LAWLESS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-14 published
STREIB, Barbara Anne (née GRAY/GREY)
Barbara Anne (GRAY/GREY) formerly of R.R.#6 Saint Thomas, on Sunday, March 13, 2005, in her 75th year. Beloved wife of the late Keith L. "Sandy" STREIB and dearly loved mother of Catherine and her husband Dwight KOYLE of Iona Station, Peter and his wife Bernice STREIB of R.R.#7 Saint Thomas and Dale and his wife Lisa STREIB of Boxall. Dear sister of Margaret LEWIS of Strathroy, Betty MacDONALD of London and sister-in-law Norma GRAY/GREY of London. Predeceased by a brother Douglas "Shorty" GRAY/GREY. Much loved grandmother of Meghan and her husband Brad MILLER, Melissa and her husband John SOTELO and Martin KOYLE, Brad, Greg and Michelle STREIB and Carlie STREIB. Special friend of Keith LAWLESS of Saint Thomas. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews.
Barb was born in London on February 7, 1931, the daughter of the late Holmer and Jean (STRATH) GRAY/GREY. She owned and operated Da-Ter Excavating with her husband and family and worked as a receptionist at Williams Funeral Home. She volunteered with the M.S. Society and was an avid gardener. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Wednesday at 1: 00 p.m. Interment to follow at Elmdale Cemetery. Visitation Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the M.S. Society or the Fingal Wildlife Sanctuary.

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LAWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-15 published
GREGOIRE, Reverend Gerald Telesphore, C.S.B.
Died in his sleep on Sunday April 3, 2005 in Shanghai, China while travelling with Friends. Father GREGOIRE was born in Toronto May 2, 1924 son of Telesphore GREGOIRE and Leonida LAWLESS. Loving brother and uncle of Frank and his wife Anne and their children, Joanne, Gerald, John, Michael, Patricia, Frank, Theresa and Kathleen Basil and his wife Shirlie and their children, Joan, Stephen, Suzanne, Janine, Brian, and MaryLou; Catherine DOWNES and her children Gerrard, Joseph, John and Maryanne. Father GREGOIRE was predeceased by his brother-in-law George DOWNES. Dear great-uncle of 31 grand-nieces and nephews and 2 great-grand-nieces and nephews. Father GREGOIRE will be dearly missed by many cousins and Friends.
Father GREGOIRE attended Holy Name elementary school (Toronto) and St. Michael's College School (Toronto) where he was an accomplished hockey player. He entered the Basilian Fathers Novitiate in 1942, and graduated from St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto in 1946. He was ordained to the priesthood on June 29, 1951. Father GREGOIRE's teaching career included appointments to Catholic Central High School (Detroit), St. Michael's College School (Toronto), Saint Mary's College (Calgary), Assumption High School (Windsor) and St. Joseph's High School (Ottawa). He was Principal of St. Francis Boys' High School (Lethbridge) and St. Mary's College (Sault Ste. Marie.) Father GREGOIRE taught Latin, French and Theology and coached football, basketball and hockey.
He was Superior of a residence for young Basilians in Windsor and was Superior of St. Basil's Seminary (Toronto). Parish appointments included Pastor of Saint Mary's (Owen Sound), St. Basil's (Ottawa), Holy Rosary (Toronto), St. Basil's (Toronto) and St. Eugene's (Toronto). His most recent appointment was Associate Pastor at St. Basil's (Toronto).
Friends may call at St. Basil's Parish Church, 50 St. Joseph Street, Toronto on Monday, April 18th from 3 p.m. A Vigil Service will be held at the Church on Monday night at 7 p.m. Father GREGOIRE's body will lie in state at St. Basil's Church until the concelebration of the Mass of Christian Burial which will take place on Tuesday night at 7 p.m. Interment on Wednesday, April 20th at 10 a.m. in the Basilian Plot at Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill, Ontario.

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LAWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-16 published
GREGOIRE, Reverend Gerald Telesphore, C.S.B.
Died in his sleep on Sunday April 3, 2005 in Shanghai, China while travelling with Friends. Father GREGOIRE was born in Toronto May 2, 1924 son of Telesphore GREGOIRE and Leonida LAWLESS. Loving brother and uncle of Frank and his wife Anne and their children, Joanne, Gerald, John, Michael, Patricia, Frank, Theresa and Kathleen Basil and his wife Shirlie and their children, Joan, Stephen, Suzanne, Janine, Brian, and Mary Lou; Catherine DOWNES and her children Gerrard, Joseph, John and Maryanne. Father GREGOIRE was predeceased by his brother-in-law George DOWNES. Dear great-uncle of 31 grand-nieces and nephews and 2 great-grand-nieces and nephews. Father GREGOIRE will be dearly missed by many cousins and Friends.
Father GREGOIRE attended Holy Name elementary school (Toronto) and St. Michael's College School (Toronto) where he was an accomplished hockey player. He entered the Basilian Fathers Novitiate in 1942, and graduated from St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto in 1946. He was ordained to the priesthood on June 29, 1951. Father GREGOIRE's teaching career included appointments to Catholic Central High School (Detroit), St. Michael's College School (Toronto), Saint Mary's College (Calgary), Assumption High School (Windsor) and St. Joseph's High School (Ottawa). He was Principal of St. Francis Boys' High School (Lethbridge) and St. Mary's College (Sault Ste. Marie.) Father GREGOIRE taught Latin, French and Theology and coached football, basketball and hockey.
He was Superior of a residence for young Basilians in Windsor and was Superior of St. Basil's Seminary (Toronto). Parish appointments included Pastor of Saint Mary's (Owen Sound), St. Basil's (Ottawa), Holy Rosary (Toronto), St. Basil's (Toronto) and St. Eugene's (Toronto). His most recent appointment was Associate Pastor at St. Basil's (Toronto).
Friends may call at St. Basil's Parish Church, 50 St. Joseph Street, Toronto on Monday, April 18th from 3 p.m. A Vigil Service will be held at the Church on Monday night at 7 p.m. Father GREGOIRE's body will lie in state at St. Basil's Church until the concelebration of the Mass of Christian Burial which will take place on Tuesday night at 7 p.m. Interment on Wednesday, April 20th at 10 a.m. in the Basilian Plot at Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill, Ontario.

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LAWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-25 published
LAWLESS, Kathleen (BREMNER)

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LAWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-02 published
LAWLESS, Father John Hazelton
Died peacefully, on March 31, 2005, at St. Joseph's Villa, Dundas, Ontario where he has lived since 1990. Born in Grafton, Ontario on April 6, 1916 and ordained into the priesthood for Hamilton Diocese on June 6, 1948. Father John taught French at Cathedral Boys' High School while working as Assistant Pastor at the parishes of St. Francis Xavier, Stoney Creek, Saint Mary's, Saint John the Baptist, St. Charles Garnier and St. Patrick's - all in Hamilton. He was the founding Pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Hamilton where he served from 1962-1967. He was the Pastor of St. Boniface Parish in Maryhill from 1967-1979 followed by Chaplaincy of Mount St. Joseph until 1986. Following a serious illness he retired to St. Joseph Villa where he continued to offer daily Mass for the Sisters until a few weeks ago. Father LAWLESS was predeceased by his parents, Jenny Hazelton LAWLESS (1918) and Henry LAWLESS (1937;) his sister Jane KOERNER (1994;) and his brother Daniel (2001). He is survived by his sister Gertrude (husband Bernard MURPHY) of Toronto; his brother Denis (wife Joan) of Ottawa his sister Rose Lawless TAILOR/TAYLOR of Fairfax, Virginia; his sister-in-law Mary Ellen LAWLESS of Toronto; his brother-in-law George KOERNER of Falls Church, Virginia; and innumerable nieces, nephews and cousins in Ontario and the United States. Being raised by his Aunt Kate and Uncle Rueben LAWLESS, he always looked upon these cousins, including the Gregoire and Love families as his brothers and sisters. Father LAWLESS' dedication to family will be treasured by all who remember his quiet presence at family celebrations, especially his visits to the sick and suffering. Visitation and prayers for Father LAWLESS will be held at St. Augustine's Church, 58 Sydenham Street, Dundas, Ontario on Sunday, April 3, 2005 from 4: 00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held at St. Augustine's Church at 11: 00 a.m. on Monday, April 4, 2005, followed by burial at 3: 00 p.m. in St. Boniface Cemetery, Maryhill, Ontario. Father John's family thanks the Sisters of St. Joseph of Hamilton for the care they have given to Father John over the years and to the staff and many outstanding caregivers of St. Joseph's Villa for the dedication, compassion and love they have showered on Father John, especially over these last few months. Thank You! Charitable contributions in honour of Father LAWLESS should be sent to the charity of your choice. For further information, contact Marlatt Funeral Home, Dundas, 905-627-7452.

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LAWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-01 published
MURPHY, Gertrude (née LAWLESS)
Peacefully at Sheridan Villa on Wednesday, November 30, 2005. Gertrude MURPHY, dearly beloved wife of 57 years to Bernard. Dear mother of Dennis (Heidi), Michael, Robert (Debbie), Catherine, Maureen (Stephen QUICK), Thomas (Sabine), Sharron (Tom GLEASON) and Rosanne (Andre ALBERTS.) Special Nana to 16 grandchildren. Sadly missed by her brother Denis (Joan,) her sister Rose TAILOR/TAYLOR and predeceased by Fr. John Daniel and Jane. Also sadly missed by nieces, nephews, family and Friends. Resting at the Newediuk Funeral Home, Kipling Chapel, 2104 Kipling Ave., Etobicoke (two blocks north of Rexdale Blvd.) from Friday 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Saturday, leaving the funeral home 9 a.m. to St. Benedict's Church, 2194 Kipling Ave. for Funeral Mass at 9: 30 a.m., followed by cremation. (As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated by the family).

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LAWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-18 published
MULLEN, Albert Christopher Lawrence
It is with unspeakable grief that we announce the passing this December 16, 2005, of our father, grandfather, brother, friend and moral guide, Albert Christopher Lawrence MULLEN of Whitby, Ontario and Dublin, Ireland. Albert was born January 4, 1936 in Dublin at 15 Usher's Island on the city's south side, the second son of Albert Leopold MULLEN and Bridget MULLEN (née O'BRIEN.) Educated by the Christian Brothers at St. Columba's School, Albert distinguished himself amongst his peers, excelling most prominently in Mathematics. In 1956, he married the love of his life, Kathleen LAWLESS, and the two immigrated to England within hours of marriage, intending to build a new life together in Canada. The couple lived for a time in Toronto's Annex neighbourhood before settling in Whitby to raise their four daughters. Albert was a hard-working man blessed with an inexhaustible patience and a formidable strength of character that carried him through each of his days. A gentle giant of a man who thought of himself only after he looked to his loved ones, Albert was an inspiration to all who were so fortunate to know him. He was predeceased by his brother Joseph Richard MULLEN and survived by his loving wife Kathleen; his brothers Martin and Michael; his sister Bridget; his daughters Theresa, Catherine and her husband Fausto, Maureen and her husband Michael, Jacqueline and her husband Darren; and his grandchildren Albert, Zaira, Natasha, Madeleine, Kathleen, Stefanie, Bridget and Brendan. No matter how many years pass, not one of us will forget the mighty force of his laughter. The family will receive Friends at W.C. Town Funeral Chapel, 110 Dundas Street East, Whitby (905-668-3410), from 2: 00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. until 9: 00 p.m. on Monday, December 19. Mass of the Christian Burial will be held at Saint John the Evangelist Church, 903 Giffard Street, Whitby, at 11: 00 a.m., Tuesday, December 20. Interment, Resurrection Cemetery. In memoriam donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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LAWLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-07 published
SPICER, Elizabeth Aitken
On Saturday, February 5, 2005, in her 93rd year, at York Central Hospital Long Term Care Facility. Dear wife of the late Bernard Frederick SPICER, loving mother of Florence HUMPHRIES and Alexander SPICER. Grandmother of Margo LEDUC, Robert HUMPHRIES, Gregory SPICER, Christine VAN HUIS, great-grandmother of Jason, Jeffrey and Jamie LAWLEY, Chelsea and Connor HUMPHRIES, Brittany, Amber and Tamara SPICER, Catherine, Erika, Grace and Cameron VAN HUIS. Private family interment. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Salvation Army Red Shield would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Roadhouse and Rose Funeral Home, 157 Main St. South, Newmarket.

