NELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-02 published
NELAN, Norman
Passed away peacefully, Sunday, May 1, 2005, at General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood, in his 91st year. Loving husband to Joyce NELAN of Wasaga Beach. Dear father to Terry LOVE, Toronto, Gail LAVALLEY, Montreal, Brian NELAN, Toronto, Moira DEDRICK, Caledon, Rob NELAN, Ajax, Laura DEMPSEY, Mount Albert. Grandpa to seven grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Watts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 132 River Road E., Wasaga Beach (705-429-1040). Memorial Service will be held at a later date. Cremation has taken place. Donations may be made to the General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood, as expressions of sympathy.

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NELHAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-02 published
WARD, Beecher Gordon
Peacefully, surrounded by the love of his sister and brother at London Health Sciences Centre, University Campus on Thursday, March 31, 2005, Beecher Gordon WARD. Dear brother of Elizabeth McKENZIE of London and Port Stanley and John Owen WARD of London. Lovingly remembered by his cousins Doug and Madeleine WARD of Grand Bend, Bud and Marg WARD and Bob and Joan WARD all of London and by his dear Friends Jill and Tom HAYMAN of London. Visitors will be received at the John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, London on Saturday morning, April 2, 2005 from 10 o'clock until the time of the funeral service at 11 o'clock with Reverend Donald MCINNES/MCINNIS of New St. James Presbyterian Church officiating. Interment in Woodland Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. A heartfelt thank you to the staff and nurses of the 4th Floor, University Hospital, St. Joseph's Health Care Centre - London Regional Mental Health, Dr. Jane CUMMING and Susan McLELLAN, R.N., London Regional Cancer Centre, Dr. Diane LOGAN, Dr. Mark NELHAM and Triage nurse, Nancy FULTON, Community Care Access Center, Kari THORNTON, Lorraine McVEIGH and nurses. Beecher fought his illness with great courage and dignity and we will never forget the many kindnesses shown to him. "May God bless him always."

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NELHAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-29 published
LISTER, Elizabeth Alice " Betty" (née PEARSON)
Peacefully, at South Huron Hospital, Exeter, Tuesday, June 28, 2005, Elizabeth Alice "Betty" (PEARSON) LISTER, of Grand Cove Estates, Grand Bend, age 76. Beloved wife of the late John Phillip LISTER (1993.) Loved mother of Mary CURRY and her husband Bruce and loving grandma of Michelle Lynne HUGHES, all of Mississauga. Remembered by her many nieces, nephews and their families; her special Friends Zeta QUIGLEY of Whitby and Phillip and Inge ROWE of London. Predeceased by brothers Harold and Clifford PEARSON, parents John and Alice (COATES) PEARSON. At Elizabeth's request, there will be no visitation. Cremation. A Memorial Funeral Mass will be held at Immaculate Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church, Grand Bend, Saturday, July 9, 2005, at 10: 30 a.m. The Reverend Father John KULATHINKAL Celebrant. Interment Mount Peace Cemetery, Mississauga. If desired, memorial donations to the Cancer Society or charity of choice would be appreciated. The family would like to thank Dr. NELHAM and nurses at South Huron Hospital for their kind care and concern. T. Harry Hoffman and Sons Funeral Home, Dashwood, entrusted with arrangements. Condolences at www.hoffmanfuneralhome.com

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NELISCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-13 published
NELISCHER, John (July 10, 1933 to October 11, 2005)
Dear brother to Joseph, Anne, Leonie, Gloria, Pauline and Rosalie. Predeceased by brother Stephan and parents Appolonia and Anthony. "Great" Uncle John to 55 nieces and nephews, including Anita and Maurice NELISCHER. Viewing at 10 a.m. Friday, October 14th at Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Rd. Funeral 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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NELISSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-02 published
HORNE, Harold
Peacefully at York Central Hospital, Richmond Hill on Tuesday, May 31, 2005, in his 88th year. Beloved husband of Grace. Dear father of Lynda and her husband Bill FINES, Doug and his wife Yvonne, Donna and her husband Dru NELISSEN. Dear grandfather of Stacey, Laura, Robyn, Ryan, Deanna and Dustin and great-grandfather of Nicholas and Julia, Emmett and Lauren. A Memorial Service will be held at Marshall Funeral Home, 10366 Yonge Street (4th traffic light north of Major Mackenzie Drive) on Saturday, June 4 at 3 p.m. Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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NELLES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-31 published
TOPHAM, Robert " Bobbie" John
Robert " Bobbie" John TOPHAM passed away suddenly at Chatham Kent Health Alliance on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 at the age of 79 years. Beloved husband of Leona BROWN- TOPHAM and the late Deloris and Marilyn Jean (CAMPBELL) TOPHAM. Loving father of Dawn STILTZ, Robert (Jayne), Rick TOPHAM, Judy (Don) NELLES, Debbie (Mark) MATTHEWS and the late James Norman and Janice. Loved grandfather of 10 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Dear brother of Henry (Shirley) TOPHAM, Gord (Bev) TOPHAM, Jean (Clifford) ORMANDY, Rita WILTON, Ruth CHIMNEY and the late Jannet, Cora, Margaret, Rose, May, Wilmer, Norman, Bill and Donald. Bobbie will also be missed by his special Friends Mark and Teresa DYMOCK and family. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), London for visitation on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be on Friday, April 1, 2005 at 1 p.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or the Canadian Diabetes Association would be gratefully appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Memorial Funeral Home, 452-3770.

