MANNION o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-07-28 published
STARK, Donald Keith
In Meaford on Tuesday July 26th, 2005. Don STARK, son of the late John and Frances (HUMPHRIES) STARK, in his 83rd year. Predeceased by his beloved wife, the former Rosie SPAK, on October 28th, 2001. Dear father of Jacqueline (late Bill) BASTINGS of St. Catharines, Diane STEEVES, and Virginia "Ginny" and her husband Ken WILEY all of Meaford. Sadly missed by grandchildren Lee (Jennifer), Dawson (Tenille,) and Stacey BASTINGS and predeceased by a grand_son Justin STEEVES. Great-grandfather of Storm, Mackenzie and Justin. Brother of Lovis FISHER of Kitchener, Florence (Don) DEVINE of Cambridge, and brother-in-law of Gord SCOTT of Cambridge and Helen MANNION of Toronto. Predeceased by a sister, Jean SCOTT. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher St. E., in Meaford, on Friday from 2: 00 to 4:00 and from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. Royal Canadian Legion Branch 32 will conduct a memorial service at the funeral home Friday evening at 6: 45 p.m. The Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Vincent's Roman Catholic Church, Cook Street, Meaford on Saturday July 30th, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. with cremation to follow. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Multiple Sclerosis Society, Muscular Dystrophy Association or Meaford Nursing Home Auxiliary would be appreciated.
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MANNIRÀ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-19 published
DENTE, Caterina (née MANNIRÀ)
Peacefully at York Central Hospital, Richmond Hill on Tuesday, May 17, 2005, in her 88th year. Caterina, loving wife of the late Joseph. Beloved mother of Tony and his wife Beverley, Dom, Tino and his wife Jannette, Mary and her husband Gary CROMBIE, and Claudio and his wife Judy. Proud grandmother of Linda, Kevin, Joanne, Carl, Riccardo, Nicole, Paul, Diana, Christina and Drew. Great-grandmother of Megan, Sierra, Karly, Julia, and Lexie. Dear sister of Andrea MANNIRÀ and his wife Lily and family, and Elena and her husband Michele MALLIA and family. Visitation will be held at the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421) on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held Saturday, May 21, 11 a.m. at Our Lady of Grace Roman Catholic Church, 15347 Yonge Street, Aurora. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill. Memorial donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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MANNISTO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-19 published
ARMSTRONG, Catherine Sandra (née MANNISTO)
Peacefully, after a strong battle with cancer, at her home in Burketon, on Monday, October 17, 2005, at age 42. Sandy, beloved wife of Donald ARMSTRONG, of Burketon. Loving mother of Dylan, Scarlett and Brooks. Loved daughter of Ina (deceased) and Eric MANNISTO. Dear aunt of Brent, Erica, Jason, Tegan and Jenny. Sister of Anne SHIER, Rob MANNISTO and his wife Bev, and Connie and her husband Mike KNAPP. Special thanks for the care and compassion shown by her many care givers, in particular Dr. Steven RUSSELL of Port Perry, Dr. Ronald L. BURKES and his team at Mount Sinai Hospital and particularly the St. Elizabeth team (thank you girls!). Our family would also like to express deep gratitude to the many Friends who supported us during this past year. The family of Sandy ARMSTRONG will receive Friends at the Wagg Funeral Home, "McDermott-Panabaker Chapel", 216 Queen Street in Port Perry (905-985-2171), on Thursday, October 20th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Service to celebrate the life of Saz will be held in the Chapel on Friday, October 21st at 11 a.m. with Michelle HOFMAN officiating. If desired, memorial donations may be made by cheque to the Canadian Cancer Society or the charity of your choice. On-line condolences may be left at www.waggfuneralhome.com

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MANNO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-06 published
LANGILLE, Marianne "Maria Johanna" (née STEVENS)
Peacefully with her family by her side at her residence R.R.#2 Harley on Monday September 5, 2005. Marianne (Maria Johanna) LANGILLE (née STEVENS) in her 60th year. Loving wife of Wayne LANGILLE, mother of Angeline LANGILLE of Paris, and William LANGILLE (Stacey) of Harley. Dear grandmother of Ashley (John) TUCK and Alicia TUCK and great-grandmother of Kassidy. Loving sister of John (Trudy) STEVENS of Ipperwash and Wilhelmina (John) VAN LIESHOUT of Granton. Predeceased by her father, William STEVENS (1968) and mother Johanna STEVENS (1993.) Sister-in-law of Hilda (Wray) MISENER, Shirley (Tom) POOLER, Betty (Doug) MARTIN, Alice MUNRO, Grace (Judd) EMMETT, Norma (Ken) DAVIDSON, Charlie (Donna) LANGILLE, Terry (Edna) LANGILLE, Eric (Linda) LANGILLE. Also survived by several nieces and nephews and also several cousins in Holland. Marianne was a member of the Good Neighbours Club of New Durham, enjoyed quilting and spending time with family and Friends and working in her garden. Friends will be received at the Keith Ovington Funeral Home, 134 King Street, Burford on Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Thursday September 8, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. with Father Frank MANNO officiating. As expression of sympathy donations in Marianne's memory may be made to the Victorian Order of Nurses or the Community Care Access Centre of Brantford. Special thanks to Alice MUNRO for the love and caring given to Marianne during her illness, together with Dorothy BURTON, Bev HEENEY and Mary LEROUX for their assistance, Tammy COOKE of Community Care Access Centre and the staff and the Victorian Order of Nurses of Brantford for their compassionate care. Keith OVINGTON 449-1112.

