LANGABEER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-23 published
LANGABEER, Gordon Albert
Peacefully after a brief illness, with family at his side, on Tuesday, February 22, 2005, at age 66. Beloved husband of Sue and loving father of Chantal, Nicholas and Megan. He will be fondly remembered by family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Neweduk Funeral Home - "Mississauga Chapel", 1981 Dundas St. W. (1 block E. of Erin Mills Pkwy.) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Friday. A Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday, February 26 at 1 p.m. followed by cremation. Neweduk Funeral Home 905-828-8000 www.neweduk.com

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LANGABEER - All Categories in OGSPI

LANGAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-06-29 published
POGE, Ronald Roy
World War 2 Veteran, served in the Royal Air Force (Per Ardua Regiment). Peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound on Sunday, June 26th, 2005. Ron POGE of Owen Sound, at the age of 82. Beloved husband of Brenda (née NICOLL.) Dear father of Brenda LANGAN (Jim) of Bramalea, David (Mary) of Port Credit, Lorraine GONNEAU (Garth) of Bramalea and Yvonne LAMB (Dale) of Owen Sound. Sadly missed by eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Also survived by a brother Alfred of Essex, England. A Celebration of Life for Ron will be held at the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 6 Owen Sound on Saturday, July 9th from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. at which fellow Veterans are especially welcome. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate memorial donations to the Cancer Society, Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre Foundation or the Royal Canadian Legion Poppy Fund, which may be placed through the Tannahill Funeral Home, 376-3710.
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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-03 published
HELENIAK, Richard Paul
Peacefully into the arms of Angels surrounded by his family at the L.H.S.C. South Street Campus, London on Saturday January 1, 2005 at the age of 53. Beloved husband of Cheryl (BICKELL.) Loving father of Matthew, Kristen, Michelle and Jennifer. Richard was the cherished son of Maria HELENIAK and the late Marian HELENIAK. He will be sadly missed by his brothers John, Stan and wife Edith, Ron and wife Joy as well as his many nieces and nephews. Son-in-law of James and Betty BICKELL. Richard will also be greatly missed by all of his other family members and many Friends whose lives he had so deeply touched. As an owner of Norwich Packers, Richard was deeply involved with the cattle business and devoted a large part of his life to the betterment of the Beef Industry. Richard was highly respected and revered by his colleagues and was a much sought after speaker at annual meetings and conventions as well as a judge at numerous competitions. He was involved with many organizations and charities and was a member of both the Knights of Columbus and the Norwich Legion. Friends and family will be received at The Arn-Lockie Funeral Home, 45 Main Street West, Norwich on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass of Resurrection will be held at Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 51 Venison Street, Tillsonburg on Thursday January 6th at 10: 30 a.m. with Father Michael LANGAN as Celebrant. Rite of Committal will be held at Tillsonburg Cemetery. Donations to the Woodstock Hospital Foundation, Canadian Blood Services or Saint Mary's Church would be gratefully acknowledged by the family. A Legion service will be held on Tuesday evening at 6: 30 p.m.; Prayers will be said on Wednesday evening at 6: 30 p.m. Arn-Lockie (519) 863-3020.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-09 published
EVANOFF, Blondine S. (née DEBOEY)
Peacefully but suddenly on February 8, 2005, Blondine S. EVANOFF passed away at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital. Loving mother and best friend to Carol EVANOFF of R.R.#1 Otterville. Blondine was predeceased by her husband and best friend Nick EVANOFF (1968,) and her parents Edward DEBOEY (1985) and Celestine DEBOEY (1984.) She was a member of the Catholic Women's League of Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, and was an avid lover of all animals. The family welcomes Friends and family to visit with them at Ostranders Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell Street, Tillsonburg (842-5221) on Thursday, February 10, 2005 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. C.W.L. Prayers to be held Thursday at 3 p.m. and Parish Prayers to be held Thursday at 7 p.m. A funeral Mass for Blondine will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 51 Venison St. W., Tillsonburg on Friday, February 11, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Father Michael LANGAN officiating. Interment Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations (payable by cheque) may be made to Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Tillsonburg, Caressant Care Nusring Home, Courtland, and the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital. Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-14 published
MATTHYNSSENS, Blanche (formerly VERSTRAETEN)
Blanche (VERSTRAETEN) MATTHYNSSENS (Delhi) passed away peacefully, surrounded by her family at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Sunday, February 13, 2005, in her 94th year. Blanche was born in San Antonio, Texas on December 17th, 1911. She was a member of the Saint Mary's Church, the C.W.L., Tillsonburg, and Sacred Heart Church, Langton and also a member of the Delhi Belgian Club. Together with her husband Albert, she farmed tobacco for several years at R.R.#1 Delhi.
Loving mother and mother-in-law of: Diana and Noël GHESQUIERE, Tillsonburg; Anita and Dr. David HILLNER, Tillsonburg and Ginny VERSTRAETEN, South River. Blanche was proud to be called "Meme" by her grandchildren Dan and Liz VERSTRAETEN, Marc VERSTRAETEN and Liz, Linda and Gary MATTAN, Wendy and David HOLMES, Michael and Deana GHESQUIERE, Marc and Jennifer HILLNER, Bonnie and Billy GAGNON and Tammy GODDEN and Roger. Also survived by several great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her parents Abel VAN DE VYVER and Clementina BLANCQUAERT and by her first husband Roger VERSTRAETEN (1945,) her second husband Albert MATTHYNSSENS (1990) and recently by her son Marcel VERSTRAETEN (February 4, 2005); she was also predeceased by her four sisters: Aline (Jean) VAN DEN BROECK, Yvonne (Albert) MICHIELSON, Margaret (Philemon) BOEL, Elza (Albert) BRAECKE and a niece Rosita VERBOVEN. Friends and relatives are welcome to meet with the family on Tuesday from 2: 30-4:30 and 7-9 p.m. at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg (842-4238). C.W.L. Prayers are Tuesday at 4 p.m. Parish Prayers are Tuesday evening at 7: 30 p.m. Funeral Mass of a Christian Burial on Wednesday at 11: 30 p.m. at the Saint Marys Roman Catholic Church, 51 Venison Street West, Tillsonburg by Reverend Father Michael LANGAN. Interment to follow in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations (by cheque) payable to the "Heart and Stroke Foundation" or the charity of your choice would be gratefully acknowledged.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-16 published
THERRIEN, Doreen Patricia (GILLESPIE)
Peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, on Monday, February 14th, 2005 Doreen Patricia (GILLESPIE) THERRIEN of Tillsonburg in her 76th year. Born January 10th, 1930, Swan River, Manitoba, daughter of the late Patrick GILLESPIE (Old Chelsea, P.Q.) and the late former Dora DURAND (Crookston, Minnesota, U.S.A..) (Doreen was a member of the Saint Mary's Catholic Church and dedicated Co-Proprietor and employee of the Beaver Lumber and Building Supplies, Tillsonburg). Much loved wife and best friend of 46 years of Paul A. THERRIEN. Much loved devoted mother and mother-in-law of: Jeff THERRIEN and partner Mary Ellen KROETSCH, Pender Island, British Columbia, Cindy TOWNSEND and partner Hank STUYT, Kent THERRIEN, Todd THERRIEN and wife Phyliss, all of Tillsonburg. Loved and proud "Jabba" of Ben, Bailey and Kelly Townsend; Keegan THERRIEN; Kelsey and Jessie THERRIEN, Blake and Connor THERRIEN David, Mary and Jeff STUYT. Dear sister of: Lillian MacNEIL of Regina, Saskatchewan, John GILLESPIE of Kelvington, Saskatchewan, Percy GILLESPIE (Janet) of Vanderhoof, British Columbia, Sr. Marilyn GILLESPIE of Guelph, Ontario, and Wayne GILLESPIE of Vanderhoof, British Columbia Survived by in-laws: Gerry THERRIEN (Eleanor) of Midland, Ronald THERRIEN (Mary) Port Colborne, Sister Laura THERRIEN, Rome, Italy and Ellen Jean SHERK of Ridgeway, Ontario. Doreen is predeceased by her brothers: Lyle (1984), Terry (1995) and Lorne GILLESPIE (1995.) Friends and relatives are welcomed to meet with the family on Wednesday 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway Tillsonbury, (519) 842-4238. Parish Prayers are Wednesday evening at 7: 30 p.m. Complete Funeral Mass on Thursday at 11 a.m. at the St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 51 Venison Street West, Tillsonburg by Reverend Father Michael LANGAN. Cremation to follow. Inurnment in the Tillsonburg Cemetery Columbarium Wall at a later date. Memorial donations (payable by cheque) to the "Canadian Cancer Society" would be gratefully acknowledged by the family.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-03 published
HORVATH, Anthony " Tony"
Anthony "Tony" HORVATH. Passed away peacefully at Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Friday, April 1, 2005 with his family at his bedside Tony HORVATH of Tillsonburg in his 77th year. Beloved husband of 51 years to his dear wife and best friend Marie HORVATH (née HOELZLI.) Dear father of Rose HORVATH and her companion Leon VANHAVERBEKE of Tillsonburg; Dianne (Rick) TROTTIER of Petrolia. Cherished and much loved "Papa" to Brianne and Brittany DEPUES; Kristen and Ryan TROTTIER. Dear brother of Steve (Helen) HORVATH of Tillsonburg, and nephew to Blanche VARGA of Tillsonburg. Also survived by several nieces and nephews and cousins. Tony was predeceased by his parents Joseph and Agnes HORVATH, and two brothers Joe and John HORVATH in Hungary. The family welcome Friends and family to visit with them at Ostrander's Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell Street, Tillsonburg (842-5221) on Monday, April 4, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 51 Venison St. W., Tillsonburg on Tuesday, April 5, 2005 at 11 a.m. Rev. Father Michael LANGAN officiating. Interment Tillsonburg Cemetery. Parish prayers will be offered at Ostrander's Funeral Home on Monday afternoon at 2 p.m. At the family's request memorial donations (payable by cheque) may be made to Tillsonburg Hospital or St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Tillsonburg. Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-05 published