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LAWLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-05 published
OTTEN, Joan
Peacefully at home on October 3, 2005 at the age of 71. Dear wife of Alex. Loving mother of Debbie and her husband Mike LAWLEY. Grammy O. will be sadly missed by her granddaughters Krista and Kara. A Memorial Service will be held at Advent Lutheran Church, 2800 Don Mills Rd., Toronto, on Friday, October 7, 2005 at 2 p.m. Donations to The Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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LAWLIS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-19 published
LAWLIS, Maxwell
Maxwell...
If we could have one lifetime wish,
One dream that could come true,
We would ask with all our hearts
For yesterday and you.
Remembering on this day how special it was to know you. Love Katelyn, Zack, Donna and Shawn.

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LAWLIS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-19 published
LAWLIS, Maxwell
Remembering our dear grand_son Maxwell.
Those we love don't go away,
They walk beside us every day,
Unseen, unheard and always near,
Still loved, still missed and very dear.
Love Gramma Jean and Grampa.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-03 published
DEAN, Eva Hilda (formerly SCHULTZ, née READING)
Peacefully at Caressant Care, Woodstock on Thursday, September 1, 2005, Eva Hilda DEAN (SCHULTZ, née READING) of Woodstock went to be with her Lord in her 100th year. Beloved wife for 52 years of the late Stanley SCHULTZ (1979) and for 13 years of the late W. Ross DEAN (1993.) Predeceased by her only son Harold SCHULTZ (1998.) She left in God's trust her five daughters, Dorothy AMY (John) of Montreal, Betty HUGGINS (the late Lloyd) of Norwich, Bernice ROBINSON (the late Jim) of Harrington, Shirley MICK (Ford) of Woodstock and Marie SLATER (Gordon) of Kitchener and her daughter-in-law Grace SCHULTZ of Harley. Also lovingly remembered by 20 grandchildren, 43 great grandchildren and 9 great great grandchildren. Stepmother of June RADFORD, Gordon DEAN and Gerry DEAN (Donna). Also predeceased by her parents William and Ida READING, sisters Vera, Florence, Della, Eileen and Olive, grandchildren Diane LAWLOR, Phillip AMY, and Janette SCURR, and great granddaughter Jamie Elaine PREKUP. She was a long-time member of East Oxford Baptist Church and Huron Park Baptist Church. Friends will be received at the Smith-LeRoy Funeral Home, 69 Wellington St. North, Woodstock on Wednesday, September 7, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service at Huron Park Baptist Church, 199 Berwick Street, Woodstock on Thursday, September 8, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Princeton Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Christian Service Centres, The Gideons International, Canadian Cancer Society or Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. Smith-LeRoy, (519) 537-3611. Personal condolences may be sent at www.smithleroy.com

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-28 published
CREELMAN, Mary
At Parkwood Hospital, London, on Monday, December 26th, 2005, Mary CREELMAN of London and formerly of Nova Scotia in her 85th year. Beloved daughter of the late Hedley and Jessie CREELMAN. Dear sister of Helen LAWLOR of London, Gladys WORKMAN and her husband Allen of Langley, British Columbia, Gordon CREELMAN and his wife Joan of Truro, Nova Scotia, Warren CREELMAN and his wife Helen of Fredericton, New Brunswick, and Allan CREELMAN and his wife Joanne of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Predeceased by her brothers Walter, Kenneth and Donald and her sister-in-law Portia. Dear sister-in-law of Debra and Muriel CREELMAN both of Truro, Nova Scotia Dear aunt of David LAWLOR of Barrie and Janet LAWLOR of Wellington, New Zealand. At Mary's request, cremation has taken place and a memorial service will be held in Nova Scotia at a later date. Memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated. A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London (433-5184) in care of arrangements. On line condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-21 published
Douglas MARSHALL, Journalist 1937-2005
Toronto editor and writer was a co-founder of the journal Books In Canada and a sounding board for Margaret Atwood, Robert Fulford and Margaret Laurence
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, January 21, 2005 - Page S7
Doug MARSHALL was a writer and editor who cut his teeth in the newspaper business in the 1950s while working on a university paper with the likes of broadcaster Peter GZOWSKI. As an undergraduate at the University of Toronto, Mr. MARSHALL worked on The Varsity with the late Mr. GZOWSKI, who was then the paper's editor, and long-time Globe reporter John GRAY/GREY. Considered one of its star writers, Mr. MARSHALL eventually became editor of the student newspaper in 1958-59 and embarked on his lifelong career in the business.
"He loved the English language," said Lynda HURST, a columnist at the Toronto Star, where Mr. MARSHALL spent 20 years of his career. "He was obsessed with its proper use in newspapers."
After graduation, Mr. MARSHALL headed back to England, where he had spent much of his childhood. Based in London, he worked for several years as a reporter for The Canadian Press. On his return to Canada, he became a staff writer at Maclean's, which was then a monthly magazine. In 1971, he co-founded the monthly review journal Books In Canada with the late Val Clery. It got started after the two men, along with a couple of others, contributed $55 each. With the help of a $250 grant from the Ontario government, they set out to fill a void in the Canadian book world.
Getting the magazine off the ground didn't happen without a few rocky moments. Readers, for instance, didn't see the first issue dated May, 1971, until a month later. When Mr. Clery left less than two years after it started, Mr. MARSHALL took over and was said to have injected his own cultural nationalism into the magazine.
"We weren't out necessarily to take an adversary position but to give attention to Canadian books," he told the Toronto Star in a 1986 interview.
"Our philosophical position was clear, which was to judge Canadian books on the highest possible standards. Good, professionally written reviews create a climate for good literature. I think we provided one of the tools that kept alive the renaissance of Canadian literature, with the result that Canada now has at least a half-dozen world-class writers."
Under Mr. MARSHALL, Books In Canada provided a forum for such authors and critics as Margaret Atwood, Robert Fulford, Margaret Laurence and Pierre BERTON. It also served as a training ground for up-and-coming writers.
"He loved to read," Mr. GRAY/GREY said. "He always had a book shoved into his jacket pocket."
Born not long before the Second World War, Mr. MARSHALL was the eldest of three children to Porte and Marion MARSHALL. His father, a family doctor in Colbourne, Ontario, was in England during the war; his job was to check on the health status of those wishing to immigrate to Canada. After the war, he brought his family to England to join him. Young Douglas later returned to Canada to attend the University of Toronto.
During his university years, his interest in journalism is said to have been sparked after he noticed that the students who most liked to drink happened to be the same ones who worked at the newspaper. "He began life when the newspaper business was a hard-drinking business and maintained the tradition," Mr. GRAY/GREY said.
"There was nothing he liked more than a feisty debate in the pub," said Sandra MARTIN, a Globe and Mail writer who worked with Mr. MARSHALL at Books In Canada.
In the early 1980s, Mr. MARSHALL joined the Toronto Star and remained there until his retirement two years ago. During his five years as the paper's entertainment editor, he is credited for having created the innovative What's On section. Departing from traditional newspaper design, the new section incorporated a magazine style. He later worked as the paper's science and environment editor.
"He could be difficult to work for," said Toronto Star editorial columnist Bob HEPBURN. "It would drive him nuts if he saw typos or mistakes in the paper."
Outside of the newspaper world, Mr. MARSHALL was a founding member of the Crime Writers of Canada and the Periodical Writers Association of Canada, and author of the crime fiction novel A Very Palpable Hit. He was at work on a mystery novel set in England.
Patrick Oliver Douglas MARSHALL was born on November 25, 1937, in Cobourg, Ontario He died of liver disease at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto on Wednesday. He was 67. He is survived by his wife, Sarah MURDOCH, and by Barnaby and Benjamin, sons from an earlier marriage to Deborah MARSHALL. Funeral arrangements have not been finalized.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-10 published
Gerry PATTERSON, Sports Agent 1933-2005
Starting with Jean Beliveau, he managed his clients in the style of big business. Nancy Greene, Guy Lafleur, Gordie Howe, Don Cherry and many others soon followed
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, February 10, 2005 - Page S7
Forever the optimist, Gerry PATTERSON set out boldly in the late 1960s to become the Mark McCormack of Canada. Based on the American sports marketing giant's business model, Mr. PATTERSON introduced a daring new way to manage sports stars in Canada. His pioneering idea was to run an athlete in the style of big business. "I am not an agent, but a corporate manager," he once told a reporter.
Mr. PATTERSON decided early that, if he were going to make it in the competitive sports world, he had to start at the top. Like Mr. McCormack, who got his start in 1960 with a young golfer named Arnold Palmer and from there built his IMG empire, Mr. PATTERSON decided he needed a sports icon of his own. He set his sights on Montreal Canadiens legend Jean Beliveau.
After a long and difficult courting period that included many days and nights of negotiating around Mr. PATTERSON's dining-room table, he and Mr. Beliveau shook hands in 1969.
"He wouldn't take no for an answer," said Scott PATTERSON, his son. "It's like he just wouldn't go away."
Mr. PATTERSON quit his marketing job at Canadian International Paper in Montreal and was soon following through on his promise to make Mr. Beliveau a lot of money in the marketplace. He worked out deals that saw the hockey legend's face on milk cartons, in General Motors commercials and as the spokesman for Scotiabank. The success was so big that Jean Beliveau Inc. was soon created.
At that time, Mr. PATTERSON also formed his company, Sports Management Inc., which would use the Beliveau model for baseball slugger Rusty Staub, Olympic ski champion Nancy Greene, and hockey greats Guy Lafleur and Gordie Howe. Don Cherry also credits Mr. PATTERSON for getting him on television and radio.
It was a year after signing on Mr. Beliveau that Mr. PATTERSON added Mr. Howe to his growing stable of top athletes. The handshake followed a Saturday night pre-game dinner with Mr. Beliveau, Mr. Howe, Mr. PATTERSON and his business partner, Jerry PETRIE. It was Mr. PATTERSON who would later negotiate the deal that saw Mr. Howe come out of retirement in 1973 to play with his sons Mark and Marty on the World Hockey Association's Houston Aeros.
"He was a giant," said Ralph MELLANBY, former executive producer of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television's Hockey Night in Canada. "He changed the fabric of sport in Canada."
Born in the Niagara region of Ontario, Gerry PATTERSON was the son of Martha and Herald PATTERSON, an oil-truck deliveryman. The family moved to Windsor, Ontario, when Mr. PATTERSON was still a young boy. A sports enthusiast all his life, he played basketball and baseball as a kid, but didn't have as much luck when it came to football. Mr. MELLANBY, who attended the same high school as Mr. PATTERSON, remembers during a tryout for the junior football team of having his affable friend threaten to become a cheerleader if he didn't beat him. Mr. PATTERSON followed through on his threat and ended up on the school cheerleading team. As luck would have it, he met and married a fellow team member named Wilma.
After high school, Mr. PATTERSON moved to Hamilton, where he took a management training program with Ford Motor Co. Years later, he would be back in Steeltown trying to bring in a National Hockey League franchise. In 1990, after two years of work, Mr. PATTERSON swallowed a bitter rejection pill. His consortium had lost its bid.
In 1962, he moved his family to Montreal. Despite his climb up the management ladder at Canadian International Paper, Mr. PATTERSON itched to follow his dream of marketing athletes. Aside from starting Sports Management Inc., he also co-owned Special Event Television with Mr. MELLANBY. The company produced several shows, including Mr. Cherry's Grapevine, Howie Meeker Pro Tips and Duke Snider's Baseball Pro Tips.
Mr. PATTERSON is credited with starting to market the Grapes nickname by which Mr. Cherry is known to Friends and television fans. The nickname is said to have come from an encounter with the late Eddie Shore, who dismissed an argument over money by saying, "That's just sour grapes."
Mr. PATTERSON and Mr. MELLANBY invented Grapevine and got the Hamilton television show going in the early 1980s. It later moved to national distribution. Mr. PATTERSON also suggested Mr. Cherry's Grapevines restaurant chain, but he dropped out after a two-year search for the right location in Hamilton.