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MANNO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-11 published
MANNO, ANTONIO
Passed away peacefully after a lengthy illness on Monday, January 10, 2005 at the Humber River Regional Hospital - Finch Site in his 83rd year. Beloved husband to Maria FILOMENA for 49 years. Loving father to Anna (Rick COULTER) and to Michael MANNO. Cherished nonno to David and Katrina. Dear brother to Alfonsina of Woodbridge, Ontario and to Coletta of Sera San Bruno, Catanzaro, Italy. Predeceased by his brothers Bruno and Raffaele and his sisters Rosarina, Bettina, Giulia and Chiarina. Antonio will be sadly missed by his nephew Bruno CORDIANO and family, sister-in-law Carmela MUZZI and family and niece Fiora CORDIANO and family. Also missed by sisters-in-law Sara, Rita, Maria and families from Italy. Friends will be received at Delmoro Funeral Home, 61 Beverly Hills Dr., (1 light south of Wilson Ave., west of Jane Street, 416-249-4499) on Wednesday, January 12, 2005 from 2-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held on Thursday, January 13, 2005 at St. Jane Frances Roman Catholic Church at 9: 30 a.m. Entombment to follow at Beechwood Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Lung Association would be appreciated by the MANNO family.

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MANNO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-16 published
MARIANI, Gloria
God called Gloria peacefully on March 15th, 2005 from the William Osler Health Care Centre, at the age of 95. Reunited in Heaven with her loving husband Benedetto, and children Luigi, and Domenico. She will be cherished by her dear children Gabriele (Nazzarena), Rocca (Mario TESA,) Addolorata (Giovanni, predeceased,) Antonio (Alfonsina), Maria Stella (Luca TESA), Donato (Vincenza), Giovanni (Mirella VITTORIA,) Libera (Giuseppe DI MANNO.) Proud grandmother of 23 grandchildren, and 22 great-grandchildren. She will be held dear in the hearts of her nieces, nephews, cousins, relatives, and many Friends. Family will receive Friends at the Fratelli Vescio Funeral Homes Ltd. (8101 Weston Rd., south of Langstaff Rd., 905-850-3332) on Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. and Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Friday at 10: 00 a.m. from St. Roch Roman Catholic Church (on Islington Ave., north of Finch Ave.). Entombment to follow at the Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery (on Yonge Street, south of Hwy. 7).

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MANNONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-01 published
MOONEY, Alvera " Vera" (née MASTROMATTEO)
Peacefully in Toronto on Monday, May 30, 2005 in her 83rd year. Dear sister of Angelina MANNONE, Bill, Theresa Rose DENINO, Lena SCOTT (Charles,) Anthony (Mary,) her twin brother Albert (Jean,) Lucy HIGGINS (Kenneth) and Carmen. Predeceased by her sister Cora CHORNEY and brothers Fred and Lou. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, great-nieces, great-nephews, other family and Friends. Visitation will take place at the Ridley Funeral Home, 3080 Lakeshore Blvd. W. (between Islington and Kipling Aves., at 14th Street, 416-259-3705) on Saturday from 1 to 2 p.m. followed by a celebration of Alvera's life at 2 p.m. As per her expressed wishes, cremation has taken place. If desired, donations to St. Hilda's Towers Foundation (416-781-6621) or Lakeshore Lodge (416-392-9410) would be appreciated. Messages of condolence may be placed at www. RidleyFuneralHome.com

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MANNONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-17 published
MANNONE, Mamie
Peacefully in her 91st year on December 15th, 2005. Known as Aunt Mame to family, Friends and neighbours alike. She will be greatly missed by 3 generations of nephews and nieces who lives were blessed by her loving presence. Family and Friends may gather at the Jerrett Funeral Home, 660 Kennedy Road, Scarborough (between Eglinton and St. Clair Aves. E.), on Sunday, December 18th, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass on Monday, December 19th, 2005 at 12 noon at St. Theresa Parish Shrine of the Little Flower, 2559 Kingston Road in Scarborough. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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MANOCCHIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-02 published
MANOCCHIO, Nicolina
Peacefully passed away on Tuesday, November 1, 2005. Loving wife of the late Giovanni. Dearest mother of Antonio. Adoring grandmother of 7 grandchildren, and 9 great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Cardinal Funeral Home, 366 Bathurst St. (near Dundas) on Thursday from 7-9 p.m., and Friday 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. Funeral Mass on Saturday, 9: 45 a.m. at St. Francis of Assisi Church. Entombment to follow at Westminster Mausoleum. Online condolences at www.cardinalfuneralhomes.com.

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MANOCCHIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-06 published
MANNA, Antonetta (née MANOCCHIO)
Peacefully, on Friday, November 4, 2005, at York Finch Hospital, in her 95th year. Predeceased by husband Michele. Beloved mother of Sam, John, Mary and Lester STANFORD. Cherished grandmother to Paul and wife Janice, Patti, Tracy and husband Andrew, Stephen and wife Anamaria, and Peter. Cherished great-grandmother to Brendan, Justine, Lucas and Madeline. She will be sadly missed by her brother Carmen and wife Fiora, as well as numerous nieces, nephews and Friends. Friends may call at the Cardinal Funeral Home, 366 Bathurst St. (near Dundas), on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Monday at St. Francis Roman Catholic Church, 45 Mansfield Ave., at 9: 45 a.m. Interment to follow at Prospect Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Antonetta would have loved knowing donations were being made to St. Christopher House (248 Ossington Ave.). The family wishes to thank the staff of Casa Verdi Retirement Home for their care and attention which they extended to her.

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MANOCHA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-12 published
MANOCHA, Harbhajan (September 15, 1932 - January 3, 2005)
In the loving memory of a great husband, father, grandfather, teacher and community volunteer, Sardar Harbhajan Singh MANOCHA passed away peacefully in his home surrounded by his family, after a long struggle with cancer. He will always be in our hearts for the dedication towards family and numerous lives he touched with his relentless service to the youth and the community as an inspirational educator. All his Friends and family will dearly miss him.
He lived as a servant of God and is now at peace with the everlasting spirit.
Donations in memory may be made to United Nations Children's Fund or to the Cancer Society. Messages may be sent to jmanocha@shaw.ca

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MANOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-22 published
MANOCK, Jack
Suddenly on January 20th, 2005 in Newmarket. Jack, beloved husband of the late Jennie Norma, father of Russell and wife Lorraine, grandfather of Stephanie CHINNER and husband Ashley, Sandi LUND and husband Travis and Stephen and his friend Monica. Great-grandfather of Trinity, Payton, Breeana and Isabella. Missed and loved by all.