STENGER, Anna T. (née LEKAI)
Anna T. STENGER (LEKAI) of Tillsonburg at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Monday April 4th, 2005 in her 87th year. Loving mother of Agnes McLAIN of Tillsonburg. Dear grandmother of Alex, George and Joe McMASTER. Loving great-grandmother of Crystal, George, William and Jennifer. Predeceased by her parents Michaly and Elizabeth (STAUB) LEKAI, her husband Karl STENGER (1993), five sisters and two brothers as well as sons-in-law, William McMASTER and James McLAIN. Anna's family will receive Friends at the Ostrander Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell St, Tillsonburg (519-842-5221) on Tuesday, from 2-4 and 7-9p.m. Funeral Mass for Anna will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Tillsonburg on Wednesday, April 6th, 2005 at 11 a.m. with Fr. Michael LANGAN celebrating. Parish prayers will be recited Tuesday evening at 7 p.m. Right of committal in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. If desired memorial donations may be made tot he Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Diabetes Association. Personal condolences may be sent at www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-17 published
STEER, Kathryn Ann (née SMITH)
Peacefully, at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Monday, May 16, 2005, Kathryn Ann (SMITH) STEER of Tillsonburg, formerly of Niagara Falls, Ontario in her 43rd year. Born January 15, 1963 in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. Beloved daughter of Ken and Angela SMITH of Niagara Falls, Ontario. Kathy was a well-respected and well-liked music teacher at Annadale School, Tillsonburg and was a member of Saint Mary's Church, Tillsonburg. She also served with the Tillsonburg Cultural Commission. Beloved wife and best friend of 20 years of Edward STEER and much loved mother of Kevin and Victoria. Dear sister of Andrew SMITH and financée Shannon of Niagara Falls. Survived by her mother-in-law Martha STEER of London and the late Karel (1979.) Also survived by a brother-in-law Dr. Robert STEER and his wife Gail of London and two sisters-in-law Fran STEER and her partner Mary of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia and Carol and her husband Doug VANWATERSCHOOT of Whitby and nieces, nephews and cousins. Friends, colleagues and relatives are welcome to meet with the family to share memories of Kathy on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg, (519) 842-4238. Funeral Mass of a Christian Burial to be said on Thursday at 2 p.m. at the Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 51 Venison St. W., Tillsonburg, by Reverend Father Michael LANGAN. Interment to follow in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. Instead of flowers, memorial donations (payable by cheque) to the Canadian Cancer Society would be gratefully appreciated by the family. Parish Prayers are Wednesday evening at 7: 30 p.m.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-18 published
VAN HOVE, Yvonne Marie (née MAHU)
It is with heartfelt sadness that the family regrettably announces the passing of our precious wife, mother and grandmother, Yvonne Marie VAN HOVE of R.R.#2 Tillsonburg, peacefully, at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Tuesday, May 17th, 2005 in her 70th year. Born in St. Boniface, Manitoba, December 7th, 1935, daughter of the late Louis MAHU and the late former Helen WYNANT and sister of the late Charles MAHU (February 13, 2001.) Yvonne was a member of the Saint Mary's Church and C.W.L. and the Delhi Belgian Club Ladies Auxiliary. Much loved wife and best friend of 48 years of John VAN HOVE. Loved mother and mother-in-law of Carolynn and her husband Dennis VANDEPOELE and their children: Sabrena and Branden of Tillsonburg, Dennis VAN HOVE and his wife Ann and their children: Ainslea and Alegra of R.R.#2 Tillsonburg Carmen and her husband John McDERMID and their children: Alexis, Jonathon and Deidra of Brantford. Friends and relatives can meet with the VAN HOVE family on Thursday from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg (842-4238). Funeral Mass of A Christian Burial to be said on Friday at 11 a.m. at the Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 51 Venison St. W., Tillsonburg by Reverend Father Michael LANGAN. Interment to follow in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations (payable by cheque) to "Saint Mary's Church" or the "Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital Foundation" or any charity of your choice would be gratefully acknowledged by the VAN HOVE family. C.W.L. Prayers are Thursday at 4: 30 pm. Parish Prayers are Thursday evening at 7: 30 pm. "Mothers are God's angels, but remember, they are on loan and one day in the future, God will call them home."

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-24 published
WALKER, Sylvia Diana (née BOC)
Peacefully, with her family, at her bedside, after a courageous battle with cancer. Sylvia Diana WALKER, of Tillsonburg on Sunday, May 22, 2005, in her 67th year. Born in Welland, Ontario, September 2, 1938. Dear daughter of the late John BOC Sr., and the late former Lily KOUCAR. Resident of Tillsonburg, since 1951. Member of Saint Marys Roman Catholic Church, Tillsonburg and the C.W.L. Dear wife and best friend for 49 years to Jimmy WALKER. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Tammy HICKS - London, Jamie WALKER - Tillsonburg, J.D. WALKER and his wife Tanya - Timmins. Dear sister of John BOC - Tillsonburg, Beverley WALKER - Eden. Proud grandmother of 4 grandchildren Brandon HICKS, Katlyn HICKS, Elliot WALKER, Paitra WALKER and by several cousins, aunts. A special thank you for your kindness through the years to Vicky LUKI, Sarie OVERBEEK, Pat and Gina with C.M.H.A. Resting at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway Tillsonburg (519-842-4238). Funeral Mass of Christian Burial, to be said on Wednesday, May 25, 2005, at 11: 00 a.m. at Saint Marys Roman Catholic Church, Tillsonburg, by Reverend Fr. Michael LANGAN. Interment to follow at Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations (by cheque only) to the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Canadian Mental Health Association or choice. Visitation Tuesday 2-4: 30 p.m., 7-9:00 p.m. C.W.L. Prayers Tuesday at 4 p.m. Parish Prayers Tuesday at 8: 00 p.m.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-10 published
DANIEL, Ron
It is with great sadness that Ron DANIEL passed away at the Stratford General Hospital on Thursday June 9, 2005 surrounded by his family. Loving husband and best friend of Shirley DANIEL for over 50 years. Beloved father to Derrick DANIEL and his friend Barb MOLNAR of Tillsonburg, Rhonda PATTERSON and her husband Bob of Brampton, and Heather KENNEDY and her companion Michael WALZACK of Milverton. Ron was a loving grandfather to several grandchildren. He is survived by his sisters Ruth McKAY and her husband Gord of Ingersoll, Carolyn CASSIDY of London, Jenette GOFTON and her husband John of Tillsonburg, Cheryl DONEFF and her husband Herb of Tillsonburg, brother-in-law Jim LOGGER and his wife Gloria of Glencoe, and several nieces and nephews. Ron was predeceased by his grand_son Daniel KENNEDY. Ron worked at Livingston Industries from the young age of 18 up until he retired. He was also a longstanding member of the Knights of Columbus. The family will receive Friends and family at Ostrander's Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell Street, Tillsonburg on Saturday June 11, 2005 from 7-9 p.m. and on Sunday June 12, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Parish prayers will commence Sunday evening at 7: 00 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial for Ron will be held at the Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Tillsonburg on Monday June 13, 2005 at 11 a.m. Reverend Fr. Michael LANGAN officiating. Interment Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made (payable by cheque) to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-16 published
LANGAN, Marie Cecelia
At Marion Villa, London on Friday, October 14, 2005. Marie Cecelia LANGAN of London in her 89th year. Survived by her sisters Helen STEPHENS and Rheta BOTHWELL and sister-in-law Leatha LANGAN. Predeceased by her parents Frank and Margaret LANGAN and her brothers Jack and Joseph LANGAN and her niece Lynda BREEDON. Dear aunt of Gayle TOON, Joanne WINTER and Doug STEPHENS, Ron BOTHWELL and his wife Peggy, Margaret GARDINER and her husband Ron and Tara LANGAN. Also survived by great nieces and nephews. A funeral service will be held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy on Monday October 17 at 1 p.m. with Fr. John SHARP officiating. Interment in Bornish Cemetery. Visitation will be held from 12 p.m. until time of service. Donation to Marion Villa would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Marie.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-03 published
BOTHWELL, Rheta Francis (née LANGAN)
Suddenly at the Dearness Home on Wednesay, November 2, 2005. Rheta Francis (LANGAN) BOTHWELL of London in her 83rd year. Beloved wife of the late Ron (Tiny) BOTHWELL (1967.) Loving mother of the late Lynda BREEDON (2002,) loving grandmother of the late Craig BREEDON (2001.) Survived by son Ron (Peggy) BOTHWELL, grandmother to Penny, Melanie and Billy BREEDON, Patricia BOTHWELL and Phil REMBER, Ronnie and Belkis BOTHWELL, Nicole, Samantha and Terry BOTHWELL, great-grandmother of Lexi BREEDON- DEGRAW. Sister to Helen STEPHENS and sister-in-law Dean and John GALLANT, sister-in-law Leatha LANGAN. Predeceased by her parents Frank and Margaret LANGAN, her sister Marie LANGAN, her brothers Joseph and Jack LANGAN, Keith and Mary BOTHWELL, Barbara and Ted WELCH, Howard and Eleanor BOTHWELL. Survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Visitation will be held Saturday, November 5 from 12-2 p.m. at the Denning Bros. Funeral Home, with the funeral service at 2 p.m. with Fr. John SHARP officiating. Interment in All Saints Cemetery, Strathroy. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Rheta.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-21 published
LANGAN, Reverend Father Michael
