday, March 18, 2005 in her 89th year. Beulah was a member of the United Church Women at Salem, past member of the Rebekah Lodge and dairy farmed on the North River Line. She is the daughter of the late Mary Ann (SUDS) and William John FERGUSON and step-daughter of Jennie Deacon (JOHNSON.) Beloved wife of the late Joiner MONINGER. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Harold and Donna of Wallaceburg, Brenda and Steve MILLS of Port Lambton and Lonnie and Lorie of Wallaceburg. Dear grandmother of Jason and Stacey, Stuart and Kristine, Brad, Dustin, Clayton and Ryan MONINGER, David and Lisa MILLS and Janet & Paul VANDEGUCHTE. Great grandmother of Taylor, Matthew, Magan, Nicolle, Rebecca, Zakary, Katarena. Sister and sister-in-law of Dorothy and Ford NEWMAN of Sarnia and the late Evelyn and Clayton LINDSAY, John and Marjorey FERGUSON and Bernice and Gene LAWING. The family received relatives and Friends at the Haycock-Cavanagh Funeral Home, 409 Nelson Street (at Elgin), in Wallaceburg from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Sunday. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. Linda MAW and Bonnie HARVEY on Monday, March 21, 2005 in the chapel at 1 p.m. The interment followed at Riverview Cemetery. If desired, remembrances to the Tupperville Zion United Church or Canadian Cancer Society may be left at the funeral home. 519-627-3231.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-06 published
DYSON, Gwendolyn " Gwen" (HARVEY)
On Tuesday, January 4, 2005 at London Health Sciences Centre-University Campus. Gwendolyn "Gwen" (HARVEY) DYSON of London in her 75th year. Beloved wife of Mr. Frank DYSON. Dear mother of Dave DYSON and his wife Anne Marie of London. Dear grandmother of Dylan. Dear sister of Vera STANBRIDGE and her husband Stanley of England. Predeceased by her son Ian DYSON. Friends will be received by the family on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London, where the funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday January 8, 2005 at 11 a.m. with the Reverend Phillip NEWMAN of Riverside United Church, London officiating. Interment in Woodland Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Parkinson Society of Canada, 4500 Blakie Road, London, Ontario, N6L 1G5.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-23 published
FORD, John Montgomery
Suddenly at London Health Sciences Centre, University Campus, on Friday, January 21st, 2005, John Montgomery FORD of London in his 18th year. Beloved son of Connie and John FORD. Loving brother of Colleen and Cheryl. Dear grand_son of Nora FORD and the late Albert Montgomery FORD and Betty and Harry CAMPBELL. Dear nephew of Carol and David MILLER of Mississauga, Catherine and Bruce JOHNSTONE of Oakville, Heather and Bob OGILVIE of Dundalk, Diane and Jim PRESTON of Orangeville. Also survived by his many cousins. John will be missed by many Friends. Visitation will be held at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, (2 blocks north of Oxford), on Monday from 7: 00 - 9:00 p.m. and Tuesday from 2: 00 - 4:00 and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at Riverside United Church, 451 Dunedin Drive, on Wednesday, January 26th, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. with Reverend Philip NEWMAN officiating. Cremation to follow. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of John are asked to consider the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-19 published
MONINGER, Beulah Mae (née FERGUSON)
Beulah Mae, a resident of Wallaceburg, on Friday, March 18, 2005 in her 89th year. Beulah was a member of the United Church Women at Salem, past member of the Rebekah Lodge and dairy farmed on the North River Line. She is the daughter of the late Mary Ann (SUDS) and William John FERGUSON and step-daughter of Jennie Deacon (JOHNSON.) Beloved wife of the late Joiner MONINGER. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Harold and Donna of Wallaceburg, Brenda and Steve MILLS of Port Lambton and Lonnie and Lorie of Wallaceburg. Dear grandmother of Jason and Stacey, Stuart and Kristine, Brad, Dustin, Clayton and Ryan MONINGER, David and Lisa MILLS and Janet and Paul VANDEGUCHTE. Great-grandmother of 7. Sister and sister-in-law Dorothy and Ford NEWMAN of Sarnia and the late Evelyn and Clayton LINDSAY, John and Marjorey FERGUSON and Bernice and Gene LAWING. The family will receive relatives and Friends at the Haycock-Cavanagh Funeral Home, 409 Nelson Street (at Elgin) in Wallaceburg from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Sunday. The funeral service will be conducted by Reverend Linda MAW and Bonnie HARVEY on Monday, March 21, in the Chapel at 1 p.m. The interment will follow at Riverview Cemetery. If desired, remembrances to the Tupperville Zion United Church or Canadian Cancer Society may be left at the funeral home 519-627-3231.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-02 published
PEAKER, Harry W.
At the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital, on Friday, April 1st, 2005, Mr. Harry W. PEAKER of R.R.#1 Straffordville in his 95th year. Born in England, March 22nd, 1911 son of the late Harry PEAKER (1973) and the late former Hilda NEWMAN (1977.) Predeceased by his wife of 66 years Katherine ("Kit") Mary PEAKER (October 10, 2003). Loved father and father-in-law of: Harry PEAKER (and his wife Margaret ROSE) of London and a daughter Marlene (and her husband Clifford NOELS) of R.R.#1 Straffordville. Proud grandfather of 8 grandchildren and 7 greatgrandchildren. Survived by a brother George PEAKER (and his wife Edith) of Tillsonburg and a sister Hilda DAFOE of Aylmer (and the late John.) Predeceased by a loved grand_son David PEAKER (1989,) a daughter Valma ESSELTINE (1971) and a sister Ivy GREEN. Private Family Visitation took place at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg. Private Family Graveside Service in the family plot in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. Friends, neighbours and relatives, are welcome to attend the Public Funeral Service and Reception for Harry W. PEAKER on Monday at 2 p.m. at the Tillsonburg Kingdom Hall (Hwy. #19 just south of Hwy #3) to be presided by Mr. Robert HEALD. Memorial donations (payable by cheque) to the charity of your choice can be arranged through the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg (519) 842-4238.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-16 published
NEWMAN, Ronald A.
Suddenly on Friday, April 15, 2005, Ronald A. NEWMAN, age 70 of Sarnia. Beloved husband of Rosemary PEACHEY. Dear nephew of Dorothy WESTON and uncle of Robert NEWMAN of Sarnia. Also surviving are several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Andrew and Elizabeth NEWMAN and brother Clare. Ron was the caretaker at the Sarnia Yacht Club for 33 years. Funeral service will be held at Point Edward Presbyterian Church on Monday at 2 p.m. with Jeff LACKIE officiating. Arrangements entrusted to the McKenzie & Blundy Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 431 N. Christina Street, Sarnia. As an expression of sympathy Friends who wish may send memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, 747 London Rd. Sarnia N7T 4Y1 or the Diabetes Association, 415 Exmouth Street, Sarnia N7T 8A4. Messages of condolence and memories may be left at www.mckenzieblundy.com A tree will be planted in memory of Ron NEWMAN in the McKenzie and Blundy Memorial Forest. Dedication service Sunday, September 18th, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. at the Wawanosh Wetlands Conservation Area.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-03 published
MADDOCK, Morley Kenneth
Peacefully, after a lengthy illness, on Monday, May 2nd, 2005, Morley Kenneth MADDOCK of London in his 69th year. Husband of 48 years to Louise (WERDEN) MADDOCK. Dear father of Linda and Tim DICKSON/DIXON of Oakville, Heather and Chris DAWDY of London, Jennifer and Mike REID of Courtice. Dear brother of Sharon SHEPPERD of London. Loving grandfather of Carson, Cody, Jacob, Rebecca, and Tyler. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends will be received on Wednesday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, (2 blocks North of Oxford), where the funeral service will be conducted on Thursday, May 5th, 2005 at 11 a.m. Reverend Philip NEWMAN officiating. Interment, Alvinston Cemetery. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Morley are asked to consider the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-04 published
WEILER, Robert " Bob"
At home, on Monday, May 2nd, 2005, Robert "Bob" WEILER of London in his 68th year. Very special husband and loving dad of Gail (TUCKER) WEILER, Jeff, of Beamsville, Michelle and her husband Ken BOE of Owen Sound. Proud papa of Zach, Jack, Taylor and Nicole. Dear brother of Marg and her husband Art PAQUETTE, Monica and her husband Jim STEELE, Veronica and her husband June MARKLE, Ray WEILER, Sandy and his wife Doreen, Nancy and Glenn CHADWELL and Lynda NEWMAN, and brother-in-law of Jim and Lorraine LIVINGSTONE, and Bill and Carolyn McGEE. Bob was a proud retiree of the Ontario Provincial Police. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North (2 blocks North of Oxford), on Thursday, May 5th, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. with visiting one hour prior to the service. Interment of ashes at Saint Mary's Cemetery, Woodstock. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Bob, are asked to consider the Canadian Diabetes Association.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-09 published
SMITH, Dulcie Louise (née STUDER)
Dulcie Louise SMITH, née STUDER peacefully at Chelsey Park Nursing Home on Saturday, May 7, 2005, age 86. Beloved wife of the late Hugh SMITH. Loving mother of Peter and his wife Gayle of Atikokan and Dulcie and her husband Steve WATSON of London. Dear Granny of Jason and his wife Sarah, Joanne, Sean and great grandmother of Dylan, Madison and Jessica. Sister of Enid MOHNS, and the late Jack and Bert STUDER. She will be fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Friends may call on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 St. James Street at Richmond where the funeral service will be conducted on Tuesday, May 10 at 11: 00 a.m. by Reverend Philip NEWMAN. Interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be gratefully acknowledged.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-15 published
MacARTHUR, Florence Isabel (MacKAY)
Peacefully at the London Health Sciences Centre - University Campus surrounded by her children on Friday, May 13th, 2005, Mrs. Florence Isabel (MacKAY) MacARTHUR of London in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Angus Rae MacARTHUR. Loving mother of Allan (Joy) MacARTHUR of Toronto, Brenda (David) ROTH of Ottawa and Gwen (Brian) McKNIGHT of London. Also loved by her granchildren Michael and Amanda ROTH and Harley, and Zoe McKNIGHT. Florence will be missed by her many Friends at Riverside United Church. Friends will be received at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, (2 blocks North of Oxford), on Monday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The Funeral Service will be conducted at Riverside United Church, 451 Dunedin Drive, London on Tuesday, May 17th, 2005 at 12: 00 p.m. with Reverend Philip NEWMAN officiating. Interment Poplar Hill Cemetery, Poplar Hill.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-09 published
McKEEGAN, Danny James
Danny James McKEEGAN passed away peacefully on Tuesday, June 7, 2005 in his 49th year. Much loved partner of Robert NEWMAN. Father of Kym EVANS and son-in-law Shawn of London. Grandfather of Teryn Mckeegan EVANS. Stepfather of Jennifer BURGIE of Toronto and Thom NEWMAN of London. Brother of Michael McKEEGAN and sister-in-law Joanne. Life long friend of Brigitte WINTER- TARDIF of Quebec and Marilyn LOW/LOWE/LOUGH of Richmond Hill. Danny will also be missed by many Friends and extended family. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), London for visitation on Thursday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be on Friday, June 10, 2005 at 2 pm. Cremation to follow. Arrangements entrusted to Memorial Funeral Home 452-3770.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-13 published
DURNIN, James Charles " Jim"
James Charles (Jim) DURNIN of London, Ontario on Saturday, June 11, 2005 at London Health Sciences Centre University Campus in his 91st year. Dearly beloved husband of Irene (WOODS) for 64 years and much loved father of Brian and his wife Jean of London. Cherished Papa of Scott and Mark. Favorite uncle of Patricia (GAGEN) and her husband Dr. George HINTON. Dear brother-in-law of Isabel HARRIS of Clinton. Fondly remembered by his many nieces and nephews and their families. Predeceased by his only sister Almeda GAGEN and her husband Tom also his brother-in-law Donald HARRIS. As well as being a devoted family man, Jim provided service to the City of London as a dedicated police officer and retired in the position as detective after 32 years. A memorial service will be conducted by Reverend Philip NEWMAN at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, on Friday, June 17, 2005 at 1 p.m. (Visitation 1 hour prior) Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Jim are asked to consider the Hospice of London, St. Elizabeth Health Care or McCormick Home Building Fund. Special thanks to the staff and residents at the McCormick Home for their care and support. "He will live forever through his family who will never forget his unending love and support"

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-06 published
RILEY, Elaine (GLANVILLE)
At Exeter Villa, Exeter on Monday, July 4, 2005 Elaine (GLANVILLE) RILEY formerly of Huron Park in her 76th year. Beloved wife of the late Bill RILEY (1996.) Dear mother and mother-in-law of Ron and Marilyn RILEY of West Lorne, Floyd and Lynda RILEY of Centralia, Cheryl and Dave KENNEDY and Carolyn and Randy REDMOND all of Huron Park, Marilyn and Bill DICKSON/DIXON, Rob and Tracey RILEY and Joanne McLAREN all of London and Gayle RILEY of Lucan. Also survived by 23 grandchildren and 27 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Donna NEWMAN of London, Meryl and Gloria GLANVILLE of Seaforth, Cecil and Betty GLANVILLE and Marion and Tom PENHALE all of Exeter and Marjorie GLANVILLE of Staffa. Predeceased by her parents Wilbert and Lucinda GLANVILLE, a son Don (2000,) a grand_son Herbie and granddaughter Jennifer LEE. Friends may call at the Hopper Hockey Funeral Home, 370 William Street, Exeter on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Thursday, July 7th at 11 a.m. with Pastor Cathy PROUT officiating. Interment Exeter Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be forwarded through www.hopperhockeyfh.com