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NELLES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-02 published
OWLES, John H. “Jack&rdquo
John H. “Jack” OWLES of Saint Thomas, passed away at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Friday, April 29, 2005, in his 86th year. Beloved husband of Edna (TRIPP) OWLES, late Edna (HAMILTON) OWLES (1959) and the late Hazel (NELLES) OWLES (1968.) Dearly loved father of Charlie OWLES and his wife Nancy of Saint Thomas. Dear step-father of Yvonne CHAMBERS, Carol BROWN, Wendy WOLFE and her husband Jim, and Brian PARKINS and his wife Sandy, all of Saint Thomas. Brother of the late Lois HENRY and late George OWLES. Also survived by a brother-in-law, Bill HENRY of British Columbia, Goddaughter, Shannon WILLIAMS of Sweaburg, and by a number of grandchildren and greatgrandchildren.
Born in Morse, Saskatchewan, April 24, 1920, son of the late Percy and May (BEAUMONT) OWLES. He was a retired employee of Canron, Saint Thomas. Mr. OWLES was a member of the Saint Thomas Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). During the Second World War, he served in Labrador with the Royal Canadian Air Force. Friends will be received at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral and committal service will be conducted Tuesday at 1 p.m. Private interment in Elmdale Memorial Park. Memorial donations to the Saint Thomas Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) or the charity of one's choice gratefully acknowledged.

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NELLES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-01 published
Judge led probe into baby deaths
Canadian Press
Toronto -- Samuel GRANGE, who chaired a royal commission into the deaths of 36 babies at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, has died. He was 85.
GRANGE also led a public inquiry into a 1979 train derailment in Mississauga that forced 218,000 residents to flee their homes in the largest peacetime evacuation in North American history, and was the first judge in Ontario to take a drunk driver's licence away for life.
GRANGE "was a most respected jurist," said Chief Justice Roy McMURTRY, who was Ontario's attorney general at the time of the hospital and derailment probes.
"He had a lot of responsibility which he took seriously, but he never took himself too seriously."
GRANGE was an Ontario Supreme Court judge and later a judge for the Ontario Court of Appeal.
He was appointed to look into the three dozen deaths at the Hospital for Sick Children between July 1980 and March 1981. The death rate in the two cardiac wards was about 625 per cent higher than normal during those months.
Police charged Susan NELLES, a former nurse at the hospital, with the deaths of four babies. On May 21, 1982, charges against her were dropped because there wasn't enough evidence for a trial.
The royal commission opened in June 1983. It lasted more than a year, cost more than $2.8 million and called 64 witnesses.
GRANGE concluded at least eight and possibly as many as 23 babies died from overdoses of the heart drug digoxin. But in the end, he didn't find anyone responsible for the deaths.
GRANGE, who died Friday, leaves a son, Dougall, and daughter, Alice. His wife, Patricia, died in 2003.

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NELLES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-29 published
SCHAAP, Antonius " Tony"
Passed away peacefully at Valleyview Home, Saint Thomas, on Tuesday, December 27, 2005 in his 72nd year. Beloved husband of the late Johanna SCHAAP. Loving father of John (Judith) SCHAAP, Sonja (Mark) NELLES, Helen (Steven) HEATHER, Hendrika SCHAAP, Frances SCHAAP and Anthony (Cheryl) SCHAAP. Loved father to Alice SMITH. Popa to Robert and Katie. Cherished grandfather of 17 grandchildren. Sadly missed by Joe (Ans) SCHAAP and family. Tony will be missed by many brothers and sisters still residing in Holland. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), London, for a memorial service on Friday, December 30, 2005 at 11 a.m. Visitation one hour prior to service. Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Arrangements entrusted to Memorial Funeral Home, 452-3770.