Entered into the joyful presence of our God of the Galaxies, December 19, 2005, Reverend Father Michael LANGAN, 72, of Tillsonburg, Ontario. Born in Sarnia, Ontario, February 17, 1933. He was ordained to the priesthood, May 30, 1959. Survived by his sister, Maureen and her husband James O'DRISCOLL, Burlington. Beloved uncle of Patricia MONTPETIT, Naughton: Kathleen O'DRISCOLL, Picton; Timothy O'DRISCOLL, Burlington and Daniel O'DRISCOLL, Kitchener. Predeceased by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T.A. LANGAN, Sarnia and by his brother Rev. R. Jerome LANGAN, (1982.) Fr. Mike will be lying in state at Saint Mary's R.C. Church, 51 Venison Street West, Tillsonburg on Thursday, December 22, 2005. You are invited to pay your respects from 10: 00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and on Friday morning from 9:00 a.m. to 10: 30 a.m. Funeral Mass of a Christian Burial on Friday, December 23, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. at Saint Mary's R.C. Church, Tillsonburg. Bishop Ronald P. FABRO, Diocese of London, Celebrant. C.W.L. Prayers on Thursday at 3: 00 p.m. Parish Prayers on Thursday at 7: 00 p.m. Knights of Columbus Prayers on Thursday at 8:00 p.m. Interment in Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations (payable by cheque) to the Father Langan Parish Centre or Saint Mary's Youth Ministry. Verhoeve Funeral Homes, 262 Broadway Street, Tillsonburg (519-842-4238) in charge of arrangements.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2005-10-18 published
LANGAN, Marie Cecelia
At Marian Villa, London, on Friday, October 14, 2005, Marie Cecelia LANGAN of London, in her 89th year. Survived by her sisters Helen STEPHENS and Rheta BOTHWELL and sister-in-law Leatha LANGAN. Predeceased by her parents Frank and Margaret LANGAN, her brothers Jack and Joseph LANGAN, and her niece Lynda BREEDON. Dear aunt of Gayle TOON, Joanne WINTER and Doug STEPHENS, Ron BOTHWELL and his wife Peggy, Margaret GARDINER and her husband Ron and Tara LANGAN. Also survived by great-nieces and nephews. A funeral service was held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy, on Monday, October 17 at 1 p.m. with Fr. John SHARP officiating. Interment in Bornish Cemetery. Visitation was held from 12 p.m. until time of service. Donations to Marian Villa would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Marie.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2005-11-08 published
BOTHWELL, Rheta Francis (née LANGAN)
Suddenly, at the Dearness Home, on Wednesday, November 2, 2005, Rheta Francis (LANGAN) BOTHWELL of London, in her 83rd year. Beloved wife of the late Ron (Tiny) BOTHWELL (1967.) Loving mother of the late Lynda BREEDON (2002,) loving grandmother of the late Craig BREEDON (2001.) Survived by son Ron (Peggy) BOTHWELL, grandmother to Penny, Melanie, and Billy BREEDON, Patricia BOTHWELL and Phil REMBER, Ronnie and Belkis BOTHWELL, Nicole, Samantha, and Terry BOTHWELL, great-grandmother of Lexi BREEDON- DEGRAW. Sister of Helen STEPHENS, and sister-in-law Dean and John GALLANT, sister-in-law Leatha LANGAN. Predeceased by her parents Frank and Margaret LANGAN, her sister Marie LANGAN, her brothers Joseph and Jack LANGAN, Keith and Mary BOTHWELL, Barbara and Ted WELCH, Howard and Eleanor BOTHWELL. Survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Visitation was held Saturday, November 5 from 12-2 p.m. at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, with the funeral service at 2 p.m. Fr. John SHARP officiating. Interment in All Saints Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Rheta.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-15 published
Earl CAMERON, Broadcaster: 1915-2005
The man with the distinctive, rich voice and famously unflinching face lent authority to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in the early days of television broadcasting. Never a journalist, 'I just read the words'
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, January 15, 2005 - Page S7
Toronto -- Earl CAMERON used to tell the story of how he once walked into a store and found a salesman staring at him.
"Fellow who reads the news on television looks just like you. Ever watch him?"
"No," said Mr. CAMERON, not telling a lie since he couldn't watch himself while he was doing his job.
Early on, he discovered the strange kind of fame that comes with appearing on television. Like the salesman, people thought they knew him but weren't sure.
"People often look at me in the street. They want to say hello, but aren't sure whether I'm somebody's brother or a guy they met recently at a party."
Earl CAMERON was a classic Canadian Broadcasting Corporation announcer, the voice of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's The National, which, in the early part of his tenure from 1959 to 1966, was the only national television newscast in the country. If Lorne GREENE was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Voice of Doom, then Earl CAMERON was probably its voice from Mount Olympus -- listened to and trusted by the viewers.
"If Earl said it, you knew it was true and that, even with all the miseries, all was well with the world," said Knowlton NASH, who read The National long after Mr. CAMERON.
"He was the last anchor who was part of the old school of broadcasting," said Mr. NASH from his winter home in Naples, Florida "No matter how awful the news -- and he broadcast during the war -- he was always a reassuring presence, giving the impression there were better things ahead."
Mr. CAMERON will long be regarded as "the anchor's anchor" by the corporation. "His skill and professionalism contributed greatly to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's reputation for credibility, objectivity and dependability in our newsgathering and broadcasting, and in our role as Canada's national public broadcaster," said Richard STURSBERG, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television's executive vice-president. "He was truly a legend."
All told, Mr. CAMERON read more than 1,500 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation newscasts. His audience believed that if Mr. CAMERON said something -- anything -- then it had to be true. One woman went so far as to say, "he couldn't convince me that black is white, but if he said it, then I would certainly give it some thought."
Back in the days when news on television was a few talking heads and too many words, Mr. CAMERON appeared on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's 11 p.m. news broadcast and became a national institution. He read the news from a script, not a teleprompter, and was famous for his diction and flawless delivery.
His fans included those with an ear for perfectly spoken English. In 1966, television columnist Dennis BRAITHWAITE wrote in The Globe and Mail that "I consider him a uniquely talented news reader, the only one at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation who, in my hearing, has never made a mistake in phrasing or pronunciation."
Earl CAMERON was born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan., during the early months of the First World War. He inherited his magnificent voice from his father, Ernest, who was described as having "one of the finest undiscovered bass-baritones in North America" by Sir Arthur Benjamin, the British composer who toured North America judging choral contests.
The elder Mr. CAMERON wanted Earl to become a teacher like his brother and two sisters. Earl did go to Saskatchewan Teachers College, but soon decided the vocation wasn't for him. He liked to tell a story of his brief career in the classroom. "I was hired to teach in a little town called Kildare. This was during the great Western drought of the '30s and it hadn't rained in Kildare for a long time. My second day on the job there was a downpour of 3½ inches. I figured I had done enough for the town, so I left."
Perhaps it wasn't a great idea at the height of the Depression, for he next found work shovelling coal for $18 a week. After that, he worked on the railway for 25 cents an hour. His break came when he heard of an audition for a summer job as an announcer at CHAB, the local Moose Jaw radio station.
"I had about 70 others competing against me for an announcing job. The whole public speaking class at the Young Men's Christian Association," quipped Mr. CAMERON, who had a droll sense of humour despite his unflinching, stone-faced persona. His distinctive, rumbling voice won him the job, and it quickly became permanent.
He soon moved to CKY in Winnipeg and stayed there for four years. The station was owned by the Manitoba Telephone Co. but, as it happened, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation also used the staff and facilities there and Mr. CAMERON quickly made a good impression. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation promptly lured him away and, in 1941, he arrived in Toronto. It wasn't long until he was reading the National Radio News.
After television arrived, Mr. CAMERON served as the backup for Larry HENDERSON, who was the reader at 11 p.m. When Mr. HENDERSON quit in 1959, Mr. CAMERON was given the job of reading the National News.
For the next seven years, he was a familiar face, opening the program with a nod of his head, a hint of a smile and a quiet "good evening." It was a no-nonsense approach to a no-nonsense subject, and both Mr. CAMERON and the network liked it that way. Then he got down to the serious stuff (commercials were not allowed during the news) and he worked hard to avoid the slightest gesture or change in inflection that might betray an emotion or a personal opinion. If the program's editors provided him with a "kicker" to end the newscast, he would permit himself an expression that might suggest a chuckle.
He was the anchor, a term that didn't make it into the Oxford English Dictionary until 1965, from 1959 to 1966. In many ways, he was the last of a breed.
"Earl was devastated when they decided to go with a journalistic anchor rather than a traditional broadcaster," says Larry STOUT, who was then a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation news writer and reporter. "He didn't think of himself as a journalist, but rather as a broadcaster."
That got him into a bit of trouble. Like other announcers, he was allowed to do commercial work. Mr. CAMERON had two big clients Crest toothpaste and Rambler, a car made by American Motors. The toothpaste ads caused some complaints of bias -- by politicians, among others -- and in 1965 Mr. CAMERON was given a choice: no more jobs doing ads if he wanted to keep his high-profile job reading the 11 o'clock news.