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-25 published
MacKAY, Sylvia Marie " Mickey" (née RODGERS)
Sylvia Marie "Mickey" (née RODGERS) MacKAY of London passed away at age 71 on Saturday, July 23rd, 2005. Mickey lost her battle with cancer and his gone to be with her parents Elaine and Stew RODGERS, and her sisters Anne NEWMAN and Barbara BIBBY. Her special son Kenny (The Light of her Life) and dedicated son Rodger (Cindy and Samantha) as well as her sister Jan SHUKER (Larry) were beside her along the way. Mickey leaves husband Bill and grand_son Mathew, niece Crystal Brady (Drew,) nephews Dan MOSER (Michelle,) Randy NEWMAN, Rob NEWMAN (Kelli,) great nieces and nephews Ryleigh and Zack BRADY, Tara and Matthew NEWMAN, with Loving Memories.
Mickey was loved and highly respected through her involvement in London Minor Hockey, The Red Hats and Community Living London. Many thanks to the nurses from St. Elizabeth's Health Care and special Friends Gerri and Betty for their love and support. Cremation has taken place. Friends will be received 1 hour prior to the funeral service being held in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London (433-5184) on Thursday, July 28th at 1 p.m. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations would be appreciated to Community Living London, 190 Adelaide Street South, London, N5Z 3L1. On line condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-08 published
NEWMAN, Bondon F.
At Parkwood Hospital, on Wednesday, September 7th, 2005 Bondon F. NEWMAN of London in his 79th year. Beloved husband for 30 years of Ellen NEWMAN of London. Loving father of Sue of Iowa, Bondon of Ohio and the late Wanda NEWMAN. Loved by several grandchildren. Predeceased by his brother Raymond (1993). Loved by his sister-in-law Jean NEWMAN of Kentucky. Bondon was a member of the Amateur Radio Club with a call sign of VE3 NRV. He was awarded the Purple Heart for combat duty in the Korean War in 1953. Friends may call at the McFarlane and Roberts Funeral Home (2240 Wharncliffe Rd. S., Lambeth) on Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. A graveside service will be held at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens on Friday, September 9th, 2005 at 3 p.m. with Reverend Elaine CLARK officiating. Donations to the Lung Association gratefully acknowledged.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-09 published
NEWMAN, Vondon F.
At Parkwood Hospital, on Wednesday, September 7th, 2005 Vondon F. NEWMAN of London in his 79th year. Beloved husband for 30 years of Ellen NEWMAN of London. Loving father of Sue of Iowa, Vondon of Ohio and the late Wanda NEWMAN. Loved by several grandchildren. Predeceased by his brother Raymond (1993). Loved by his sister-in-law Jean NEWMAN of Kentucky. Vondon was a member of the Amateur Radio Club with a call sign of VE3 NRV. He was awarded the Purple Heart for combat duty in the Korean War in 1953. Friends may call at the McFarlane and Roberts Funeral Home (2240 Wharncliffe Rd. S., Lambeth) on Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. A graveside service will be held at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens on Friday, September 9th, 2005 at 3 p.m. with Reverend Elaine CLARK officiating. Donations to the Lung Association gratefully acknowledged.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-20 published
NEWMAN, Jon Everett
At Bluewater Health Palliative Care, Sarnia on Friday, September 16, 2005, Jon Everett NEWMAN, age 68 of Bright's Grove. Much loved husband of Carolyn NEWMAN. Loved son of Mildred and the late Everett Joseph NEWMAN of Corunna. Dear brother of David Allan and his wife Marilyn of Keller, Texas. Survived by a sister-in-law Mardi and the late Robert Eugene (February 2003) of Suffield, Connecticut. Dear cousin of Suzanne LUSTENBERGER and her husband Adolph of Lockport, New York. Uncle to Ann SELVITELLI and her husband David of Suffield, Connecticut, Amy NEWMAN of Medway, Massachusetts, Ellie PETROV and her husband Denis of Suffield, Connecticut. Great-uncle to Nicholas, Mikhail, Aleksei and Hope. Also survived by numerous cousins. Jon was retired from Dow Chemical in 1993, he was a volunteer his entire working career in Junior Achievement, former Treasurer of Parker Street United Church, Past President of the Canadian Cancer Society, Moore Presbyterian Foundation Board (Thompson Gardens), Presbyterian Church Elder, Victorian Order of Nurses -- Palliative Care Visitor -- Team Leader, Hospice Advisory Committee, Community Care Access Centre Board, Care Watch, Sarnia Lambton Health Coalition, Bright's Grove Community Centre Committee, Lay Minister, Community member, Treasurer and auditor for Sarnia Palliative Care Assn., political activist for Public Medicare, Advocate to save Sarnia Palliative Care Unit. Jon was the recent recipient of the Ontario Volunteer Award (September 15, 2005). The family wishes to express thanks to the Doctors and nurses of the Sarnia Chemotherapy Clinic, the Palliative Care Unit -- Bluewater Health Norman St. Site, Victorian Order of Nurses nurses and staff, and Friends and relatives for all their care and support. A memorial service will be held on Thursday, September 22, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 94 St. James St. Mooretown. Cremation has taken place. Friends and family will be received at Smith Funeral Home, on Wednesday afternoon from 2 to 4 p.m. only. In lieu of flowers, sympathy donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, Victorian Order of Nurses, Moore Presbyterian Foundation Thompson Gardens -- Corunna, Huron House Boys Home -- Bright's Grove, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church -- Mooretown, or the Sarnia Lambton Palliative Care Association (Dr. Linda Bowring Music Therapy Program). Memories and condolences may be sent online to www.smithfuneral home.ca

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-22 published
GRAVES, Evelyn Ella (née RODEN)
Peacefully at University Hospital, on Wednesday, September 21, 2005, Evelyn Ella GRAVES of London in her 79th year. Predeceased by her parents George and Clara RODEN. Beloved mother of Beverly BAKER, Roberta HADFIELD and her husband John TARZWELL, Melody ORMEROD and her husband the late John ORMEROD (2001) and Chris GRAVES and his wife Sandy. Loving grandmother of 10 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Missed by her sisters Shirley and Beverly and their families and Dawn and Jim and their families. Evelyn retired from Northern Telecom after 22 years of dedicated service. Visitation will be held at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road, North, on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the complete funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Friday, September 23, 2005 at 3 p.m., with the Reverend Philip NEWMAN officiating. Cremation. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Evelyn, are asked to consider The Deiters Love-Transplant and Neonatal Research, through Children's Health Foundation or to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada. (www.westviewfuneralchapel.com)

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-27 published
GLANVILLE, Marjorie " Marj"
Suddenly, at South Huron Hospital, Exeter on Monday, September 26, 2005 Marjorie (Marj) GLANVILLE of R.R.#2 Staffa in her 70th year. Beloved daughter of the late Wilbert (Wib) and Cindy GLANVILLE. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Cecil and Betty GLANVILLE and Marian and Tom PENHALE all of Exeter, Meryl and Gloria GLANVILLE of Seaforth and Donna NEWMAN of London. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by a sister Elaine RILEY (2005.) Friends may call at the Hopper Hockey Funeral Home, 370 William Street, one west of Main, Exeter on Tuesday evening 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday, September 28th at 2 p.m. Interment Exeter Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be forwarded through www.hopperhockeyfh.com

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-07 published
CHIEF, Robin Douglas " Rob"
On Saturday, October 1, 2005, as a result of a motor vehicle accident in Algoma, Ontario, Robin Douglas "Rob" CHIEF of London in his 30th year. Beloved son of Keith and Elaine CHIEF. Sadly missed by his best friend Deana. Loved brother of Brandy CHIEF (Bill,) Rocky CHIEF all of London, and Paul DOXTATOR (Adrian) of Cornwall. Uncle of Damon, Savannah and Nevada. Cherished nephew of Jack (Shirley), Priscilla, Raymond (Arliss), Bob (Darlene), Fred, Pat (Dave), Bev (Kenneth) and Ruth. Also will be sadly missed by many cousins. Predeceased by his aunt Brenda CHRISJOHN and by his uncle Brian PETRANT. Visitation will be held on Tuesday, October 11th, 2005 from 7: 00-9:00 as well as one hour prior to the funeral service being conducted at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, on Wednesday, October 12th, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend Philip NEWMAN officiating. Cremation with private family interment of ashes at a later date. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Rob are asked to consider the Canadian Diabetes Association.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-15 published
GRAVES, Evelyn
The family of the late Evelyn GRAVES would like to express our deepest appreciation to family, Friends and neighbours for their support and kindness. Thanks for all the beautiful flowers, cards and memorial donations in memory of our Mother. To the nurses and staff at University Hospital, your wonderful care and kindness will always be remembered. Thank you to Westview Funeral Home and Reverend Philip NEWMAN for a beautiful, meaningful service. Sincerely, The GRAVES Family.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-26 published
LYNCH, Peggy " Margaret" (née COCHRANE)
At London Health Sciences Centre, Victoria Hospital, with her loved ones by her side on Monday, October 24, 2005 Peggy (Margaret) LYNCH (née COCHRANE) of Dorchester in her 76th year. Beloved and devoted wife of 51 years of Bill LYNCH. Beloved mother of Ann NEWMAN (Wayne) and his children Kyle and Kelsey of Dorchester and predeceased by her daughter Fran FLETCHER (2001.) Sadly missed by her son-in-law Gord FLETCHER of Dorchester and his children Kelly, Kristy and Ryan all of Dorchester. Peggy was dearly loved by Shane LYNCH (wife Sjouk) of Mississauga. Dear sister of Jim COCHRANE (Margaret) and their family all of Garvagh, Northern Ireland. Fondly remembered by a niece Margaret CAMPBELL (Malcolm) of Boveedy, Northern Ireland and several other nieces and nephews all of Northern Ireland. Also survived by brothers-in-law Sammy LYNCH (Annie,) Bobby LYNCH (Meta) and John LYNCH (Margaret) and their families all of England. Friends will be received at the Bieman Funeral Home, Dorchester on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Friday, October 28th, 2005 at 11 a.m. at St. Peter's Anglican Church, 4101 Catherine Street, Dorchester with Reverend Andrea McINTYRE officiating. Interment at Dorchester Union Cemetery. Memorial donations to a charity of your choice gratefully acknowledged.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-03 published
ARTHUR, May (formerly HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, née CHASE)
Of Saint Thomas, on Tuesday, November 1, 2005, at her daughter's home, surrounded by her loving family, in her 81st year. Beloved wife of the late Ross HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON (1974) and the late Bruce ARTHUR (1989.) Loved spouse of Jack BODKIN and dearly loved mother of Kathy and her husband Charles DANIEL and Karen and her husband Brian CHATFIELD all of Saint Thomas. Dear step-mother of Doug and his wife Joellen BODKIN, Gary and his wife Irene BODKIN and Randy and his wife Pat BODKIN. Dear sister of Helen MUNROE of Saint Thomas, Harold and his wife Greta CHASE of Aylmer, Betty and her husband Jordie BOWCOTT of British Columbia and Connie NEWMAN of Saint Thomas and dear sister-in-law of Jean CHASE and Jim NEWMAN both of St. Thomas. Predeceased by a brother Herb CHASE. Much loved grandmother of Jason and his wife Cathy, Joel, Matthew and his partner Jenn DAWE, Shelby and Richard. Sadly missed by a number of step-grandchildren and nieces and nephews. May was born in Saint Thomas on July 18, 1925, the daughter of the late Lawrence James and Hilda SHEPHERD) CHASE. She was retired from Bell Canada. May was a member of First United Church, the Lady Trainmen, Flower City Chapter of the O.E.S. and the Bell Pioneers. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Saturday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment to follow in Elmdale Cemetery. Visitation Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital Foundation (Chemotherapy Unit).

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-06 published
NEWMAN, Robby " Sunshine" (July 12 1988-November 6 1995)
We miss the sun, that shone so bright Our little boy, our star at night The laughter in your eyes we see When we gaze at grace and peace The smile you shared is everywhere Family gathers. You are there. Tommy, you'd be proud of him He's strong and good, your younger twin Jen is bright and strong like you She carries on, the torch for two. Our love we share spans all of time You are our love, our precious sunshine. Always remembered and Loved. Dad, Tom, Jen, Lori and family.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-07 published
COOK, A. Howard " Skeez"
At the Woodstock General Hospital on Saturday, November 5, 2005. A. Howard " Skeez" COOK of Beachville in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of the late Nellie May Lorine (née MARTIN) COOK (2002) for over 58 years. Dear father of Ron, Ken, Susan CRAWFORD and her husband Brad all of Beachville and Jim and his wife Judy of Ingersoll. Loved grandfather of Lisa (Paul), David, Ian, (Andrea), Corinne, Steven and great-grandfather of Tony, Adam, Alex, Anna, Karli, Taylor, Kaline and Belle. Dear brother of Olive NEWMAN of Kelowna, British Columbia and brother-in-law of Loula COOK of Beachville, Marie BINGHAN of London, Norman MARTIN and his wife Lorna and Lorne MARTIN and his wife Doreen all of Woodstock. Predeceased by his great-grand_son Matthew and by his brother Don. Howard had worked with Weston's Bakeries for over 24 years as a bread salesman, acted as Councillor of Beachville and S.W. Oxford Council for over 25 years serving 1 term on County Council, was an "Ordinary Member" with the Beachville Legion #495 and worked there as Bartender/Caretaker for many years and served in the past on the Cemetery Board of the Beachville Cemetery. Friends may call at the R.D. Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock, 539-0004 on Tuesday, November 8, 2005 from 2: 30-4:30 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held in the chapel on Wednesday at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Kent GARRET officiating. Interment in the Beachville Cemetery. If you wish, contributions to the Beachville Historical Society, Beachville United Church or the Beachville Legion would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-15 published
CHASE, Greta Maude (née MATTHEWS)
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on November 13, 2005. Greta Maude CHASE of Aylmer passed away peacefully with her family by her side on Sunday November 13, 2005 in her 82nd year. Beloved wife and best friend to Harold for 61 years. Loving mother of Ken CHASE and his wife Pat of London, Carol MAES and her husband Romain of Saint Thomas, Vickie SULLIVAN and her husband Skip of London, and Carey CHASE and Andrea of Saint Thomas. Loved by her grandchildren Julie and Steve EMBURY, John and Marcy MUNROE, Michelle and Raymond JOHNSTON, Terri and Paul PARADIS, Lisa and Todd HENRY, Greg PALMER and Rob CHASE. Great grandmother of Cassie and Brian, Nathan, Natalie and Nicole, Kaitlyn and Taylor, Shane and Ryan, and Kaitlyn. Sister-in-law to Helen MUNROE, Connie NEWMAN, Jean CHASE, and Jack BODKIN all of Saint Thomas and Betty BOWCOTT and husband Jordie of British Columbia. Also survived by several cousins, nieces, nephews, step grandchildren, and step great grandchildren. Predeceased by brothers Wilfred and Grant MATTHEWS, brothers-in-law Ross HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, Stewart MUNROE, Herb CHASE, Bruce ARTHUR and a sister-in-law May ARTHUR. Born in Yarmouth Township, Ontario on February 20, 1924 daughter of the late William and Aleta (WALTERS) MATTHEWS. Greta was a retired Registered Nursing Assistant and belonged to the Calton Women's Institute. She was a member of St. Paul's United Church and the U.C. W of St. Paul's Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held on Wednesday November 16, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. at St. Paul's United Church, Aylmer with Reverend Norman JONES officiating. Interment, Elmdale Cemetery, Saint Thomas. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital Foundation (Palliative Care) would be appreciated.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-19 published
COOK, Howard Alfred " Skeez"
The family of the late Howard Alfred (Skeez) COOK wish to express our sincere thanks to Friends, neighbours, and relatives for their support, visits, flowers, food, memorial donations and expressions of sympathy. We would like to thank the staff at R.D. Longworth Funeral Home, and Reverend Kent GARRETT for the encouraging and thoughtful message and for his words of comfort. Our gratitude is extended to the pallbearers: Doug NEWMAN, Dave COOK, Ian COOK, Brad CRAWFORD, Steven CRAWFORD and Paul DEFENT, and to the Beachville United Church Women for providing a delicious lunch. A special thank you to Dr. POP, Dr. EL SALVITI and Dr. FULLERTON and the nursing staff on fourth floor and Chronic Care Second East, Woodstock General Hospital.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-22 published
NEWMAN, Duncan
In loving memory of a dear Father and Grandfather, Duncan NEWMAN, who passed away seven years ago today. The world changes year to year And Friends from day to day But never will the one we loved From memory pass away. Always loved and sadly missed by your son and family Perry, Cindy, Stacey and D.J.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-01 published
SMYTH, Margaret Elizabeth
On Tuesday, November 29, 2005, Margaret Elizabeth SMYTH, passed away at Grand Wood Park Retirement Residences. She will join her parents Walter and Ruth SMYTH, brother-in-law John CHALIFOUX and her beloved dog Duffy. She leaves behind her sister Ruth CHALIFOUX and nieces Leslie (Toby,) Lynn (David) and Bonnie (Lance.) She also leaves her great-nieces and great-nephews Ashley, Adam, Erin and Matthew (all of Leduc, Alberta). Margaret was a long time teacher and vice-principal with the Middlesex County Board of Education. She will be greatly missed by family and Friends. Visitors will be received at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, on Friday from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. The funeral service will be held at Riverside United Church, 451 Dunedin Drive, London, on Saturday, December 3rd, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. with Rev. Philip NEWMAN officiating. Friends who wish to celebrate Margaret's life may make donations to the London Humane Society, Riverside United Church Memorial Fund or to the charity of your choice.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-10 published
WILLIAMS, Charles E.
At London Health Sciences Centre-University Hospital, on Thursday, December 8th, 2005, Mr. Charles E. WILLIAMS of London in his 96th year. Beloved husband of Mabel M. (BRETT) WILLIAMS, and the late Vera WILLIAMS (1987.) Loving father of Carol DONALDSON, husband Don of Port Stanley, Sharon CAMPBELL of Edmonton, Alberta, and the late Robert WILLIAMS (1976.) Also loved by his grandchildren, Rob and wife Kerrie, Jamie, Tammie and husband Jerry, Greg and wife Heather, Geoff and his close friend Sarita, as well as by his 6 great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Mabel SKINNER of Toronto, Thelma NASBY of Burlington, Merle WILLIAMS of Hamilton, and Vernon WILLIAMS and his wife Margaret of Oakville. Predeceased by his brother Frank and by his sister Elsie. Fondly remembered by David and Ivy BRETT, Reg and Marie BRETT, Ewen and Myrna BRETT, Earl and Ruby BRETT, and John GREEN. The funeral service will be conducted at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, on Tuesday, December 13th, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to the service. Reverend Philip NEWMAN officiating. Cremation with interment of ashes at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-29 published
SNELL, Ronald Edward (1935-2005)
Died Tuesday, December 27, 2005 in his 71st year after a brief but courageous struggle. Best friend and loving husband of the late Carolyn Faye SNELL née NEUMAN (1941-1998.) Loving and kind father and wise counsellor to Timothy Edward SNELL. Loving and devoted son of the late Charles SNELL and Hazel SNELL née KESTLE. Loving son-in-law of Ethel KAUFFELDT (Neuman) née WEBER and of the late Frederick NEUMAN. Loving brother to Ray SNELL, Mary WATSON and Elizabeth PROUTY. Loving brother-in-law to Bette SNELL, Robert WATSON, David PROUTY, Gary and Rosemary NEWMAN, Marline and Ray NEUMAN. He will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews. A good friend and faithful colleague to so many from church, business, extended family and all walks of life. A man of faith, hope, charity, kindness, patience and courage. He lives in the joyous memories of the many lives he has touched. "And now faith, hope and love abide, these three; and the greatest of these is love." I Corinthians 13. Friends may call on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 St. James Street at Richmond. A memorial service will be conducted on Saturday, December 31 at 11: 00 a.m. at New St. James Presbyterian Church, 280 Oxford Street at Wellington. Cremation with interment later in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Memorial contributions to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada would be gratefully acknowledged.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-25 published
CUDDIE, John Anderson
Peacefully at the Village of Wentworth Heights on January 22, 2005 in his 76th year. Devoted and loving husband of Margery for 52 years. Much loved father of Anne (Chris) NEWMAN, John Robert (Jennifer) and Susan (George) MAHLER. Beloved Boppa of Mathew, Jennifer, Sarah, Mitchell, Russell, Jessica, Katherine and Mark. Predeceased by his brother Robert Alan. John was long time member and elder emeritus of Central Presbyterian Church. He was an avid golfer and played at the Hamilton Golf and Country Club for 56 years. John was a dedicated member (Major) of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Reserve). We wish to thank all of the staff of Wentworth Heights, from the administrators to the kitchen staff, and especially those in the Carrington Unit. They continually cared for John with dedication and compassion and provided tremendous support to our whole family. These men and women have continuously gone above and beyond and we are truly blessed to have had them look after our family as their own, especially during this past week. The family will receive Friends at Swackhamer, Blachford and Wray Funeral Home, 1341 Main Street West (opposite McMaster) on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A private interment will take place on Thursday morning. A Memorial Service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church, 165 Charlton Avenue West, Hamilton on Thursday at 1 p.m. Donations in lieu of flowers to the Alzheimer Society, Central Presbyterian Church Restoration Fund, the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry Museum or a charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated by the family.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-01 published
CHAPMAN, Malcolm Edwards " MAC"
Peacefully at Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, on Saturday, January 29, 2005 in his 84th year. Loving husband of Marilyn WALLACE. Special friend of Kelly and Wayne KEILTY (Kristina, Paul), Aurora. Dear brother of Lorraine McDONNELL, Bobcaygeon. Cherished uncle of Janice and Tom CLARK (Dana, Erin), Bracebridge, Neil and Vickie (Jason), Vancouver, Kevin and Michele (Meaghan, Graydon), Whitehorse. Cousin of Ann KERRY (née NEWMAN), Midland. Son-in-law of Florentine WALLACE, Port Colborne. Missed by his horse Lance and Friends at Foxhunter Farms, Stouffville. A memorial service will be held Saturday, February 5th at one o'clock at Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) with reception to follow. If desired donations may be made to C.A.R.D., 4777 Dufferin Street, Toronto M3H 5T3 (Community Association For Riding For The Disabled).