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NELLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-19 published
Robert FREEDOM, Surgeon 1941-2005
The director of cardiology at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children was a widely respected surgeon who wrote hefty textbooks and played a key role in the royal commission that investigated the mystery deaths of 36 baby patients
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, May 19, 2005, Page S11
Halifax -- Known by his peers as "Mr. Pediatric Cardiology," Robert FREEDOM was widely respected for his clinical skills and for his training of cardiologists from around the world, and as a prolific author of clinical research and textbooks, several of which are considered classics in the field. Less happily, he figured large in a sensational 1981 murder probe and a subsequent royal commission that investigated the deaths of more than 30 babies at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children
It wasn't uncommon to find the head of cardiology at Sick Kids hunched over his desk in the early morning hours writing. Over his career, Dr. FREEDOM wrote more than 400 medical papers, 125 book chapters, and eight textbooks, including the formidably large Atlas of Congenital Heart Disease and the Natural and Modified History of Congenital Heart Disease. Published in 2003, it was the last of his textbooks.
Robert Mark FREEDOM was a native of Maryland, where he and his twin brother, Gary, experienced a disruptive childhood. Shortly after they were born, their parents divorced and they had virtually no contact with their father, a neurologist and an eighth-generation physician. When they were still young, they moved to Southern California and were soon placed together in boarding schools and residential homes. The brothers remained close throughout their lives.
Robert studied medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles; Gary went on to earn a PhD in geography. Initially focused on neurosurgery, Dr. FREEDOM soon found a new interest. At medical school, he was asked to perform four autopsies on babies or children with congenital cardiac disease; from that experience, he decided to pursue a new path in medicine.
After finishing medical school, he was accepted for an internship and residency in pediatrics at Children's Hospital Boston. While there, he also studied pediatric cardiology. In 1972, he was recruited by Richard ROWE, then director of pediatric cardiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, to become the director of the diagnostic cardiac catheterization laboratory and assistant professor of pediatrics. When Dr. ROWE, who had become his mentor, was recruited to take over as director of cardiology at the Hospital for Sick Children in 1973, he asked Dr. FREEDOM to join him in Toronto.
Dr. FREEDOM moved to Canada in the summer of 1974 and spent the rest of his career there, dedicating himself to the hospital and the faculty of medicine at the University of Toronto. But the next decade did not unfold so smoothly, and there were times when he must have questioned his choice of careers, or at least hospitals.
On March 25, 1981, police accused Sick Kids nurse Susan NELLES of murdering baby Justin COOK. Two days later, she was charged with murdering three other infants. More than a year later, in May of 1982, Ms. NELLES was discharged at a preliminary hearing. A royal commission headed by Mr. Justice Samuel GRANGE of the Supreme Court of Ontario then examined the circumstances surrounding Ms. NELLES's arrest and prosecution.
The commission also tried to reconstruct events at the hospital from June 30, 1980, to March 22, 1981, to determine whether the babies died of heart defects or were murdered by overdoses of the heart drug digoxin. All told, the commission investigated 36 deaths.
In September of 1983, Dr. FREEDOM testified before the commission that he had told several of his relatives that "someone is killing our babies" after he learned that large amounts of digoxin had been found in a baby who died in March of 1981. Days later, he repeated the comment to Metro Toronto Police Staff-Sergeant Anthony WARR. He said he was convinced that something malevolent had transpired at the hospital after three babies died with high levels of the heart drug in their bodies.
"I believe I made the comment to my wife or my brother-in-law and his wife late on the Saturday night [March 21] after I heard of the digoxin readings on [infant] Allana MILLER," Dr. FREEDOM said. "The digoxin levels in the baby had been low [in the afternoon] and then they were sky-high. I thought something malicious was going on."
Dr. FREEDOM testified that when he learned of the high readings on the night of March 21, he thought, "My God, how can she go from a very low level to a very high level?... I wonder if it's murder?"
The commission also heard that he was so alarmed about the deaths that he told another doctor during a catherization on Justin COOK: "If this baby dies, we have a murderer on our hands."
Judge GRANGER later heard that Dr. FREEDOM had provided a vital link in the murder investigation when he told a homicide detective that problems with an intravenous line could have resulted in a digoxin overdose slowly infusing into the baby's body over several hours, making it possible for Ms. NELLES to have given the drug to the infant before she went off duty on the evening before the infant died.
At the preliminary hearing, Ms. NELLES was cleared of all charges after the judge found insufficient evidence to send the case to trial.
In 1986, Dr. FREEDOM succeeded his mentor as director of cardiology at Sick Kids, a post he held until the fall of 2000, when he stepped down because of failing health.
"We're one of the largest and best-known divisions of pediatric cardiology in the world," said Lee BENSON, a long-time colleague.
A big burly man, Dr. FREEDOM demanded high standards not only from himself but from everyone around him, and he could be intimidating. During his teaching rounds, medical students were known to tremble with fright. But, as a professor, he won his fair share of awards. He also helped in developing a three-year, sub-specialty training program in pediatric cardiology at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.
Dr. FREEDOM was known among colleagues for his encyclopedic memory. If another doctor so much as mentioned a study in an obscure publication, he was able to recall not only details but authors and publication date, said his friend and colleague Shi-Joon YOO.
His patients loved him. "The parents worshipped the ground he walked on," said Dr. BENSON, adding that years later he remembered their names. Obsessive about his work, he spent all hours of the day and night in the hospital. "He lived at Sick Kids," said his wife, Penny, whom he met in the late 1980s after a couple of failed marriages.
Despite suffering from diabetes, Dr. FREEDOM didn't take care of his own health. He enjoyed Scotch, smoking cigars and eating whatever he desired. "Bob did things his way," Dr. BENSON said.
Not one to usually take vacations, he changed his mind after a trip to Granville Ferry in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley. Located on the Annapolis River, he fell in love with the place and would spend a month there each year until he retired.
Dr. FREEDOM received several awards, including the Council Award of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, presented to Ontario physicians who are judged to have been closest to meeting society's vision of an "ideal" physician. In 2000, he was named to the Order of Ontario.
Robert FREEDOM was born on February 27, 1941, in Baltimore. He died on May 7, 2005, in Halifax of renal failure as a result of diabetes. He was 64. He leaves his wife Penny and stepson Jonathan.