"Gerry took me under his wing when I came [to Ontario] from Colorado," said Mr. Cherry, referring to his return to Canada in 1981 after being fired by the Colorado Rockies after one season.
Before long, he was helping out Mr. Cherry, who was feeling down on his luck, by lining up speaking engagements in small towns across Ontario. In those days, Mr. Cherry didn't draw the crowds he does today. Sometimes, he'd look out at the audience and see only a handful of faces, including that of his short, pudgy, ever-smiling friend, Gerry PATTERSON.
"He'd be the only one laughing," Mr. Cherry said.
One night, while driving to a speaking event together, Mr. Cherry performed a trial run of a new speech he had written. It was 20-minute motivational talk, and Mr. PATTERSON wasn't impressed. "Horseshit," he told Mr. Cherry. "Grapes, people just want to hear you and your stories. People don't want to be lectured on life."
In 1981, Mr. PATTERSON really came through for his friend when he marched into CFRB in Toronto and told the radio executives that he wanted to get Mr. Cherry on a sports talk show. After being told there were 100 guys just like Mr. Cherry vying for the same shot, Mr. PATTERSON pulled out a $91,000 cheque and put it on the table.
"Gerry got me on the radio," Mr. Cherry said. "The first week I said to Gerry, 'Do you think we'll have enough stories for the rest of the week?' "
Today, the syndicated radio talk show is played on more than 100 stations and has nearly one million listeners a week.
Despite his success as a sports agent, Mr. PATTERSON, who also served for a time as executive director of the Canadian Football League's Players Association, didn't stay long in the business. In 1974, just five years after starting Sports Management Inc., he sold his company to Mr. PETRIE.
"Had he stayed with it, he could have been the Mark McCormack of Canada," said Mr. MELLANBY, who thought his friend made a big mistake by leaving the business.
But, according to Mr. MELLANBY, Mr. PATTERSON had aspirations to become president of the National Hockey League and had been told that he first needed experience. In an effort to learn the ropes, he took over as commissioner of the National Lacrosse League. When he left the National Lacrosse League, he moved on to several different things, including director of marketing for CCM Canada, and as a consultant to the Montreal Olympics. He also published a book called Behind the Superstars: The Business Side of Sports.
He had completed another manuscript for a self-help book he meant to bring out under the title "Suxxess" but hadn't published it. Known for his positive sayings, even his car's licence plate had one: UCANXL.
"I never saw Gerry without a smile on his face," Mr. Cherry said.
Gerry PATTERSON was born on August 19, 1933, in Humberstone, Ontario, a community now part of Port Colborne. He died in St. Catharines, Ontario, on January 21 of a heart attack while out walking his dog. He was 71. He is survived by his wife, Trudy, daughters Jill and Myla, sons Scott, Kevin and Kim, sisters Dolores and Carol, and brother Wayne.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-18 published
Peter WIDDRINGTON, Executive and Chief Executive Officer: 1930-2005
As the head of Labatt, he was a 'father of baseball in Canada' who established the Blue Jays in Toronto and later came close to becoming president of the American League. For a time, he was even commissioner of baseball
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, February 18, 2005 - Page S7
Peter WIDDRINGTON once mused that he could well be the only beer salesman with an M.B.A. from Harvard. The long-time executive and former chairman of the Toronto Blue Jays took his Ivy League degree to John Labatt Ltd., where he started out in sales and held senior positions along the way before becoming head of the company in 1973. He held that position until 1989.
When talks started more than 30 years ago about bringing major league baseball to Toronto, Mr. WIDDRINGTON was at the front and centre. He helped put together a team that would eventually make it happen. The day came on March 26, 1976, when the American League voted to expand to Toronto, awarding a franchise to a group made up of Labatt, Imperial Trust Ltd. and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. Three months later, a franchise fee of $7-million (U.S.) was agreed upon. Early on, the owners decided that the franchise was to be run on sound business principles, where the baseball people were allowed to act freely within certain parameters, but were to report back to the board.
"He was definitely one of the fathers of baseball in Canada," said Paul GODFREY, the president of the Blue Jays. "Without the corporate leadership of Labatt's, there would have been no baseball in Toronto."
Mr. WIDDRINGTON's interest wasn't focused just on the bottom line: He was also a big sports fan. He truly loved the game of baseball and was lucky enough to have been chairman of the Blue Jays during the glory years leading up to, and including, the 1992 and 1993 World Series, when the team beat Atlanta and Philadelphia respectively. He watched as the Blue Jays became the first team to capture back-to-back World Series titles since the 1977-1978 Yankees.
Even last year, long after he had left the team's corporate management, Mr. WIDDRINGTON would still make the two-hour trip to Toronto from his home in London, Ontario, to watch a game with Mr. GODFREY. Or, if he wasn't with the president, then he'd be down in the stands taking in a game. "He was one of the big fans," Mr. GODFREY said.
Born in Toronto, Peter Nigel Tinling WIDDRINGTON was the son of Margery MacDONALD and Gerard WIDDRINGTON. His father, who emigrated from England, was assistant headmaster at Pickering College, a private school in Newmarket, Ontario, midway between downtown Toronto and Barrie. The young Mr. WIDDRINGTON attended Pickering College, where he played football and hockey. After high school, he studied economics at Queen's University and then went on to Harvard Business School. Later, he received an honorary doctorate from the University of Western Ontario.
One of his early successes as president of Labatt was to have the bright idea of producing a Canadian version of Budweiser, with the result that the beer grabbed a 7 per cent market share in the opening weeks of the 1991 summer season -- a stunning figure by industry standards. Two weeks later, Labatt launched "Bud" in Quebec and sold out its entire inventory in a day.
In addition to his role as president and chief executive officer, Mr. WIDDRINGTON served as chairman from 1987 until 1991, when Interbrew of Belgium took over the beer company and the Blue Jays. During his time at Labatt, he also played a key part in the creation of TSN, Canada's first all-sports network.
In 1993, Mr. WIDDRINGTON temporarily occupied the office of commissioner of major-league baseball after Fay VINCENT was forced out by the owners, and deputy Steven GREENBERG left of his own accord.
"There was no senior person in baseball in the commissioner's office and, at the time, there were 170 people working there, so I was there on somewhat of a part-time basis for an average of two to three days a week from January through until December," Mr. WIDDRINGTON said.
Then, for a few years in the mid-1990s, he was also the chairman of Major League Properties until interim baseball commissioner Bud Selig decided Mr. WIDDRINGTON should go because he was no longer affiliated with baseball.
"I miss baseball, and I miss the Jays, but I had to recognize that when Interbrew bought Labatt's, they were going to make some changes, as they are entitled to do," Mr. WIDDRINGTON later told a reporter. "I personally was disappointed but, structurally and objectively, I understood."
Mr. WIDDRINGTON's power-packed résumé shows he was also chairman of Laidlaw Inc., a director of Brick Brewing Company, Radiology Corporation of America Inc., Gatekeeper Business Solutions Inc., and Pickering College. In a 1994 interview with The Globe and Mail, he admitted that he wasn't the type to retire and head south to golf every day or lie on a beach.
"Really, I'm a professional manager, I guess you could say," is the way Mr. WIDDRINGTON described himself at the time.
How did he find the time for everything at an age when he could have easily been slowing down his life? "I do the best I can in juggling time and responsibilities," he said in 1994. "It depends on my other schedules. I can't drop everything and devote all my time to baseball. Am I retired? I suppose I'm retired from Labatt's, but certainly I'm not retired in the sense of playing golf or going down south, but I don't have a 9-to-5 job."
That same year, he was in the running to become president of the American League. While he never seriously saw himself as a contender for the commissioner's job, the American League job had its attractions. After all, his beloved Jays were an American League club.
"I was approached [to apply] in both cases," he told The Globe and Mail. "I've been interviewed twice for the American League post. I would be interested in the job. I think they'll be making up their minds fairly shortly. I think I would enjoy it very much, but I'm just taking it a day at a time."
In the end, it came to nothing and instead, he found himself involved in operating a series of companies.
In 1997, he landed in the middle of a bitter corporate conflict of the kind long remembered by the business community. A succession feud erupted within the family that owned Cuddy International Corp., then Canada's largest poultry processor with about $500-million in annual sales, a staff of 3,000 people worldwide and a juicy contract to supply McDonald's with McNuggets. The London, Ontario, company had been rife with plots and counterplots that pitted the founder against one or more of his five sons, and between 1992 and 1996 had gone through several chief executive officers. At the time, Peter WIDDRINGTON was the fifth or sixth Chief Executive Officer.
Not surprisingly, the situation was not to anyone's liking and Mr. WIDDRINGTON made his exit. Most recently, he was chairman of Brick Brewing of Waterloo, Ontario
Until the end, Mr. WIDDRINGTON had one foot in the business world and one foot in the sports world. Earlier this month, he had joined Tom VALCKE, president of the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame, in New York, where they met with Charles Bronfman to ask him to sponsor the hall's expansion and planned academy in St. Marys, Ontario Mr. WIDDRINGTON was chair of the hall's fundraising campaign, which is currently aiming to raise $5.3-million. Mr. VALCKE was more than impressed with Mr. WIDDRINGTON's skill in the boardroom on February 2. "Based on that meeting, we will be having another meeting with [Mr.] Bronfman."
Afterward, Mr. WIDDRINGTON remarked that it was one of the best presentations he had ever been a part of. Despite the high note, he didn't have time to celebrate or even to join his colleagues for dinner. He bid them farewell and immediately headed back to the airport. Just over a week later, after an exhilarating day of skiing in Aspen, Colorado., he suffered a heart attack.
"He was living life in the fast lane," Mr. Valcke said.
Peter WIDDRINGTON was born in Toronto on June 2, 1930. He died in Aspen, Colorado., on February 11, 2005. He was 74. He is survived by his wife, Betty Ann, daughters Cindy and Stacy, brother Michael and three grandchildren. A funeral service is set for today at St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-11 published
Clarence FUERST, Biochemist: 1928-2005
'The perfect scientist' is credited with laying the foundation of the genetics department at the University of Toronto
By Allison LAWLOR, Monday, April 11, 2005, Page S9
As a Canadian scientist who began his career in the pioneering days of molecular biology, Clarence FUERST never lost his belief in the value of pursuing science purely for the love of science.
Credited for having played a key role in building the Ontario Cancer Institute and the Department of Medical Genetics and Microbiology at the University of Toronto, Dr. FUERST spent two formative years in Paris in the mid-1950s, working in what was then widely considered the best lab in Europe.
After completing his PhD in biochemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, he was awarded a fellowship at the renowned Pasteur Institute in Paris in 1955. While at the institute, Dr. FUERST worked under the supervision of François Jacob, who would go onto win the 1965 Nobel Prize for Medicine with colleagues André Lwoff and Jacques Monod for their groundbreaking discoveries concerning the genetic regulation of enzyme and virus synthesis.
"It was the early era of microbiology," said Lou SIMINOVITCH, who is often called the father of Canadian genetics. "It was an exciting time."
Dr. SIMINOVITCH, who was at the Pasteur Institute around the same time, recalled how small the field of microbiology was in the early 1950s. He remembered attending a conference held near Paris, which drew all the scientists around the world working in the field at the time. About 80 people were in attendance, he said.
When Dr. FUERST's fellowship ended, in 1957, he chose to return to Canada instead of heading to the United States, where large pharmaceutical companies were luring scientists working in his field. He felt he owed a debt to the country that had helped him pursue his dream.
"Had it not been for the Canadian scholarships [he received], he wouldn't have been able to pursue his education," his daughter Michelle FUERST said.
Dr. SIMINOVITCH had also returned to Canada and was working in Toronto at the Cancer Institute of Ontario, located at the Princess Margaret Hospital. He was starting a microbiology lab and recruited Dr. FUERST to work with him. At the institute, Dr. FUERST continued what would become his lifelong work studying bacterial viruses or bacteriophages, which have been important in the development of our understanding of all types of viruses. At that time, there were very few scientists in Canada working in this area.