In the end, he chose the news over toothpaste, but a year later he was dumped anyway. Mr. CAMERON's replacement as the main reader on The National was Stanley BURK/BURKE, who had worked as a foreign correspondent. Mr. CAMERON took over rotating duties that included reading the early evening news that went across the country. He also introduced the opinion program Viewpoint.
Earl CAMERON was always strictly a newsreader. He wasn't allowed to change a comma of copy. It was a union regulation and not one he minded. "I just read the words."
While his diction may have been perfect, he was wrong on the direction that television news was taking. In 1967, he told the Toronto Telegram, "I've heard that Huntley and Brinkley and Walter Cronkite say that the era of the broadcast journalist is ending and here the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is just trying to start it."
The tradition at almost all television networks now is that the main newsreader is not "just an announcer" but someone who has advanced through the ranks as a reporter. The change did not occur overnight. Stanley BURK/BURKE quit and was replaced by announcers, including Lloyd ROBERTSON.
Peter KENT, a field reporter, read The National after Mr. ROBERTSON and he was followed by others of similar background. For all that, Mr. CAMERON and Mr. ROBERTSON were remembered as newsreaders by the audience and by the comedy troupe SCTV, which played on their names in a running sketch that featured rival anchors Earl Camembert and Floyd Robertson.
After Mr. CAMERON's demotion from his television job, he was still one of two readers for The World at Six on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio. And he stayed on, introducing Viewpoint until it was cancelled in January of 1976. A few months later, Mr. CAMERON retired after 32 years -- and the world seen through a Canadian television screen was never the same again. "He was very, very Canadian," said Mr. NASH. "As Canadian as wheat."
Earl CAMERON was born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan., on June 12, 1915. He died Thursday in Royal Victoria Hospital in Barrie, Ontario, after a lengthy illness. He was 89. He is survived by his wife, Adelaide and son Harold. He was predeceased by his son Clark, who died in a car accident in 1984. Funeral services will be held on Saturday.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-29 published
Bob MacDOUGALL, Royal Canadian Air Force Flier And Priest 1924-2004
Shot down over the North Sea, he made a pact with God, accepted the German surrender in Denmark and then came home to take his vows and work among hardened criminals. Later, he starred on 100 Huntley Street as a evangelical priest
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, January 29, 2005 - Page S7
No one wants to be the last man killed in a war.
Hitler had just four days to live when Bob MacDOUGALL found himself floating in the dark in the North Sea. Flying Officer MacDOUGALL had about another 60 years to live, most of them as a Jesuit priest, but all he knew then was that the Second World War was almost over and his situation was desperate.
Minutes before, he had been the tail gunner in a Halifax bomber, carrying war material to the resistance in Denmark. The crew was with 644 Squadron and had left their base in Dorset in England at 10 p.m. on April 26, 1945. To remain undetected by German radar, the plane flew between 50 and 100 feet above the water. "When we hit the west coast of Jutland, we had to climb," remembered Father MacDOUGALL in an interview in 1988.
A short while after they made their drop, they were hit by fire from the ground. According to Sandy BARR, a pilot who now runs the Squadron's historical website, their pilot ditched the plane just off the coast. All six crew members -- one Canadian, three New Zealanders and two Brits -- made it out alive.
The frigid water numbed his legs. Later in life, vascular problems would confine him to a wheelchair. Father MacDOUGALL wasn't particularly religious then, but as he struggled in the water, he formulated a pact. Years later, he told his brother Ian that he had made a promise to God. "He said, 'Save me from this and I'll spend my life doing good.' He was saved, and he kept his promise," said Ian MacDOUGALL.
After a spell in the water, the crew was picked up by Danish fishermen. As soon as the crew members landed, they left the fishermen, since the Germans shot anyone who helped a downed airman. Father MacDOUGALL wandered for a day or so, following instructions from the fishermen to look for a church steeple, since there he might find a sympathetic minister.
"I came to a brook and crossed over, but failed to see a German sentry on the other side. He raised his gun and brought me to a halt," recounted Father MacDOUGALL. He and at least one other crew member were arrested and put in a prisoner of war camp. Their internment didn't last long. On May 7, 1945, far away at a schoolhouse in the French city of Rheims, senior representatives of Hitler's defeated forces signed a ceasefire and the war in Europe was over.
In Denmark, the Germans wanted to surrender, but not to the Russians, who were fast approaching from the East and had already occupied an offshore island. The German command resolved to surrender to a British or American officer, preferably a general or even a colonel. They scoured their prisoner of war camps and all they could come up with was a 21-year-old Canadian flying officer who only days before had been swimming about in the North Sea. His officer rank was the second-lowest in the Royal Canadian Air Force, equal to a lieutenant in the army.
And that is how Bob MacDOUGALL came to accept the surrender of the German garrison in Denmark. He was carried through the streets of Vejle, the town nearest his PoW camp, and hailed as a liberator. At that moment, no one was more surprised than he. A month later, the picture of the celebration found its way back home and the face and name of "F/O Robert MacDOUGALL of 107 Henry Street, Halifax," was splashed across the front page of the Halifax Chronicle.
Father MacDOUGALL grew up in Nova Scotia but was born in Saskatchewan, where his father worked as a bank manager. The family moved to Halifax when he was a tot. Ralph MacDOUGALL was a businessmen, and although not rich, he was successful enough to raise a brood of children and send them all to university. He was a Presbyterian but his wife May WEBB was a Roman Catholic, so young Bob went to Saint Thomas Aquinas elementary school and St. Patrick's high school.
His mother died when he was quite young and his father married Gertrude MacNEIL, also a Catholic. Together, they raised his six children, as well as two more the couple would have together.
Bob MacDOUGALL joined the Royal Canadian Air Force from high school. He was the third member of his family to join, and all three went overseas -- his brother Bill as a soldier in the army and his sister Betty as an army nurse. Like everyone who joined the air force, he hoped to be a pilot. Instead, he became a tail gunner, the most vulnerable crew position on a Second World War bomber.
On his return to England from Denmark, he visited his sister at the hospital where she worked. In their happiness, a rather raucous party developed during which "he wrecked my bicycle," she recalled.
When he reached Halifax, Bob MacDOUGALL decided to attend St. Mary's University, where he was active in organizing the hockey team and also played football. Mindful of his promise to God, he considered becoming a journalist and instead opted for the priesthood. In 1950, he joined the Jesuits, the largest of all Roman Catholic religious orders. Many of his Friends bet he wouldn't last.
"It was tough for a war veteran who had seen the world to settle into that routine," said Elmer MacGILLIVRAY, who attended the Jesuit Novitiate with Father MacDOUGALL. "He was older than everyone else and the rules were tough for him."
Life was lived in silence, from rising at 5: 30 a.m. to chapel at 5: 55 a.m., followed by prayer from 6 to 7 a.m., a mass, and then breakfast 30 minutes later. "You could ask for sugar, but otherwise it was total silence," said Mr. MacGILLIVRAY, who later gave up the priesthood.
Because of his age and experience, Bob MacDOUGALL was ordained after 11 years instead of the usual 13. One of his first assignments was Loyola High School in Montreal. There he coached sports teams and taught several subjects, including Latin.
In one session, the boys learned to conjugate scio, the verb to know. In Latin, the words "I know," "you know," "he knows" are scio, scis, scit, with the "c" pronounced as an "h." His 14-year-old pupils fell about laughing at the sound of scit. To help them get over it, Father MacDOUGALL had them conjugate the verb aloud 30 times. The giggles soon disappeared.
Father MacDOUGALL had a varied life. He taught in schools, worked in parishes, was the priest at a veterans hospital and even worked as a missionary in South America. For several years, he served as the chaplain at Stoney Mountain Penitentiary near Winnipeg. There, he started a choir and convinced parishes in the area that his singing prisoners posed no danger. One of those he convinced was Elmer MacGILLIVRAY, who was then the parish priest at St. Ignatius of Winnipeg.
"On one trip, he stopped and he lost one prisoner when he escaped for a while. He was embarrassed about that," said Mr. MacGILLIVRAY who now lives in Edmonton.
Working at the maximum-security jail was tough and Father MacDOUGALL sometimes found it depressing to deal with hardened criminals. Often dismissed by cynical and intractable convicts as just another man in a dog collar to offer them empty promises and meaningless rituals, Father MacDOUGALL came to believe he was a failure and that the promise he made on that black, North Sea night had come to nothing. He was convinced he was a catastrophe as a prison priest and had not done good or helped any in his congregation. The truth, of course, was quite different. Until he learned otherwise, he grappled with more immediate demons at Stoney Mountain and found himself drinking too much. In the end, Father MacDOUGALL succeeded in conquering both depression and alcohol.
Perhaps the most astounding part of Father MacDOUGALL's religious life was his born-again status as a Christian evangelist. That occurred while working in a parish north of San Diego, California. Afterward, he remained a Roman Catholic and a Jesuit but embraced the scripture, the words of the Bible, and became the only Roman Catholic priest to preach on 100 Huntley Street, the Toronto-based evangelical Christian television channel.
He appeared on hundreds of television shows and started his own Food for Life program. Many conventional Catholics found his evangelism shocking and lodged complaints, but he persisted. "There are Catholic evangelicals, and he served them," said Rev. Jacques MONET, the archivist at Jesuit headquarters in Toronto.
Father MacDOUGALL was unapologetic about his evangelism. "I know God wanted me to be an evangelist to the world -- my Roman Catholic world," he said. A natural performer, he appeared on television and at prayer meetings, sometimes in his Roman collar, other times in an open-necked shirt.
Even his brothers and sisters, all of them religious Catholics, were sometimes startled at what their brother was up to. For all that, they are intensely proud of the homeless mission he set up in Toronto.