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-28 published
Award-winning political writer McCALL, 70, dies
Author published two volumes on Trudeau
By Oliver MOORE and Sandra MARTIN, Thursday, April 28, 2005, Page A8
Christina McCALL, the political writer who helped coin the phrase "he haunts us still" about Pierre Trudeau, died yesterday morning after a long illness. She was 70.
Ms. McCALL combined a journalism career with literary non-fiction writing, winning several awards for her work and, at one point, challenging her then-former-husband Peter C. NEWMAN in a duel played out at the top of the bestseller lists.
It was with her second husband, University of Toronto political economist Stephen CLARKSON, that she published two volumes on Mr. Trudeau, establishing the oft-used phrase about the former prime minister's ability to haunt Canadians.
Last night Mr. CLARKSON said Ms. McCALL had been seriously ill for more than a year with three progressive, incurable illnesses. She had found out about them one after the other, he said.
"But I don't want to concentrate on the illnesses," he said. "She was the premier political analyst of her generation.
"She was a perfectionist," he said. "What she loved was getting a letter from a carpenter who said she got it right. She was writing for her fellows, and by that I mean her fellow Canadians."
She died in the Providence Healthcare centre in Toronto. Her funeral is tomorrow.
In addition to her books, Ms. McCALL wrote about Canadian politics for years in senior positions at the magazines Saturday Night and Maclean's and at The Globe and Mail. She also held a position as assistant editor at Chatelaine magazine.
It was at Maclean's that she met Mr. NEWMAN, who at the time was married, but admitted recently in print to being "bowled over" by the editorial assistant. He suggested separation to his first wife and then, finding she was pregnant, said that he would remain until the birth, but could promise no more.
Mr. NEWMAN and Ms. McCALL were married in the autumn of 1959. Theirs was a literary as well as a marital partnership, with Ms. McCALL helping shepherd his 1963 book on Diefenbaker through the editing process.
Mr. NEWMAN once said she was his best editor.
The Diefenbaker book sent Mr. NEWMAN's reputation soaring, in a period during which Ms. McCALL continued writing. She received several Press Club Awards for magazine writing
She produced her own book nearly two decades later, several years after she and Mr. NEWMAN had parted company in 1977. The next year she married Mr. CLARKSON.
The 1982 publication of Grits: An Intimate Portrait of the Liberal Party peeled back layers of the governing party, offering Canadians telling glimpses of their leaders.
In one anecdote, she described Mr. TRUDEAU hearing over the phone that a hockey game was in progress.
There was an "awkward pause at the other end of the line and then Trudeau said, 'Oh, I see. What inning are they in?' "
Critics loved the book, which beat out a work from Ms. McCALL's former university professor, Northrop FRYE, for the 1983 non-fiction prize from the Canadian Authors Association. It was also nominated for a Governor-General's Award.
Grits -- praised as "one of the most important Canadian books of the 1980s" -- was locked in an end-of-year battle in 1982 with Mr. NEWMAN's biography of Conrad Black, The Establishment Manitoba
Nearly a decade later Ms. McCALL published the first volume of her two-volume work on Mr. Trudeau, collaborating with Mr. CLARKSON. The first volume won the Governor-General's Award in 1990.
Other works include The Man From Oxbow (1967) and The Unlikely Gladiators: Pearson and Diefenbaker Remembered (1999).
Ms. McCALL leaves her husband and three children, Ashley McCALL, Kyra CLARKSON and Blaise CLARKSON.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-30 published
Christina McCALL, Journalist, Biographer: 1935-2005
She combined powerful analysis with insightful writing to produce a groundbreaking examination of the Liberals, writes Sandra MARTIN, and then topped that by collaborating on the definitive study of Pierre Trudeau
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, April 30, 2005, Page S9
My, how she could write. Her sentences were as sensuous as they were illuminating. Every word, every comma, was sculpted and buffed as though she were working on marble not paper. Married twice, first to writer Peter NEWMAN and then to political economist Stephen CLARKSON, Christina McCALL moved in powerful political, journalistic and academic circles, but in the past dozen years she was plagued with illnesses, from diabetes to cancer to Parkinson's, and suffered from chronic pain.
Mr. NEWMAN, who flew from London to attend her funeral yesterday in Toronto, compared her to a singer with perfect pitch. "It is not something you learn, You have it or you don't, and she had it." Assessing her importance as a writer, he said: "On the negative side, the quantity wasn't there and I have no explanation for that because she could have done anything and everything. On the positive side, she brought a whole new way of looking at the political world."
Prof. CLARKSON, with whom she collaborated on Trudeau and Our Times, a two-volume study of the late prime minister, said she "had a novelist's intuition," which she applied to political actors instead of imagined characters in a fictional plot. "She could understand their motivation, their psychology and where they came from," he said, explaining that when they did joint interviews, "she would come out understanding the person and I would come out knowing the issues."
Christina McCALL was the daughter of civil servant Christopher Warnock McCALL and Orlie Alma (FREEMAN,) a registered nurse he had married after the death of his first wife. Christina grew up with an older half-brother, Sam, an older sister, Orlie and a younger brother, Brian. She graduated from Jarvis Collegiate in Toronto at 17 and spent that summer working at Maclean's magazine to help earn her tuition at Victoria College in the University of Toronto.
Northrop FRYE was a tremendous influence and she "always talked about his lectures as the intellectual highlight of her life," according to Mr. NEWMAN. She wanted to go on to do graduate work, according to Prof. CLARKSON, but money was scarce. So, after graduating with an honours degree in 1956, she returned as an editorial assistant to Maclean's, which was then under the editorship of Ralph Allan.
He became the second major influence in her life as a writer. "He wasn't religious, but he had all the advantages of believing in goodness and practising it, which is rare for editors," said Mr. NEWMAN. "He was our role model and we became his Disciples and tried to emulate his qualities." Ms. McCALL's first book, Ralph Allan: The Man from Oxbow (1967), was an anthology she edited as a tribute to the legendary magazine editor.
It was at Maclean's that she met Mr. NEWMAN. " She was very junior," he said, "but I was blown away by her ability," not to mention her allure. "Beauty and intelligence are a potent combination and she had both in spades." They fell in love, but he was already married.
She shifted to Chatelaine magazine. "She came to me in the late 1950s," said Doris ANDERSON, then editor of Chatelaine. "She was wonderful," said Ms. ANDERSON. " She was a great writer, very insightful with an original eye and she used the language with great skill and grace." Ms. McCALL had two other qualities that appealed to Ms. ANDERSON: She generated lots of ideas for the magazine and underneath her demure appearance she was a dedicated feminist.
She was also a woman in love. After Mr. NEWMAN divorced, they married in October of 1959. Shortly afterward, they moved to Ottawa, where Mr. NEWMAN became Ottawa editor of Maclean's. These were the years when he was writing his book Renegade in Power: The Diefenbaker Years with her help and she was beginning her study of Lester Pearson and the Liberal Party.
Asked if she chose the Liberals because he was already working on the Progressive Conservatives, Mr. NEWMAN said no. "Any good journalist in this country knows the Liberals are a natural subject because they are such a force in this country. What gives them such continuity and strength? Analyzing that is the prime ambition of every political journalist." Besides, "the people who ran that party were our Friends and contacts."
The NEWMAN / McCALL marriage collapsed in the early 1970s. They divorced in 1977. By that time, they had long since returned to Toronto. Ms. McCALL had worked as a freelance writer and as a contributing editor and writer to Saturday Night and Maclean's.
She had also become friendly with Prof. CLARKSON. He knew her first through her writing, which he admired for its depth, insights and authority. "You believed what she wrote," he said, "because you knew she had thought about it and often her perceptions were novel."
Prof. CLARKSON and his broadcaster wife, Adrienne CLARKSON, now the Governor-General, split up in 1973. Some time later, he invited Ms. McCALL, who was then working as a national reporter for The Globe and Mail, to have lunch to discuss the federal election of 1974. He asked her to dinner a year later and they gradually began a relationship.
They were married in 1978, bought a new home "to start afresh" with the respective children from their first marriages. "We were the operative parents," Prof. CLARKSON said simply. Later, he and Ms. McCALL adopted each other's daughters. "It was the symbolism of being one family rather than a split family," he said. That tight arrangement led to painful estrangements from the other biological parents -- Mr. NEWMAN and Ms. CLARKSON -- that were only resolved after the passage of time and the birth of grandchildren.
Grits: An Intimate Portrait of the Liberal Party was finally published in 1982. It was dedicated "with love and admiration" to Stephen Hugh Elliott CLARKSON. The book, which caused a sensation, was unlike most political writing at the time. It was a biography of a party, not a person, but it was written as a series of profiles of key figures (Keith Davey, Pierre Trudeau, Jim Coutts, Michael Pitfield, John Turner and Marc Lalonde) from the Pearson years through the Trudeau era.
"Grits is not only a brilliant portrait of how an arthritic party, drenched in scandal, suddenly learned to dance again, but also a textbook on how easily a bunch of young political junkies could take over a party," said historian John ENGLISH. "It endures as one of the finest analyses of Canadian politics ever written." Journalist Robert FULFORD, who picked up Grits again after he heard about Ms. McCALL's death, said: "It is still fresh and full of terrific insights into the politics of the 1960s and 1970s."
Besides forging a tight family unit, Ms. McCALL and Prof. CLARKSON decided to collaborate as authors, she bringing her writing talent and political insights and he contributing his organizational skills and policy analysis to their study of Trudeau, which won the Governor-General's award for volume one, The Magnificent Obsession in 1990. Prof. CLARKSON said the process was agonizing because her method was to start with the introduction and polish it before moving on, an approach he thought akin to "building the front door before you've got the basement foundations in."
They wrote every sentence sitting side by side at the same keyboard. Every few pages, they would "print out" and "haggle" over the punctuation and the wording. "It was very, very slow," he said. Even he can't remember who actually wrote of Mr. Trudeau, "He haunts us still," saying that their editor Doug GIBSON at McClelland & Stewart also had a role in shaping the iconic sentence. Mr. GIBSON recalls that they had written, "He still haunts us," and he shifted the emphasis by moving the second word to the end of the sentence.
Writing wasn't the only agony that Ms. McCALL and Prof. CLARKSON shared. For most of their marriage, she was in severe physical pain and he was the gentle and loving caregiver. "In the mid-1970s, she had back pain and then arthritis, but the serious illnesses began in 1993," he said, "when she was diagnosed with diabetes, followed by breast cancer four years later." It wasn't so much the malignancy, but the treatment that caused many of her subsequent health problems.
The surgeon cut her brachial nerve during an operation to remove the tumour in her breast, leaving her left shoulder, arm and hand in chronic pain. "She was a very classy, elegant woman and writer," said broadcaster Eleanor WACHTEL, who became a friend in the late 1990s, "but she was also very private."
Ms. McCALL didn't want anybody to know that she had breast cancer, and didn't want to be seen looking frail and ill. Ms. McCALL's world shrank and she saw fewer and fewer people as her illnesses progressed. Managing her pain grew harder, although she continued to help her friend Rosemary SPEIRS strategize for the Equal Voice website (a movement to increase the number of women in elected office in Canada). The real downhill journey began about a year ago when she could no longer be cared for at home. Until almost the end, though, say the few Friends who visited her, she was a very astute, very witty and very engaging conversationalist.
It was a rough and frustrating passage for the woman many considered the best political writer and analyst of her generation.
Christina McCALL was born in Toronto on January 29, 1935. She died in Toronto of cancer on Wednesday. She was 70. She is survived by her husband, Stephen CLARKSON, three children and their families.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-14 published
NEWMAN, Gerald Miller
Passed away at St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia at age 79 on 5th May 2005. After completing his Bachelor of Arts Degree at the University of British Columbia in 1951, Gerald worked for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1956-1968 where he produced and directed numerous drama and music programmes for radio and television. In 1967, he joined the Department of English at Simon Fraser University where he taught Shakespeare and literary criticism until his retirement in 1991. Gerald also served as Chairman of this department from 1968-1974. Throughout his life, Gerald was equally passionate about music, drama, photography, and film always offering distinctive viewpoints and maintaining the highest standard of intellectual discourse. His wife, Joyce and sons, Geoffrey and Timothy, daughter-in-law, Haya and stepgrandchildren, Talya and Hilah will lovingly remember him along with extended family and his many Friends. The family wishes to thank St. Paul's and Lions Gate Hospitals for their efforts and care.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-30 published
I Remember -- Bill LAFORGE
By Mark NEWMAN, Thursday, June 30, 2005, Page S11
Mark NEWMAN, a former sports reporter at CHML radio in Hamilton, Ontario, writes about Bill LAFORGE, whose obituary ran on June Wild Bill LAFORGE joined a long list of colourful sports characters when he arrived in town to coach the Ontario Hockey League's Steelhawks in the mid-1980s. Seldom do hockey fans buy tickets to watch a coach in action. Bill was an exception, and he loved every minute of it. The LAFORGE era lasted only a few years in Hamilton before the team was moved to Niagara Falls, where it was renamed the Thunder. At the time, I used to play pick-up hockey after Thunder games. One night, when Guelph was in town, I arrived to find Bill sitting alone on a bench and he mentioned how he had upset the Thunder management earlier in the evening. The Thunder had been embroiled in a dispute with the city over their lease at the arena. With a mischievous grin, he told me how he had questioned the lease concerns on the team's in-house television program before the game. "They're not paying any rent here," he said. "I should know, I negotiated the lease."