"He was a lab scientist," Dr. SIMINOVITCH said, adding that it wasn't uncommon for his colleague to spend up to 15 hours a day there. "When he did an experiment, it was always very accurate."
Clarence Ronald FUERST was born on the family farm in rural Bashaw, Alberta. He was the eldest of the two sons of Bill and Ella FUERST. He grew up through both the Depression and the Second World War, when the FUERST family, like other prairie farm families, lived through tough times. In his early years, there was no electricity or running water in the farmhouse. With little money for hired help, Dr. FUERST and his brother always had chores to do. At one point, the young Dr. FUERST feared that he wouldn't be able to finish high school because he had to devote so much time to the farm during the harvesting and planting seasons.
It was in high school where Dr. FUERST discovered he had an aptitude for science and decided to go onto study agriculture at the University of Alberta. Initially, his family was not happy, as he was expected to return home and take over the family farm. He excelled academically and was awarded scholarships to complete his master of science degree. Any prospect that he would return to the farm vanished.
Before leaving Alberta for California, where he was going to pursue his PhD, he met a young registered nurse named Katherine PAWLOWSKI on a blind date. In 1952, the couple married in California. They later had three children.
"He loved discovery for its own sake," said Paul SADOWSKI, a former colleague in the Department of Medical Genetics and Microbiology at the University of Toronto. "He didn't care if he got credit for his discoveries."
Sadly, much of his work lies hidden in notebooks, Dr. SADOWSKI said. He had difficulty knowing when to stop his rigorous research in order to write down his discoveries and have them published. In addition to his scientific research at the Ontario Cancer Institute, he became a full professor in 1968 in the departments of Medical Genetics and Microbiology and Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto.
"From him I learned not only how to think about experiments, how to question one's reasoning all the time, but also how to keep one's humanity in a sometimes not-too-friendly world," a former student, Helios MURIALDO, wrote in a speech he delivered when Dr. FUERST retired from the university in 1993. "From him I learned that one can never be critical enough of one's own hypothesis."
Although Dr. FUERST formally retired at the age of 65, he continued to teach part-time at the university for a number of years. He also continued to participate in examining doctoral candidates.
"He was so principled," Dr. SADOWSKI said. "He was the moral compass for the department."
Between work and family, there was little time for anything else. Often he brought work home with him and, fuelled by black coffee and cigarettes, toiled into the early morning hours at the kitchen table with slide ruler in hand. "He was a quiet man," Michelle FUERST said. "The perfect scientist."
Clarence FUERST was born on May 9, 1928, in Bashaw, Alberta., and died in Toronto on March 7, 2005. Dr. FUERST died at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto on March 7 from complications due to Parkinson's disease. He was 76. He leaves his wife Katherine children Michelle, Linda and Darren; brother Gordon and grandchildren Ryan, John, Elsa, Katie and Lindsay.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-19 published
Agnes JACKS, Ringette Promoter: 1923-2005
As a champion of a sport known as the little sister of hockey, she took up the banner from Sam JACKS, its inventor
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, April 19, 2005, Page S9
In the early days, enthusiastic young girls and women flooded onto outdoor rinks in northern Ontario, wearing discarded hockey skates and clutching broken hockey sticks. Up and down the ice they skated, chasing a ring. Most of the players didn't wear uniforms, and some preferred pink sweaters and matching pink sticks to keep the neighbourhood boys away from the rink.
It was 1963, and ringette was born. Agnes JACKS was there watching the emergence of the game her husband had invented to give girls and women their own winter team sport. Over the next 40 years, she saw it grow from a handful of young women in northern Ontario to a presence in half a dozen countries around the world. In Canada alone, it counts more than 25,000 players competing on nearly 2,000 teams. Even today, the sport is primarily for women and girls.
Over the years, Ms. JACKS became known as the ringette ambassador for Canada. She tirelessly travelled the world to boost the sport that Mr. JACKS invented in North Bay when he was the city's parks and recreation director. When he died of cancer in 1975 at 59, she continued her husband's legacy.
"In the early 1960s, there was a great need for girls' and women's sports," Ms. JACKS told the Kitchener-Waterloo Record in 2003. "Sam could see the need."
Mr. JACKS patched together hockey and basketball rules to create a fluid, non-contact game that soon became one of the fastest team sports on ice. Six years after he invented ringette, which has been called the little sister to hockey, the Ontario Ringette Association was founded with a government grant of $229.27. At the time, it numbered 1,500 players in 14 communities.
The sport boomed after the mid-1970s when the other provinces took an interest and formed ringette associations. In particular, it gained a firm footing in Quebec and first appeared there in Mount Royal where it was introduced by Herb LINDER, a good friend of the JACKS. In the late 1970s, the United States also started leagues. By all accounts, former Toronto Maple Leafs coach Roger NEILSON used ringette during the late 1970s to vary routines at practice. That got the attention of the then coach of the Czechoslovak national hockey team, who took home information on the game and adopted it in training and for his country's universities.
Ms. JACKS, who became honorary president of the International Ringette Association, didn't play the game herself but sponsored trophies and scholarships for outstanding players, coaches and officials and faithfully attended as many ringette tournaments and championship events as she could. In March, she was at the Ontario provincial AA championships in Ottawa. Young athletes flocked to her to ask for autographs and for words of encouragement.
"She always told us that we were 'her girls' and you believed it," said Laura WARNER, ringette's Team Canada captain. The one bit of advice she repeatedly gave to the girls was "stay out of the penalty box." When she said this to you, said Ms. WARNER, you felt she was honestly encouraging you to play ringette in the true spirit of the game -- fair play, sportsmanship and teamwork.
Like hockey, ringette is played on ice with skates and sticks and six players on each team -- a goalie and five skaters. But instead of a puck, the players pursue a rubber ring, which must be shot into a standard hockey net. The ring is passed to another player, rather than carried from zone to zone, all of which makes it a very team-oriented game. Wingers carry bladeless, red sticks so that an official can identify them if they illegally enter their own zone. Defence players have blue sticks and are not allowed in the attacking zone. The rules allow for fast play and little congestion in any zone. While hockey has become a game associated with body contact, ringette is not. A player receives a penalty for any body contact.
Like boys' hockey, ringette is divided into divisions: petite for girls 10 years and under, tweens for 12 and under, juniors for 14 and under, belles for 17 and under, debs for 18 and under and ladies for those over 20. It is not uncommon to find 25-year-old players who first took up the game at 6. Some dedicated veterans are in their mid-50s.
When they first take up the sport, young girls can be self-conscious about wearing boys' skates but soon stop worrying about it. Eventually, they give up wearing figure skates -- even for public skating and some abandon figure skating in favour of ringette.
Ms. WARNER remembers the first time she saw Ms. JACKS. She was just 14 years old and excited to be at the opening ceremony of the national ringette championships. Suddenly everyone around her stood and started cheering. She looked up and saw a petite, Scottish woman walking onto the stage.
"As soon as she started talking you couldn't not be drawn to her. "This [was] someone with an unparalleled love of the sport," Ms. WARNER said. "You could feel her love for the game."
In 2001, Ms. JACKS was appointed a member of the Order of Canada for her devotion to the sport. "She is an example of integrity, selflessness and devotion," the citation reads. "For over 30 years, she has promoted ringette as a medium for girls and women to benefit from the physical activity and personal growth derived from team sports... She has become a goodwill ambassador, imparting the importance of perseverance, good conduct and fair play to tens of thousands of young athletes."
Agnes MacKRELL was a Scottish lass who, during the Second World War, moved to England to work in a munitions plant. It was at a dance where she met Sam JACKS, a young Canadian soldier and recreation director in the army. After the war, he took her back home with him to Canada. They arrived in Halifax and made their way to Toronto and then in 1946 to North Bay. While Ms. JACKS didn't see her husband's dream of ringette becoming an Olympic sport fulfilled, she did see it inch closer to that goal. She remained faithful to the sport and its community until the end and had planned to attend the 2005 Canadian Ringette Championships that would up in Winnipeg on Saturday.
"I love the game," Ms. JACKS told a reporter in 2003. "It has everything a sport needs -- skill, speed, passion and no checking."
Agnes JACKS was born in Scotland on August 17, 1923. She died of heart failure on April 1, 2005, at the North Bay General Hospital. She was 81. She leaves her sons Barry, Bruce and Brian; three brothers and two sisters; 11 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-29 published
CREELMAN, Kenneth Munroe
Kenneth Munroe CREELMAN of Truro, Nova Scotia, died Wednesday, April 27, 2005 in the comfort of his home with his family by his side. He was 80.
He was born on June 30, 1924 to parents Jesse (JOHNSON) and Hedley CREELMAN. On October 18, 1948 he married Muriel J. DAVIS of Five Islands in Truro, Nova Scotia, and they became the proud parents of three sons and one daughter.
Kenneth lived most of his life in the house where his eight siblings were born on the Creelman farm at Otterbrook, Colchester County. Kenneth was the only one born in Truro Hospital. The story goes that his father Hedley picked him out of the babies in the nursery by the distinctive sound of his cry.
Hard work and long hours in the logging and lumber business defined Kenneth's work life spanning 67 years. Kenneth started driving a yard horse in Smith Field in the winter of 1937, when he was 13 years old. Decades later he was still building the business, always passionate about his life's work. His last day in the office was just a few days ago.
He was President of the Marwood group of companies. Kenneth enjoyed his work, enjoyed the Friendship of Marwood employees, and took great pride in ensuring Marwood provided top quality products and customer service. Kenneth enjoyed seeing people grow and succeed in his work life.
During his long career, Kenneth worked with his father, his brothers, and his sons. Along with being dedicated to the best interests of his business and his employees, he was, above all else, dedicated to caring for the needs of his family.
Kenneth had two families -- his own family and his corporate family; he loved and enjoyed the company of both. He was the leader who his families looked up to right through to the last days of his life. He was always there as a teacher and as an advisor for both. He was dedicated to the well being of the members of each of his families. Although soft spoken, with gentle humour, he provided clear direction and guidance. He set the example with a strong work ethic. He was a leader and a teacher to so many for so long; his attentive, caring hand and his guidance will be greatly missed.
Kenneth was associated with horses all his life -- first work horses in woodland operations and in more recent years, the champion Cape Cod Percherons in the show ring. Not one for hobbies, he did enjoy horse racing and horse shows as long as they did not interfere too much with work. Kenneth was a 50 year plus member of the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons
He is predeceased by his parents and brothers Walter and Donald of Truro. Among the survivors are his wife, Muriel of Truro, and his four children: K. Ross (Carrie) of Fredericton, Barbara L. of Falmouth, Nova Scotia, Douglas (Karen) of Fall River, Nova Scotia and Michael A. (Stephanie) Fredericton; his sisters, Helen A. LAWLOR and Mary E. CREELMAN of London, Ontario, S. Gladys (Alan) WORKMAN of Vancouver, his brothers, H. Gordon (Joan) of Truro, Warren R. (Helen) of Fredericton, Alan E. (Joanne) of Dartmouth; his sister in laws, Debra J. CREELMAN (Walter) and Mrs. Beryl SUTTON; his grandchildren: Sarah and Daniel CREELMAN (Douglas and Karen,) Andrea, Katherine, and Austin CREELMAN (Michael) and step grandchildren Jansen and Travis WHITE/WHYTE (Ross and Carrie.)
Arrangements are being made with Colchester Community Funeral Home, 521 Willow Street, Truro, Nova Scotia with visitation on Friday, April 29, from 6 to 9 p.m. and Saturday, April 30, from 2 to 4 p.m. A celebration of Mr. CREELMAN's life will be held at Middle Stewiacke United Church on Sunday, May 1, at 3 p.m. and the Reverend Larry Harrison will officiate. Interment will follow at Middle Stewiacke Cemetery. On line condolences to colchestercommunityfh@ca.ns.sympatico.ca

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-12 published
Jessica Jarvis HUNT, Aviatrix: 1911-2005
Toronto socialite was among the first women in Canada to win a commercial pilot's licence but, sidelined by the Second World War, never flew a plane again
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, May 12, 2005, Page S9
At a time when flying was considered a man's world, Jessica JARVIS, at the age of 23, became the first woman in Toronto, and the fourth in Canada, to obtain a commercial flying licence.