"I think one of the highlights of his life was setting up the Good Shepherd Refuge on Queen Street East near Parliament [in Toronto]. He wanted to feed the street people, and he worked at gathering food from local restaurants to feed them" said his brother Ian. "He started it in the mid 1970s and it's still open."
He made good on that promise.
Robert Leonard MacDOUGALL was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan., on February 27, 1924. He died on December 26, 2004. He was 80. He is survived by his brother Ian of Brampton, Ontario, his brother Lorne of Truro, Nova Scotia, and by his sisters Bette COLFORD and Margaret BOUDREAU of Halifax.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-09 published
Bob McADOREY, Broadcaster: 1935-2005
Deejay who helped determine what Toronto's youth listened to in the sixties went on to enjoy a 27-year run as a popular and irreverent figure on Global television
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, February 9, 2005 - Page S9
Toronto -- If you knew Peggy Sue, you knew Bob McADOREY. That's because, with his pile of curly hair and horn-rimmed glasses, the Toronto disc jockey was a ringer for Buddy Holly, the songwriter and singer from Texas whose song was a hit in 1959. The two men were born 10 months apart -- McADOREY in 1935, Holly in 1936 and actually met in the mid-1950s when Mr. McADOREY was a disc jockey in Guelph, Ontario, and the singer was on a tour of Canada.
"His job was to introduce Buddy Holly at a concert at Kitchener. When he went on stage, the crowd went wild, and Bob though 'Gee, I didn't know I was this popular,' " remembered his sister Pat RUSSELL. "Of course, they thought he was Buddy Holly."
For decades, Mr. McADOREY was the entertainment commentator on Global Television; he retired less than five years ago. But in an earlier era, he was a household name in Southern Ontario. In 1960, just a few months after Buddy Holly died in a plane crash in 1959, his look-alike joined Toronto's CHUM. Almost overnight, Bob McADOREY became the top disc jockey at CHUM, the No. 1 rock station in the country. He was astonished when the station paid him what he was asking for -- $7,200 a year (about $50,000 in today's money, according to the Bank of Canada's inflation calculator).
"Bob McADOREY, whose face is as well known in Toronto as Mayor Givens, has the most power to dictate what pop music Ontario teens listen to," wrote the Toronto Telegram in 1966.
Not only was he the on-air man in the key 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. slot, he was also the music director. He chose the records the other six disc jockeys played. He and the other disc jockeys decided on CHUM's Top 10, which sent kids to record stores to buy records with a big hole in the middle and a song on each side. They spun at 45 revolutions a minute and were called 45s.
"He alone commands what goes on the hit parade in Canada," wrote The Globe's Blake KIRBY in 1968. "Middle-aged squares who run record stores use the CHUM chart, the weekly list of what McADOREY is playing and plugging as a buying guide."
Along the way, he shared the footlights with such big-name visitors as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.
The CHUM hit parade made records such as The Unicorn by the Irish Rovers. Mr. McADOREY, a sentimental Irish-Canadian, pushed the record, which sold 140,000 copies in Canada and a million in the United States. But he didn't like everything on the CHUM chart. It was a business, after all.
"We're playing records here which I just can't bear to listen to, but I wouldn't let that influence what goes on the air," Mr. McADOREY once told The Globe and Mail. His sister said that when he went home after work, he was so sick of rock 'n' roll that he put earphones on and listened to classical music.
Like many successful big-city disc jockeys, Mr. McADOREY also ran dances on the weekends -- events with such names as Bob McAdorey's Canadian Bandstand or Canadian Hopville. He and a couple of other disc jockeys owned a company called Teen Scene Ltd., which put on dances in towns all over Southern Ontario.
After a long spell on CHUM, Bob McADOREY either was too old -- he was well into his 30s -- or too tired, and so he suddenly found himself fired. Unlike the regular corporate world, where people resign, in radio they are just plain sacked. Disc jockeys almost wear it as a badge of honour.
"There are no hard feelings," he told an entertainment writer in 1972 after he had been sacked from CFTR following a stint at CFGM. "I was told that it was either the station's new music-and-contests format or me." Within days, he had rejoined radio station CFGM.
A few years later, he morphed into television. No one told him that radio types, from the hot side of the Marshall McLuhan equation, are not supposed to be able to make the switch to the cool world of television. He perched on his stool in 1973 and performed for about 27 years.
Bob McADOREY was born within earshot of the Niagara Falls. His father worked as a machinist on the railway and the whole family lived near both the tracks and the roundhouse at Niagara Falls, Ontario For the rest of his life, Mr. McADOREY maintained a love affair with trains and rode them at every opportunity.
He went to high school at Stamford Collegiate. An Irish Catholic, he was one of two non-Protestants in the class. The other was Barbara FRUM, later the host of The Journal and As It Happens on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The two would spend the religious class in another room, enjoying their time off.
In Grade 12, Mr. McADOREY started work at the local radio station, doing a program in the early morning before class. "One day, the station manager told me to go on air and do the play-by-play of a local baseball game," he told the Toronto Star in 2000. "I didn't know the players' names and I didn't know much about baseball, so I sat in the bleachers and interviewed the spectators and it seemed to work."
After that, he was hooked. For a time, he worked all over -- including radio station CJDC in remote Dawson's Creek, British Columbia Even then, he was fairly outrageous. " CJDC had access to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation feeds," he said in 2000. "But nobody monitored us, so we sold everything -- the one o'clock time signal to a jewellery store, the Queen's Christmas Message brought to you by Sammy's Bar and Grill."
But it was soon after he had moved to Guelph, Ontario, that things really began to happen and he hit the big time at the age of 24 by working for CHUM.
Though he may have been at the top of the pop game in the Toronto of the sixties, he also became a national figure at Global as it expanded from a base in Southern Ontario to become the country's third network. He never applied for a job in television, it was just chance.
Bill CUNNINGHAM, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation foreign correspondent brought in to run Global News, hired him after he saw him speak during a tour of the new television station. At the time, Mr. McADOREY was working for Alan SLAIGHT, a prescient broadcaster who had run CHUM, bought CFGM and was one of the early owners of Global. Mr. CUNNINGHAM's plan was to lighten up the newscast and hire a kind of humourist-commentator. Thus, Mr. McADOREY covered entertainment and did light pieces for the newscast, heading out with a cameraman to find what he could. Once, during an Air Canada strike, he drifted out to Toronto's Pearson International Airport and happened to find Terminal 2 entirely deserted. The scene made irresistible camera fodder. The pair had time to erect an impromptu bowling alley and roll a few balls before the party was broken up by patrolling policemen.
The show was an enduring success. It helped that Mr. McADOREY was good-looking, possessed a great voice and was totally unaffected and unpretentious. Behind the scenes, though, Global was in turmoil and not just financially.
The network kept trying to reinvent itself. One idea was to bring in an untried newsreader, Suzanne PERRY, who was one of Pierre TRUDEAU's press aides and whose son, Matthew PERRY, went on to fame in the sitcom Friends. Sadly, Ms. PERRY was put on air before she was ready and that experiment failed.
A short while afterward, the network tried something called News at Noon, with Bob McADOREY doing entertainment, Mike ANSCOMBE the sports, and John DAWE, business. The three of them joked, made fun of each other, and did and said things you weren't supposed to see on television. All of a sudden, they had a huge audience, unheard of at that time of day.
"We broke new ground with 300,000 viewers at noon," said business reporter John DAWE. " Then it expanded and we did the 5: 30 news as well. We worked together for 14 years."
As he matured, Mr. McADOREY lost his Buddy Holly looks. Instead, he was often mistaken for another famous person with glasses and a mass of curly hair -- Ken TAILOR/TAYLOR, the Canadian ambassador to Iran who sheltered American colleagues during the 1979-80 hostage crisis.
At Global, the news department kept trying new things and new people, though the on-air staff remained pretty much the same. One producer didn't like the jocular format. And Mr. McADOREY didn't like him. He rebelled by being provocative on air.
"It's Friday, and I didn't really feel much like working today. The boss is out of town so I took it easy this afternoon, stretching out in my office, reading and daydreaming," he began his part of the 6 p.m. newscast on April 8, 1983. It got him fired.
"Unprofessional and insulting to the viewers," read the note from his pompous producer. The viewers thought otherwise. Phone lines buzzed and letters landed on all the right desks. Two weeks later, the producer was fired and Bob McADOREY was rehired.
As host of Entertainment Desk from 1991 to 1997, he guided it through many lively segments. Among the most memorable was the appearance of comedienne Judy Tenuta. "[She] pretty well took over the show, which bothered some viewers but not me," he once said. "Her wild style made for bizarre television. Most of the interview was done with Judy sitting on my lap making semi-lewd comments."
For all that, he never did like producers. At the time of his retirement in July, 2000, Andrew RYAN of The Globe and Mail asked him what advice he would give to aspiring young entertainment journalists. "Producers are dorks, actors are jerks," Mr. McADOREY answered. "The only ones worth talking to are directors."
Having been asked to retire, he said he had no expectations of a gold watch. Rather, "how about a gold boot up the butt? Retirement was not my idea. I always thought I had a few more good years left."
Instead, he chose to retire quietly at his home in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario His main hobby was reading and he was something of an authority on James Joyce. An Irish nationalist, he had a lifelong obsession with the great Dublin writer.