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NELLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-07 published
CULLEN, The Honourable Bud
Former Member of Parliament Sarnia-Lambton Trudeau-Era Cabinet Minister Retired Federal Court Judge
Peacefully in Ottawa on Tuesday, July 5, 2005, surrounded by his family, age 78 years. Devoted husband of Nicole for 25 years. Loving father of Olivier, Annie (Darcy GORDON), Kate (John NELLES), Chris and stepfather of Jean-Charles and Mijanou. Cherished Grandad of Bronwyn and Jemma GORDON and Emma NELLES. Dear brother of Phyllis McLEOD (Barrie) and the late Joan WELLER. Bud will be fondly remembered and sadly missed by his many nieces, nephews, cousins, colleagues and Friends. Bud had a phenomenal sense of humour. His legacy to his family and Friends was 'never take yourself too seriously.' True to that, he kept us all laughing until the end. Special thanks to his caregivers Laura and Heather and to all the caring staff at the Colonel By Retirement Residence. Family and Friends may attend a memorial service to celebrate Bud's life at Mackay United Church, 257 MacKay St. (at Dufferin), Ottawa, on Saturday, July 9, 2005 at 11 a.m. Reception to follow at The Gardens, 85 Bronson Ave., (at Queen St.) In lieu of flowers memorial donations to New Hope School supporting people with mental disabilities - a project close to Bud's heart, would be appreciated. Please make cheques payable to Community Living Sarnia, specify the New Hope School Project, P.O. Box 610, 551 Exmouth Street, Sarnia, Ontario, N7T 7J4. Funeral Arrangements with the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry. Condolences/Donations/Tributes at: mcgarryfamily.ca 613-233-1143.

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NELLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-30 published
Samuel GRANGE, Jurist (1920-2005)
Best known for heading the royal commission into the deaths of 24 babies at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, he declined to lay blame and stoically endured any criticism
By Oliver MOORE, Tuesday, August 30, 2005, Page S11
After falling quite by chance into the legal profession, Samuel GRANGE was at the centre of a series of key decisions and headed the controversial inquiry which determined that babies had been murdered at the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children.
"He played an enormous role... he should be remembered because of his contribution," said Horace KREVER, another retired judge who oversaw a commission, in his case a probe of the tainted-blood scandal. "He was everything a judge should be: learned, wise, compassionate, patient and extraordinarily literate."
Judge GRANGE was on the bench at the Ontario Court of Appeal when it ruled the rape-shield law constitutional and when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation miniseries The Valour and the Horror was ruled not to have libelled Canadian airmen. He also backed the decision by that court which allowed the custodial parent in a divorced couple to move the child far away from the former spouse.
But Judge GRANGE was most prominently in the public eye when he headed the royal commission into the deaths at the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children. The probe was called after a series of deaths rocked the hospital, a leading pediatrics institution. From the summer of 1980 to the spring of 1981, the death toll on the hospital's cardiac ward was 625 per cent higher than the previous three nine-month periods.
After 191 days of testimony over three years, Judge GRANGE found that eight babies had been killed by drug overdoses and another 15 had died in suspicious circumstances. He issued his 224-page report in the first few days of 1985. He concluded that the babies had died because of overdoses of digoxin, a heart drug that many should not have been given. The babies' bodies, nine of which were exhumed for the investigation, revealed abnormally high digoxin levels.
Controversially, although Judge GRANGE recommended compensation to Susan NELLES, a nurse charged with several of the murders, he did not assign blame to anyone. He faulted no one and offered no solution to the mystery of who killed the babies.
The report angered parents of some of the babies and brought a wave of public criticism. Ms. NELLES had been released after a preliminary hearing because of lack of evidence and it appeared no one would be held responsible.
But according to his son Dougall, Judge GRANGE had long inured himself from criticism and maintained a healthy distaste for the media, in spite of initially considering a career in journalism. Later, though, he came publicly to the defence of inquiries at a time when they were being criticized as unwieldy and overly time-consuming.
"You can't run an inquiry without letting everybody have his say," he said in the mid-1990s. "You don't know what a person's going to say until he says it -- even though sometimes he says it and you're sorry you ever let him speak."
His father recognized the importance of many of the cases he heard and was keenly aware of the lasting impact of his decisions, said Dougall, a 46-year-old paralegal in Toronto. "Sometimes he didn't come to these decisions easily, he really worked, he was conscientious and would think very, very carefully about what he was doing. Regularly he would be up at three or four in the morning, going over the materials and trying to come up with a solution."
Judge GRANGE felt strongly that the practice of law had fallen into public disrepute and believed that one way to regain the people's trust would be to introduce television cameras into some courtrooms. "The image of justice is poor, I don't think we deserve that image," he said in the mid-1980s.
But he felt no compulsion to play to the public gallery. "He was of the view that you write your judgments, you write your reports, and you let them speak for themselves," said the younger Mr. GRANGE.
Many of the decisions are still with us, their importance being felt still today. The intrusive questioning of rape complainants is a thing of the past in part because of the decision written by Judge GRANGE. In the case of two adults accused of assaulting a 15-year-old girl in the basement of a school, the question of the girl's previous behaviour with men came up. But Judge GRANGE, then sitting on the Ontario Court of Appeal, made it clear that times had changed.
"Sexual reputation is no more an indicator of credibility in a woman then it is in a man," he wrote for the majority in the late summer of 1987. "It should no longer be recognized as relevant to the issue."
Two years earlier he backed another controversial Court of Appeal decision, this one written by then Madam Justice Rosalie ABELLA. Hearing the case of a divorced couple, one of whom wanted to move away with the couple's child, the three judges unanimously agreed that she could.
"The custodial parent's best interests are inextricably tied to those of the child," wrote Judge ABELLA, supported by Judge GRANGE and backed by then Mr. Justice Jean LABROSSE. In effect, they ruled that what is good for the custodial parent should be presumed to be good for the child.
Retired judge KREVER called him "an exemplary member of the profession" and said he was something approaching a poet laureate at the Court of Appeal.
"There are a lot of cases in which he wrote excellent decisions which will stand the test of time," said Judge KREVER, 76.
Dougall GRANGE said that, as a child of two journalists, his father was headed for that career when the war diverted him to Europe. Awarded the Croix de Guerre for his dangerous work as a forward artillery observer, he seems also to have caught the eye of several peers. Military law at the time allowed a serviceman accused of a crime to choose the officer he wanted to represent him. Mr. GRANGE, then a captain, had no legal training or experience but was chosen several times.
In one of the more serious cases, he defended an American who had lied his way into the war before his country became involved. When the United States entered the war he quit his unit with the intention of joining the allied U.S. forces. Caught and tried for desertion, he could have been shot. Then-Captain GRANGE successfully argued his case and the man was released, Dougall GRANGE said.
"He came back here afterwards and thought 'okay, why don't I try this. He loved the practice and he liked the people... it was his life'."
Samuel GRANGE was born on March 19, 1920, in London, Ontario He died on August 26, 2005, at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto after suffering a series of strokes. He was 85. He was predeceased in 2003 by his wife Patricia. He is survived by his son Dougall and daughter Alice.