Dubbed a "young aviatrix" by Canada's press of the mid-1930s, she also went onto earn her Canadian, English, French and German private pilot's licences. "I flew to do something to justify my existence and to stand out from the crowd," she said years later.
A member of the Toronto Flying Club, Ms. JARVIS got her wings on August 21, 1931, a little more than two years after Eileen VOLLICK of Hamilton, Ontario, became the first woman in Canada to receive her private pilot's licence. In an interview with the Toronto Daily Star two years later, Ms. JARVIS explained why she thought a commercial pilot's licence would elude her. "I can never have a commercial pilot's licence," she said, "because my eyesight is not good enough. I wear specially ground glasses in my helmet goggles, as it is. Commercial flying is out for me, I'm afraid."
Even so, on August 23, 1934, she became the fourth woman in Canada to qualify for her commercial licence. Still, she later said that as a woman, she never expected to find work as a pilot, even if her eyesight had been better.
"I took it to prove to myself that I could do it. I was always realistic, and I didn't see any place in aviation for women," she told writer Shirley RENDER for Ms. RENDER's book No Place for a Lady: The Story of Canadian Women Pilots 1928-1992 "I didn't want to do anything except enjoy the experience."
Ms. JARVIS loved the experience of flying in open planes. "I'd go up at 7: 30 or 8 a.m. in the summer," she recalled. "The air was so still. The feeling of freedom -- it's incredibly exhilarating. It's a very sensual experience."
The daughter of William Henry Pope JARVIS and Mary Isabelle JARVIS, Jessica JARVIS was born into an affluent Toronto family. Her father, a gentleman journalist, travelled to the North where he took part in the Yukon Gold Rush and wrote several novels based on his experiences.
Despite her privileged background, which included private schools and the well-connected life of a young socialite, Ms. JARVIS described her childhood as lonely and unhappy. "I was very prim and proper," she said in a newspaper interview in 1992. "But at school I couldn't do anything -- I was no good at games. Learning to fly was something I could do sitting down."
While lessons were expensive, money wasn't a problem for Ms. JARVIS. By the time she was 18 she had set aside enough to enroll in flying school at a cost of $20 an hour (about the cost in 1931 to rent an apartment for a month). "It was just something I wanted to do," she said. "I had no lofty aims."
A photograph of Ms. JARVIS, glamourously dressed in her flying gear, graced the cover of Star Weekly in 1940. "Jessica JARVIS, University of Toronto student, is one of Canada's most experienced women pilots. Royal Canadian Air Force say she is capable of piloting their planes," said the caption.
"I do photograph well," she years later said of the publicity.
"She quite liked all the attention she got from her flying," said her daughter Diana INSELBERG. " She was interested in standing out from the crowd."
In 1942, she graduated with a degree in household science from the University of Toronto. She served as a dietician in the Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service in Halifax during the Second World War. She later said that she hadn't expected to fly with the Royal Canadian Air Force during the war years due to her poor eyesight.
in the meantime, flying had brought her close to death at least once. "It was looping a loop that nearly did me in, in England," she said in an interview with the Toronto Daily Star in 1933. "I did two loops and, in the second one I didn't pull the stick back far enough. Instead of completing the loop I went out on a vertical so that I was flying upside down. I caught my foot in the side, I couldn't see, and I thought I was in a spin.
"In other words, I thought I was done for. But strange to say, I wasn't scared. A man once told me that when you get in a jam in the air you don't get scared because you are so busy watching what happens.
"That's exactly what took place. In those few seconds, I seemed to remember all the things I had ever been taught and, some way, I pulled out of it. I had started at 2,000 feet and I ended at Shortly after she landed, she recalled how a junior pilot set down soon afterwards. "His face was white with fright. He said he saw me shoot by, going about 165 miles an hour, and thought I was headed straight for death," she said.
"However, it was absolutely my own fault," she added. "I have no one to blame but myself for the whole affair. Most accidents are the pilot's fault, unless there is a structural break."
During the war she had married a naval officer -- she took his name, HUNT -- and they had one child. Unfortunately, the marriage did not last and she found herself alone with a young daughter to raise and no more money for flying. After the war, Ms. Jarvis HUNT moved to Oakville, Ontario, where she ran a bakery and later a second-hand clothing store before returning to Toronto to work for the federal government.
She never took to the air again. Instead, money worries displaced the devil-may-care spirit she had shown as a young pilot. "It was an unfulfilled life in many ways," Ms. INSELBERG said.
In 1969, a dream came true when mother and daughter boarded a DC8 British Airways plane bound for England. It was Jessica Jarvis HUNT's first commercial flight. While she wasn't in the cockpit, the experience proved exhilarating. When the crew heard about her early flying days, they invited her to meet the captain and see what it was like to be behind the controls in a high-tech cockpit -- so very different from the open planes she once flew in the Ontario skies of her youth.
She lived alone most of her life and, in the late 1980s, moved to British Columbia to be near her daughter.
"I never looked on flying as anything but a recreation," she said in 1993. "There were other women pilots who were much more accomplished."
Jessica Jarvis HUNT was born in Toronto on August 26, 1911, and died in the Okanagan Valley town of Enderby, British Columbia, on April 16, 2005. She was 93. She is survived by her daughter Diana INSELBERG and by half-brother William Michael JARVIS.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-19 published
Robert FREEDOM, Surgeon 1941-2005
The director of cardiology at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children was a widely respected surgeon who wrote hefty textbooks and played a key role in the royal commission that investigated the mystery deaths of 36 baby patients
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, May 19, 2005, Page S11
Halifax -- Known by his peers as "Mr. Pediatric Cardiology," Robert FREEDOM was widely respected for his clinical skills and for his training of cardiologists from around the world, and as a prolific author of clinical research and textbooks, several of which are considered classics in the field. Less happily, he figured large in a sensational 1981 murder probe and a subsequent royal commission that investigated the deaths of more than 30 babies at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children
It wasn't uncommon to find the head of cardiology at Sick Kids hunched over his desk in the early morning hours writing. Over his career, Dr. FREEDOM wrote more than 400 medical papers, 125 book chapters, and eight textbooks, including the formidably large Atlas of Congenital Heart Disease and the Natural and Modified History of Congenital Heart Disease. Published in 2003, it was the last of his textbooks.
Robert Mark FREEDOM was a native of Maryland, where he and his twin brother, Gary, experienced a disruptive childhood. Shortly after they were born, their parents divorced and they had virtually no contact with their father, a neurologist and an eighth-generation physician. When they were still young, they moved to Southern California and were soon placed together in boarding schools and residential homes. The brothers remained close throughout their lives.
Robert studied medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles; Gary went on to earn a PhD in geography. Initially focused on neurosurgery, Dr. FREEDOM soon found a new interest. At medical school, he was asked to perform four autopsies on babies or children with congenital cardiac disease; from that experience, he decided to pursue a new path in medicine.
After finishing medical school, he was accepted for an internship and residency in pediatrics at Children's Hospital Boston. While there, he also studied pediatric cardiology. In 1972, he was recruited by Richard ROWE, then director of pediatric cardiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, to become the director of the diagnostic cardiac catheterization laboratory and assistant professor of pediatrics. When Dr. ROWE, who had become his mentor, was recruited to take over as director of cardiology at the Hospital for Sick Children in 1973, he asked Dr. FREEDOM to join him in Toronto.
Dr. FREEDOM moved to Canada in the summer of 1974 and spent the rest of his career there, dedicating himself to the hospital and the faculty of medicine at the University of Toronto. But the next decade did not unfold so smoothly, and there were times when he must have questioned his choice of careers, or at least hospitals.
On March 25, 1981, police accused Sick Kids nurse Susan NELLES of murdering baby Justin COOK. Two days later, she was charged with murdering three other infants. More than a year later, in May of 1982, Ms. NELLES was discharged at a preliminary hearing. A royal commission headed by Mr. Justice Samuel GRANGE of the Supreme Court of Ontario then examined the circumstances surrounding Ms. NELLES's arrest and prosecution.
The commission also tried to reconstruct events at the hospital from June 30, 1980, to March 22, 1981, to determine whether the babies died of heart defects or were murdered by overdoses of the heart drug digoxin. All told, the commission investigated 36 deaths.
In September of 1983, Dr. FREEDOM testified before the commission that he had told several of his relatives that "someone is killing our babies" after he learned that large amounts of digoxin had been found in a baby who died in March of 1981. Days later, he repeated the comment to Metro Toronto Police Staff-Sergeant Anthony WARR. He said he was convinced that something malevolent had transpired at the hospital after three babies died with high levels of the heart drug in their bodies.
"I believe I made the comment to my wife or my brother-in-law and his wife late on the Saturday night [March 21] after I heard of the digoxin readings on [infant] Allana MILLER," Dr. FREEDOM said. "The digoxin levels in the baby had been low [in the afternoon] and then they were sky-high. I thought something malicious was going on."
Dr. FREEDOM testified that when he learned of the high readings on the night of March 21, he thought, "My God, how can she go from a very low level to a very high level?... I wonder if it's murder?"
The commission also heard that he was so alarmed about the deaths that he told another doctor during a catherization on Justin COOK: "If this baby dies, we have a murderer on our hands."
Judge GRANGER later heard that Dr. FREEDOM had provided a vital link in the murder investigation when he told a homicide detective that problems with an intravenous line could have resulted in a digoxin overdose slowly infusing into the baby's body over several hours, making it possible for Ms. NELLES to have given the drug to the infant before she went off duty on the evening before the infant died.
At the preliminary hearing, Ms. NELLES was cleared of all charges after the judge found insufficient evidence to send the case to trial.
In 1986, Dr. FREEDOM succeeded his mentor as director of cardiology at Sick Kids, a post he held until the fall of 2000, when he stepped down because of failing health.
"We're one of the largest and best-known divisions of pediatric cardiology in the world," said Lee BENSON, a long-time colleague.
A big burly man, Dr. FREEDOM demanded high standards not only from himself but from everyone around him, and he could be intimidating. During his teaching rounds, medical students were known to tremble with fright. But, as a professor, he won his fair share of awards. He also helped in developing a three-year, sub-specialty training program in pediatric cardiology at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.
Dr. FREEDOM was known among colleagues for his encyclopedic memory. If another doctor so much as mentioned a study in an obscure publication, he was able to recall not only details but authors and publication date, said his friend and colleague Shi-Joon YOO.
His patients loved him. "The parents worshipped the ground he walked on," said Dr. BENSON, adding that years later he remembered their names. Obsessive about his work, he spent all hours of the day and night in the hospital. "He lived at Sick Kids," said his wife, Penny, whom he met in the late 1980s after a couple of failed marriages.
Despite suffering from diabetes, Dr. FREEDOM didn't take care of his own health. He enjoyed Scotch, smoking cigars and eating whatever he desired. "Bob did things his way," Dr. BENSON said.
Not one to usually take vacations, he changed his mind after a trip to Granville Ferry in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley. Located on the Annapolis River, he fell in love with the place and would spend a month there each year until he retired.
Dr. FREEDOM received several awards, including the Council Award of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, presented to Ontario physicians who are judged to have been closest to meeting society's vision of an "ideal" physician. In 2000, he was named to the Order of Ontario.
Robert FREEDOM was born on February 27, 1941, in Baltimore. He died on May 7, 2005, in Halifax of renal failure as a result of diabetes. He was 64. He leaves his wife Penny and stepson Jonathan.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-13 published
Ted LIGHT, Military Chaplain 1914-2005
His faith -- sorely tested by what he witnessed in the Second World War -- was restored by a little German girl. He went on to become general secretary of the Anglican Church
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, June 13, 2005, Page S6
As a chaplain serving overseas during the Second World War, it was customary for Ted LIGHT to wave off a bomber from the airfield as it set out on a raid and to be there once again after a long, agonizing wait to see how many men returned.