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-12 published
RICHARDS, Eric Oxford (October 14, 1972-September 8, 2005)
Passed away at Toronto on Thursday, September 8, 2005. Beloved son of Glenda RICHARDS (née WHITESIDE) and Scott RICHARDS (predeceased.) He is also lovingly remembered by Evelyn ZUBEK (Godmother) and Wayne ZUBEK, Lori NEWMAN (spouse), Joy NEWMAN, Uncle Derek and Merle RICHARDS and family, Linda DAWE and Ashley ALVERO, Stephen and David KELLEY and family and Wayne BURNETT. Gareth BENNETT and Cara PIFKO and Eric's bands, The Elastocitizens, My Dear Heretic and Thieves' Crossing will cherish the memory of his close Friendship. A thoughtful, generous and kind-hearted human being, he will be missed by all those lives he touched. His sense of humour enabled him to transcend his many physical challenges. Now he is free to soar. A special thank you to the doctors, nurses and staff at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto Western Hospital and Toronto General Hospital who enabled Eric to overcome many obstacles throughout his life. The family wishes to extend their sincere appreciation to the Toronto General Hospital Dialysis Unit (Eaton South) staff and particularly, Betty KELLMAN, R.N. for all of their dedicated care and support. Donations in honour of Eric's life may be made to the Kidney Foundation of Canada, 15 Gervais Drive, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario M3C 1Y8, Toronto Humane Society, 11 River Street, Toronto, Ontario M5A 4C2 or Toronto Zoo, 361A Old Finch Avenue, Scarborough, Ontario M1B 5K7. A Celebration of Life service will be held in the near future and invitations will be sent out.
"My life flows on in endless song".

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-17 published
RICHARDS, Eric -- Dispatch:
By Oliver MOORE, Saturday, September 17, 2005, Page M6
Even when gravely ill with kidney disease, Eric Oxford RICHARDS insisted that his life was about more than his health problems. Not even three-hour dialysis treatments or a Christmas in hospital would change that.
"He never wanted his medical situation to define him," said his mother, Glenda RICHARDS.
Mr. RICHARDS's kidney problems dated to the early stages of his life. After being in and out of hospital from the age of 2 to 5, he got a clean bill of health and was off all medications by the age of 10. Nearly a decade later, though, the effects of living with one kidney removed began to show.
Mr. RICHARDS started daily dialysis at 19. He died prematurely, a month before his 33rd birthday, but his mother said he had lived a full life by his death September 8.
"The coroner said he had a really rough life. I had to correct him," Ms. RICHARDS said. "He had a wonderful life."
As a teen, Mr. RICHARDS acted on a television show called The Campbells. Over the years, he also played in several bands and wrote poetry.
He was drawn to the myth of the phoenix, the idea of a new being rising from the ashes of the old. It was a reflection of the hardships he had endured, his mother said, and how they had strengthened him.
"He was, in his own way, very spiritual," Ms. RICHARDS said. "He knew that if he moved on, he was moving on to somewhere else, wherever that is."
Mr. RICHARDS leaves his mother and his two cats, Hamlet and Macbeth. His dog, Buddy, is in the care of his ex-wife, Lori NEWMAN.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-15 published
Gordon LUNAN, Spy (1915-2005)
Named as a Soviet agent by Igor GOUZENKO, he maintained to the end that he did not mean to betray Canada, only to defeat Nazis, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, October 15, 2005, Page S9
As a left-leaning advertising copywriter, Gordon LUNAN would probably have ended his days in obscurity if Igor GOUZENKO, a cipher clerk in the Soviet embassy in Ottawa, had not defected in September, 1945, and offered him up as a trophy.
"He definitely passed information and acted as a go-between for the Soviets, as the Russians were called then," says historian Amy Knight. She interviewed Mr. LUNAN extensively for her forthcoming book, How the Cold War Began.
"He really didn't know what he was getting into" and the information he passed on was inconsequential, in her view. "He violated the law but he didn't do any harm to Canadian national security."
Compared with spies such as Kim Philby and Guy Burgess, Mr. LUNAN hardly rated as a threat, but his story is significant for what it reveals about the times and how Canadians responded to the news that we harboured Soviet spy rings during the Second World War.
David Gordon LUNAN was born in Scotland, one of four sons of a commercial traveller. When Gordon was 9, the family moved to London where his father was put in charge of persuading the public to buy Congoleum, a cheap substitute for linoleum. He did so well that the company tried to renegotiate his contract, a cheat that was not lost on his son, who tended even then to side with the underdog.
His father's earnings made it possible to send Gordon to Belmont, a feeder school for Mill Hill School, a non-conformist public school on the outskirts of London. A boarder from the age of 10, he liked school and did well, ending up as one of two head boys at Belmont. At Mill Hill, he was taught music, theatre and officer training along with standard school subjects.
He graduated at 17 in 1932 and immediately began an apprenticeship with the S.H. Benson advertising agency. It took him two years to secure a place in the copy department (where Dorothy Sayers had once toiled), becoming, at 20, the agency's youngest copywriter.
Meanwhile, fascism was on the rise in Germany, where Adolf Hitler became chancellor in 1933. The Soviet Union, ruled by Joseph Stalin, had joined the League of Nations in 1934 and become an active player in the fascist/anti-fascist political machinations. In 1935, Mussolini invaded Abyssinia from the adjacent Italian territory of Somaliland.
A year later, Mr. LUNAN visited Spain and saw the anti-democratic and repressive effects of General Francisco Franco's crusade to destroy the republican government. Back in England, where Sir Oswald Mosley was gathering momentum for his British Union of Fascists, Mr. LUNAN joined the anti-appeasement movement. He was convinced that another war was inevitable.
There were plenty of causes he could have joined in England. Instead, in 1938, he decided to immigrate to Canada and leave the political unease behind him.
He soon found a job with the A. McKim advertising agency in Montreal, took a lease on a large flat with Friends on what is now Aylmer Avenue and immersed himself in the city's left-wing artistic community. The Quebec of Premier Maurice Duplessis was rigidly authoritarian, overtly Catholic and rampantly anti-Semitic. This was the era of the infamous Padlock Law that allowed authorities to padlock the premises of any people suspected of communist connections.
Mr. LUNAN quickly turned from a left-leaning sympathizer into an activist, connected to communist groups and supporters of the Canadians who had formed the Mackenzie Papineau Battalion in 1936 and gone to fight for the republican cause in the Spanish Civil War.
He was part of a welcoming committee at Windsor Station for a train load of Mac-Paps returning from the Spanish Civil War in 1938. Anticipating that the reception might get out of hand, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the local press were out in force and Mr. LUNAN was snapped giving a clenched-fist salute.
In the spring of 1939, he met Phyllis NEWMAN, a Polish emigré. Their family backgrounds could not have been more different, but they espoused similar political causes and married months later, right after Britain declared war on Germany. Their only child was born in July, 1945.
About this time, he also met Fred ROSE, a union organizer and Communist Party member who, in 1945, would become the first person elected to the House of Commons on the Communist ticket. While Mr. LUNAN never joined the Communist Party, he certainly befriended members of the party and offered them space in his apartment for meetings.
In 1943, Mr. LUNAN enlisted in the Canadian Army as a private, earned a commission as a lieutenant a year later and was posted to Ottawa to the wartime information board. Mainly, he worked on Canadian Affairs, a newsletter providing a summary of Canadian news and editorials for troops stationed abroad and in Canada.
While he was in Ottawa, he met frequently with Mr. ROSE, who urged him to befriend Russians working at the embassy in Ottawa. Mr. LUNAN readily agreed and had a series of meetings with Colonel Rogov, who asked him to solicit information from scientists who were Soviet sympathizers.
Eager to oblige, Mr. LUNAN passed along whatever information he was able to glean and recruited others to the cause. "Far from damaging Canada," he wrote 50 years later in his memoirs, "my motive -- and I assumed it must have been theirs also -- was to help Canada by helping our most powerful and effective ally and thereby shortening the war."
He was promoted to captain in June, 1945, and sent to London by the Canadian Information Service. One of his supervisors described him as "a very ordinary, likeable chap with not too much imagination but very industrious."
The war was over in Europe, the first meeting of the General Assembly of the United Nations was about to take place in Westminster Central Hall in London. He was sent to Canada House in January, 1946, to help with the publicity and ended up working as a pinch-hitting speechwriter for Paul MARTIN Sr.
Back home, his world had begun to collapse. Mr. LUNAN later said that he knew he was in trouble as soon as he heard that Mr. GOUZENKO had defected and brought documentation with him about an extensive Soviet espionage network linking Canada, the United States and Britain and directed at finding information about the U.S. atomic-bomb program. Mr. GOUZENKO implicated Mr. LUNAN as a "recruiting agent" and the leader of a cell of three others who were passing information to Soviet intelligence on trends in Canadian politics and military weapons.
In February, 1946, Mr. LUNAN was summoned back to Ottawa for "an important assignment." After his plane landed in Montreal, he was surrounded and restrained by three men in plain clothes, frisked and taken to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police barracks in Rockcliffe, a suburb of Ottawa. Two days later he was read a detailed surveillance record dating back to 1939 and a list of alleged co-conspirators.
Civil liberties were trampled on in the round-ups and detentions at that time, says Wesley WARK, a specialist in Canadian security and intelligence. Most of the detainees were woken up in dawn raids, denied access to lawyers and not cautioned about incriminating themselves. All of this was legal, says Prof. WARK, because Canada had not yet rescinded the War Measures Act, at least partly because of Mr. GOUZENKO's defection.
Mr. LUNAN confessed and implicated some of the men he had recruited. This was his biggest regret at the end of his life, said Prof. KNIGHT. "If you are a believer in the cause, the last thing you want to do is to implicate your fellow comrades. And he did."
Mr. LUNAN was convicted in November, 1946. Before his sentence was handed down, he told the judge: "I do not consider myself guilty of the charge either in law or in fact." Nevertheless, he spent the next five years in Kingston Penitentiary with extra time tacked on for refusing to testify in court about some of the colleagues he had implicated earlier.
His marriage held together while he was in prison, but fell apart quickly thereafter. He met his second wife, Miriam MAGEE, the love of his life, at the party thrown to celebrate his release from prison. They were married in Montreal, where Mr. LUNAN was again working in the advertising business.
He eventually opened his own agency and retired with his wife to the countryside near Ottawa in 1975. He spent the rest of his life growing strawberries, cooking gourmet meals, espousing social justice principles to his step-grandchildren, and writing two memoirs, The Making of a Spy (published in 1995) and Redhanded: Inside the Spy Ring that Changed the World (which he finished just before he died and which is being published this month by Optimum).
The major difference between the two books is an epilogue in the second one in which Mr. LUNAN explains, more explicitly than ever before, that he acted "naively, stupidly and admittedly outside the law" in the "best interests of winning the war against Nazism." He also acknowledges that the GOUZENKO affair helped trigger the Cold War and he expresses regret that he "played a part in making it happen so soon."
Not a huge mea culpa by most definitions. Still, Mr. LUNAN did serve his time for betraying his country, however ineffectually and naively. Only this past summer, he received his Royal Canadian Mounted Police dossier and learned they had been keeping tabs on him until the mid-1970s.
David Gordon LUNAN was born in Kirkaldy, Scotland, in 1915. He died in hospital in Hawkesbury, Ontario, on October 3 after suffering a fall. He was 90. He is survived by his daughter Jan CONDLIN, two stepsons and their families.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-17 published
EMERSON, John Alexander MacLean
With great sadness, but thanksgiving for a life well lived, the family announces the peaceful passing of John on Friday, October Devoted and cherished husband of Sandra (née WOLFE;) proud and loving father of his 'troops', sons: Bruce, Brian and Douglas admiring father-in-law of Margaret and Natasha; and grandfather of Kate DAVIS.
John will be deeply missed by brother Gordon and his wife Barbara sister Florence and husband Richard NEWMAN, sister Margaret and husband Roderick McLEAN and brother-in-law Joseph WOLFE and wife Willa. Many nieces and nephews will also fondly remember him.
John was an esteemed educator in Etobicoke Schools, the Ontario Ministry of Education and the Faculty of Education, University of Toronto. He was also Past President and Honorary Life Member of the Canadian Society of Education through Art and the first recipient of the Ray Blackwell Excellence in Art Education Award Past President of the Streetsville Historical Society; recipient of the Ontario Heritage Foundation Certificate of Achievement and the Mississauga Heritage Foundation's Member's Choice Award.
Music was an integral component of John's life; he was a long-time member of the Streestville United Church choir, and organist at Seabreeze Community Church, Lake of Bays.
John's boundless energy, imagination and capabilities inspired a countless stream of projects at his beloved Streetsville and Seabreeze homes. His far-reaching intellectual curiosity enriched his family's education and experience.
We extend our thanks and gratitude to Dr. Donna REECE at Princess Margaret Hospital, to the Haemodialysis Team at Credit Valley Hospital, and to the caregivers who assisted at home for their support throughout John's illness.
The family will receive Friends at Lee Funeral Home Limited, 258 Queen St. S., Streetsville on Sunday, October 16, and Monday, October 17, 2005, from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. The Funeral Service and reception will take place at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday, October 18, 2005, at Streetsville United Church, 274 Queen St. S., Mississauga.
If desired, the family would prefer that expressions of sympathy be made through a donation to the charity of your choice.
"And ever has it been, that love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation."