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NELLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-21 published
SOPINKA, John, 1997 -- Died This Day
Monday, November 21, 2005, Page S11
Lawyer and judge was born in Broderick, Saskatchewan., on March After growing up in Hamilton, Ontario, he graduated from the University of Toronto, where he was a star halfback with the Varsity Blues. He later played with the Toronto Argonauts and Montreal Alouettes. His folksy manner and easy wit cloaked a sharp intellect that made him one of the country's top trial lawyers for nearly three decades. He was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1988 by prime minister Brian MULRONEY, who pulled him out of private practice. Among his celebrated cases as a lawyer was that of Susan NELLES, a nurse charged in the deaths of several infants at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children. She retained him to represent her in a civil action against the Ontario Attorney-General and Toronto police, alleging malicious prosecution. The Nelles suit was his most satisfying case. "A lawyer often gets well paid, but it is not every case where you feel you have really done something good for a human being."

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NELLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-05 published
MARCH, Elizabeth C. " Betty" (SINCLAIR)
Peacefully at Saint Mary's of the Lake Hospital, Kingston on Sunday, April 3, 2005. Betty SINCLAIR of Seeley's Bay, in her 72nd year. Beloved wife of Gordon MARCH. Dear mother of Carol Anne and her husband Jim ALDRIDGE of Seeley's Bay, Dianne and her husband Kelly NELLES of Codrington, Janet MOORE of Peterborough, Judy and her husband Rob MILLIGAN of Belleville. Dear sister of Lena BLACK of Toronto, Buster SINCLAIR of Toronto, June WARLOW of Toronto. Predeceased by sister Jean MANGUM. Fondly remembered by seven grandchildren. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. A Private Family Graveside Service will be held at Olivet Cemetery, Seeley's Bay. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations made to the Jennifer Ashley Foundation, R.R.#1, Uxbridge, Ontario L9P 1R1 or the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. (Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Scotland Funeral Home, Elgin, 613-359-5555).

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NELLIGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-05 published
NELLIGAN, Joseph Leo
At London Health Sciences Centre South Street Campus on Monday April 4, 2005, Joseph Leo beloved husband of Noreen (Oatridge) NELLIGAN in his 79th year. Dear father of Daniel NELLIGAN (Janet) of Thamesville, Joanne KILLIN (Rick) of Edmonton, Cathy REEVES (Garth,) Steven NELLIGAN (Margaret) and Tom NELLIGAN (Barbara) all of London. Joseph was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 501 and Royal Canadian Naval Association, serving in World War 2 and a retired engineer from Canadian National Railway. Dear brother of Barry, Pat and Steve. Predeceased by his brother Frank. Also survived by 12 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren. Visitors will be received at John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, on Wednesday from 2-4 and 6-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass will be held at St. Justin's Church, 855 Jalna Boulevard, on Thursday at 12 Noon. Interment in St. Peter's Cemetery. Donations to Parkwood Hospital would be appreciated. A special thank you to the Staff of Victoria and Parkwood Hospitals and to the Staff at Meadowcroft Nursing Home.

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NELLIGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-20 published
KOCHYLEMA, Albert
September 20, 2004 Our hearts are full of memories We treasure them with care The way you had to leave us Will always seem unfair. Never to be forgotten and truly missed. Irene, Jenny, Aimee, Ron and Goddaughter Hailey. Special thanks for the support during and after a difficult time to Maria BEADLE, R.N., St. Joseph's Health Centre Palliative Care, Don and Linda RILEY, Paul and Kathy SSAINTERRE, Carl and Rosalie DANIELSEN, Ken and Mike at Lee Valley Tools for installing the memorial plaque, Barry NELLIGAN, and Jacinta ALMEIDA. The picture was taken just weeks before Al became sick. He had gone West to spend a happy time with brothers Tony, Ernie, Donald, Danny and their families. Pro Patria.