The bomber's return wasn't always a happy homecoming. On one occasion, Mr. LIGHT was on an airfield in Yorkshire, England, watching as a damaged bomber struggled to make its way back to the base. The plane crashed on landing and caught fire. Mr. LIGHT, along with others, rushed to the plane in an attempt to save the men on board. One man was clearly dying. Mr. LIGHT knelt down to give him his last rites. As he did, he placed a cherished crucifix, given to him by a Roman Catholic priest, into the dying man's hand. The hand closed around it and the man died. Mr. LIGHT left the crucifix with him.
Edwin LIGHT was born on a homestead in northern Saskatchewan. When he was 3, his family moved to Leask, Saskatchewan., a village on the Canadian National Railway line from Prince Albert to North Battleford. Every Sunday he, along with his parents, three brothers and three sisters, attended the local Anglican church.
In 1933, he went off to study theology at Emmanuel College, University of Saskatchewan. After graduation he was ordained as a deacon and put in charge of a county parish in northern Saskatchewan. In 1939, he was ordained as a priest.
Mr. LIGHT was the first in his family to enter the priesthood. "I didn't have what you might call a Damascus road experience," he told the Canadian Churchman (predecessor to the Anglican Journal) in a 1979 interview. "I really wanted to work with people and I thought I could best fulfill that vocation through the church."
When the Second World War broke out, Mr. LIGHT enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force "because all the young men were leaving." He felt it was something he, too, should do. "I was a young man and felt that personally... if I missed out on the experience the majority of young men in Canada were facing in the military forces because of war, that I would have a great deal of difficulty relating to them when the war was over," he is recorded as saying in documents from the Anglican Church House.
When he failed to become a pilot because he couldn't land planes properly, he decided to train as an air bomber. Before he finished his training, Mr. LIGHT was drafted into the chaplaincy service in Canada and then overseas.
In January, 1943, he was posted as chaplain to No. 2 Bombing and Gunnery School in Mossbank, Saskatchewan. The following year he was sent overseas, where he served as chaplain to Bomber Squadrons 420 and 425 until the war's end.
Knowing it was strictly against orders, Mr. LIGHT got himself smuggled aboard an aircraft on one occasion just so he could experience what the air crews he worked and lived with went through. He went on a bombing raid over the Ruhr Valley in Germany and later admitted that he was "scared stiff" by the experience. Among his duties as a wartime chaplain was writing to the next of kin of servicemen who were either killed in combat or missing in action.
But the war for Mr. LIGHT wasn't all about death and destruction, it was also a time when he would meet and within 10 weeks marry his future wife, Evelyn. It was Christmas in 1942 and Mr. LIGHT was travelling by train from Prince Albert to his home in Leask. It was an overnight train and sleeping berths were scarce. Some time in the evening, the porter called out: "Berth for Leask." Mr. LIGHT believed the announcement was for him, and Evelyn, whose last name was Leask, assumed it was for her. The porter's announcement brought them face to face.
After spending Christmas with their families, they left home and met once again on the same train returning to Prince Albert. Speculation is that it may have been more than a coincidence, said Mr. LIGHT's son, Greg. On the train, they agreed to spend New Year's Eve together. They fell in love and were married on March 16, 1943.
Mr. LIGHT served in Germany until October, 1945. At the war's end, having been witness to the horrors of war, his faith was tested. Having seen the destruction and death -- corpses piled up at the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp, German amputees and prisoners of war -- Mr. LIGHT wondered where the world could go from there. "It shook one's faith in whether humanity could ever establish itself again -- whether generosity and kindness were really viable," he said.
He later credited a little German girl with few personal belongings for having restored his faith in humanity. He met her in a small German village and gave her a piece of candy. She thanked him and returned soon after with a parcel wrapped in newspaper. Inside the package were a couple of plums from her family's garden.
After the war, Mr. LIGHT worked briefly as a reporter for the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix before returning to the Canadian Forces, where he became chaplain to military detachments along the Alaska Highway from Fort Saint John to Snag on the Alaska border.
Mr. LIGHT's career in the forces included a stint as assistant director in the Air Force chaplaincy in Ottawa, as command chaplain of Canada's North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces stationed in France, and eventually as chaplain-general. He earned the rank of brigadier-general and was responsible for some 130 chaplains in the country's army, navy and air force.
"He felt a strong sense of journeying with our personnel, of going where they go and caring for the families who are left behind," said Lieutenant-Colonel John FLETCHER, the army's command chaplain.
In 1968, Mr. LIGHT retired from the military to become general secretary of the Anglican Church of Canada, a position he held until his retirement in 1979. He also served on numerous national and international organizations, including the Central Committee of the World Council of Churches. After retirement, Mr. LIGHT and his wife moved to the Ontario town of Meaford.
In retirement, he remained active with the Anglican Church's provincial synod, in his local parish and as chaplain to Branch 32 of the Royal Canadian Legion.
Mr. LIGHT died on May 21 at Toronto Grace Hospital. He had prostate cancer. His wife of 62 years died just more than a week later in the same hospital. She had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease. During their final days in the hospital, they lived in separate rooms on separate floors, but each day they were brought to each other so they could spend time together.
"He was inspiring," Col. FLETCHER said. " LIGHT wasn't just his last name. There was a light that shined deep within. He had a tremendous spirit."
Ted LIGHT was born in northern Saskatchewan on March 19, 1914. He died in Toronto on May 21, 2005. He was 91. He leaves his sons, Gordon, a bishop in the central interior of British Columbia, Ted, Greg, and Brian; sister Doris and 15 grandchildren.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-04 published
Susan GOLDBERG, Professor And Researcher: 1938-2005
Psychologist at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children wrote the book on parent-child attachment
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, July 4, 2005, Page S6
As a research psychologist at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, her work on attachment in children was internationally recognized. As a social activist involved in the peace movement, she guided parents on how to talk to their children about nuclear war. And as a folk musician, she formed choirs and song circles as part of her deep belief that building community could be done through music.
During her career, Susan GOLDBERG, who has died in Toronto at the age of 67, made significant contributions on the psychosocial implications of early medical problems, such as prematurity, developmental delay, cystic fibrosis and congenital heart disease, how they impact on parent-infant relationships and their consequences for a child's future emotional and social development.
Her book, Attachment and Development, was considered one of the best books on the subject, says Dr. Jean WITTENBERG, head of the infant psychiatry program at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. "She was able to put the theories into language that people understood," he said.
In the last months of her life, Dr. GOLDBERG's study of parent-child attachment was recognized and honoured when she received the Bowlby-Ainsworth Award from the Centre for Mental Health Promotion and the New York Attachment Consortium.
Susan WEISSMAN was a native of New York. Growing up in the Bronx, her parents Frank and Anne WEISSMAN were members of the Communist party and active in the labour movement. Childhood was filled with music, summer camps with the children of fellow Communists and lots of discussion about the rights of workers. She breezed through school; she was 16 when she went off to Antioch University in Yellow Springs, Ohio -- then a hotbed for social activism. It was there that she met her future husband Stanley GOLDBERG. They married and moved to Boston where he did graduate work in the history of science.
In the late 1960s, they moved to Zambia where Mr. GOLDBERG got a teaching job. They stayed in Africa for a couple of years before returning to the United States. Dr. GOLDBERG completed her PhD in child-developmental psychology and in 1974, the couple separated. With three young children, she moved to the Boston area where she got a job at Brandeis University. She taught there for the next seven years.
In 1981, Dr. GOLDBERG moved her family to Toronto and joined the psychiatry research unit at Sick Kids. Six years later, she was appointed professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Toronto.
"She was a very kindly mentor," said her former colleague Dr. Susan BRADLEY. " She was extremely valued and sought out by students. She mentored more PhD students than anyone else in our department."
During her career, she was also a member of the editorial boards of the Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development and Infant Behaviour and Development and played a leadership role among Canadian attachment researchers.
Active in the peace movement and having studied the effects of war on children, she wrote a guide called Facing the Nuclear Age: Parents and Children Together and spent time with parents groups to help them understand how to best talk to their children about nuclear war.
During the Gulf War of 1990, she put together a booklet that was distributed to Toronto school teachers to guide them in their discussions about global conflict in the classroom. In the guidelines, she recommends: "It is important that youngsters have an opportunity to express their concerns and to feel adults are taking those concerns seriously. Acknowledge that it is difficult to concentrate on other things in the wake of these events. You may, after some initial discussion, be able to set aside some time each day for this issue."
In the mid-1990s, Dr. GOLDBERG came up with a finding, which at the time she said could alter theories about parent-child attachment.
In experiments involving Romanian-born and Canadian-born four-year-olds, she found a tenfold difference in the tendency of Romanian-born orphaned children to be indiscriminately friendly.
"They would walk up to a stranger and behave affectionately with no hesitation and without checking with their mother," she told The Globe and Mail. This kind of unguarded behaviour normally is thought to result from the lack of a secure bond with a parent, she said at the time, but the Romanian children observed did have good bonds with their adoptive parents.
"Preschoolers who go up to strangers and behave affectionately cannot be said to be well protected," she said. "We have to clue-in parents that being sociable and friendly isn't always a positive thing." Indiscriminate affection is a good survival skill in an orphanage -- since it can win a child attention from busy staff -- but even children who have been in an adoptive family for several years continue to show this behaviour, Dr. GOLDBERG's research found.
Outside her research, Dr. GOLDBERG's other passion was music. "She had a life-long love of folk music," said her daughter Eve GOLDBERG, who is herself a professional musician. "She was always singing. We always had music in the house."
An organizer of the Woods Music and Dance Camp for adults in the Muskoka area of Ontario, she also started a Toronto community choir with her daughter Eve about six years ago. Created with the aim of singing folk music from around the world, the Common Thread Community Choir now has about 70 singers. "She was the heart and soul of the choir," said Eve.
Considered unpretentious by her colleagues, Dr. GOLDBERG was also extremely private. "She never talked about her feelings," Dr. WITTENBERG said. However, she could be outspoken if she felt an injustice had been committed. He recalls a particular child-development conference in Boston in which Dr. GOLDBERG stood up and challenged a top international researcher when he made what she felt was a misogynistic comment. "It was talked about for a long time."
Dr. GOLDBERG had been fighting cancer for several years. About 15 years ago she endured two lumpectomies and later a mastectomy. Last summer, doctors told her that the cancer had spread to her lung. Several months later, it spread to her brain. While she had retired in the early 2000s, she maintained an office and continued her research for as long as she could.
In her honour, the Susan Goldberg Colloquium on attachment, development and child psychotherapies has been established. It will be held every year at Sick Kids. When she heard the news, she told a colleague that she wished she could be there -- at least for the first one.
Susan GOLDBERG was born on March 25, 1938 in New York. She died at home in Toronto on June 14, 2005, surrounded by Friends and family. She leaves her children Ruth, David and Eve; sister Terry and brother Peter.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-19 published
Carmen PROVENZANO, Lawyer And Politician 1942-2005
The former member of Parliament from Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, and son of a steelmaker fought to save Algoma Steel when others thought it a lost cause
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, August 19, 2005, Page S7
He was a hard-working Liberal member of Parliament from Northern Ontario who listened to his electorate. He openly opposed gay marriage long before it became a hot-button issue and, as the son of a steelmaker, struggled mightily to save Algoma Steel from financial oblivion. "I'm going to reflect the wishes of my community," Carmen PROVENZANO once told a reporter. "I'm obligated to handle it that way."
The native of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, was one of the minority Liberal members of Parliament who voted against his party's same-sex-marriage bill. In 1999, he presented a petition to the House of Commons signed by 250 constituents who opposed the initiative.
"I have people expressing their opinions to me in quite forceful ways," he said. "They're telling me they're never going to vote for me again because of what my government is doing."
At the time, a neighbour and long-time party member had told the member of Parliament that "your government is ruining society" and warned that he wouldn't put up a Liberal lawn sign in the next election.
Despite taking a minority stance within his party, Mr. PROVENZANO always believed he had done the right thing. "He often said he would vote the same way again," said Liberal member of Parliament Joe COMUZZI.