Robert Joseph McADOREY was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on July 24, 1935. He died on February 5 at St. Catharines, Ontario He was 70 and had suffered prolonged illness. He is survived by daughter Colleen, sister Pat and brother Terry. He was predeceased by his wife and by two of three children.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-28 published
Karl RENNER, Aristocrat And Broadcaster: 1917-2005
Grandson of modern Austria's first chancellor, he came to Canada as an 'enemy alien' and stayed to broadcast propaganda to Germany. Later, he worked for Radio Canada International
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, February 28, 2005 - Page S6
Toronto -- Karl RENNER never meant to come to Canada. He was sent here at the start of war as an internee, an "enemy alien" kept behind barbed wire in one of several camps for Germans and Austrians, many of them Jews, who were living in England when the Second World War broke out in 1939.
Although not a vengeful man, Mr. RENNER did get back at the Nazis. He later helped to create Canadian war propaganda, German-language radio broadcasts aimed at sowing doubts in the German population, and stayed on for most of 65 years.
The Nazi race laws were one of the reasons Karl RENNER and part of his family fled to England. The other was that they couldn't abide living under Nazi rule. Although his father had been a practising Protestant, the Nazis classified him as Jewish. "As far as the Nazis were concerned, he was Jewish," said Frances ASHLEY, Mr. RENNER's sister. The classification applied to his son, too.
In May, 1940, the British didn't have time to decide who was a threat and who wasn't. They put them all in internment camps, such as on the Isle of Man, and then shipped them to Canada. "The British panicked," said broadcaster and writer Eric KOCH who went to England from Germany in the mid-1930s. "We were interned by the British and sent to Canada."
Both men spent about two years in "enemy alien" camps. Later, Mr. RENNER would joke that although they were given the same rations as men in the Canadian Army, they ate better. The chef from the Ritz in London was among the detainees at his camp at Farnham in Quebec's Eastern Townships.
The internees arrived in May, 1940, and settled down to life behind the wire. Soon, however, Ottawa questioned whether they should be treated as prisoners of war and in mid-1941 reclassified them as refugees. The government also realized they could be useful. Some, like Mr. RENNER, were given a chance to work.
He spent a short time at the spy school at Camp X outside Toronto where he polished his propaganda skills. From 1943 on, Mr. RENNER and others wrote and broadcast propaganda aimed at the German population in a unit with the ominous name of the Psychological Warfare Committee. The Canadian Censorship Board also asked Mr. RENNER and many others to translate letters to and from some of the 32,000 German prisoners of war held in camps in Canada. What they gleaned was often used to advantage in their radio broadcasts. The service began transmission during Christmas, "What distinguished the German-language material was that it was prepared by very bright persons who understood German, could empathize with the German population as well as the prisoners," wrote Arthur SIEGEL in his History of Radio Canada International. "Karl RENNER, the Censorship's Board's contributor to psychological warfare, had himself been an internee when he first arrived in this country, although he was a refugee from the Nazis."
Even 10 years after the war, Canadian officials glossed over the treatment given to Germans and Austrians who had fled the Nazis. "A native of Vienna, Karl came to Canada in 1940 and worked for a time with the National War Services in Ottawa," read the announcement when Mr. RENNER was named a correspondent for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation International Service, implying he arrived as a happy immigrant.
Karl RENNER was a man of polished manners and a sharp wit, a product of a privileged childhood in Vienna and a direct connection to the culture of central Europe. In Canada, where he lived for most of the past 65 years, he was always the life of the party.
He loved his connection to European socialist aristocracy. "We don't have to work, we're socialists," was a favourite throwaway line. And he had a string of them.
"He had beautiful manners, spoke several languages and was a beautiful dancer," recalled Joan IRWIN, a retired journalist who knew him in Ottawa and Montreal. "He was very aware of his family background. He lived two-thirds in the present and one-third in the past."
Karl RENNER's socialist connection came through his maternal grandfather, Karl RENNER, the first Chancellor of the Republic of Austria. He was born Karl RENNER- DEUTSCH (his father, Hans DEUTSCH, had hyphenated the two names) in Vienna in 1917. The year of his birth shaped his life. The Austro Hungarian Empire was at war with Britain, Canada and the rest of the Empire, France and Italy and soon the United States. When it ended, so did the Empire that stretched from parts of Poland in the north to Trieste and the Adriatic in the south, covering 11 ethnic groups. Vienna went from being the centre of a polyglot empire of 50 million people to being the capital of a poor man's Switzerland with just three million people.
Karl RENNER, grandfather of the man who has just died in Ottawa, was the son of a Moravian peasant and a prominent socialist politician, first elected to Parliament in 1907. In her book, Paris 1919, University of Toronto historian Margaret MacMILLAN details how Karl RENNER, who was leader of a peace delegation at Versailles, used his charm to save chunks of land for the new Austria. "Karl RENNER, a cheerful, portly man, fond of good food and drink, card games and dancing," was how Ms. MacMILLAN described the Austrian chancellor.
By all accounts, it also described his grand_son, Karl RENNER, who had long since dropped both the hyphen and his father's name. Big-picture politics continued to shape young Karl RENNER's life. When that other Austrian, Adolf HITLER, took over his native country in 1938, young Karl RENNER fled to England. His grandfather remained in Vienna under a kind of house arrest throughout the war and re-surfaced in 1945 to help Austria maintain its delicate balance between the Soviet Union and the West.
In England, the grand_son of the old Austrian Chancellor was a social hit. His dancing skills made him a favourite at balls his Austrian airs added a cosmopolitan sparkle, helped out by anti-Nazi views.
After his internment and then freedom in Canada, Mr. RENNER returned to London and worked for an oil company, travelling across Europe. In 1948-1950 he worked for the International Refuge Organization in Italy. During his time in Europe he maintained his Canadian connection, making freelance radio reports to the International Service.
In the mid 1960s, he returned to Montreal to serve as public-relations officer for the service. By then, the Cold War was at its height and much of the service was broadcasting to the Soviet Union.
Mr. RENNER's ambition was to become head of the department but worried his connection to a famous socialist family might have done in him. "Socialism and communism were seen as closely related during the Cold War," said his wife, Juliet HARRISON. Some of his Friends thought he was thwarted, in part by his own louche image.
"He loved to give the appearance of never working very hard," said Mr. KOCH. His old friend Joan IRWIN remembered that Al Johnson, the Saskatchewan-born president of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, was not fond of the smooth Karl RENNER.
"Al Johnson thought Karl was frivolous," said Ms. IRWIN. And, in many ways, he was. Years of diplomatic parties gave him a weakness for drink. One of his affectations was to carry a silver flask filled with vodka. Eventually, one by one, he gave up his vices.
Some time in the mid-1970s, Karl RENNER moved to Ottawa. He loved it there. The Austrian embassy treated him as a near deity and he was invited to many receptions. Recently, the current ambassador paid him a visit.
He visited Austria often, staying with his mother at the family home near Vienna. When his mother died, the house was dedicated to his grandfather and made into the Renner Museum.
Karl RENNER was born in Vienna on February 7, 1917. He died in Ottawa on January 26, 2005. He was 87.
He is survived by his wife and by a sister who lives in California.
He asked that some of his ashes be buried beside his parents in Austria, and the rest spread at Lake Memphramagog in Quebec's Eastern Townships.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-16 published
Stanley MANSBRIDGE, Civil Servant: 1919-2005
Royal Air Force navigator decorated for his part in a critical bombing raid on a Nazi missile site later settled in Canada to become an influential civil servant in Ottawa and Alberta
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, April 16, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- The Flying Log Book of Wing Commander Stanley Mansbridge reads like a shorthand history of the air war over Europe. The log books were kept by every pilot and navigator, some more thorough than others. The blue-covered book was meticulously maintained, filled with detail, and demonstrated the kind of commitment to good organization that later propelled him to the heights of Canada's civil service.
Starting as a novice navigator, he recorded his flights in such smaller two-engine aircraft as Ansons, Fairey Battles and Blenheims before graduating to heavier machines, Hampdens, Wellingtons and finally the four-engine Lancaster. The bombing runs and flights over enemy territory -- operations -- are written in red ink, the training and transport flights in blue.
Each entry in the logbook occupies just one line, maybe two for a big mission. It gives the date, type of aircraft, name of the pilot, the "duty" or job Stanley MANSBRIDGE was doing, and a description of the mission.
The operation on the night of August 17, 1943, is one of the raids that merits two lines, naming the target and the size and number of bombs dropped by the Lancaster. The entry reads, "Peenemunde- 8 x 1000 G.P. 5 X 500 M.C.; Very Successful -- Large Fires."
The target was 1,000 kilometres from bomber bases in Britain and the flight took six and half hours there and back. His squadron was in the third wave, so the German defenders, fooled earlier by a phony raid on Berlin, were ready. Of the 12 aircraft in his squadron, only eight returned. The target was protected by a thicket of anti-aircraft fire from the ground and German night fighters in the air. Peenemunde was the secret location where Nazi scientists built the V-1 flying bomb (the world's first cruise missile) and the V-2 (the world's first ballistic missile).
The raid destroyed the rocket factory and killed many scientists, including Dr. Walter Thiel, the designer of the rocket engines. Flight Lieutenant MANSBRIDGE, as he was at the time, knew the raid was important, but didn't know it was one of the key air attacks of the war.
"Peenemunde one of the two raids by the Royal Air Force that changed the course of the war," says Steve HARRIS, director of History at the Department of National Defence in Ottawa. "It slowed the development of the V-1 and V-2 by at least two months. Had the V-2 been ready on time, the Allies might not have been able to hold the beaches in Normandy."
The war in Europe might have continued for years without the invasion of Normandy in June of 1944. The first V-1's, known as doodlebugs, were launched against Britain on June 13, 1944, a week after the D-Day invasion. Many were shot down. It wasn't until September of 1944 that the more deadly V-2's were launched. They carried a 975 kilogram warhead and their supersonic speed meant they were impossible to shoot down.