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NELLIGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-03 published
NELLIGAN, P.W. "Flip"
Suddenly, on Saturday, October 1, 2005 P.W. "Flip" NELLIGAN in his 54th year. Loving son of Steve NELLIGAN and the late Betty V. NELLIGAN (1992.) Father of Denise and Farrah. Brother of Michael NELLIGAN. Also survived by a nunber of aunts, uncles and cousins. Visitors will be received in the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William St. on Tuesday from 7: 00 p.m. until time of the Funeral Service in the Chapel at 8: 30 p.m. Final interment will be private.

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NELLIGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-31 published
BRAITHWAITE, Margaret Mary (CHISHOLM)
It is with great sadness, that we announce the passing of Margaret Mary (CHISHOLM) BRAITHWAITE in her 85th year. At London Health Sciences Centre - University Hospital on October 29, 2005 after a brief illness. Devoted wife, companion and friend of Robert James BRAITHWAITE for 63 years. Loving mother of Sharon COX (David,) Donald BRAITHWAITE (Karen,) Barbara (née Lill) BRAITHWAITE, and Ellen HAASEN (John.) Dear Grandmother of Becky BRAITHWAITE, Wendi (née BRAITHWAITE) TASHLIKOWICH, D'Arcy COX, Andrea and Colin BRAITHWAITE, Katrina and Anna HAASEN. Great grandmother of Jayden and Ryann TASHLIKOWICH in Alberta. Dear sister of Mary NELLIGAN (T. Barry). Predeceased by son Robert Jr. (1999) and granddaughter Johanna HAASEN (1985.) Mom was genuinely patient and kind, always looking for the positive in what life offered her. Her sunny, cheerful nature will be missed. The family is grateful to all the caregivers, nurses, staff and Friends at the McCormick Home, her beloved home away from home these past 3 years. We are also grateful to the many doctors, nurses and caregivers we encountered at University Hospital over the past two weeks who combined their professional skill equally with sincere compassion and caring. Visitors will be received at the John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, London on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 o'clock. Memorial Funeral Mass at St. Patrick's Church, 377 Oakland Avenue on Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock. Interment in St. Peter's Cemetery at a later date. Prayers Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, memorial tributes to the McCormick Home Building Fund would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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NELLIGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-17 published
NELLIGAN, Pauline A.
In loving memory of a dear wife, mother and grandmother who passed away, November 17, 1997. In all the world we shall not find A heart so wonderfully kind, So soft a voice, so sweet a smile, An inspiration so worthwhile, A sympathy so sure, so deep, A love so beautiful to keep. Forever loved and sadly missed by husband Michael, daughter Mary Michelle, son Fred and his wife Doris and grandchildren Ashleigh, Joseph and Matthew.

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NELMES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-27 published
NELMES, Harvey J.
(Veteran World War 2)
Peacefully at Humber River Regional Hospital - Finch Site, on December 25, 2005 in his 88th year. Loving husband of Ingrid for 43 years. Dear father of Wilhelmina NELMES- VOGTLE and her husband James, John and wife Adriane, and Peter. Beloved grandad of Emma. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, from 5-9 p.m. Wednesday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, December 29, 2005 at 3 p.m. If desired, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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NELMES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-27 published
NELMES, Harvey J.
(Veteran World War 2)
Peacefully at Humber River Regional Hospital - Finch Site on December 25, 2005 in his 88th year. Loving husband of Ingrid for 43 years. Dear father of Wilhelmina NELMES- VOGTLE and her husband James, John and his wife Adriane, and Peter. Beloved grandad of Emma. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway from 5-9 p.m. Wednesday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, December 29, 2005 at 3 p.m. If desired, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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NELMS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-14 published
SIMPSON, Douglas Frederick
Peacefully at Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital, on Monday, September 12, 2005, Douglas Frederick SIMPSON of Glencoe in his 89th year. Beloved husband and best friend of Edna "Bunny" (née BURROWS) SIMPSON. Proud father of Robert and Mirah of Glencoe, Brian and Joanna of West Lorne, Norman and Kim of Strathroy, Sheila SIMPSON and Stan HUGHES of London. Loving grandfather of Heather (John) JAKOBI, Greg (Christine), Krista (Stephen) HUVER, Erika (Barry) HOGAN, Sarah (Ben) SMALL, Jacob, Theresa, Andrew, Paul, Megan, Joshua, Kyle (Becky), Troy, Anna, Abbee and Alex HUGHES. Special great grandfather of 7. Dear brother of Frances McCALLUM, Dorothy and Reverend Harvey PARKER, Stewart and Betty SIMPSON, Ina and Vern NELMS. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews and their families. Doug was a life-long resident of the Glencoe community where he contributed many hours of his time and actively participated in many capacities. He had served with the Royal Canadian Air Force in North America and Britain. He was a life-long member of Saint John's Anglican Church, a member of Lorne Masonic Lodge, a member of Reg. Lovell Branch 219 of Royal Canadian Legion, a Board member of Four Counties Health Services, a Charter member of the Vocal Federation, and was involved with the Scouting Movement for many years. He also served in many leadership positions of various agricultural associations. Doug was a Steward of the land and a tree will be planted in his memory. Cremation has taken place. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Van Heck Funeral Home, 172 Symes Street, Glencoe on Thursday evening from 7-9 p.m. and on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Lorne Lodge #282 Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons will conduct a Masonic Service at the funeral home on Thursday evening at 7: 00 p.m. A Memorial Service to Celebrate Doug's Life will held at Saint John's Anglican Church, Glencoe on Saturday, September 17 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment at St. Peter's Anglican Cemetery, Tyrconnell at a later date. Memorial donations may be made to Four Counties Health Services Foundation, Bobier Villa, Dutton or Saint John's Anglican Church, Glencoe.