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MANOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-16 published
MANOCK, Christina Lorean
Peacefully at home on Tuesday, February 15th, 2005 at 75 years of age. Beloved wife and "best friend" of Jack W. Loving mother of Jack L. and Lynn. Adored grandmother of Daniel and David. Christina was a long time employee of Christie Biscuits. In keeping with Christina's wishes, cremation has taken place. If so desired, donations may be made to the Lung Association. Arrangements entrusted to The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre - Mississauga.

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MANOFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-18 published
NAUMOVICH, Donka " Doris" (April 10, 1910-June 16, 2005)
Departed this world to join her beloved husband Mircho (Jimmy, 1972) and daughter Mary MANOFF (2002) and son-in-law Carl PAUL (2001.) Survived by her daughter Helen PAUL and son-in-law George MANOFF. Baba will be missed by her darling grandchildren: Deborah (Gianfranco), Barry (Sandra), Stephanie, Pamela, James (Leigh) and beloved great-grandchildren: Natasha, Melissa, Jeffrey, Luca, and Talluiah. Friends and family may visit at the Heritage Funeral Centre, 50 Overlea Blvd., 416-423-1000, on Sunday, June 19th from 4-8 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at the Heritage Funeral Chapel on Monday, June 20, 2005, time not yet determined. Interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery to follow. Donations to Canadian Macedonian Place would be appreciated instead of flowers.

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MANOJLOVIC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-20 published
BORAGINA, Frank (June 12, 1961-October 15, 2005)
Taken suddenly from us on Saturday, October 15, 2005 at the age of 44. Beloved husband of Maria (née RUFFOLO.) Precious son of Maria and the late Raffaele BORAGINA. Precious son-in-law of Giuseppe and Lina RUFFOLO. Adored brother and brother-in-law of Mary and Sava MANOJLOVIC, Pina and Bill HAYES and Danny and Lucy RUFFOLO. Loving uncle and godfather to Nicolas HAYES. Sadly missed by his wife Maria BORAGINA - to be loved by him was special and once in a lifetime. The emptiness he leaves is of unexplainable proportion and will never be filled. Fondly remembered and sadly missed by family and Friends. Friends will be received at Delmoro Funeral Home, 61 Beverly Hills Dr. (1 light south of Wilson Ave., west of Jane Street, 416-249-4499) on Thursday, October 20, 2005 from 6-9 p.m. and on Friday, October 21, 2005 from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, October 22, 2005 from All Saints Roman Catholic Church (on Royal York Rd., at LaRose Ave.) at 12: 00 p.m. Entombment to follow at Prospect Cemetery (on St. Clair Ave., at Lansdowne Ave.).

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MANOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-26 published
LETROS, Theopie " Toby" (née MOHTARES)
Passed away on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 at Trillium Ridge Retirement Home in Kingston. Beloved wife of the late John. Loving sister of Betty and her husband Frank MANOS and Alexander and his late wife Nada (MOHTARES) and sister-in-law of Jim, Penny and Mary. Toby will be missed by her many nieces and nephews especially her caregiver Carol. Family and Friends will be received at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Ave. East, Agincourt (east of Kennedy Rd.) on Tuesday, March 1 from 10-11 a.m. with the Funeral Service to follow in the Ogden Chapel at 11 a.m. Interment Pine Hills Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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MANOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-21 published
MANOS, Sotirios
Passed away on September 20, 2005 after a courageous battle with cancer at St. Michael's Hospital. Beloved husband of Aspasia, cherished father of Nick and his wife Thelma and Vaia and her husband Joe ANDREOLI. Adored grandfather of Aspasia, Sotirios, Italo and Victoria. The family wishes to express their heartfelt gratitude for the care given by Dr. KORTEN and the support of Vasilios MANOS and his entire family. Visitation will take place at the Heritage Funeral Centre, 50 Overlea Blvd., 416-423-1000, on Thursday, September 22nd from 2 to 4 and 6 to 9 p.m. Funeral service on Friday, September 23rd at St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church at 10: 00 a.m. Interment to follow at Elgin Mills Cemetery.

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MANOU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-15 published
KELLY, Violet (née MANOU)
Suddenly, in her sleep on Monday, March 14, 2005 at age 76. Predeceased by her husband Philip. Loving mother to Michael and his wife Sonia, and Sandra and her husband Glen JOHNSON. Proud grandmother to Taryn and Tate. Survived by her brother George MANOU and sisters Mary KIZOFF and Frances ANASTAS. Predeceased by her brother Alec MANOU. The family wish to express their appreciation to Edenia DE LE VENA and Lina MANALO as well as the staff at Leisure World Nursing Home. Friends may call at the Trull "North Toronto" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence), on Tuesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A funeral service will be held in the chapel Thursday morning at 11 o'clock. Interment York Cemetery. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Toronto, 2323 Yonge Street, Suite 500, Toronto, M4P 2C9.

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MANOV o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-28 published
ZUBATA, Theodore " Ted"
On Wednesday, April 27, 2005 at his home. Ted ZUBATA, loving father and father-in- law of Sharon MIMRAN, Adrienne and Brent ZYLBERBERG, and Elaine and Hershy WEINBERG. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Sadie and the late Barney MILLER, Honey and Syd SHROTT, Morrie MANOV and the late Esther MANOV. Devoted grandfather of Kaylee, Alexander, Mercedes, Jade, Aja, Nechemiah, Sonia and Avi, and Ruby. A service was held at Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel on Wednesday, April 27, 2005. Shiva 1 Chedington Place, beginning Monday, May 2, 2005 commencing 12: 00 noon. Memorial donations may be made to the Kohai Educational Centre 416-489-3636.

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MANS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-17 published
MANS, Helmut
Passed away peacefully on March 15, 2005. Helmut will be missed by his wife, Laine, his nephew Toivo, his niece Maret, godson Michael and all his relatives and Friends in Canada, Estonia and Sweden. A funeral service will be held at the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mt. Pleasant Road (south of Eglinton) on Friday, March 18, 2005 at 1 p.m. Visitation one hour prior to service time. Cremation.