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-09 published
Beland HONDERICH, Newspaper Publisher (1918-2005)
Micromanager changed the Toronto Star from a scoop-an-edition news sheet into an information-based vehicle for an emerging middle class, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, Page S9
An outsider who joined the Toronto Star as a "wartime replacement," Beland (Bee) HONDERICH worked his way up through the newsroom to become editor, publisher and ultimately chairman of the board of the country's largest and most colourful city newspaper. Its archives can boast staff bylines belonging to Ernest Hemingway (he likened it to "serving in the Prussian army under a bad general"), Pierre Berton, Gordon Sinclair and Peter Newman.
A micromanager and a curmudgeon who was feared more than he was loved, he transformed and modernized the Star, built a legendary newsroom in the late 1950s and 1960s, fought and won a newspaper war with the now defunct Toronto Telegram, bought up its circulation lists and its fleet of community newspapers, crusaded in support of diversity, national unity and cultural nationalism, and acquired Harlequin Enterprises, for many years a substantial cash cow for Torstar Corp.
"He took a paper that mattered and turned it into a great newspaper. I think his impact on Canadian journalism and his craft was huge," said his son, John HONDERICH, himself a former editor and publisher of the Toronto Star and now a member of the board of directors of Torstar Corp.
He was hard to love, but easy to respect, said Peter NEWMAN, editor-in-chief from 1969 to 1971. "I was always impressed by his wisdom, his determination and his optimistic view of the Canadian future. Unlike most publishers, his ideology went way beyond the bottom line. He never really understood the Canada that stretched beyond the shadow of the C.N. Tower, but he loved the idea of this country."
Beland (Bee) Hugh HONDERICH was born in Baden (near Kitchener,) Ontario, one of six children of John William HONDERICH, a Mennonite postmaster and railway agent, and Rae Laura (ARMSTRONG,) a Presbyterian. Religion was a contentious and omnipresent factor, according to Mr. HONDERICH's youngest brother, philosopher Edgar (Ted) HONDERICH. His father liked unusual names. He called his eldest son Loine and he named his second son after a physician named Béland in Montreal.
During the Depression, the family home was sold at auction when the mortgage holder foreclosed. Beland left school after Grade 8 to help support the family and began working as the Baden correspondent for the Kitchener Record (now The Record) in 1935 at the age of 17.
He did well covering two big fires in his community and made the move to the Toronto Star as a wartime replacement in 1943, earning $35 a week. He had been rejected from the armed forces because he had poor eyesight and a bad ear. When he got to the Star, he was told "all the good men were away fighting" and warned that there wouldn't be a job for him when they came back.
Shy, private, and insecure -- the poorly educated country man in the big city -- he "always felt he had to work twice as hard," according to his son, John.
Mr. HONDERICH told the journalist Doug (now George) FETHERLING in a 1983 interview for Saturday Night magazine that "you produced or else," explaining that he covered two speeches a day, delivering a few facts and a couple of "punchy" quotes. "It left a deep impression on my mind... what people are interested in is information." This was a lesson he would apply when he had control of the paper.
Far from being dismissed when peace was declared, he was promoted to financial editor in 1945, named editor-in-chief a decade later and elected a director of the company in 1957.
The Toronto Star is a private business like other newspapers in Canada, but it is unusual in that it is owned by a group of families and it operates according to a set of principles established by the late Joseph ATKINSON Sr. He became editor in 1899, quickly turned the struggling newspaper around and soon acquired a controlling interest. In 1911, Harry C. HINDMARSH joined the paper. He became Mr. ATKINSON's lieutenant and his son-in-law. Together, they turned the newspaper into the home of "razzle-dazzle journalism," ordering saturation coverage of big stories and indulging in huge headlines, full-page pictures and wacky stunts. They also supported the Liberal Party and social-welfare issues such as mothers' allowances, unemployment insurance, old-age pensions, minimum wages and the rights of labour unions. The combination of Christian piety, free-wheeling Fabian socialism and popular journalism was good for circulation and advertising revenues. By 1913, the Star was Toronto's largest paper and Mr. ATKINSON was its controlling shareholder.
He died in 1948, leaving an estate of more than $8-million, putting the bulk of it, including the ownership of the paper, into the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, which he had established six years earlier. In his will, he directed that profits from the paper's operations were "for the promotion and maintenance of social, scientific and economic reforms which are charitable in nature, for the benefit of the people of the province of Ontario" and he stipulated that the paper could be sold only to people who shared his social views.
Mr. HINDMARSH became president of the five-person board established to govern the paper and carry out Mr. ATKINSON's wishes. However, the Ontario government, led by Conservative Leslie FROST, and rival newspapers, including The Globe and Mail and The Toronto Telegram, argued that the foundation was merely a device to avoid paying succession duties on Mr. ATKINSON's estate.
The FROST government passed a law forbidding charitable foundations from owning more than 10 per cent of a profit-making business. The Star was given seven years to sell its business interests, with the foundation's trustees, officers and directors allowed to buy them, subject to the approval of the Supreme Court of Canada.
While this wrangling was going on, Mr. HINDMARSH dropped dead of a heart attack on December 20, 1956. The new board of the Atkinson Foundation was made up of Joseph S. ATKINSON (son of the late Mr. ATKINSON,) his sister Ruth HINDMARSH (widow of Mr. HINDMARSH), Burnett THALL, William J. CAMPBELL and Mr. HONDERICH.
In 1958, after swearing before the Supreme Court that they would uphold the principles outlined in Mr. ATKINSON's will, they were allowed to buy the newspaper. They paid $25.5-million in a leveraged buyout, which Globe business columnist Eric REGULY has called "the steal of the century." They put down $1-million in cash and secured most of the rest by selling debt and preferred shares to the public.
Mr. HONDERICH, who had been editor for three years and on the board for one, had no family money or other resources to draw upon. He was living in a duplex with his wife and three children. "We had one couch and one chair," said his son John. "The Bank of Commerce virtually put up all the money, but the security was the shares of the largest newspaper in the country."
In addition, Mr. HONDERICH took a personal loan for his 15-per-cent share, helped by advice and references from accountant, cultural nationalist and later politician, Walter GORDON. Today, Torstar Corp., the media conglomerate that owns the Star, is worth about $1.7-billion.
As editor and then publisher, Mr. HONDERICH built the great Toronto Star newsroom of the late 1950s and 1960s. He transformed the paper from a flashy, scoop-an-edition news sheet into an information-based vehicle for columnists and critics. He quickly realized, according to journalist Val SEARS, that the real market in the postwar period lay in finding readers among the young middle class in the suburbs who were moving up through the social strata.
They wanted context and information, not just headlines. Ron HAGGART worked as a columnist for the Star in the sixties. Mr. HONDERICH had the right ideas about how to change the Star, which was a stodgy, old-fashioned paper, according to Mr. HAGGART. "It was still a paper that believed the most recent event deserved a headline because it had happened in the last hour."
Among the stable of writers and editors Mr. HONDERICH enlisted or celebrated were: Pierre Berton as a daily columnist, Charles Templeton as managing editor, Nathan Cohen as drama critic, Milt Dunnell on sports, Gwyn (Jocko) Thomas on crime and Peter NEWMAN as Ottawa editor and editor-in-chief.
He loved to hire people, said journalist Robert FULFORD, who worked for the Star twice (from 1958 to 1962 and from 1964 to 1968), but he quickly grew bored with them. Managing editors were a notoriously endangered species, according to Mr. FULFORD, who once joked that after more than two years on the job, managing editors took on the look of "hunted animals." When he was having trouble sleeping at night, police reporter Jocko Thomas was said to recite the names of the more than 40 city editors who served during his long career at the paper.
Mr. NEWMAN spent seven years at the Star, leaving in 1971 in "frustration because [Mr. HONDERICH] was always stone-cold certain about what he didn't want, but not good at suggesting practical options."
He could be a bully. "He wasn't a particularly big man, but he looked big to his employees. He tended to tower," said Mr. SEARS, who worked for Mr. HONDERICH for about 25 years in a number of capacities, including Ottawa bureau chief and Washington correspondent. "He spoke low, but he made his position very clear. On the other hand, he was certainly the best publisher I ever worked for because he knew what he wanted and he would back you up."
Saying that he and Mr. HONDERICH fought a lot, especially when he was editor of the editorial page, Mr. SEARS said he always thought it was a mistake to try to outguess his boss. Mr. HONDERICH seemed aware of his power. "He once said to me, 'If I walk through that newsroom and I say to someone it is a nice day, by the final edition I have two full pages on the weather," said Mr. SEARS.
Stories abound about Mr. HONDERICH's tendency to micromanage. When he was editor, he behaved as though he was the publisher and when he became publisher and president in 1966, "he acted as though he owned the paper outright," Mr. FULFORD said.
Staffers were obsessed with anticipating his wishes, often with bizarre results. Somebody heard that "Bee" believed that a colour photograph had to have red in it, so Star photographers took to stowing red jackets in their cars and asking people to put them on before snapping their pictures, or so the story goes.
"Bee had a phobia about accompanying each picture in his paper with explanatory cutlines," recalled Mr. NEWMAN. "I got hell once for running an illustration of Gina Lollobrigida, the Italian film star, standing beside a male dwarf, because I had left out the 'left' and 'right' identifications."
During his years at the newspaper, Mr. HONDERICH oversaw the introduction of colour, the shift from an afternoon to a morning paper, a Sunday edition and the appointment of the first ombudsman at any paper in Canada. He was also a driving force behind the establishment of the Ontario Press Council. In 1976, he was appointed chairman and chief executive officer of Torstar Corp. He continued to serve as publisher until September, 1988.
Mr. HONDERICH married three times. His and his first wife Florence divorced in 1962. He married Agnes KING in 1968. Star legend has it that he called the paper from the airport as he and his bride were leaving on their honeymoon and asked for the front page to be read to him. She died of cancer in 1999 after a long and painful illness. "He was amazingly diligent in the way he cared for her," said his son John.
That same year he became engaged to Rina WHELAN, a widow he had met many years before (when both were married to other people) in the barbershop of the Hotel Vancouver, where she worked as a manicurist. "This is one of the great love stories," John HONDERICH said, "I have had the honour of standing up for him at two of his three weddings."
The HONDERICHs lived in the penthouse of La Carina (Rina's House,) a condominium she had developed and built on English Bay. "He was a wealthy man and she was a wealthy woman," commented Mr. HONDERICH's brother Ted, "and so both were under suspicion of being gold diggers."
Mr. HONDERICH became more left wing in his politics as he became older, said his brother. "All newspaper publishers are accused of being ruthless, but actually they are activists," he said. "They want to make things happen and they don't like things hanging on in an indecisive way."
Beland Hugh HONDERICH was born on November 25, 1918, in Baden, Ontario. He died yesterday in St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver after a massive stroke. He was 86. He is survived by his first wife Florence, his third wife Rina, three children, six grandchildren and one brother.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-17 published
REID, Carmen D.
Died peacefully December 13, 2005, in Naples, Florida, age 96. Widow of Arthur P. REID and loving Mother to his two sons the late L. Bruce REID (Annetta) and A. Paul REID (Marion) of Collingwood. Lovingly remembered by daughters, Cynthia REID of Brookline, Massachusetts and Susan MARLEY (Jack) of Mississauga. Carmen was predeceased by two brothers and her dear sister Helen ADAM/ADAMS.
She leaves 8 grandchildren; Heather MUNROE and Leslie CARR (Brian) of British Columbia; Robert REID (Kathy) of Collingwood, Joanne WILSON (Nolan) of Kitchener, Cathy PATERSON (Kent) of Uxbridge Jennifer SMITH (Andy), John MARLEY (Tara O'BRIEN) and Patrick MARLEY (Jennifer NEWMAN) all from Toronto; as well as her 19 great grandchildren: Blake and Alison MUNROE: Natalie and Adian CARR; Evan, Kayley and Stewart REID; Aaron and Joel WILSON; Chelsea and Sarah PATERSON; Matthew and Kate SMITH; Noa, Lauren and Alexandra MARLEY; Samantha and Sara MARLEY. Born near San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1909, Carmen grew up in New York City. In 1938, Carmen married Arthur and moved to Toronto. Her happy life included summers with family and Friends at Thunder Beach, and golfing winters in Naples, Florida.
Interment will be held at a later date. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Canada, 936 The East Mall, Toronto M9B 6J9, or to the charity the charity of your choice.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-20 published
REID, Carmen D.
Died peacefully December 13, 2005, in Naples, Florida, age 96. Widow of Arthur P. REID and loving Mother to his two sons the late L. Bruce REID (Annetta) and A. Paul REID (Marion) of Collingwood. Lovingly remembered by daughters, Cynthia REID of Brookline, Massachusetts and Susan MARLEY (Jack) of Mississauga. Carmen was predeceased by two brothers and her dear sister Helen ADAM/ADAMS. She leaves 8 grandchildren; Heather MUNRO and Leslie CARR (Brian) of British Columbia; Robert REID (Kathy) of Collingwood, Joanne WILSON (Nolon) of Kitchener, Cathie PATTERSON (Kent) of Uxbridge Jennifer SMITH (Andy), John MARLEY (Tara O'BRIEN) and Patrick MARLEY (Jennifer NEWMAN) all from Toronto; as well as her 19 great grandchildren: Blake and Alison MUNRO; Natalie and Aidan CARR; Evan, Kaley, Tory and Stuart REID; Aaron and Joel WILSON Chelsea and Sarah PATTERSON; Matthew and Kate SMITH; Noa, LAUREN and Alexandra MARLEY; Samantha and Sara MARLEY. Born near San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1909, Carmen grew up in New York City. In 1938, Carmen married Arthur and moved to Toronto. Her happy life included summers with family and Friends at Thunder Beach, and golfing winters in Naples, Florida. Internment will be held at a later date. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Canada, 936 The East Mall, Toronto M9B 6J9, or to the charity of your choice.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-21 published
NEWMAN, James David
Passed away quietly and peacefully on Saturday, December 17, 2005 at West Park Health Clinic, in his 83rd year. Jim was the younger son of Charlotte ECCLESTONE and Herbert NEWMAN, brother-in-law of Barbara and brother of the late Ted NEWMAN. Loving husband of Elizabeth (Betty) HULL and dear father of Suzie and Terry NEWMAN, Paddy, husband Paul SZEPS, and Christine, husband George KAWA. Dear grandpa, grampy and poppy of Tyler, Hailey, Stevie, Jack and Cary. Jim worked at the Alliance Paper Mill and Thorold Concrete Block Company before joining Newman Bros. Ltd., General Contractors, founded by his grandfather, Jabez, in 1878. Jim became office manager and then president of the company. He was an active and dedicated alderman on City Council for six years. He was a zealous participant in numerous construction associations. In later years, he was on the Board of Directors and Board of Governors of the Shaver Hospital and served devotedly for seventeen years. He had been a member of the Niagara Falls Club, St. Catharines Golf and Curling Club and a long time member of the St. Catharines Club. The family would like to extend special thanks to Dr. Earl HUNT who has been so attentive and caring, and to the administrative staff, nurses, aides and all workers who attended Jim with competence and kindness at West Park Health Clinic. The family will receive Friends at the Hulse and English Funeral Home and Chapel, 75 Church Street, 905-684-6346 on Tuesday, December 20, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Service will take place at Saint Thomas Anglican Church on Ontario Street, on Wednesday, December 21, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. Cremation will take place following the service. The family would appreciate expressions of sympathy be donated to the Shaver Hospital Foundation. Memorial tributes may be made online at www.mem.com.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-01 published
MINICUCI, Giovanni
Peacefully, at the York Central Hospital, on December 30, 2004. Giovanni MINICUCI, dearly beloved husband of Maria. Loving father of Antonina and her husband Rolf NEWMAN, and Concetto and his wife Kim. Dear Nonno of Keith and Tara. Friends and family will be received at the Demarco Funeral Home "Keele Chapel", 3725 Keele St. (between Sheppard and Finch Aves. W.), 416-636-7027, on Sunday 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. and Monday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday at 10: 00 a.m. in the Chapel. Entombment to follow at Westminster Mausoleum. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-03 published
NEWMAN, Rachel
On Sunday, January 2, 2005 at Toronto Western Hospital. Rachel NEWMAN, beloved wife of the late Norton NEWMAN. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Jack and Adele. Devoted grandmother of Daniel, Elise, and David. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W. (2 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Monday, January 3, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Stashover Young Men's Society section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-07 published
SHAW, Victor Stanley (June 2, 1924 - January 5, 2005)
We are deeply saddened to announce the death of our wonderful father, Victor, in his 81st year, at the Mississauga Trillium Health Centre. Vic gallantly represented Canada and served in the Canadian Tank Corps during the World War 2 conflict from 1942-1946. Victor spent 38 productive and rewarding years employed as an engineer by the Canadian Pacific Railway. Vic is predeceased by his wife Dorothy (NEWMAN,) parents Stanley and Alice (BRENNAN) and sister Ruth PARTRIDGE. Victor will be affectionately remembered and genuinely missed by his sons Gary and his wife Kathy, Jeff, and Steven and his wife Cheryl. "Grandpa Vic" will be fondly remembered and sincerely missed by his grandchildren Cale, Carissa, Peter, Brent, Whitney-Elyse, Taryn, Kaitlyn, Lindsay and Ryan. Victor will be truly missed by his brother Wesley and sister Marie HAMMOND and his nephews and nieces. At Victor's request, there will be no funeral service. In lieu of this, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated and may be made through the Wignall Funeral Home, 62 Long Branch Ave. Victor will be reunited and buried beside Dorothy at the Hillcrest Cemetery in Tara, Ontario.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-07 published
WELSH, Grace Luella
Peacefully, at her home in Sandford on Wednesday, January 5, 2005, in her 89th year. Grace, beloved wife of the late Arnold. Dear mother of Wayne and his wife Brenda. Grandmother of Mark and Alexander. Survived by sister Jean NEWMAN and predeceased by sisters Doris and Marjorie and brothers Lloyd and Douglas. Resting at the Low and Low Funeral Home, Uxbridge, 23 Main Street South (905-852-3073) on Friday, January 7, 2005 from 10: 00 a.m. until Service time at 11: 00 a.m. Spring interment, Sandford Cemetery. In Grace's memory, donations may be made to Uxbridge Community Care.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-28 published
NEWMAN, Gordon James
On Wednesday, January 26, 2005, after a full and dynamic life, Gordon left us in his 88th year to be with the Lord. He was a dear and exemplary husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather and friend. He will be lovingly remembered and missed by his wife, Helen, his daughters, Pamela and companion Dan CORLETT, Elaine and husband Greg DIMMER, dear grandchildren Jessica, Alexandra and Michael, great-granddaughter Madeleine, and nephew Norman and his wife Grace of Huntsville. Gordon joined General Electric Canada in 1949. For the next 33 years until his retirement he worked in a managerial capacity in credit management. He was Past President and Dean of The Credit Institute of Canada. His interest in credit education led him to become a Community Instructor for the University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies Distant Learning Program. Gordon's family would like to express deep appreciation to Dr. Michael ABBOTT and Dr. Sheldon MINTZ for their many years of care and to Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre Critical Care Unit for their outstanding kindness and support over the past two months. The funeral service will be held at the Anglican Church of St. Andrew Scarborough (Victoria Park, south of Highway 401), on Monday, January 31st at 11 a.m. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the service at 10 a.m. in the St. Andrew's Room of the church. Interment Mt. Pleasant Cemetery. Funeral arrangements entrusted to The Ogden Funeral Home, 416-293-5211.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-01 published
CHAPMAN, Malcolm Edwards " MAC"
Peacefully at Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, on Saturday, January 29, 2005 in his 84th year. Loving husband of Marilyn WALLACE. Special friend of Kelly and Wayne KEILTY (Kristina, Paul), Aurora. Dear brother of Lorraine McDONNELL, Bobcaygeon. Cherished uncle of Janice and Tom CLARK (Dana, Erin), Bracebridge, Neil and Vickie (Jason), Vancouver, Kevin and Michele (Meaghan, Graydon), Whitehorse. Cousin of Ann Kerry (née NEWMAN) Midland. Son-in-law of Florentine WALLACE, Port Colborne. Missed by his horse Lance and Friends at Foxhunter Farms, Stouffville. A memorial service will be held Saturday, February 5th at one o'clock at Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) with reception to follow. If desired, donations may be made to C.A.R.D., 4777 Dufferin Street, Toronto M3H 5T3 (Community Association For Riding For The Disabled).