"It seems likely that if the Germans had succeeded in perfecting and using these new weapons earlier than he did, our invasion of Europe would have proved exceedingly difficult, perhaps impossible," wrote General Dwight Eisenhower, Supreme allied Commander in Europe.
Stanley MANSBRIDGE flew with the Royal Air Force. He had been born in a Canadian military hospital in England in 1918, son of a Canadian father and a British mother. His father, Harry, served with the Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry during the First World War and, among other battles, fought at Vimy Ridge.
After the war, the family lived in Toronto for a few years but his mother longed for home and they all moved back. Stanley grew up in the London suburb of Richmond, where he became an accomplished cricket player. He passed the British equivalent of high school and then went to work for Lloyd's Bank. There, he took banking courses that helped with his later career.
In 1939, he joined the Royal Air Force which happily latched on to his gift for numbers and detail and made him a navigator. The Royal Air Force was not disappointed. His unerring ability to find his way to the target and back in all conditions earned him the role of senior navigator in his squadron, a job that held heart-stopping responsibilities. Essentially, the navigator was the heart and mind of each bomber and was all but in command. The crew relied on the pilot's flying skills to get them off the ground, over the target and returned to earth in one piece yet knew in their bones that it was the navigator who gave him his instructions. Only the navigator understood the mysterious art of how to find their way in the dark to a hostile target and then return them safely home. In the case of Stan MANSBRIDGE, he was also accountable for an entire squadron that on any one mission mustered as many as 25 aircraft, each with its own navigator and each of whom was under his supervision.
His total time in combat involved two tours of duty, which meant 50 "operation" flights over enemy territory, including a 1941 mine-laying mission in the North Sea that disabled the German battle cruiser Gneisenau (with its sister ship, it had sunk 22 merchant vessels). Altogether, he made 340 flights during the war. Perhaps the most unusual was to deliver 600 pounds of Royal Mail to Gibraltar in a Lancaster bomber.
Some of his major missions included the raid on Hamburg that set the city afire and a long-distance raid on the Skoda munitions works in Czechoslovakia. A night mission against a German radar factory surprised the Germans by carrying on to bases in North Africa rather than turning for home and into the gun sights of waiting nightfighters.
The raid on Peenemunde was Mr. MANSBRIDGE's last operation and soon after he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He then went to the Royal Air Force staff college and it was during that period he married his sweetheart Brenda. Unlike other wartime flyers who rushed into marriage, he had put off the wedding because he had seen so many of his Friends leave young widows after failing to come back from a raid. Ever the careful organizer, he decided to wait until after his second and final "tour."
From staff college, he was assigned to Bomber Command headquarters in High Wycombe outside London where he worked under Air Marshal Arthur "Bomber" Harris, the tactician and father of the "1,000-bomber raid" who, after the Battle of Britain, became the force to be reckoned with in Royal Air Force strategy. Fittingly, as a newly minted member of headquarters "brass," Mr. MANSBRIDGE was promoted to wing commander, which is the air force equivalent of a lieutenant-colonel.
After the war, he turned down a permanent commission in the Royal Air Force and went to work for the British civil service. His specialty was organization. From 1950 to 54, he and his young family lived in the Federated Malay States where Mr. MANSBRIDGE worked to set up the civil service for the soon-to-be-independent country of Malaysia. It was a time of professional rewards at work and personal satisfaction at home. With young children under foot, his large Kuala Lumpur home was made busy by the hubbub of family life. By then his two older children had been born Wendy, who would take up nursing, and Peter, who would grow up to become one of Canada's best known broadcasters.
While in Kuala Lumpur, Mr. MANSBRIDGE played for the state cricket team and won colours for his contribution as a fast bowler. It was from there that he decided to move to Canada, a country he hadn't visited since he was a boy.
The family moved to Ottawa where they put down new roots and welcomed the addition of a third child, Paul, who is now a supermarket executive. Mr. MANSBRIDGE soon made himself valuable to the federal government as a kind of trouble shooter for the Civil Service Commission, moving from one department to the other when they needed re-organization. "He was an expert in finding out what was wrong in government departments and making them more efficient in what they do, whether it was Malaya or in Ottawa," said Peter MANSBRIDGE, who before he joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation had been inspired to train as a Royal Canadian Navy pilot.
By 1960, Stanley MANSBRIDGE was deputy chief of organization and methods for the Civil Services Commission and was made its chief in 1964. In 1971, he joined the department of Health and Welfare where he was assistant deputy minister under Marc LALONDE.
Al JOHNSON, one of the most powerful mandarins in Ottawa during the 1960's and 1970's appreciated Mr. MANSBRIDGE's organizational skills. "He was assistant deputy minister of administration at National Welfare," remembered Mr. JOHNSON, who was the deputy minister and who is now retired in Ottawa. "Stanley was our financial watchdog. It's not a job that always makes you popular, but he was well liked since he was such an amiable person."
In 1976, he went to Edmonton for a meeting with Peter Lougheed. Mr. MANSBRIDGE later recalled that the Alberta premier insisted on one-on-one interviews with any senior people he hired. He passed muster and became the province's chief deputy minister of Social Services and Community Health, a job he kept until "The Province of Alberta was very fortunate to have Mr. MANSBRIDGE play a senior role with the Government of Alberta during the time I was premier," Mr. Lougheed said last week from his office in Calgary.
It was a period of intense debate between the federal and provincial governments over matters of health and welfare. Mr. MANSBRIDGE wrote many papers on these issues, some of which appeared in the Canadian Journal of Public Administration.
After leaving his job in Edmonton, Mr. MANSBRIDGE moved to Victoria where he taught public administration at the University of Victoria. Several years ago, he moved to London, Ontario, to be closer to his family.
Stanley Harry MANSBRIDGE was born on May 29, 1918, in Folkestone, England. He died in London, Ontario, on March 27, 2005. He is leaves his wife Brenda and by his children, Wendy, Peter and Paul.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-07 published
George SALVERSON, Playwright: 1916-2005
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's first drama editor wrote a thousand radio plays, switched effortlessly to television and wrote a hit musical
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, May 7, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- He was Canada's king of radio drama in its golden age. George SALVERSON wrote about a thousand radio plays in a career that began in 1945 and lasted until long after the arrival of television. He was a volume man who never kept count and, in fact, held few copies of his work. Week after week, Mr. SALVERSON generated a one-hour Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio play with a careful story line and perfect dialogue. The phrase "writer's block" didn't exist for him; he was a freelancer and he had to eat.
He did have a routine, though. For many years he worked for Stages, the main Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio drama of the week. His work week started on a Tuesday or a Wednesday with an idea. It could be something in the news, such as prison reform or mental health. Radio dramas were used to deal with social issues the same way television documentaries or long news items are today.
After the idea was nailed down, Mr. SALVERSON would write one act a day, with almost all his plays having three acts. That left him ready for the rehearsal, which took all day Saturday. During and after the rehearsal, he and the director, either Esse LJUNGH or Andrew ALLAN, would work polishing the script.
"The live performance was on Sunday," remembers Alfie SCOPP who was one of the actors. "We could come dressed casually for the rehearsal, but when we went live at 5 o'clock on Sunday we had to be dressed in a suit and a tie."
Studio G on Jarvis Street in Toronto would be filled with as many as 20 actors, including such well-known names as John DRAINIE, Aileen SEATON and Bud KNAPP. No matter how long their part, actors were all paid $45 a performance.
One example of the radio play as social commentary was a series called Return Journey, which Mr. SALVERSON wrote in 1951. It was based on research done at Kingston Penitentiary on how hard it was for a released prisoner to make it on the outside. The story tells how a prisoner was afraid of the outside world but also afraid of failure and a return to behind bars.
He did much of the research for that particular play while on his honeymoon in Kingston, Ontario His wife Olive SCOTT, went by the stage name of Sandra SCOTT, and acted in many of his productions. "George was always amazed that this glamorous actress married him," remembers his friend Mr. SCOPP.
The work on his honeymoon showed how an idea could be plucked from the headlines. In a recent e-mail to his daughter, Julie, he said the early Canadian Broadcasting Corporation almost invented documentary drama for radio. "Now it's routine in Law and Order."
Later when Mr. SALVERSON moved to television, he used the same techniques for coming up with story ideas. Once he met a man he knew who had been a successful advertising executive but could no longer find work because he was over 45. "The trouble is, I'm over-age and over qualified," the man told Mr. SALVERSON.
The same line came out of the mouth of Walter, the fictional version of the ad man in the television play, The Write-Off. Mr. SALVERSON spoke to people in the business world, talked to employment agencies and tried to find out just how many Walters there were in Canada. He figured there to be at least 500,000 under-employed older people.
"The real Walter attended one of the taping sessions and he walked into the control room as Rudi [director Rudi DORN] was directing the firing scene," recalled Mr. SALVERSON in a 1968 interview. "When I asked him was this anything like the way it really happened, he gave me a long look and remarked, 'Have you ever been through a nightmare twice?' "
George SALVERSON's early life read like an improbable script for a radio play. His father, the son of Scandinavian immigrants, worked for the Canadian National Railway and the family lived, at one time or another, in Port Arthur, Ontario, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Kamloops, British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria. Fortunately, he spent enough time in Port Arthur to go to high school there. His mother, Laura Goodman SALVERSON, wrote and published 10 books. She won the Governor General's Award twice -- for her novel The Dark Weaver in 1937 and then for her autobiography Confessions of an Immigrant's Daughter in1939.