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MANS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-21 published
HOGEVEEN, Peter " Petrus"
Went to be with his Lord and Saviour, at the Brantford General Hospital on Wednesday, April 20, 2005, Petrus (Peter) HOGEVEEN, in his 78th year. Beloved husband for 50 years of the late Tillie (née BOONSTRA.) Loving father of Jerry and his wife Eunice, Rudy and his wife Diana, Toby and his wife Linda, Wilf and his wife Jennifer, Randy and his wife Louise, Peter Jr. and his wife Melody. Predeceased by a son, Timothy James, in 1992. Loving grandfather of Jessica, Jeremy, Esmé, Jaclyn, Emily, Rachel, Michael, Simone, Patrick, Rebecca, Charlotte and Zöe. Dear brother of Andy and his wife Pat, Ann and her husband Melvin WERKMAN, Sylvia and her husband Ted VISSER, Andy and his wife the late Dinie, Shirley and her husband Ibe BERGSMA, Frances and her husband George VANDERSLUIS, Sytske and her husband Homme WOLTHUIZEN, Toby and the late Sally, brother-in-law of Alice and John MANS. Predeceased by his parents Jerry and Sytske HOGEVEEN, brother Chuck, sister Grace and her husband Ron KOORNSTRA, and a brother-in-law Ted DOUWES. Peter was a devout man who lived his faith. He was an active member of the Full Gospel Businessmen's Association and enjoyed his new found hobby of golf. Friends will be received at the Dennis Toll Funeral Home, 55 Charing Cross Street, Brantford on Thursday 7 to 9 and Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Service at Hope Christian Reformed Church, Buchanan at Dunsdon Street, Brantford on Saturday at 11 a.m. with Pastor Richard Grift officiating. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. Donations to the Brantford Christian School or World Vision appreciated. www.dennistoll.ca

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-13 published
CAMERON called 'classic journalist'
Canadian Press
Toronto -- Bill CAMERON, the intellectually challenging and erudite broadcast journalist who had a celebrated parting of the ways with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television in the wake of 1999 budget cuts, is dead. CAMERON died Friday of cancer of the esophagus which had moved into his brain and liver despite rounds of brutal chemotherapy, said a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation spokesperson.
He was 62.
"He was one of the last of the classic journalists," said Canadian Broadcasting Corporation senior executive documentary producer Mark STAROWICZ.
"The man was a terrific writer, a terrific correspondent, an anchor, a documentary writer and a documentary director," recalled STAROWICZ, who hired CAMERON in 1983 for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's news magazine program The Journal.
"A lot of people are good at one of those things. I can't think of anyone else that's good at all of those things."
CAMERON was born in Vancouver in 1943.
He got his first break in broadcasting at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in the 1960s as a freelance journalist. He later served as an editorial writer and columnist for the Toronto Star and as an associate editor at Maclean's magazine.
He appeared on Global television as host of Newsweek from 1978 to '83. He was also an anchor on Toronto's independent Citytv before joining The Journal as a reporter, producer and alternate host.
He spent nine years there and during his stint he journeyed to the United States and Britain, and to Jordan to cover the Persian Gulf crisis. He also reported from Mozambique and Nicaragua.
He was the show's final host when it signed off October 30, 1992.
"To me, he was a great interviewer," said Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's The National anchor Peter MANSBRIDGE, who worked with CAMERON at The Journal.
"He had a skill that few can match in terms of drawing people out in an interview," MANSBRIDGE told Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Newsworld from Stratford, Ontario "It was just a treat to watch him do that."
His death, "leaves a giant hole in Canadian journalism," he said.
After The Journal, CAMERON joined CBLT, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Toronto flagship station where he anchored the evening newscast, and won a Gemini Award for his efforts.
In September 1995, he joined Newsworld in Halifax as host of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Morning News, replacing Henry Champ who was moving to Washington. In 1999, he moved back to Toronto to host Sunday Report and daily newscasts for Newsworld and Newsworld International.
He co-wrote The Real Poverty Report, a study of the plight of the poor in Canada.
"He lived the journalistic spectrum," said friend and fellow journalist Peter Kent.
CAMERON's extensive experience was passed on through his role as educator at Toronto's Ryerson School of Journalism.
"He shared it with the up-and-comers quite freely," said Kent. "He wasn't a turf protector at all. He's a loss to the younger generation of journalists."
CAMERON also wrote plays and poetry, having been published by Random House.
CAMERON is survived by his wife, Cheryl HAWKES, a freelance journalist, and their three children.

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-29 published
MANSBRIDGE, Stanley Harry
It is with deep love, respect and enormous sadness that the family of Stanley Harry MANSBRIDGE announces that he died peacefully in his 87th year on Easter Sunday, March 27th, 2005 in London, Ontario. Wing Commander MANSBRIDGE, Royal Air Force, D.F.C. was born in Folkestone, England on May 29th, 1918, the son of Harry MANSBRIDGE (Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry) and Alice (TAILOR/TAYLOR) MANSBRIDGE. He was the last of his immediate family, predeceased by his parents, four brothers and one sister.
Mr. MANSBRIDGE passionately believed in public service, and served with distinction the Royal Air Force (1939-1946) the Governments of Great Britain and Malaya (1946-1954), the Government of Canada (1954-1976), the Government of Alberta (1976-1981) and the University of Victoria (1981-1986).
Mr. MANSBRIDGE is survived by his devoted wife of sixty-one wonderful years, Brenda Louise. The cherished father of Wendy, Peter and Paul and father-in-law of Douglas GUNN, Cynthia DALE and Susan MANSBRIDGE. The much admired grandfather of Jennifer MANSBRIDGE, Lisa GUNN, David GUNN, Pamela MANSBRIDGE, Andrew GUNN, Wendy MANSBRIDGE, Christopher MANSBRIDGE, Thomas MANSBRIDGE and William MANSBRIDGE, and the great-grandfather of Alexandra GUNN and Honor Mansbridge HINCHEY. Special Poppa to Jordan HINCHEY, Joy YUNKER, Cameron DILAY and Heather WIRICK. A private family service will be held in Saint Thomas, Ontario on Friday April 1st. 2005. A service of dedication will be held in the late spring. Arrangements through Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas, Ontario. If so wished, memorial donations may be made to the Elgin Military Museum, 30 Talbot Street, Saint Thomas, Ontario N5P 1A3.