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-11 published
HOOK, Charles " Chas"
At Peterborough Regional Health Centre on Wednesday, February 9th, 2005, after a brief, intense illness, Charles HOOK, of Hastings, formerly of Toronto, in his 84th year. Beloved husband of Joan for over 35 years, with stepchildren Brad NEWMAN (Jeiley,) Jan VAN DER REEST (Gary), Barbara LEGGE (Max), and daughter-in-law Teresa KRAWCZYK/ NEWMAN. His grandchildren are Kevin, Ryan (Margo,) Darek, Lara, Courtney, Jason, Dylan, Jared and Daniel. Predeceased by his parents and his son-in-law, Jeff NEWMAN. Charles served in the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1940-1945. He was a 30 year former employee of the City of Toronto City Hall Health Department (Accounting). He was an avid sports fan, card player, ice skater, storyteller, and loved to chat with all who crossed his path. He will be greatly missed and is loved by all. A special thank you to Dr. WILKIN, Dr. McMILLAN, Dr. ROWSOM and the Intensive Care Unit staff of Peterborough Regional Health Centre. Visiting at Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main Street North, Markham, Ontario (905) 294-2030 on Saturday, February 12th from 11: 00 a.m. to 1: 00 p.m. Service at 1:00 p.m. Reverend Matthew ROBERTS officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Lung Association or Canadian Cancer Society.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-13 published
FELDMAN, Samuel
Passed away peacefully on Friday, February 11, 2005 at the age of 91. Beloved husband of the late Belle FELDMAN (SLAVNER;) father of Elaine and Rick SCHWARTZ, Jacqueline FELDMAN, Nadine and Bill FUSSNER, Joyce NEWMAN and the late James FIELDS. Grandfather to Alyse, Shani and Brooke, Kimberley and Polly. Great-grandfather to Courtney and Michael. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Steeles Memorial Chapel. Please call 905-881-6003 or check online at www.steeles.org for funeral information. Shiva at 65 Skymark Ave., Ste. 201.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-07 published
MYERS, Jacqueline " Jackie"
On Sunday, March 6, 2005 after a courageous battle at Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket. Jackie MYERS beloved wife of Ian. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Sharon MYERS- VAMOSI and Peter VAMOSI, Aimee and William WATTERSON, and stepmother and mother-in-law of Susie and Wally CAMERON. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Norma and Raymond NEWMAN of England, and Brian and Helen ROTHFEDER of England. Devoted grandmother of Megan, Samantha, Sean, Joshua, Samson, and Anna. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. West (2 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday, March 8, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Foresters Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 20 Baif Blvd., Suite 709, Richmond Hill. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 1-888-939-3333.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-17 published
GROVES, Ethel Bettsy (formerly NEWMAN)
Entered into rest after a brief fight with cancer at Orillia Soldiers' Memorial Hospital on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 with her three girls by her side and in her son's heart. Bettsy's great pride and joy was her family. She will be profoundly missed by her children Carolyn (Neil) TURNBULL, Janice (Charles) WHITE/WHYTE, John (Marty LOCKHART) NEWMAN and Nancy (John MILNE) NEWMAN. Her love and sense of tradition will be missed by her many grandchildren and their families: Emma and Sammie TURNBULL, Tim (Rhonda MELVIN) WHITE/WHYTE, Alison WHITE/WHYTE, Liam and Colin WEBSTER, Rachel (Rick) KRUYF and children Teo and Mackenzie and Gretchen (Zeion WILSON) NEWMAN and their daughter Zuzu. She was predeceased by her first love, Samuel John NEWMAN to whom she was married for 34 years and her beloved brothers Donald Arthur, Wallace Emerson, Stewart Andrew, Bruce George and John Stanley and two sisters Marjorie Jean and Margaret Bernice BETTS. She was a dear aunt to Joan, John, Judy, Lynne and to Helen, Ralph and Bruce. She leaves behind her beloved husband of 20 years, Wrexford GROVES of Beaverton and will be missed by his family, Don (Crystal) GROVES, Mary (Pat) BROWN and Bob (Laura) GROVES. The GROVES grandchildren and great-grandchildren have come to know Bettsy as their grandmother and will miss her dearly: Holly (Andrew) SOUTHWELL and children Meredith and Madelaine, Adam (Meghan) GROVES and children Evan and Aaron, Sean (Joann) BROWN and daughter Katie, Carey (Robert) FRASER and daughter Courtney, Daniel (Michelle) and son Danny and Kelly GROVES. Bettsy was a respected teacher for many years at Brock and Port Perry High Schools. She was very proud to have achieved her B.A. at the age of 62. Her life and energies were committed to family, church and community. The family will receive Friends at the Mangan Funeral Home, Beaverton (705-426-5777) on Wednesday from 7 to 9 p.m. and on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at St. Andrew's United Church, 523 Simcoe Street, Beaverton on Friday at 2 p.m. Spring interment Smith Cemetery, Woodville. The family would appreciate memorial donations to St. Andrew's United Church or St. Paul's Anglican Church, Beaverton or charity of choice.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-26 published
MUNRO, Nora Margaret (DICKER)
At the Ross Memorial Hospital, Lindsay on Sunday, April 24, 2005. Nora (DICKER) MUNRO of Woodville, in her 91st year, was the beloved wife of the late Norman MUNRO. Beloved mother of Bob (Robert) of Kettleby. Loved grandma of Natalie and Charlotte both of Kettleby. Predeceased by sisters Blanche (Stewart) TASKER, Emily (Allan) NEWMAN and infant brother Norman DICKER. Loved aunt of Ron (Jennifer) TASKER, late Doug (Frances) TASKER, Beverley (Roy) MOORE and their families. Cousin of Laura MacMILLAN and the late Violet HURREN, Florence BARNES and Norman DICKER. The family will receive Friends at the Mangan Funeral Home, Beaverton (705-426-5777) on Tuesday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. and on Wednesday at the Woodville United Church from 1 p.m. until service time at 2 p.m. Interment Stone Church Cemetery, Beaverton. Memorial donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-15 published
MacARTHUR, Florence
Peacefully at the London Health Sciences Centre - University Campus, surrounded by her children, on Friday, May 13, 2005, Mrs. Florence Isabel (MacKAY) MacARTHUR of London in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Angus Rae MacARTHUR. Loving mother of Allan (Joy) MacARTHUR of Toronto, Brenda (David) ROTH of Ottawa and Gwen (Brian) McKNIGHT of London. Also loved by her grandchildren Michael and Amanda ROTH and Harley and Zoe McKNIGHT. Florence will be missed by her many Friends at Riverside United Church. Friends will be received at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, (2 blocks North of Oxford), on Monday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The Funeral Service will be conducted at Riverside United Church, 451 Dunedin Drive, London on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 at 12: 00 p.m. with Reverend Philip NEWMAN officiating. Interment Poplar Hill Cemetery, Poplar Hill.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-17 published
ROBERTSHAW, Anne
At the Cambridge Memorial Hospital on Saturday, May 14, 2005, at the age of 100 years. Anne ROBERTSHAW, formerly of Toronto, will be lovingly remembered by her niece Alma NEWMAN and her husband Duncan of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and their children Jane and Ian, her nephew John LAWTON of England, one cousin Ted LAWTON of England. Mississippi. ROBERTSHAW was a special aunt to Muriel and Bill TORRANCE of Cambridge and their family Barbara and Gordon HEUSER of Kansas City, Missouri. She was predeceased by her parents Mary and William ROBERTSHAW and one brother William. A family service was conducted at the Chapel of Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto. Arrangements entrusted to Coutts Funeral Home & Cremation Centre, Cambridge (519-621-1650).

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-23 published
KAGAN, Judith
On Saturday, May 21st, 2005. Beloved wife of the late Abraham. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Michael and Patricia KAGAN, and Mindy and Larry NEWMAN. Loving and devoted Bubby of Danny and Tracy, and Cory. Loving great-grandmother of Jordan and Sydney. Funeral service from Paperman and Sons, Montreal on Monday, May 23 at 10: 45 a.m. Burial at the Farband Labour Zionist Organization Cemetery, Montreal. Shiva in Toronto. Donations in her memory may be made to Simon Wiesenthal Centre for Holocaust Studies, 1-866-864-9735, Canadian Cancer Society, 514-255-5151, or Heart and Stroke Foundation, 1-888-473-4636.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-21 published
PARTRIDGE, Marjorie (née NEWMAN)
Peacefully at Etobicoke General Hospital on Sunday, June 19, 2005. Marjorie, loving wife of the late William. Beloved mother of Joan, Mary and her husband John, William Jr., and the late Robert. Cherished sister of Jack NEWMAN. Fondly remembered by her six grandchildren David, Karen, Johnny, Michael, Jori and Melanie, and great-grandmother of eight great-great-grand-children. Friends may call at the "Eglinton Chapel" of the McDougall and Brown Funeral HomeS, 1812 Eglinton Ave. West (at Dufferin St.), 416-782-1197, from 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday, June 21, 2005. Complete service and committal in the chapel at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, June 22, 2005. Cremation at a later date.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-25 published
NEWMAN, Dolly " Adele"

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-11 published
BARNETT, Arthur
Peacefully at his home in Tottenham, on Tuesday, August 9, 2005. Arthur BARNETT in his 86th year, beloved husband of Edna DONOVAN, and the late Helen BARNETT. Loving father of Patricia NEWMAN, and Anne and her husband John PYPER. Loved grandfather of Andrew, Katie, and Alex. Fondly remembered by Edna's family: Cindy and Theo D'HOLLANDER, Michelle, Ryan, Ethan, and Connor; Kathy and Mike BROWN, Mathew, David, and Heather; Jim and Jacquie DONOVAN, Katie, and Sean. Dear brother of Florence GOODE. Resting at Rod Abrams Funeral Home, 1666 Tottenham Rd., Tottenham, 905-936-3477 on Thursday, August 11, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in Christ Church Anglican, Tottenham 11 a.m. Friday, August 12, 2005. Cremation will follow.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-08 published
FOX, Joseph
(Retired from Sony Music) AtScarborough General Hospital on Tuesday, September 6, 2005. Joe, loving husband of Sheila. Devoted father of Rick (Debbie), Jennifer and the late Joe Jr. Cherished grandpa of Sarah and Ryan. Dear brother of Catherine (Jim NEWMAN.) Brother-in-law of Babs and Paul GARIEPY. Visitation at the Paul O'Conner Funeral Home, 1939 Lawrence Ave. E. (between Warden and Pharmacy) from 7-9 p.m. Thursday and 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Friday. A Mass to celebrate Joe's life will be offered at Saint Thomas More Church (Ellesmere, east of Markham Rd.) on Saturday morning at 11 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Our deepest gratitude to Dr. R. COLWILL and the nurses and staff of the Oncology Clinic at Scarborough General Hospital for their compassionate care over the last four years and the nursing staff of Tower 7 who cared for Joe during the past week. A very special 'Thank You' to Eileen for always being there. Donations to the Terry Fox Foundation or Scarborough General Oncology Unit would be appreciated.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-11 published
RICHARDS, Eric Oxford (October 14, 1972-September 8, 2005)
Passed away at Toronto on Thursday, September 8, 2005. Beloved son of Glenda RICHARDS (née WHITESIDE) and Scott RICHARDS (predeceased.) He is also lovingly remembered by Evelyn ZUBEK (Godmother) and Wayne ZUBEK, Lori NEWMAN (spouse), Joy NEWMAN, Uncle Derek and Aunt Merle RICHARDS and family, Linda DAWE and Ashley ALVERO, Stephen and David KELLEY and family, and Wayne BURNETT. Gareth BENNETT and Cara PIFKO and Eric's bands, the Elastocitizens, My Dear Heretic and Thieves Crossing will cherish the memory of his close Friendship. Thoughtful, generous and kind-hearted, Eric will be missed by all those lives he touched. His sense of humour enabled him to transcend his many physical challenges. Now he is free to soar. A special thank you to the doctors, nurses and staff at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto Western Hospital and Toronto General Hospital who enabled Eric to overcome many obstacles throughout his life. The family wishes to extend their sincere appreciation to the Toronto General Hospital Dialysis Unit staff (Eaton South,) and Betty KELLMAN, R.N. for all the dedicated care and support. Donations in honour of Eric's life may be made to the Kidney Foundation of Canada, 15 Gervais Drive, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario. M3C 1Y8, Toronto Humane Society, 11 River Street, Toronto, Ontario. M5A 4C2 or Toronto Zoo, 361A Old Finch Avenue, Scarborough, Ontario. M1B 3K6. A Celebration of Life service will be held in the near future and invitations will be sent. My Life Flows On In Endless Song