Mr. PROVENZANO served as Sault Ste. Marie's member of Parliament from 1997 to 2004, when he lost his seat in a close race to New Democrat Tony MARTIN. It would have been a third term for the popular parliamentarian, whose loss may have been explained by his opponent's name. In fact, during last year's campaign, he chose not to hammer Team Martin signs into the front lawns of his supporters. It's not that he wanted to distance himself from Prime Minister Paul Martin, but rather from Tony MARTIN, a former member of provincial parliament who had lost his seat in the 2003 Ontario election.
"You know I would be papering the city with my opponent's name," Mr. PROVENZANO said, if he were to put up Team Martin signs. "I want to get my own name out there."
In the end, Sault Ste. Marie remained true to character as a swing riding, and Mr. PROVENZANO was defeated. But he didn't allow himself to wallow in misery; he set his sights on running for the Liberal Party again in the next federal election.
"He had a great respect for Sault Ste. Marie and its people," said Mr. COMUZZI, who represents the Northern Ontario riding of Thunder Bay-Superior North.
Described as modest and unassuming, Mr. PROVENZANO was also known for his tenacity.
"We argued a lot," said Mr. COMUZZI, who, as minister of state responsible for the federal economic development initiative for Northern Ontario, received daily calls from his colleague. "He was incessant with his requests."
Mr. COMUZZI recalled Mr. PROVENZANO saying: 'Look, if you get this done for me, I won't ask you for anything else.' " Despite the promise, he'd come knocking again a couple of weeks later. "He was so persistent. If he didn't get a good ear, he would eventually end up in the Prime Minister's office."
Paul MARTIN called Mr. PROVENZANO a man who upheld the best in parliamentary tradition.
"His aim was to serve the best he could the needs of his community and constituents," he said in a statement. "Mr. PROVENZANO was proud to be a member of Parliament, serving on a number of parliamentary committees and as parliamentary secretary to the minister of veterans affairs. He was proud, too, to be the son of a steelworker and a native of Sault Ste. Marie, and immensely proud of his family."
Carmen PROVENZANO was the son of Frank and Norma PROVENZANO. A second-generation Italian Canadian, his grandparents had settled in Sault Ste. Marie, which was once seen as a haven for Italian immigrants. Proud of his cultural heritage, he was also proud to say he was the son of a steelmaker. His father worked for Algoma Steel and, as a student, Mr. PROVENZANO would join him during the summers to work at the plant.
Having grown up in Sault Ste. Marie, he appreciated the company's economic importance. When Algoma teetered on collapse in April of 2001 and sought protection from its creditors, he understood the devastation that would ensue in the city and worked hard to get Algoma back on its feet. He is credited with playing a major role in the steel plant's restructuring and in securing $50-million in loan guarantees from the federal government to ensure its viability. He badgered Jean CHRÉTIEN until he got the loan secured, said Ron IRWIN, former Indian affairs minister. "At that time, no one had any hopes for Algoma."
Algoma weathered the storms, emerged from creditor protection in early 2002 and today employs 3,000 people.
As it happens, it was Mr. IRWIN, former member of Parliament for Sault Ste. Marie, who encouraged Mr. PROVENZANO to run for office. In 1997, he decided to retire from federal politics and saw in Mr. PROVENZANO a "solid family man" who would represent the city well. While politics had been a lifelong dream, Mr. PROVENZANO delayed his entry because he didn't want to be far away from his family and four young children.
"His family came first," said Mr. IRWIN. "And his Friends were a close second."
At the heart and soul of Mr. PROVENZANO's family was his wife, Ada. Chance had brought them together. It was at a community parade in Sault Ste. Marie that Mr. PROVENZANO had first spotted her and later said he knew immediately that she would be his wife. "It was love at first sight," said son Lucas PROVENZANO.
After a courtship of two years, the couple married in 1966 and, over the years, filled their home with children, extended family and Friends. It wasn't uncommon to find Mr. PROVENZANO sitting down at 11 p.m. to a meal with a dozen people. "His family was an extended family. It was the community," said son Frank PROVENZANO.
One of the ways he helped others in the community was by often opting out of flying home from Ottawa on weekends and making the 10-hour drive, instead. There always seemed to be someone who needed a ride; his driving companions were often university students on their way home.
Mr. PROVENZANO attended the University of Windsor, followed by law school at Queen's University in Kingston. He spent the early years of his career, from 1972 to 1980, as an assistant solicitor for the city of Sault Ste. Marie. Later, he had a private practice with his brother Frank and was an owner of Maplewood Golf Course. Over the years, he also served on a number of local charities and boards and as a school board trustee. Attend any sporting event in the city and you were likely to see him there, too. "My father was involved in every aspect of this community," said Lucas PROVENZANO.
His pride in his ancestry was never more evident than when he took part in a federal trade mission to Italy in the late 1990s. Having the opportunity to travel as an member of Parliament to the country his grandparents had left as poor immigrants and to meet the Pope and Italian parliamentarians struck a deep cord within him. "He was very proud of how far his family had come in three generations," Mr. IRWIN said.
Carmen PROVENZANO was born on February 3, 1942, in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario He died at home in Sault Ste. Marie on July 27, 2005, after suffering a heart attack. He is survived by his siblings Frank, Marlene and Nancy and by his wife, Ada, and children Frank, Lucas, Jana and Mark. Tomorrow, in Hockley Valley, Ontario, Mark is to marry Paula AMAEIO, of Tottingham, Ontario, just as his father would have wanted.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-07 published
EDMUND, Edward Joseph
Peacefully surrounded by his family on Sunday, September 4, 2005, in his 65th year. Beloved husband and best friend of Corinne, loving father of Erin. Dear brother of Joan and her husband Joe LAWLOR, Patti and her husband Paul BARTON. Uncle of Tim (Bernice,) Sean (Linda), Kevin (Toni) and Maureen LAWLOR, Antony, Jonn, Darren BARTON and Chantal CLEMENT. Cousin of John and Stella JAROSZ, and Anne TKACHYK. Son-in-law of Dorothy CLEMENT and brother-in-law of Sue and the late Don CLEMENT. The family will receive Friends at the McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax (Pickering Village) (905) 428-8488, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Isaac Jogues Catholic Church, 1148 Finch Avenue, Pickering, on Thursday, September 8, 2005 at 11 a.m. Interment in Resurrection Cemetery, Whitby. Should family and Friends so desire, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Diabetes Association would be greatly appreciated.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-27 published
Richard LEITERMAN, Cinematographer: (1935-2005)
In 1969, the pioneer of cinéma vérité was among the first to use a technique that today's television viewers know as reality television
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail; Globe and Mail archives, Tuesday, September 27, 2005, Page S11
The cinematographer Richard LEITERMAN -- best known for his work in such films as Goin' Down the Road and A Married Couple -- was told by a teacher early in his career that he might have been born holding a camera.
Mr. LEITERMAN first picked up a camera because his then brother-in-law, filmmaker Allan KING, was making documentaries. Working in film seemed a lot more fun to Mr. LEITERMAN than the assortment of odd jobs -- from a forklift operator to a dish washer -- he had done for money since dropping out of university. He asked Mr. KING if he could get a job hauling gear around, but was told to learn how to use a camera instead. Later on, he referred to Mr. KING as his mentor and as someone who "took me in when I was very, very green."
As a pioneer in cinéma vérité filmmaking, Mr. LEITERMAN's work with Mr. KING created some landmark, low-budget documentaries, including A Married Couple (1969), a raw and at times disturbing look inside the strained marriage of an ordinary Toronto couple.
"He had a great relationship not only with people but with machines," said filmmaker Don SHEBIB, whose first feature film was Goin' Down the Road, a 1970 low-budget movie about Maritimers down and out in Toronto which has become a Canadian classic. "The machine was so close to him. I don't have the same relationship with the camera as he did. He played it like a violin and always did."
By the end of his career, his work had become a barometer against which the development of Canadian film Could be measured. In their 1978 book, Richard Leiterman, Alison Reid and P.M. Evanchuk wrote that his career "has been so closely involved with the mainstream of Canadian filmmaking that his work is practically illustrative of its trends, its tendency towards fiction film with a solid base in the documentary tradition."
Born near a small mining community near Timmins, Ontario, Mr. LEITERMAN was the youngest of six children. Raised in a strict Christian household, his father Douglas worked as a bookkeeper at the local mine. As a young boy, the family moved to Vancouver.
Initially, Mr. LEITERMAN studied engineering at the University of British Columbia. The move was in response to his talented and artistic older siblings, who all went into the arts and intimidated him. He soon learned that engineering wasn't for him and dropped out. He headed to Europe where he worked in restaurant kitchens, drove trucks in Germany, sailed charter yachts on the Mediterranean and served coffee in trendy cafes. It was at one such coffee shop in London where he met his future wife, Margaret. They married in 1960 after returning to Vancouver.
At the suggestion of Mr. KING, Mr. LEITERMAN enrolled in a summer course in camera technique at the University of British Columbia when he was in his early twenties. He jokingly referred to the course as "Be Your Own Film Director in Six Easy Weekends." His instructor, Stanley Fox, would later remark that Mr. LEITERMAN, while still a beginner, "held the camera as though it had been in his hands his whole life."
After taking the summer course, Mr. LEITERMAN bought a Bell and Howell 16 mm camera, shot some footage of a storm and sold it to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News in Vancouver for $35. Now a professional, he and his wife returned to London and he worked as a news stringer for various networks. Soon after he went into partnership with Mr. KING, helping form Allan King Associates, in 1962.
The documentaries Mr. LEITERMAN and Mr. KING made together took them from the Arctic Circle to the civil rights marches in Mississippi and Alabama and through war-ravaged Vietnam. In the late 1960s, he followed anthropologist Margaret Mead through New Guinea and American writer Norman Mailer at a protest march on the Pentagon.
"Richard is not as splashy or spectacular as most cameramen who work with the hand-held camera, but he's incredibly secure with what he sees and responds to. He has unique vision and great integrity," Mr. KING once said of Mr. LEITERMAN's techniques and style. "He never grabs at a subject; he doesn't push but responds to what's happening in front of the camera, with the result that he gets more respect from his subjects than anyone I know. If there was a shot I had to get, I'd give it to Richard."
At the end of the decade, Mr. LEITERMAN threw himself into another Allan KING project, A Married Couple. It was an early example of what television viewers today think of as reality television. The couple was Billy and Antoinette EDWARDS of Toronto. A camera crew visited their Rushton Road house for about 10 weeks and recorded their conversations, their ferocious arguments, and their moments of tenderness.
Mr. LEITERMAN told Billy and Antoinette: "Don't recognize us, don't give us a cup of coffee in the morning. We won't tell you when we're coming. We won't say goodbye when we leave."
He installed light brackets on the walls and put photo floodlights in the table lamps. Then he and Chris WANGLER, the soundman, showed up with their equipment. And waited for something to happen.
The film, whose obscene language created trouble with Ontario film Censors, was a hit. Clive Barnes in The New York Times called it "quite simply one of the greatest films I've ever seen."
Many thought it opened a new period in documentary film; it was shown at festivals and much discussed. In the United States, it was imitated by the producers of An American Family, which ran in the 1972-73 season and became perhaps the most popular series ever made for PBS. Mr. LEITERMAN's hand-held, swish-pan style was eventually adopted by fiction films, including Woody Allen's Husbands and Wives.
That same year, Mr. SHEBIB, then a young Toronto director asked Mr. LEITERMAN if he'd like to shoot a low-budget movie about Maritimers down on their luck in Toronto. Having agreed to be part of the three-man crew, Mr. LEITERMAN brought his documentary eye to fiction filmmaking with Goin' Down the Road. During the filming, he says he learned "a hell of a lot" about transition, priorities and collaboration.
"It was a learning experience for both of us," he told an interviewer, referring to himself and Mr. SHEBIB. "We shot it with minimal lighting, we shot it at 16. We would look around and see what there was in the script and see what the weather was like. Sometimes there was just nothing to shoot, and we'd say to the two lead actors, 'Okay guys, go out and do something. It's snowing, the sun is shining, it's a beautiful afternoon, let's do something.' So they'd go out and have a snowball fight. It's what the characters would have done. They would have said, "To hell with job hunting, we'll go for a walk in Edwards Gardens and throw snowballs at each other." Mr. LEITERMAN and Mr. SHEBIB went on to collaborate on several more features and documentaries including Rip-Off (1971) and Between Friends (1973). Along with making films, a concern with labour practices within the industry led Mr. LEITERMAN to help organize the Canadian cameramen's union. When he wasn't working, Mr. LEITERMAN loved to sail on his eight-metre boat. Every summer he would take a 10-day solo trip to B.C.'s Desolation Sound. But sailing wasn't limited to summertime. He was also known to take his boat out in the midst of a winter storm. "He was a person who lived on the edge," said his widow Margaret LEITERMAN.