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-29 published
MANSBRIDGE, Stanley Harry
It is with deep love, respect and enormous sadness that the family of Stanley Harry MANSBRIDGE announces that he died peacefully in his 87th year on Easter Sunday, March 27th, 2005 in London, Ontario.
Wing Commander MANSBRIDGE, Royal Air Force, D.F.C. was born in Folkestone, England on May 29th, 1918, the son of Harry MANSBRIDGE (Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry) and Alice (TAILOR/TAYLOR) MANSBRIDGE. He was the last of his immediate family, predeceased by his parents, four brothers and one sister. Mr. MANSBRIDGE passionately believed in public service, and served with distinction the Royal Air Force (1939-1946) the Governments of Great Britain and Malaya (1946-1954), the Government of Canada (1954-1976), the Government of Alberta (1976-1981) and the University of Victoria Mr. MANSBRIDGE is survived by his devoted wife of sixty-one wonderful years, Brenda Louise. The cherished father of Wendy, Peter and Paul and father-in-law of Douglas GUNN, Cynthia DALE and Susan MANSBRIDGE. The much admired admired grandfather of Jennifer MANSBRIDGE, Lisa GUNN, David GUNN, Pamela MANSBRIDGE, Andrew GUNN, Wendy MANSBRIDGE, Christopher MANSBRIDGE, Thomas MANSBRIDGE and William MANSBRIDGE; and the great-grandfather of Alexandra GUNN and Honor Mansbridge HINCHEY. Special Poppa to Jordan HINCHEY, Joy YUNKER, Cameron DILAY and Heather WIRICK.
A private family service will be held in Saint Thomas, Ontario on Friday, April 1st, 2005. A service of dedication will be held in late spring. Arrangements through Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas, Ontario.
If so wished, memorial donations may be made to: the Elgin Military Museum, 30 Talbot Street, Saint Thomas, Ontario N5P 1 A3.