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-15 published
NEWMAN, Alan Roy, P.Eng.
Suddenly on Friday, September 9, 2005. Alan, most beloved best friend, cherished and adored husband of Susan; loving son of Enid and the late Al NEWMAN, special brother of David (Angela,) dear uncle of Tara, Jessica and Kyle of Windsor, Ontario. Alan had been a tender and caring son-in-law to Minnie and Earl HALFORD (both deceased) and a supportive brother-in-law to Nancy. Alan was deeply grateful for his dear Friends Dr. Gabe and Shayne SARDI. He will be sorely missed by all his Friends, especially his co-workers at Scepter Manufacturing where he designed and developed projects in partnership with countries around the world. A remembrance of Alan's life will be held on Saturday, September 17 at 11 o'clock at The Anglican Church Of St. Clement, Eglinton, 59 Briar Hill Ave. If desired, please send donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 or to the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir, 60 Simcoe Street, Toronto, Ontario M5J 2H5 where Alan's fundraising efforts were near and dear to his heart.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-24 published
HACKETT, Linda " Lynn"
Passed away, after a brave battle with breast cancer, on Thursday, September 22, 2005, at the young age of 56. Loving wife of Craig NEWMAN. Linda was loved and will be sadly missed by many including her guide dog Ginny. Friends may call at the Giffen-Mack "Danforth" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2570 Danforth Ave. (at Main St. subway), 416-698-3121, on Monday, September 26th from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, October 1 at 11: 00 a.m. at Glen Rhodes United Church, 1470 Gerrard St. E. (1 block west of Coxwell), 416-465-3755. In lieu of flowers, donations through Glen Rhodes United Church will be used for Linda's Memorial Marker.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-16 published
EMERSON, John Alexander MacLean
With great sadness, but thanksgiving for a life well lived, the family announces the peaceful passing of John on Friday, October 14, 2005. Devoted and cherished husband of Sandra (née WOLFE) proud and loving father of his 'troops', sons: Bruce, Brian and Douglas; admiring father-in-law of Margaret and Natasha; and grandfather of Kate DAVIS. John will be deeply missed by brother Gordon and his wife Barbara; sister Florence and husband Richard NEWMAN, sister Margaret and husband Roderick McLEAN and brother-in-law Joseph WOLFE and wife Willa. Many nieces and nephews will also fondly remember him. John was an esteemed educator in Etobicoke Schools, the Ontario Ministry of Education and the Faculty of Education, University of Toronto. He was also Past President and Honorary Life Member of the Canadian Society of Education through Art and the first recipient of the Ray Blackwell Excellence in Art Education Award; Past President of the Streetsville Historical Society; recipient of the Ontario Heritage Foundation Certificate of Achievement and the Mississauga Heritage Foundation's Member's Choice Award. Music was an integral component of John's life he was a long-time member of the Streetsville United Church choir, and organist at Seabreeze Community Church, Lake of Bays. John's boundless energy, imagination and capabilities inspired a countless stream of projects at his beloved Streetsville and Seabreeze homes. His far-reaching intellectual curiosity enriched his family's education and experience. We extend our thanks and gratitude to Dr. Donna REECE at Princess Margaret Hospital, to the Haemodialysis Team at Credit Valley Hospital, and to the caregivers who assisted at home for their support throughout John's illness. The family will receive Friends at Lee Funeral Home Limited, 258 Queen St. S., Streetsville on Sunday, October 16, and Monday, October 17, 2005, from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. The Funeral Service and reception will take place at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday, October 18, 2005, at Streetsville United Church, 274 Queen St. S., Mississauga. If desired, the family would prefer that expressions of sympathy be made through a donation to the charity of your choice. "And ever has it been, that love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation."