Mr. LEITERMAN won a Canadian Film Award for Cinematography for his work on Joyce Wieland's The Far Shore (1975) and a Genie Award for Best Cinematography for Mr. KING's Silence of the North (1981). In 2000, he received the Kodak New Century Award for outstanding contribution to the art of cinematography, from the Canadian Society of Cinematographers. Recently, Mr. LEITERMAN shot movies for television, directed episodes of the Vancouver-shot series Cold Squad and taught cinematography at Sheridan College in Toronto. By all accounts, he had a reputation for demanding the best of his students.
"If you are going to carry on in this business, then the most important thing is to keep the faith," he liked to say. "Be passionate."
Richard LEITERMAN was born on April 7, 1935, in South Porcupine, Ontario, and died in Vancouver on July 14, 2005. He was 70.
Cause of death was complications from the rare disease amyloidosis, in which the body's organ systems accumulate deposits of abnormal proteins. He was diagnosed in December and spent the last few weeks of his life confined to a wheelchair.
He is survived by his wife Margaret, son Mark, daughter Rachel, granddaughter Clara and siblings Elaine, Phyllis, Catherine and Douglas, also a filmmaker.
His ashes were scattered in the Pacific Ocean.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-25 published
Elizabeth LEFORT, Artist (1914-2005)
'Canada's artist in wool' who learned at her mother's knee turned Acadian rug hooking into an art form
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, October 25, 2005, Page S9
Halifax -- As a young girl she watched her mother make hooked rugs in the barn of their Acadian home on Cape Breton Island, which were sold to supplement the family's income. Captivated by the craft, she soon worked alongside her mother and began to show an unusual talent. But instead of making only the floral patterns like the rest of the rug hookers in the community, she created more complicated works of landscapes and portraits. Eventually her work earned her the nickname of "Canada's artist in wool."
Over the years, Elizabeth LEFORT produced more than 300 tapestries that now hang in galleries around the world. In 1957, she travelled to the White House to present U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower with a portrait in wool. It was the first large portrait she had done. Years later, when asked what it was like to visit the presidential residence she replied: "It was just a house like any other one."
In 1959, a visit to Canada by the Queen inspired Ms. LEFORT to create another portrait. Measuring 68.5 centimetres by 84, the Queen's portrait featured 50 different shades of colour, for which she dyed all her own wool. When she presented the portrait to the Queen at Buckingham Palace in 1959, Ms. LEFORT told her that the portrait represented 11 days of work. The Queen replied: "Eleven days of work, but no doubt a lifetime of experience." By accounts, the portrait stills hangs in the palace.
Ms. LEFORT worked in the Cheticamp style of rug hooking which uses a hook to pull loops of dyed wool through a burlap sheet suspended in a frame. Experienced rug hookers can pull the wool through the burlap at great speeds, keeping the length of each loop approximately the same. During her heyday, Mrs. LEFORT, like other experienced rug hookers, clocked at 55 loops per minute, 3,300 in an hour and 26,400 in an eight-hour day.
A devout Catholic, Ms. LEFORT hooked many religious tapestries including The Last Supper, which measures 2.5 metres by one metre and features 154 colours. Her only hooked tapestry hanging in her Margaree Harbour home showed the infant Jesus. It was her favourite piece and was displayed prominently in her living room.
In 1959, Ms. LEFORT hooked a portrait of Pope John [[XXIII]], which was exhibited at the Vatican. Ten years later, she presented Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau with his portrait in Halifax at the start of the Canada Summer Games.
When asked which portrait she liked best of all the famous people she had depicted, she pointed to Ann Terry MacLellan, a popular Cape Breton radio and television personality. "She was hard to impress," said Reverend Daniel Doucet, who is writing Ms. LEFORT's biography.
Born on Cape Breton, Ms. LEFORT was the youngest in a family of 12 children. At 12, she left school to stay home to help her parents Placide and Evangeline manage the home. Although she had hooked from an early age, it was not until she was in her mid-20s when she realized her talent was a gift. "At that moment, God took charge of me and I knew I could do it," she recently told Father Doucet.
"She never doubted herself afterwards," he said.
That moment coincided with her decision to move away from simple floral designs in which she would use four or five different colours. In their place, she tried a complicated English country scene that required a great many colours, including dozens of shades of brown.
"She had a tremendous sense of who she was," Father Doucet said. "She was very matter-of-fact about everything. There was no fuss, no bother. She had a gift and that was it."
Aside from doing a bit of house-cleaning work outside the family home, she spent most of her time hooking and helping out at home until she met the man who would later become her husband. "She probably would have died there if her husband hadn't come along and swept her away," Father Doucet said.
Ms. LEFORT met Walter Kenneth HANSFORD in the early 1950s. Originally from Toronto, Mr. HANSFORD bought a piece of land in Margaree Harbour and became a pivotal influence in her life. He immediately recognized her talent and bought all the pieces she created. In 1951, Mr. HANSFORD built a craft-and-souvenir store in the community, which he called "PaulPix Shop" and hired Ms. LEFORT, who at the time spoke little English, to demonstrate her rug-hooking method. The store also became an outlet for selling her hooking and before long he had a gallery built where she could exhibit her work.
In 1955, Mr. HANSFORD asked Ms. LEFORT if she could produce a portrait with her hook and wool. Until that point she had done only flowers and scenery. Her first attempt was a portrait of Mr. Eisenhower. After personally presenting the portrait to the president, Ms. LEFORT received a letter from Mr. Eisenhower. "I am keenly interested in the unusual effects that you are able to create through the medium of hand hooking in wool yarn," the president wrote.
For years, Mr. HANSFORD and Ms. LEFORT operated the gallery in Margaree Harbour during the summer months and spent their winters in Phoenix, Arizona., where she continued to hook. On the side, her husband was a talented photographer in his own right. An artistic and cultured man, he enjoyed listening to opera and surrounding himself with fine crafts. He spoke little French and died in 1987.
"They were an unlikely pair," Father Doucet said.
While she eventually learned English, Ms. LEFORT felt most comfortable speaking French throughout her life. Having left school at 12, Ms. LEFORT didn't continue her education and spent most of her time hooking.
In 1983, the Elizabeth Lefort Gallery opened at Trois Pignons, a cultural centre in Cheticamp, after La Société Saint-Pierre bought 15 of her best pieces. There are now 21 pieces hanging in the gallery. One of the most impressive is a tapestry she did in 1967 when Canada celebrated its 100th anniversary of Confederation. The 5.5-square-metre piece represents important events in Canadian history, including each prime minister from 1867 to 1967. It required 416 different shades of colour, about two million loops with the hook and seven months of her time from start to finish.
"Her pieces are very well known," said Lisette Cormier, executive director of Les Trois Pignons. "It [rug hooking] is so much a part of our Acadian history. It's so important to have her work stay in the community."
In 1986, Ms. LEFORT was appointed a member of the Order of Canada for having adapted Acadian rug hooking into an art form and, in the process, having contributed to the preservation of Acadian culture and heritage.
"All the awards she won were not that important," said her friend Charles Roach. "To her, the Order of Canada was no big deal." Instead, she believed that everyone who volunteered in their community should receive the award.
In the last years of her life, Mrs. LEFORT lived in Margaree Harbour with her sister, whom she cared for until she died. This spring, Ms. LEFORT suffered a stroke but was still able to live in her small bungalow and continue to hook.
Elizabeth LEFORT was born on July 17, 1914, in Point Cross, Nova Scotia She died in nearby Cheticamp on October 10, 2005.
She was 101, and the last of her immediate family. Predeceased by her husband and by her many siblings, she is survived by one step-daughter, and by many nephews and nieces.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-04 published
BISHOP, Anna (née LAWLOR)
Peacefully on Monday, January 3, 2005 at Chateau Gardens Assisted Living, Elmira. Anna (LAWLOR) BISHOP, in her 97th year, formerly of Toronto. Wife of the late Francis BISHOP. Dear mother of Helen and Stewart LOGAN of Elmira and Mary and Terry PHILLIPS of Calgary. Also lovingly remembered by her three grand_sons, Christopher and Nancy LOGAN of Congers, New York, Timothy and Ann LOGAN of Mississauga and Michael PHILLIPS of Calgary and her great-grand_son William LOGAN of Mississauga. Anna was the last surviving member of her family having been predeceased by her parents, William and Sarah (McKENNA) LAWLOR, 2 brothers, Jack and Fintan LAWLOR, 4 sisters, Carmel LYNCH, Alice FINNERTY, Frances INWOOD and Sister Mary FINTAN. The family will receive Friends and relatives at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Thursday from 2-4 p.m. only. Funeral Mass will be held at St. Teresa of Avila Roman Catholic Church, Elmira on Friday, January 7th at 10: 30 a.m. with Father George NOWAK, C.R. officiating. Interment will take place at Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Cemetery, Mississauga on Saturday at 11: 00 a.m.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-14 published
LAWLOR, William James " Bill"
(Retired - Scarborough Hydro). Peacefully, at Lakeridge Health Oshawa, on Saturday, February 12, 2005, in his 77th year. Bill LAWLOR, loving husband of Joyce (née SLATER.) Dedicated father of Ken (Jennifer HILTON,) Gail (Richard FRASER,) and the late Wayne. Devoted Grandpa of Alex, Mary Ellen, and Karen. Brother of June PREVOST, Ralph (Ealaine), Marion SLATER (David), Ruth RICKARDS (Jim,) and predeceased by Gerald and Wilfred. Brother-in-law of Rose and Mary, Norma SLATER, Ivor SLATER (Pat), Carol OLSON (Arne,) Bob SLATER, and David SLATER (Marion.) Special uncle to Brenda, Brian, Bruce, April, Karen, Eric, and Karen. Bill will be fondly remembered by his many family and Friends. The family will receive Friends at the McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax (Pickering Village), 905-428-8488, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Tuesday. A Celebration of Bill's Life will be held at Dunbarton Fairport United Church (1066 Dunbarton Rd., Pickering), on Wednesday, February 16, 2005, at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Erskine Cemetery. Should family and Friends so desire, donations to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, or The Children's Wish Foundation would be greatly appreciated.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-06 published
EDMUND, Edward Joseph
Peacefully surrounded by his family on Sunday, September 4, 2005 in his 65th year. Beloved husband and best friend of Corinne, loving father of Erin. Dear brother of Joan and her husband Joe LAWLOR, Patti and her husband Paul BARTON. Uncle of Tim, Sean, Kevin and Maureen LAWLOR, Antony, Jonn, Darren BARTON and Chantal CLEMENT, son-in-law of Dorothy CLEMENT and brother-in-law of Sue and the late Don CLEMENT. The family will receive Friends at the McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax (Pickering Village), 905-428-8488, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Isaac Jogues Catholic Church, 1148 Finch Ave., Pickering, on Thursday, September 8, 2005 at 11 a.m. Interment to follow. Should family and Friends so desire, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Diabetes Association would be greatly appreciated.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-11 published
McCAFFERY, William John " Bill"
Flt. Lt. Royal Canadian Air Force; Former V.P. of Tupperware Canada. Peacefully, on Sunday, October 9th, 2005 in his 89th year. Bill was the loving husband of (Elizabeth) Vivian, and father of Diane (Stephen STOROSCHUK,) and Pamela BROWN. He will be fondly remembered by his grandchildren Jessica and Amy (LAWLOR) and their father, Michael. The family extends their sincere gratitude to the staff of the Burloak Long Term Care Centre and specifically Triller House, for the loving care they provided Bill in his final months. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10 North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Thursday, October 13th at 1 o'clock. If desired, donations to the Parkinson Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation, would be greatly appreciated.

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