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-16 published
Stanley MANSBRIDGE, Civil Servant: 1919-2005
Royal Air Force navigator decorated for his part in a critical bombing raid on a Nazi missile site later settled in Canada to become an influential civil servant in Ottawa and Alberta
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, April 16, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- The Flying Log Book of Wing Commander Stanley Mansbridge reads like a shorthand history of the air war over Europe. The log books were kept by every pilot and navigator, some more thorough than others. The blue-covered book was meticulously maintained, filled with detail, and demonstrated the kind of commitment to good organization that later propelled him to the heights of Canada's civil service.
Starting as a novice navigator, he recorded his flights in such smaller two-engine aircraft as Ansons, Fairey Battles and Blenheims before graduating to heavier machines, Hampdens, Wellingtons and finally the four-engine Lancaster. The bombing runs and flights over enemy territory -- operations -- are written in red ink, the training and transport flights in blue.
Each entry in the logbook occupies just one line, maybe two for a big mission. It gives the date, type of aircraft, name of the pilot, the "duty" or job Stanley MANSBRIDGE was doing, and a description of the mission.
The operation on the night of August 17, 1943, is one of the raids that merits two lines, naming the target and the size and number of bombs dropped by the Lancaster. The entry reads, "Peenemunde- 8 x 1000 G.P. 5 X 500 M.C.; Very Successful -- Large Fires."
The target was 1,000 kilometres from bomber bases in Britain and the flight took six and half hours there and back. His squadron was in the third wave, so the German defenders, fooled earlier by a phony raid on Berlin, were ready. Of the 12 aircraft in his squadron, only eight returned. The target was protected by a thicket of anti-aircraft fire from the ground and German night fighters in the air. Peenemunde was the secret location where Nazi scientists built the V-1 flying bomb (the world's first cruise missile) and the V-2 (the world's first ballistic missile).
The raid destroyed the rocket factory and killed many scientists, including Dr. Walter Thiel, the designer of the rocket engines. Flight Lieutenant MANSBRIDGE, as he was at the time, knew the raid was important, but didn't know it was one of the key air attacks of the war.
"Peenemunde one of the two raids by the Royal Air Force that changed the course of the war," says Steve HARRIS, director of History at the Department of National Defence in Ottawa. "It slowed the development of the V-1 and V-2 by at least two months. Had the V-2 been ready on time, the Allies might not have been able to hold the beaches in Normandy."
The war in Europe might have continued for years without the invasion of Normandy in June of 1944. The first V-1's, known as doodlebugs, were launched against Britain on June 13, 1944, a week after the D-Day invasion. Many were shot down. It wasn't until September of 1944 that the more deadly V-2's were launched. They carried a 975 kilogram warhead and their supersonic speed meant they were impossible to shoot down.
"It seems likely that if the Germans had succeeded in perfecting and using these new weapons earlier than he did, our invasion of Europe would have proved exceedingly difficult, perhaps impossible," wrote General Dwight Eisenhower, Supreme allied Commander in Europe.
Stanley MANSBRIDGE flew with the Royal Air Force. He had been born in a Canadian military hospital in England in 1918, son of a Canadian father and a British mother. His father, Harry, served with the Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry during the First World War and, among other battles, fought at Vimy Ridge.
After the war, the family lived in Toronto for a few years but his mother longed for home and they all moved back. Stanley grew up in the London suburb of Richmond, where he became an accomplished cricket player. He passed the British equivalent of high school and then went to work for Lloyd's Bank. There, he took banking courses that helped with his later career.
In 1939, he joined the Royal Air Force which happily latched on to his gift for numbers and detail and made him a navigator. The Royal Air Force was not disappointed. His unerring ability to find his way to the target and back in all conditions earned him the role of senior navigator in his squadron, a job that held heart-stopping responsibilities. Essentially, the navigator was the heart and mind of each bomber and was all but in command. The crew relied on the pilot's flying skills to get them off the ground, over the target and returned to earth in one piece yet knew in their bones that it was the navigator who gave him his instructions. Only the navigator understood the mysterious art of how to find their way in the dark to a hostile target and then return them safely home. In the case of Stan MANSBRIDGE, he was also accountable for an entire squadron that on any one mission mustered as many as 25 aircraft, each with its own navigator and each of whom was under his supervision.
His total time in combat involved two tours of duty, which meant 50 "operation" flights over enemy territory, including a 1941 mine-laying mission in the North Sea that disabled the German battle cruiser Gneisenau (with its sister ship, it had sunk 22 merchant vessels). Altogether, he made 340 flights during the war. Perhaps the most unusual was to deliver 600 pounds of Royal Mail to Gibraltar in a Lancaster bomber.
Some of his major missions included the raid on Hamburg that set the city afire and a long-distance raid on the Skoda munitions works in Czechoslovakia. A night mission against a German radar factory surprised the Germans by carrying on to bases in North Africa rather than turning for home and into the gun sights of waiting nightfighters.
The raid on Peenemunde was Mr. MANSBRIDGE's last operation and soon after he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He then went to the Royal Air Force staff college and it was during that period he married his sweetheart Brenda. Unlike other wartime flyers who rushed into marriage, he had put off the wedding because he had seen so many of his Friends leave young widows after failing to come back from a raid. Ever the careful organizer, he decided to wait until after his second and final "tour."
From staff college, he was assigned to Bomber Command headquarters in High Wycombe outside London where he worked under Air Marshal Arthur "Bomber" Harris, the tactician and father of the "1,000-bomber raid" who, after the Battle of Britain, became the force to be reckoned with in Royal Air Force strategy. Fittingly, as a newly minted member of headquarters "brass," Mr. MANSBRIDGE was promoted to wing commander, which is the air force equivalent of a lieutenant-colonel.
After the war, he turned down a permanent commission in the Royal Air Force and went to work for the British civil service. His specialty was organization. From 1950 to 54, he and his young family lived in the Federated Malay States where Mr. MANSBRIDGE worked to set up the civil service for the soon-to-be-independent country of Malaysia. It was a time of professional rewards at work and personal satisfaction at home. With young children under foot, his large Kuala Lumpur home was made busy by the hubbub of family life. By then his two older children had been born Wendy, who would take up nursing, and Peter, who would grow up to become one of Canada's best known broadcasters.
While in Kuala Lumpur, Mr. MANSBRIDGE played for the state cricket team and won colours for his contribution as a fast bowler. It was from there that he decided to move to Canada, a country he hadn't visited since he was a boy.
The family moved to Ottawa where they put down new roots and welcomed the addition of a third child, Paul, who is now a supermarket executive. Mr. MANSBRIDGE soon made himself valuable to the federal government as a kind of trouble shooter for the Civil Service Commission, moving from one department to the other when they needed re-organization. "He was an expert in finding out what was wrong in government departments and making them more efficient in what they do, whether it was Malaya or in Ottawa," said Peter MANSBRIDGE, who before he joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation had been inspired to train as a Royal Canadian Navy pilot.
By 1960, Stanley MANSBRIDGE was deputy chief of organization and methods for the Civil Services Commission and was made its chief in 1964. In 1971, he joined the department of Health and Welfare where he was assistant deputy minister under Marc LALONDE.
Al JOHNSON, one of the most powerful mandarins in Ottawa during the 1960's and 1970's appreciated Mr. MANSBRIDGE's organizational skills. "He was assistant deputy minister of administration at National Welfare," remembered Mr. JOHNSON, who was the deputy minister and who is now retired in Ottawa. "Stanley was our financial watchdog. It's not a job that always makes you popular, but he was well liked since he was such an amiable person."
In 1976, he went to Edmonton for a meeting with Peter Lougheed. Mr. MANSBRIDGE later recalled that the Alberta premier insisted on one-on-one interviews with any senior people he hired. He passed muster and became the province's chief deputy minister of Social Services and Community Health, a job he kept until "The Province of Alberta was very fortunate to have Mr. MANSBRIDGE play a senior role with the Government of Alberta during the time I was premier," Mr. Lougheed said last week from his office in Calgary.
It was a period of intense debate between the federal and provincial governments over matters of health and welfare. Mr. MANSBRIDGE wrote many papers on these issues, some of which appeared in the Canadian Journal of Public Administration.
After leaving his job in Edmonton, Mr. MANSBRIDGE moved to Victoria where he taught public administration at the University of Victoria. Several years ago, he moved to London, Ontario, to be closer to his family.
Stanley Harry MANSBRIDGE was born on May 29, 1918, in Folkestone, England. He died in London, Ontario, on March 27, 2005. He is leaves his wife Brenda and by his children, Wendy, Peter and Paul.

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-22 published
I Remember -- Stanley MANSBRIDGE
By Brian STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Friday, April 22, 2005, Page S7
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reporter Brian STEWARD/STEWART/STUART writes about Stanley MANSBRIDGE, whose obituary appeared April 16.
Once, I went off to lunch in London along with a visiting Stanley MANSBRIDGE, and on our way we happened to pass Buckingham Palace. Aware of his years in Britain, I asked if he'd ever been inside. "Oh, only once, but a very long time ago," he said, before breezily changing the subject. Only hours later, over dessert, could I poke out more detail: "That's when I got my medal from King George. A small chap," Stanley allowed, sidestepping the honour. "There were many of us in line, really. Some more cheese?"
Always, Stanley would seem the same ideal of elegant charm and quiet modesty. It was the Distinguished Flying Cross that then-Flight Lieutenant MANSBRIDGE had been awarded in 1943, for valour on Royal Air Force bombing missions.
I got to know Stanley through his son Peter, my Canadian Broadcasting Corporation colleague, and always pressed for more of his story. He had survived 50 dangerous missions in years when even a single "tour" was a searing test of character, with high odds against survival. Even more than the physical courage, I was fascinated by moral strength. As senior navigator for an entire squadron, he had carried responsibility for the safety of hundreds of fellow airmen. I could scarcely imagine the strain of plotting life-or-death courses while hunched over primitive instruments in a pitching Lancaster for hours on end in the deadly night sky of wartime Europe.
I always wondered how survivors of such challenges had any nervous energy left afterward to have normal careers, yet Stanley went on to become an outstanding civil servant. To me, he had that rare air of serenity one finds in those who've shown deep courage over prolonged periods, and this calmness drew people to him. They say our lives tell us who we are. Stanley MANSBRIDGE was a brave man from a brave generation.