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NELMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-12 published
Frank CLAIR, Football Coach: 1917-2005
Ottawa Rough Riders' coach and general manager did not always remember his players' names but he knew what it took to win the Grey Cup
By Danny GALLAGHER, Special to the Globe and Mail, Tuesday, April 12, 2005, Page S7
Toronto -- He was known as the absent-minded professor whose players' names sometimes beat him but Frank CLAIR was an innovative Canadian Football League institution. Once, when injury forced a halfback out of an Ottawa Rough Riders' game, coach CLAIR shouted frantically for backup Billy Kline to replace him. It was too late -- he had been traded two years before.
While general manager with the Riders, Mr. CLAIR signed a player by the name of Paul Moses and was telexing the move to the Canadian Football League's Toronto offices. Mr. CLAIR started typing Paul Abraham and coach George BRANCATO, who was beside him, noticed the error and told his boss: "No, it's Paul Moses."
"Oh," Mr. CLAIR answered, "I knew it was some guy from the Bible."
Whenever Montreal Alouettes' star running back George Dixon came to Ottawa, Mr. CLAIR referred to him not by name, but by number. "Gotta watch that No. 28," Mr. CLAIR would say. If the player was Calgary Stampeders' linebacker Wayne Harris, it was, "Have to watch that No. 55." Even after star Ottawa quarterback Russ JACKSON had won a host of awards, he was still "No. 12" to Mr. CLAIR.
"On occasion, he would call me Russ but usually he called me by my number. That was one of his idiosyncrasies. He didn't remember names," Mr. JACKSON recalled.
"Frank was so excited he didn't know what was going on in a game," said Dave THELEN, a former Rider and Toronto Argonaut fullback.
Mr. CLAIR was a pioneer in the Canadian Football League, introducing the short-trap play in 1950 and in the same year introducing films as a key method of assessing plays and personnel. He also had a habit of turning around moribund teams and winning a host of Grey Cup titles.
Wouldn't you know it -- in 1950, with the help of that short-trap play and his game movies, Mr. CLAIR's Argos won the Grey Cup. Two years later, they did it again. Mr. CLAIR also coached the Riders to three Grey Cups -- in 1960, 1968 and 1969, and was general manager when they won again in 1973 and 1976. He was Canadian Football League coach of the year in 1966 and 1969. All told, he compiled a won-lost-tied record of 174-125-7 and his teams finished out of the playoffs only twice in 19 seasons.
Mr. CLAIR was born in small-town Ohio, graduated from Ohio State University and gained some playing time with the National Football League's Washington Redskins. Along the way, in the field house connecting the football and basketball fields at Purdue University, Mr. CLAIR met his wife Pat and they married in December of 1948.
Mr. CLAIR was the head coach at the University of Buffalo in 1949 when he was persuaded to go to Toronto and coach the Argonauts. "Al Dekdebrun, who was a Toronto quarterback and an All-American at Cornell, dropped by our training camp in Buffalo and said I should come to Toronto and coach," Mr. CLAIR recalled in 1980. "I had never seen an Argos' game but I was enthused about the spirit of the football people in Toronto."
Yet, when he looked at film Clips of the Argo games in 1949, he was appalled. "They had a terrible team, a bad program and the physical conditioning was bad," Mr. CLAIR said. "Recruiting was virtually non-existent. I put more emphasis on films and got the owners to do films of every game."
The result was the short-trap play. "I think that's what won the Grey Cup for us in 1950," he once said. "Billy Bass was the fullback and time and time again, the holes would open. It was something the other teams hadn't seen."
It was a simple play and one he always enjoyed describing. "It looked like a sweep, with both guards pulling. There was a lot of quick hitting. One guard would pull to trap the tackle and our tackle would block their linebacker, clearing a hole in the line."
Mr. CLAIR left Toronto after the 1954 season and worked for a spell at the University of Cincinnati only to be lured back to the Canadian Football League to take over the head-coaching duties in Ottawa in 1956. "Ottawa had a terrible team in 1955 -- terribly disorganized," he once said. "I told the Ottawa directors that it would take five years to build a championship team. And it was five years, right on the nose, in 1960 when we won the Grey Cup."
Over the years, Mr. CLAIR witnessed scores of talented Canadian Football League players such as Dave THELEN, Ron STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Vic WASHINGTON, Bo SCOTT, Margene ADKINS, Whit TUCKER, Moe RACINE, Mike NELMS and Tony GABRIEL, but Russ JACKSON stood out as the "best ever."
"When he [ JACKSON] moved up behind the centre, he took command," Mr. CLAIR said. "He had a good voice... he made you think he was an army sergeant. We felt like we were going somewhere with him."
Mr. JACKSON and many others contend that one of the best offences ever assembled in Canadian Football League history was the late-1960s combo in Ottawa consisting of himself, Whit TUCKER, Mr. ADKINS, Mr. WASHINGTON and Mr. SCOTT.
"I spent some 12 seasons in Ottawa, all with Frank," Mr. JACKSON said. "The biggest memory I have of my time there was that he gave me a chance to play as a Canadian. He was very innovative in his offensive preparation when we practised Monday through Friday for a game on the weekend. We used the short-trap play in games some, but we also had the option play... in those days, I liked to run a lot."
Mr. CLAIR, a genius at snagging import talent, pulled off one of the greatest coups in the Canadian game by persuading two top-flight U.S. quarterbacks -- Condredge HOLLOWAY and Tom CLEMENTS to sign with the Riders on April 23, 1975. It was coincidence that they signed on the same day. Mr. CLAIR signed Mr. CLEMENTS in Pittsburgh and Mr. BRANCATO signed Mr. HOLLOWAY in Knoxville, Tennessee.
Frank CLAIR's run with the Riders lasted 25 years, a tenure that had its tenuous moments of rough waters, especially in the last two years when ownership wanted him out as general manager.
In 1978, in one of the stormiest controversies in Canadian Football League history, Mr. CLAIR was replaced as general manager by Jake DUNLAP. To compensate, he was offered a job as vice-president and director of player personnel with a $10,000 pay increase. Even so, Mr. CLAIR saw it as a demotion and quit. All he could understand was that he was losing his general manager's job and he wasn't being told why. Football fans were on Mr. CLAIR's side throughout the drama and club owner Alan WATERS and executive vice-president Terry KIELTY were seen as villains. The Rough Riders initiated new talks and Mr. CLAIR wound up with about $50,000 a season and the job the club had offered in the first place.
However, it was not the end of the affair. Several weeks before Christmas in 1980, the Riders said they wouldn't be renewing his contract. "I was disappointed, but I signed," Mr. CLAIR said at the time. "All I wanted to do was help the club."
All the same, he did not rule out the possibility that he would move to another Canadian Football League club. Indeed, he returned to the Argos in 1981 as a scout, tapping Canadian and U.S. college talent for seven years before heart surgery meant he finally had to pack in his football career.
Ottawa remained dear to the CLAIRs and for a time they kept their home in the Billings Bridge area and spent winters in Florida. In 1993, they moved permanently to Sarasota, Florida
That same year, Ottawa named the arena at Lansdowne Park arena the Frank Clair Stadium. Sadly, it hasn't done a thing for the city's football prospects. Ottawa hasn't come close to a Grey Cup since 1976 when Mr. CLAIR led his squad to a 23-20 victory over Saskatchewan.
Frank CLAIR was born May 12, 1917 in Hamilton, Ohio. He died March 27, 2005, in Sarasota, Florida, of congestive heart failure. He is survived by his wife and by a daughter.