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-19 published
NEWMAN, Roy

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-04 published
WRIGHT, Susan Lynn
Passed away at the Haliburton Hospital on Wednesday, November 2, 2005 after a valiant two month fight with cancer. Sue was in her 52nd year. Beloved wife of Tim of Halls Lake. Missed by her two sons Kevin and his wife Chriss of Whitby, Greg and his wife Jennifer of Oshawa. Proud grandmother of Brandon and Jordan. Greatly missed by her mom Evelyn NEWMAN of Toronto (predeceased by her father Edgar), by her brother Dave and sister-in-law Brenda and their children Jennifer and Stephanie, and by her half-sister Linda and her husband Dave. A Service to Celebrate Sue's Life will be held at the Minden Curling Club on Sunday, November 6, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. Reception will follow at the Curling Club. Cremation has taken place. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family and can be arranged through the Gordon A. Monk Funeral Home Ltd., 127 Main Street, P.O. Box 427, Minden, Ontario K0M 2K0 (1-888-588-5777) or at www.gordonmonkfuneralhome.com.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-07 published
KEARNS, Florence Elizabeth (née FARR)
Peacefully at Avalon Care Centre, Orangeville on Saturday, November 5, 2005 at the age of 86 years. Florence KEARNS (née FARR,) beloved wife of the late William KEARNS. Dear mother of Ron KEARNS of Toronto, Diane HEAVENS and her husband Terry of Orangeville, Wayne KEARNS and his wife Marlene of Jackson's Point, Sharon NEWMAN and her husband Winston of Fonthill, Gail KEARNS of Toronto and Bill KEARNS of Orangeville. Loving grandmother of Rodger (Janice), Mark (Melanie), Scott, Shari (Lorne), Darren (Tracy), Jeremy (Amanda), Tanya (David), Sarah, Aaron, Jeremy, and Sarah (Dakila) and great-grandmother of Mackenzie, Liam, Fergus, Keara, Erika, Trinity, Jesse and Khira. Dear sister of Helen COOMBER (Bern) and sister-in-law of Margaret OWEN and Natalie KEARNS. Predeceased by her brother Lorne FARR. Resting at the Taylor Funeral Home, 20846 Dalton Road, Sutton, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Monday. Funeral Mass will be celebrated in the Church of the Immaculate Conception, 20916 Dalton Road, Sutton, Tuesday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Briar Hill Cemetery, Sutton. Donations to your charity of choice would be appreciated by the family.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-09 published
He made his mark on city and nation
By WARREN Gerard, Special To The Star
Beland HONDERICH rose from plain beginnings to become one of the most influential Canadians of his day, using his power as publisher of Canada's largest newspaper to influence the agenda in politics and business at every level.
At the same time he set new standards for informed, in-depth, responsible reporting.
HONDERICH, publisher of the Toronto Star for 22 of his 52 years at the paper, died in Vancouver at 86 yesterday following a stroke.
HONDERICH was a fiercely private man, almost reclusive, but that didn't keep him from being an impatient perfectionist, a leader whose principal ethic was work.
The Star was his life, his passion.
Among his many honours, and one he treasured, was his election in 1986 to the News Hall of Fame by journalists across Canada for leading "Canadian newspapers into a new direction, taking readers backstage to explore and explain the current events that shaped their lives."
HONDERICH left the publisher's office in 1988, going on to become board chairman of the newspaper and its parent company, Torstar Corp. He retired from that position in 1994, but maintained an office across from the newsroom on the fifth floor at One Yonge St. until 1999.
Beland Hugh HONDERICH was born in Kitchener on November 25, 1918, and grew up in the nearby village of Baden. He was proud of his pioneer roots -- Mennonites from Germany who found religious freedom in Waterloo County in the early 1800s.
"My father was a man who stood for religious freedom, and I am proud to follow in his footsteps," HONDERICH once said.
His father, John HONDERICH, was ostracized in the staunchly traditional Mennonite community because he and young Beland went to hear a speaker from another Amish sect. The shunning, as it was called, meant that other Reform Mennonites were forbidden to sit down to eat with them or to shake their hands.
Nor did his father quite fit in with his thrifty, hard-working neighbours in other ways. A sometime beekeeper, homespun village philosopher, printer and pamphleteer for liberal causes, he was "not a very good provider" in a community where work was next to godliness.
His mother, Rae, was the family's main breadwinner. She was the local telephone operator, a job that included the use of a train station in Baden which served as a home for the HONDERICHs and their six children. HONDERICH recalled that the family never went hungry, but there was little money for anything but food.
He gathered coal along the railway tracks to heat their home and carried water in summer to gangs of workers repairing the roads. In the mornings, he worked around the Canadian National Railway station, sweeping and cleaning up for 40 cents a day.
Despite winning a regional debating championship with his sister Ruth -- they defended the proposition that the Soviet way of life was superior to the American way -- he struggled to pass high school entrance examinations.
HONDERICH didn't do well in high school. And it didn't help that he had to hitchhike 16 kilometres to and from school in Kitchener. As a result, his attendance was spotty and his marks were poor. He was demoted in his second year to a commercial course "where at least I learned to type."
Discouraged, he dropped out of school and got a job as a farmhand at the beginning of the Great Depression, much to his mother's displeasure. "You can do better than that," he recalled her saying on more than one occasion.
The farm job didn't last. His introduction to reporting came about because his father was hard of hearing and took his son to public meetings and political rallies to take notes. It taught the young HONDERICH, who was later to battle deafness himself, to write quickly and accurately.
He inherited a Kitchener-Waterloo Record paper route from one of his brothers, which led him to become the paper's correspondent for Baden at 10 cents a column inch. He created news by organizing a softball team and covering its games for the paper.
When he was 17, fires on successive nights destroyed two barns owned by a prominent Baden farmer. Arson was suspected and the young HONDERICH's coverage so impressed his editors that they offered him a tryout as a cub reporter in Kitchener at $15 a week.
He showed up for work in a mismatched jacket and pants and with his two front teeth missing from a tough hockey game the night before. He didn't shine as a reporter.
The publisher, W.J. MOTZ, concluded after a week that HONDERICH was in the wrong line of work and told city editor Art LOW/LOWE/LOUGH to fire him. But LOW/LOWE/LOUGH saw something in the youngster and persuaded MOTZ to give him a second chance.
LOW/LOWE/LOUGH worked HONDERICH hard. He gave him an assignment each evening to go along with his day job. Ed HAYES, who worked at the Record in those days, recalled in an interview that HONDERICH (or "Bee" as he was nicknamed) was determined to succeed.
"Each reporter was supposed to turn in a story every afternoon at the end of his shift. Bee wasn't satisfied with that. He'd turn in two, three or more.
"He was the darling of the city desk."
As time went by, he improved, becoming more and more confident. He was also developing into a perfectionist. So much so, in fact, that he'd bet an ice cream with an assistant city editor that he would find nothing that needed to be changed in a HONDERICH story.
At first, he recalled, it cost him a lot of ice cream cones, but later he rarely had to pay off.
In those early days at the Record, HONDERICH knew he had a country bumpkin image. So when he had saved enough money, he went to a quality menswear store and asked the manager to show him how to dress. He bought a dark pin-striped suit, complete with vest, and that look became his uniform in life.
A fellow staffer at the Record recalled HONDERICH borrowing a bike from a delivery boy and speeding off to an assignment in his pin-striped suit.
And co-workers described him as a loner who rarely headed for the beer parlour with the boys after work, though he was known to sip a scotch on special occasions. Mostly, he went to Norm Jones' restaurant for a milkshake.
Though he spent most of his time working, he taught Sunday school at a Presbyterian church, and served as secretary for a minor hockey league.
This involvement brought him into contact with Milt DUNNELL, the legendary Star sports columnist, who had made a name for himself at the Stratford Beacon Herald before heading for Toronto. He told HONDERICH that the Star was looking for reporters to replace those who had enlisted to serve in World War 2. HONDERICH, who had been rejected by the Royal Canadian Air Force and merchant marine because of poor eyesight and hearing, applied to the Star in 1943 and was hired as a reporter for $35 a week.
He was proud that the Kitchener city council gave him a vote of thanks for his fair reporting. And MOTZ, the publisher who thought he would never make it in the newspaper business, begged him not to go.
Stepping into the grandly marbled lobby of the Star's building at 80 King St. W., HONDERICH recalled that he was "scared as hell." But he was in the right place. This was the world of Joe ATKINSON.
As publisher, Joseph E. ATKINSON had guided the paper through most of the first half-century and was seen by friend and foe alike as one of the country's leading reformers. It turned out that the publisher and his new employee had some things in common.
Both had come from large, impoverished, God-fearing families in small-town Ontario, and quit school early to put food on the table. "One thing I had in common with Joe ATKINSON," HONDERICH recalled, "is that I knew need."
There was a major difference, however. ATKINSON was a star of Canadian journalism in 1899 when the new owners of the Toronto Evening Star hired him at 34 to run the paper. HONDERICH was 24 when he arrived at the paper, an unproven asset at the time.
But he didn't take long to prove himself. His work was soon noticed by Harry C. HINDMARSH, ATKINSON's son-in-law and the man who ran the newsroom.
HINDMARSH sent HONDERICH to Saskatchewan for the election that brought Tommy Douglas and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (later to become the New Democratic Party) to power in 1944.
The next year he was sent back to do a progress report on North America's first socialist government. His stories were so enthusiastically some thought naively -- positive that the Saskatchewan government asked permission to reprint them.
They also caught the eye of Joe ATKINSON, whose reform ideas were at home with the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation's, although he never endorsed the party at election time. HONDERICH was marked as someone worth watching. He was asked to fill in as an editorial writer, the newspaper job he enjoyed most of all.
Some critics said HONDERICH's writing lacked flair or style. But it was clear. He explained complicated matters in simple, accurate terms. His idea was to dive right into a story, delivering the promise of the headline in the first paragraph.
In his reporting career, HONDERICH covered a wide variety of assignments, collecting his share of scoops, enough to impress HINDMARSH. In 1946, he called in HONDERICH, congratulated him on a story, then remarked, "Oh, by the way, the financial editor left today. I'd like you to start as financial editor on Monday."
"But I don't know the difference between a stock and a bond," HONDERICH replied.
"You'll learn," HINDMARSH said.
HONDERICH told HINDMARSH he would take the job on the condition that he be allowed to go back to feature writing if it didn't work out.
"If you don't make a go of it, you'll go out the door," HINDMARSH said in a menacing way.
It goes without saying that HONDERICH made a go of it.
One of the first things he noticed from his new desk was a tailor at work in a building across King St. He decided his business section would write for that tailor, for the ordinary person.
His News Hall of Fame citation noted: "He led in turning the writing and presentation of financial news into a readable subject in terms that interest the average reader." He criticized the stock exchange, questioned banking methods, recommended profit sharing, and supported credit unions and other co-operatives.
But when there were major stories to be covered, HINDMARSH often took HONDERICH out of his financial department and sent him all over the globe -- to Newfoundland on the eve of its joining Canada, to Argentina where press freedom was under attack, to Asia with Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent for the first round-the-world trip taken by a Canadian prime minister, and to Britain for the funeral of George VI.
In 1948, HONDERICH, along with 12 other employees, chartered the first Canadian local of the American Newspaper Guild. As president of the union, he signed the first contract with the Star.
Some members of the union were suspicious, however, thinking that as financial editor he was "a company stooge" trying to make sure the Guild didn't fall into the hands of disgruntled left-wingers.
They weren't aware, however, that he knew all about bad working conditions because he had done both day and night assignments as a young reporter in Kitchener.
He served three terms as Guild president and helped win better pay and working conditions. Later, on the other side of the negotiating table, he continued to believe in the need for an organized newsroom, although that view was severely tested in a bitter strike in HONDERICH had become a major force in the newsroom when ATKINSON died in 1948 after nearly 50 years as publisher of a racy paper with principles.
His death, however, created a crisis at the paper. ATKINSON's will had left the Star to a charitable foundation to be administered by his trustees. However, the Ontario Conservative government passed the Charitable Gifts Act, which said no charity could own more than 10 per cent of a business.
The government may have viewed the will as an attempt to escape death duties, but more likely the legislation was an attempt to muzzle the Star, a liberal thorn in the Tory side.
Nevertheless, it became a distinct possibility the paper might be sold to outside interests. Bidders, including beer baron E.P. TAILOR/TAYLOR, were lining up for a chance to buy what had become Canada's most profitable daily.
The Star was granted stays of execution however, and HINDMARSH, the founder's son-in-law, succeeded ATKINSON until his own death in 1956. In the HINDMARSH years, the paper seemed to lose direction and much of its fairness, particularly in the reporting of politics. The paper's reputation was going downhill.
Meanwhile, HONDERICH had been appointed editor-in-chief in 1955 and a couple of years later he was appointed to the board, after HINDMARSH's sudden death. It put him in the position of becoming an owner of the paper.
Walter GORDON, an accountant who was to become finance minister in Lester Pearson's Liberal government, worked out a plan for the trustees to buy the Star by putting up $1 million among the six of them, including HONDERICH. The paper was valued at $25.5 million.
At the time, the sale price was the most ever paid in Canada for a newspaper, and it turned out to be a steal. Under HONDERICH's leadership, Torstar, the Star's parent company, would become a more than $1 billion enterprise over the next 30-plus years.
For readers and the staff, the HONDERICH years had begun, although he didn't take over as publisher until 1966. Immediately, however, he went about remaking the paper. Headlines didn't scream any more, and the silly and the sensational disappeared from the paper.
HONDERICH was putting his stamp on the Star. Reporting only the facts wasn't good enough. He demanded thorough backgrounding of stories to make them understandable to the average reader. Or, as he said, for "my barber."
He created a great newsroom that included sports columnist DUNNELL and leading Canadian writers such as Pierre BERTON, Peter NEWMAN, Charles TEMPLETON and Nathan COHEN, as well as award-winning cartoonist Duncan MacPHERSON.
HONDERICH returned the Star to the principles of Joseph E. ATKINSON, including a reform-centred editorial policy. Unemployment, affordable housing, adequate welfare benefits, medicare, pensions, minority rights, the need for an independent Canada -- these became subjects he demanded be dealt with on a daily basis.
In one of his rare public appearances, he told a group of editors in 1961 that "the basic function of a newspaper is to inform, to tell the public what is happening in the community, in the nation and in the world. You will notice I did not use the word, entertain." He felt that television had made entertainment a secondary function for newspapers. "How much better then, to concentrate on what we can do best, and that is to inform the public."
The change was most evident in the Star's treatment of politics and economics. The background feature gradually became commonplace in North American journalism, and a poll of U.S. editors rated the Star one of the world's 10 top foreign papers.
Critics of the HONDERICH way -- many of them highly placed in the paper -- couldn't wait for HONDERICH's grey, humourless Star to fail, but they were doomed to disappointment, just as surely as the Star's competitor -- the unchanging Telegram -- was doomed to extinction.
Not only did the Star's circulation grow, so did its profits.
Honesty and integrity were words that most people associated with HONDERICH. But many on his staff found him a demanding taskmaster, an uncompromising and often difficult man to deal with. There was never any doubt that Beland HONDERICH was the boss. He wasn't one for chit-chat.
Early in his career as publisher, he all but cut himself off from the social whirl of movers and shakers. He admitted to becoming almost reclusive after finding himself challenged at social functions and parties to defend Star policies he felt needed no defence, especially since he had put them into place.
But he never felt that way about the public at large. The so-called Little Guy could get him on the phone more easily than a celebrity could. His home number was in the book. And in the days when the Star was an afternoon paper, it wasn't unusual for an evening editor to get a call from HONDERICH, who in turn had received an irate call at home from a reader whose paper hadn't been delivered.
The paper would be delivered by taxi, and the taxi company was instructed to report to the editor the moment the paper had arrived. Then HONDERICH would phone the reader to make sure he was satisfied.
The first part of his 12-hour working day was spent poring over page proofs, quarrelling about leads of stories, questioning something in the 25th paragraph, asking for more background, and demanding follow-ups.
He was articulate, often painfully so for the person at the other end of his complaints. His editors took great pleasure when he demanded "antidotal" leads. He meant anecdotal leads.
Notes with the heavy-handed BHH signature on them rained from his office.
The difficulty everyone had in pleasing him and the way he prowled the newsroom won him the nickname "The Beast." And he was called "Drac" by some editors who thought he, like the vampire, sucked the staff dry.
When the paper departed from what the reader had come to believe was a Star tradition, he took to the typewriter to explain the reasons himself. In 1972, for example, he put his initials on an editorial that explained why the Star was supporting Progressive Conservative Robert Stanfield over Liberal Pierre Trudeau in the federal election.
In his rare public appearances, the nasal flatness of his voice often disguised the passion he felt for a subject. However, he was an effective spokesman for the causes he championed. In defending the Star's strong stand on economic nationalism, he told the Canadian Club it was based on the need to preserve the differences between Canada and the United States.
"I think our society tends to be more compassionate, somewhat less extreme and certainly less violent," he said. "We put more emphasis on basic human needs such as health insurance and pensions."
He warned that increased U.S. ownership of Canadian resources would endanger our ability to maintain those differences.
In a 1989 speech at Carleton University in Ottawa, he caused a stir when he argued that objectivity in newspapers was neither possible nor desirable.
"No self-respecting newspaper deliberately distorts or slants the news to make it conform to its own point of view," he said. "But you cannot publish a newspaper without making value judgments on what news you select to publish and how you present it in the paper.
"And these value judgments reflect a view of society -- a point of view if you will -- that carries as much weight, if not more, than what is said on the editorial page."
Just as ATKINSON used the news pages to popularize reform ideas, HONDERICH used them as a weapon in his own causes.
One example was his reaction to a document leaked to him outlining then-prime minister Brian Mulroney's government strategy on free trade. It said the communications strategy "should rely less on educating the public than getting across the message that the free trade initiative is a good idea -- in other words a selling job."
HONDERICH made sure all aspects of free trade were put under the kind of scrutiny the government wanted to avoid, particularly the possible effects on employment and social benefits.
Simon REISMAN, the bellicose chief trade negotiator, accused HONDERICH of personally waging a vendetta against free trade. He said HONDERICH used the Star "in a manner that contradicts every sense of fairness and decency in the newspaper business."
In reply, the unrepentant publisher said: "The role of a newspaper, as I see it, is to engage in the full and frank dissemination of the news and opinion from the perspective of its values and particular view of society. It should report the news fairly and accurately, reflect all pertinent facts and opinions and not only what the official establishment thinks and says."
As publisher, he demonstrated an impressive business savvy for a man who once said he hardly knew the difference between a stock and a bond. In 1972, he moved the paper to new quarters at One Yonge St.
And later, in his position as chief executive officer of the parent company, Torstar Corp., he acquired Harlequin Enterprises, the world's largest publisher of romance books, and 15 community newspapers to add to the 14 the Star already owned in the Toronto area.
At the same time, HONDERICH still was very much making his mark in journalism. He was the first in Canada to introduce a bureau of accuracy and to appoint an ombudsman to represent the reader in the newsroom. In a wider sense, he was the main force behind the establishment of the Ontario Press Council, where readers can take their complaints to an independent body.
As well as his election to the News Hall of Fame, he was honoured in other ways, receiving doctors of law degrees from Wilfrid Laurier and York universities, and the Order of Canada in 1987.
HONDERICH was married three times, the last time on New Year's Day 2000 to Rina WHELAN of Vancouver, the city where he lived until his death. He had two sons: John, who followed in his father's footsteps to become publisher of the Star, and David, an entrepreneur and one daughter, Mary, a philosophy and English teacher. He also had six grandchildren.
Even into his eighties, HONDERICH exercised daily and loved to play bridge, golf and fish.
Charles E. PASCAL, executive director of the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, recalled golfing with HONDERICH after he had entered his eighties. PASCAL was in his mid-fifties.
"I expected to be slowed down by playing with a couple of guys in their seventies and one in his eighties," PASCAL said. "Bee, as with everything else, played golf with determination, focus and tenacity. I was quite impressed with his golfing. He was very competitive."
After HONDERICH stepped down as publisher in 1988, and as a director of Torstar in 1995, he lost none of his zeal for pursuing causes. He did this through the Atkinson Charitable Foundation and his own personal philanthropy.
"His role on our board was absolutely essential, forceful, radical," PASCAL said.
"I had the sense that the older he got he became more and more impatient. He was impatient, just impatient, about all that is yet to be done by governments and others to reduce the inequities for those who are disadvantaged through no fault of their own."
He was generous in his giving and, as was his character, he had no interest in public recognition or praise.
"He just had no time whatsoever for personal recognition," PASCAL recalled.
"I think he would have liked to have been around forever if for no other reason than to contribute more."
At HONDERICH's request, there will be a cremation, after which the family will hold a small private gathering to celebrate his life.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-14 published
Linda HACKETT, 56: 'Upbeat' volunteer
Even chemotherapy couldn't dull Linda HACKETT's appreciation of life
Her many Friends recall an indomitable spirit
By Catherine DUNPHY, Lifelines
Linda HACKETT was just one of 375 volunteers who deliver 30,000 copies of Beach Metro News community newspaper. She'd been distributing 80 copies throughout 59 Edgewood, the low-rise apartment building where she lived, since September, 2001 as reliable as rain.
The paper's general manager, Sheila BLINOFF, had no idea HACKETT was blind until one day last spring when she showed up at the office to have her picture taken for the paper with her new guide dog Ginny.
"She was always so upbeat," BLINOFF said. "She told me it was a good thing we were taking her picture that day when she had her hair because she was starting a new round of chemotherapy the next week."
It was not her first run-in with the disease. She beat back advanced skin cancer in 1980 by having skin and muscle removed from her shoulder, then fought breast cancer with a total mastectomy in March, 2003, followed by chemo and radiation later that year. When the cancer flared again the next summer, she signed on for more chemotherapy. But on May 25 she was told her cancer was back, and this time, it wouldn't be going away.
Nevertheless, two days later she attended the regular monthly seniors' lunch program run by Meals Here and There, where she announced it was Ginny's birthday, to great fanfare.
The next day she gamely went out in a borrowed wheelchair to the annual Beaches Triangle neighbourhood garage sale, where she scored a keyboard. She loved garage sales, but this purchase was a special find for her because the chemo she had been undergoing had left her fingers numb and she wanted to exercise them.
But that night -- May 28 -- she was felled by a massive stroke and hospitalized again. In mid-June the doctors told her she had three months to a year to live and would never walk again. She immediately demanded physiotherapy to prove them wrong even as she was admitted to Bridgepoint's palliative care ward. By July she was organizing a Yahoo group to co-ordinate her visitors.
When a young, inexperienced nurse confessed she didn't know what to do with a blind patient, HACKETT said to her: "We have a hug."
But she knew she was slipping away.
"Colleen, I don't want to die," she told her friend Colleen PEACOCK, who heads Meals Here and There, where HACKETT used to do volunteer office work.
HACKETT's husband, Craig NEWMAN, moved into her room to be with her in the last few weeks. He slept on a chair at nights, going home during the day only to care for Ginny.
"Linda was scared," he said. "I would be too, to be blind and not be able to see if a nurse went by, to ask for help. She would have done it for me."
She died September 22 at 56. Her death stunned her Friends. If anyone was going to beat cancer, they thought, it would be her. She kept telling them she would. "I'm a fighter," she'd say. "They (doctors) don't know me, I'm going to beat this."
Of course, a lot of courageous people dealing with a cancer diagnosis say words like that. But they aren't HACKETT, who'd had to fight for everything in her life, including being able to stay in her adopted homeland of Canada. Not only did she win that battle, she also exacted in the process a promise from a cabinet minister to change the law.
Fighting back, fighting hard, had been her credo, or maybe her mantra, certainly her modus operandi since she was 10 months old and had both her eyes removed when retinal blastoma robbed her of her eyesight.
She was a timid girl from La Jolla hanging around the University of California's Berkeley campus when Mike YALE first met her in 1968. He, too, was blind but, unlike her at the time, he was a firebrand. YALE was a journalist and activist involved in the free speech, anti-war movements who was visiting Berkeley after moving to Toronto and being accepted into law school.
"Lynn was shy. I don't think she had finished high school and didn't have a lot of prospects. She did a lot of babysitting then," YALE recalled.
Her abusive father had left when she was still a toddler; her mother was an invalid and she had been raised by protective grandparents. So he was shocked to find HACKETT on his Toronto doorstep six weeks later. They were together three years, during which time HACKETT got her first guide dog and they spent a year living and working a farm with sighted Friends.
They had broken up -- but remained good Friends -- when HACKETT got a letter from the immigration appeal board telling her she couldn't stay in Canada because she was an epileptic. YALE leapt into action, phoning 23 members of Parliament over one weekend at their homes or their offices. The late Alexander ROSS, who wrote a city column for this newspaper, also championed her cause.
"The Immigration Appeal Board has decided that Lynn HACKETT must be deported and it makes me ashamed of my country," he wrote in November, 1972.
"The maddening thing is," he wrote in the same column, "she was disqualified on grounds which even department officials agree are obsolete -- the prohibition against epilepsy, a condition which Lynn admits to, but which doesn't bother her."
When the smoke cleared, HACKETT was deported November 9, but allowed back into Canada 24 hours later on a special visa granted to her by then-Immigration Minister Bryce MacKASEY, who vowed to lift the immigration ban on epileptics during the next session of Parliament. "I made it. I'm really home," she told a Toronto Star reporter.
Then she proceeded to make quite a life for herself. After working for $75 a week doing telephone customer relations with the Capitol Record Club, she moved to A and M Records and then to a position as an overseas telephone operator with Bell. She took up bicycle riding with the Tandem Bicycle Club for fun, belonged to a ham radio club, made jewellery and loved camping. With Yale, she was involved in starting Blind Organization of Ontario with Self Help Tactics in 1975.
"The whole point of The Blind Organization of Ontario with Self Help Tactics was to educate blind people to stand on their own feet and fight for themselves," he said.
When she was laid off from Bell in 2000, she began volunteering. She helped sort shoes to be sent to Cuba for one charity and, in 2002, she brought her Braille writer to PEACOCK's office to take down phone messages. Soon she was reminding clients of the dinners and scheduling rides.
"She had it all organized on thick cardboard," PEACOCK said. "I was amazed. After a while I forgot she was blind."
She never missed the movie night at her church, Glen Rhodes United. The minister there, Susan THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, was thrilled when HACKETT brought Ginny to the Sunday school and agreed to read at a special Lent candlelight service called Service of Shadows.
"I called Lynn and dictated the reading to her, she wrote it down in Braille, learned it and that night, out of the shadows, light appeared and her beautiful voice filled the room," THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said. "It was magical."
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON led the funeral service and PEACOCK provided a final resting place for their friend in her family's plot in nearby Saint John's Cemetery. Donations for a marker can be sent to Susan. J. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, c/o Glen Rhodes United Church, 1470 Gerrard St. E., Toronto.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-11 published
NEWMAN, Thomas Arthur
Passed away at Stevenson Memorial Hospital, Alliston, Ontario on Friday, December 9, 2005, in his 80th year. Beloved husband of Irene LEGGETT for 54 years. Loved father of Rick and Sandy NEWMAN, Ken and Barb NEWMAN, Linda and Chris GOFFORTH. Loving grandpa of Derek, Robert, Leanne, Jessica and Melissa. Dear brother of Ernest NEWMAN and Reta NEWMAN and predeceased by Hank and Gordon NEWMAN. Resting at W. John Thomas Funeral Home, 244 Victoria Street E., Alliston on Tuesday, December 13, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, December 14, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. followed by cremation. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-14 published
NEWMAN, Catherine M.
Suddenly passed away on Monday, December 12, 2005 at the Scarborough General Hospital. Beloved wife of James A. Loving mother of Lisa VAN LUBEEK, Douglas and his wife Francine NEWMAN. Cherished nanna of Jessica, Caitlin, Elizabeth and Nicole. Predeceased by her brother Joseph FOX. Cremation. Funeral arrangements have been entrusted to the McDougall and Brown Funeral Home, 416-267-4656.

  N... Names     NE... Names     NEW... Names     Welcome Home

NEWMAN - All Categories in OGSPI

NEW surnames continued to 05new003.htm