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-23 published
I Remember -- Stanley MANSBRIDGE
By Bernie KREWSKI, Saturday, April 23, 2005, Page S9
Bernie KREWSKI of Edmonton writes about Stanley MANSBRIDGE, whose obituary appeared on April 16.
I was Stanley MANSBRIDGE's executive assistant when he arrived in Alberta as chief deputy minister. He was a true public servant. Everyone who worked with him learned about the operations of government by his example, and his reputation for fairness and objectivity was unparalleled.
Mr. MANSBRIDGE was dignified, serious and appeared stern at times. But his very human side was also apparent. In 1977, our department was invited to nominate staff for the Queen's Silver Jubilee medal. His management committee decided that only staff of lesser stature would be recognized. Senior managers were to be excluded.
One day, he stormed into my office with a jubilee medal. "Are you responsible for this?" he demanded in an angry voice. My chuckle was louder each time he repeated the question. Later, he discovered that his minister, our boss, had secretly put forward his name and committed a "terrible deed." Too late, we learned that Mr. MANSBRIDGE was a less-than-enthusiastic royalist!

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-13 published
I Remember -- Peter JENNINGS
By Peter DESBARATS, Saturday, August 13, 2005, Page S11
Most of the public recollections of Peter JENNINGS have cited his generosity, particularly when it came to other journalists. I experienced an outstanding example of this.
It was near the end of the 1980s. I had been the journalism dean at the University of Western Ontario since 1981. A large part of this job, and similar positions in academia, was raising money. Someone came up with a brilliant idea -- we would gather together a dozen of the top Canadian journalists from home and abroad for a public celebration of their talent. It would be truly a "Gathering of the Giants."
From the outset it was evident that we would need the support of the "giant of giants," Peter JENNINGS. Clearly, he had achieved that status among Canadian journalists working in Canada, in the United States and elsewhere. He was in a class by himself.
So I flew to New York to have lunch with him. This had been surprisingly easy to arrange, despite the fact that our paths had not previously crossed. There is a camaraderie among journalists that I had experienced on assignment in many countries and Peter was a prime example of this.
We enjoyed an unpretentious lunch in the ABC network's cafeteria and chatted about mutual Friends before I made my pitch. After a minimum of discussion he agreed to be one of our giants. The rest soon followed: the two other Peters, MANSBRIDGE and GZOWSKI the two Barbaras, FRUM and AMIEL; Morley Safer from 60 Minutes, Lloyd ROBERSTON of CTV, Allan FOTHERINGHAM, Sydney Gruson of The New York Times, Jeffrey SIMPSON of The Globe and Mail, Henry CHAMP of CTV, Robert McNeil of PBS and Richard GWYN of the Toronto Star, for a total of 13.
Months later, after a tremendous amount of work by my committee in Toronto, we were approaching the big night at Toronto's Metro Convention Centre. There had been a few minor bumps along the way, but Peter JENNINGS was still on board. By this time I had learned to appreciate how unusual this was.
Peter gave me to understand that ABC wasn't particularly keen on anything that highlighted his Canadian background and citizenship. I also got the impression that his prominent role in this fundraiser was unusual and probably would not have been undertaken for a journalism school in the United States.
In the final weeks I began to worry about some major news event conflicting with our gathering and taking Peter to some far-flung but newsworthy corner of the world. He couldn't guarantee that this wouldn't happen but simply repeated that he would make every effort to attend.
My nightmare came true when the destruction of the Berlin Wall in November, 1989, unleashed a whole series of European events. I can't remember exactly which one conflicted with our gathering, only that it was significant enough to make me almost abandon hope. But Peter arrived on schedule in a private plane from New York, stopping for our event in Toronto before flying immediately that night to some European capital or other.
I watched him on the screen the following night in amazement, not so much for his profound professionalism but for his amazing Friendship and generosity.
But there's more. After our Oscar-type celebration of the 13 giants on the convention centre's main stage -- complete with video highlights of their careers and mini-interviews by 13 awestruck journalism students -- and after a lavish buffet supper ("food from the news capitals of the world"), the entertainment consisted of a mock newscast anchored by Peter JENNINGS, Lloyd ROBERTSON and Peter MANSBRIDGE. The rest of the 13 were in a nearby studio supposedly reporting from Washington, London, Moscow and other impressive datelines.
Peter gave my script for this tomfoolery his full attention, reading it carefully beforehand, underlining certain parts and rehearsing under his breath. The other two anchors quickly rose to the challenge, providing our audience with a hilarious display of competitive news delivery as they worked shamelessly to milk laughs from their appreciative audience.
The only restriction placed by Peter on this unique performance was that no one in the control room would make an unauthorized pirate tape of it. And as far as I know, no one did, because I'm sure it would have turned up by now.
We raised about $80,000 for the journalism school that night and I always felt that I had never thanked him properly. So thanks, Peter. You stood for everything that was thoughtful, professional and generous about journalism at its best.
Peter DESBARATS, a former Global television anchor, was dean of the graduate journalism program at the University of Western Ontario from 1981 to 1996.