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NELSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-10 published
GIBSON, Winnifred Eileen
of Christie Gardens, Toronto, died peacefully on Thursday, December 8, 2005 at the age of 94. Wynne GIBSON, beloved mother of Diane Gibson NELSEN (Ron) and her sister, Barbara MANNERS (Clifford.) Predeceased by her husband, George, and son, Peter (Margeurite). Loving grandmother of six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Memorial service to be held on Tuesday, December 13, 2005 at 1 p.m. at The Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. West, Toronto (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.) Reception to follow. Cremation followed by interment at Westminster Cemetery at a later date. Donations may be made in Wynne's name to Grace Church On-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Rd., Toronto, Ontario M4V 1X4, or Kiwanis Music Festival of Greater Toronto, 330 Walmer Rd., Toronto, Ontario M5R 2Y4.

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NELSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-10 published
GIBSON, Winnifred Eileen
Of Christie Gardens, Toronto, died peacefully on Thursday, December 8, 2005 at the age of 94. Wynne GIBSON, beloved mother of Diane Gibson NELSEN (Ron) and her sister, Barbara MANNERS (Clifford.) Predeceased by her husband, George, and son, Peter (Margeurite). Loving grandmother of six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Memorial service to be held on Tuesday, December 13, 2005 at 1 p.m. at The Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. West, Toronto (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.) Reception to follow. Cremation followed by interment at Westminster Cemetery at a later date. Donations may be made in Wynne's name to Grace Church On-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Rd., Toronto, Ontario M4V 1X4, or Kiwanis Music Festival of Greater Toronto, 330 Walmer Rd., Toronto, Ontario M5R 2Y4.

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NELSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-17 published
BERNS, Stephanie
Passed away suddenly, at her home in Burlington, on Saturday, May 14, 2005, at the age of 78. Beloved wife of Gus for almost 57 years. Loving mother of Donna WOLOSZANSKI and her husband Steve. Cherished grandmother of Staci TODD and her husband John, James and Robert WOLOSZANSKI, and great-grandmother of Colby TODD. Dear sister of Marion SLAVISH and Ron NELSKI. She will also be sadly missed by her nieces and nephews. As per her wishes, cremation has taken place. Memorial Service to follow in June. In memory of Stephanie, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be sincerely appreciated by the family. (Arrangements entrusted to Smith's Funeral Home, Burlington, 905-632-3333). www.smithsfh.com

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NEL surnames continued to 05nel002.htm