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-13 published
Cancer battle claims admired journalist
By Antonia ZERBISIAS, Media Columnist
The wonder is, Bill CAMERON did not author his own obituary.
For here was a man who is acknowledged as the greatest writer of his generation of Canadian journalists, whose words graced the page, the stage, the screen, the classroom and, of course, the airwaves.
CAMERON, 62, died at his Toronto home just after midnight yesterday, after a 20-month struggle with esophageal cancer, surrounded by his wife, Cheryl HAWKES, and his children Patrick, 22, Rachel, 21, and Nick 15.
"He was trying to hold us in his arms," said HAWKES yesterday. "But he was too weak."
Respected, admired, and loved, CAMERON was, what friend and former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation colleague Fred LANGAN called yesterday, "a triple threat," the consummate anchor, journalist and writer.
But he was more than that.
From his start as a freelance entertainment critic for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and CTV, to penning an editorial column at the Toronto Star at the age of 25, to editing for the nascent Global news, to anchoring at Citytv in the 1970s, to covering foreign assignments and co-hosting for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's nightly newsmagazine The Journal, to anchoring Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television's local news, to fronting Newsworld's morning show, to writing novels and ghosting documentary scripts for others, to playing the anchor on the Comedy Network's Puppets Who Kill, there was no journalism job CAMERON could not do -- and do well.
"Who the hell is good at all those things?" asked Mark STAROWICZ, the producer who hired CAMERON in 1983 to report and fill in as an anchor on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's The Journal and Midday.
Which is why, when the Journal went off the air in 1992, it was CAMERON, tapped to succeed the late Barbara FRUM as host, who delivered the eloquent goodbye to viewers: "I'd like to leave you with the words you find on the back of the cheque you get at any coffee shop in Canada. Thank you for letting us serve you."
What CAMERON had was a voice, and even at the end, when he could barely use it, he still slapped on his make-up to host his i-channel talk show, as well as act as fill-in interviewer on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's As It Happens.
His last big interview was with the Dalai Lama, for the documentary The Dalai Lama: The Power of Compassion that aired last week on i-channel.
"He was a master of the interview," said Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Peter MANSBRIDGE, who recalled CAMERON giving him some pointers last fall at a party in his honour.
About 200 Friends and colleagues, from all the networks and the print media where CAMERON had worked, gathered at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to show their support.
"He really kept his sense of humour," said Global's Peter KENT. "He'd go through the chemo sessions -- and was brutalized by them -- but then he'd come up for air and talk to Friends and inquire about others."
"Everybody has this idea that he was such a serious guy," said Valerie PRINGLE, with whom he worked on Midday. "But I remember when the opportunity came up to interview Big Bird, he wrestled me to the ground and said, 'It's mine.'
"I can remember he was doing an interview, with a cop or something, and he said, 'Well, I've shoplifted, I've smoked dope,'" PRINGLE laughed. "We all just dropped our coffees."
What CAMERON cared about was his family and journalism.
"He worshipped his wife and children," said PRINGLE, describing a Valentine's Day tribute that CAMERON had published. "It just made you cry. I thought this guy was so madly in love with Cheryl, I can't even stand it."
In fact, it was love at first sight.
HAWKES met him in 1980, when she was doing a freelance profile on him for Star Week magazine.
"He followed me out of the restaurant and tried to talk me out of writing the story," she said yesterday. "He said 'I don't need publicity; I need to marry you.'"
They were wed four months later. But he would leave her often to take on dangerous assignments for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, flying in and out of the hellholes of the world.
STAROWICZ described one assignment in which CAMERON was talking to the camera, with bombs exploding around him, but he barely flinched.
In fact, "he was talking in perfect paragraphs."
But it seems that CAMERON, who has held the journalism ethics chair at Ryerson University, also worried about the ethical hazards of war reporting.
As he wrote in 1990, "That's the dreadful suspicion: That we dip into the surface of deep events, paddle with our feet, guard our comforts, patronize our contacts, exploit great tragedies for the good of our careers, and get the story wrong."
CAMERON wanted to get the story not only right, but also exactly, perfectly, precisely right.
"He had one of the most discerning ears," said Citytv's Mark DAILEY, who worked with CAMERON when he was the anchor of the 10 p.m. newscast. "He was a very important part of our early conscience at Citypulse."
MANSBRIDGE remembered one evening co-hosting with CAMERON on the Journal. It was a time of intense rivalries between the National and the newsmagazine and few people expected the pairing to go well.
But, said MANSBRIDGE, in the middle of a technical interview on a financial story, CAMERON slipped him an idea, which improved the segment.
"That underlined that this was a guy who cared about the product, who cared about how we did things," MANSBRIDGE said.
"He studied acting which is one of the reasons he could be a little arch on television," LANGAN said. "He knew how to manipulate words more than the average announcer."
A journalist to the end, CAMERON documented his battle with his cancer for an upcoming feature in Walrus magazine. His most recent piece was a witty look... at caskets.
That's why it is so surprising he didn't leave some notes for the occasion of the death, one he knew was coming much too fast and too soon.

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-24 published
MANSBRIDGE, Anne (née ROGERSON)
It is with deep love, respect and great sadness that the family of Anne MANSBRIDGE (née ROGERSON) announces that she died peacefully in her 80th year on Thursday, April 21, 2005 at Southlake Regional Hospital in Newmarket, Ontario. Anne was born in Newcastle-Upon Tyne, England on January 20, 1926, daughter of the late John Thomas and Mary Anne ROGERSON (née O'FARRELL.) Dear sister of Bill, Cathy, Margaret, Jimmy and John. Beloved wife of the late Ivan H. MANSBRIDGE. Dear mother of Michael, Alison and Stephen. Mother-in-law of Barbara and Kathleen. Much loved grandmother of Jennifer HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, Kristine MANSBRIDGE, Jeremy TATUM, Christopher TATUM, Joshua TATUM and Melissa MANSBRIDGE. A special thank you to the nurses and Dr. HAMILTON at Southlake for their care and assistance. Friends will be received at the Elgin Mills Visitation, Chapel and Reception Centre (1591 Elgin Mills Rd. East, Richmond Hill, 905-737-1720) on Friday, April 29, 2005 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., with memorial service and reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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