Even so, George SALVERSON never wanted to be a playwright. He set out to be a newscaster and was headed in the right direction when he got his first job at CFAR in Flin Flon, Manitoba He performed every role at the tiny radio station, including writing and reading the news. The highlight of his newscasting career occurred on December 7, 1941, when he told the 7,000 people of Flin Flon of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and he did it dressed in a suit.
His second job came along in what was then the biggest city in Western Canada -- Winnipeg. But at CKRC, they had other plans. He could read the occasional newscast if he liked, but it wasn't news readers they wanted. They had plenty, thanks. What they needed was a playwright, someone who could knock off a quickie radio drama and also take a part or two.
His first play was a success, and Mr. SALVERSON soon found himself doing the writing, acting, producing and sound effects. He resolved to perfect his dramas, drifting over to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to pick up pointers on how to write believable dialogue and interesting story ideas.
For a couple of years, Mr. SALVERSON wrote, produced and directed plays for Eaton's, when the department store used radio dramas to sell its wares. Then, in 1948, he was given work by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and moved to Toronto. Among his first shows was Paper Railroad, a play based on his father's work life.
From the time he arrived in Toronto he was never short of works or awards. He won a first in the Canadian Radio Awards of 1948 and, the following year, received another from Ohio State University. In 1949, he adapted Dracula for radio, a play that starred Lorne GREEN, Alan KING and Lister SINCLAIR.
When the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation turned to television in the fall of 1952, Mr. SALVERSON was soon writing both radio and television plays and he became the network's first drama editor. One of his plays, The Discoverers, was performed on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and on Kraft Theatre in the United States. The play was about Banting and Best's discovery of insulin.
Later on he wrote documentaries as well as dramas for television. Perhaps his most famous was Air of Death. "That changed the course of public affairs programming on television," said Jane CHALMERS, vice-president of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio. "In October of 1967, this documentary report, written by George, and dealing with air pollution in Canada, aired on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television, pre-empting the top-rated The Ed Sullivan Show."
His script laid the subject bare and resulted in a lawsuit.
"Dad worked for six months helping the lawyers and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with the lawsuit. They won their case," said Julie SALVERSON. "He used to joke it was the only time he had such steady work."
He wrote one production for the stage, the musical The Legend of the Dumbells, which was produced at the Charlottetown Festival in 1977. It was about a Canadian troupe of First World War entertainers and used songs from the era. It travelled to the National Arts Centre in Ottawa and the Elgin Theatre in Toronto and continues to be staged.
When Studio G closed in July 1993, before the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation moved to its new Toronto headquarters, he wrote a 10-minute sketch for radio. It was called End Credits.
For many years, Mr. SALVERSON taught writing at Ryerson University in Toronto and, in the process, found that some people were unteachable. He told his daughter Julie, in one of their many e-mails, the story of a 50-year-old novelist who wanted to turn one of his books into a screenplay. He just couldn't do it.
"When I dramatized, I always went into the scene myself. I was sitting there doing the acting. And away went the characters, whooping it up. My writer friend remained a writer. He stood outside the scene and tried to tell you what was going on. And nobody felt anything."
As he grew older, George SALVERSON kept his mind in shape with mental exercises. One of them was memorizing The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. He could recite any verse on command, and was working on memorizing it backwards. He also wrote a lot of limericks. On the Saturday before he died, he had a new one for Alfie SCOPP. It went like this:
A well-endowed woman from Brussels
Had a veritable plethora of muscles,
She said with some pride,
There are others I hide,
And bring them out only in tussles.
He also wrote a book called Around the World in 80 Limericks, with bits of doggerel for each of the world's major cities. He wrote until the end.
George SALVERSON was born in St. Catharines, Ont, on April 30, 1916. He died on April 9, 2005, after a fall at his apartment at the Performing Arts Lodge in Toronto. He was 88. A public memorial service will be held there at 6 p.m., Monday, May 9. He is survived by his daughter Julie and son Scott. His wife died in 2000.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-16 published
Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Aviator: 1920-2005
Unassuming lad from Saskatchewan never expected to be an pilot. He got more than he bargained for, both in combat and in the bush, and yet always rose to the occasion. He ended his career as chief pilot for Imperial Oil
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, May 16, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART was a boy from a ranch in Saskatchewan who went on to be a bush pilot and captain of a corporate jet fleet. His first flight into the bush meant landing an old Tiger Moth biplane equipped with floats on the lakes of northern Saskatchewan. And while that might seem a bit risky, Mr. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART cut his teeth on far tougher stuff, having flown Spitfires in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War.
Late in the war, he tangled with an experimental jet fighter, and shot down a Focke Wolfe 190, the most dreaded German Luftwaffe fighter. The fastest radial-engine aircraft ever built, the FW-190 was a plane that Spitfire pilots such as Flight Lieutenant STEWARD/STEWART/STUART feared even more than the better-known Messerschmitt Me 109.
His victory had come as a comfort -- two days earlier, Mr. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART had lost an aircraft and been forced to bail out over Germany.
"He was caught in a tree with his parachute, but the branch gave way and he was let down gently," said his son Barry STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, an Air Canada pilot. "He didn't know which side of the line he was on, so he started walking in what he thought was the right direction. A German civilian with a pitchfork met him. Dad offered him a cigarette, he said 'Danke' and went on his way."
As it happened, Mr. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART had chosen the right path. A U.S. jeep picked him up and he was back with his squadron that same day.
The incident with the jet fighter occurred some weeks later. One of Adolf Hitler's promised "terror weapons," it was a German Me 262. Powered by two jet engines, it possessed a speed of 540 mph versus 408 mph for a late-model Spitfire. Though the Spitfire was no match for the jet, this particular Me-262 had the misfortune to drop out of the clouds in front of Mr. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART's Spitfire. He reacted in an instant, fired off a burst and damaged the jet, though it was uncertain whether it crashed.
The youngest of four siblings born in the Qu-Appelle valley, as a child Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART never dreamed he would be a pilot. His father's family had moved from Carleton Place outside Ottawa to Saskatchewan in 1883, more than two decades before the territory became a province. Young Lloyd went to school in a one-room school house, but the family rented out their ranch for a few years during the Depression and moved into Regina.
There he went to the old Regina Central Collegiate, and later to a private school called Luther College. The family paid for part of his tuition with sides of beef. After high school, he worked on the ranch for a year and then went to Normal School, or teacher's college, where he graduated in June, 1940.
He applied immediately to the air force. Always a modest man, he figured his farming background might make him useful on the ground, fixing aircraft as a fitter or rigger. So it took him by surprise when the Royal Canadian Air Force recruiter said they needed pilots and told him to come back in a few months. While he was waiting, he taught school to nine students in a one-room schoolhouse at Liberty, Saskatchewan. At Christmas, he went back to see the recruiter and found he was wanted right away. He began flight training in Regina in January, 1941.
One year later, he was with Royal Canadian Air Force 412 squadron in England, flying Spitfires. On August 19, 1942, he fought German planes over Dieppe as part of the air cover meant to protect the Canadian Army's infamous failed raid on the French Port. He flew three sorties that day, trying to make sure troops could make it off the beaches and back to the ships. The air battle was almost as one-sided as the land battle. The Royal Canadian Air Force and Royal Air Force lost 119 planes to the Luftwaffe's 46 to suffer one of the worst aerial defeats of the war.
Later that year, he was seconded to the Royal Air Force and posted to the Mediterranean island of Malta, where the British were desperately holding off attacks by the Germans and Italians. Fighting was ferocious and he was shot down. His flight of four Spitfires was over Sicily just before the Allied invasion in July, 1943, when they were attacked by 15 German fighters. The lead Royal Air Force pilot was killed, two Spitfires got away and Mr. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART bailed out.
As he floated down, he had a perfect view of an invasion fleet that was lined up for six kilometres or more off the coast of Sicily. He landed in the sea and was picked up by a British ship that was busily involved in an invasion and could not be concerned with returning a pilot to a base more than 100 kilometres away across the Malta Channel. With one thing and another, Mr. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART did not get back to his unit for many days. His squadron didn't know where he was, while back in Saskatchewan his family was told he had gone missing in action.
"Family legend is that, on hearing the news, his mother's hair turned white overnight," his son said.
Mr. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART managed to set matters straight a week later, but it was too late to save his mothers hair.
After his posting in Malta, he went to a fighter base in Scotland as a tactical fighter instructor. By then, he had done about 25 missions, which was the required number for a tour. He signed up for a second tour and in between was granted a month's home leave. He sailed for Halifax on a troop ship and then took a long train ride home to Saskatchewan. The clock started running the moment he left the ship and stopped when he returned to Halifax.
In the process, he happened to miss a lot of action. While he was away, the D-Day landings in Normandy occurred, and by the time he returned, his squadron was based on the Continent. He spent the rest of war flying over France, the Netherlands and Germany, all the while thinking about what he would do when it was all over.
He had taken overseas a book called Trees in Canada, and he always kept it by him. He had it in mind to become a forester, and after war applied to Saskatchewan Department of Forestry. As it happened, they needed pilots and he was soon in the air again. He quit when the provincial government decided on a round of pay cuts and he went to work for Territories Air Service, flying out of Fort Smith, then the capital of the Northwest Territories. He found that he loved the North and was never happier.
In 1952, Mr. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART joined Imperial Oil and flew Beavers, Otters and such larger propeller-driven aircraft as the Lockheed Lodestar and the DC-3. Four years later, he moved to Toronto, bought a house in Etobicoke and was soon piloting company personnel. He graduated to corporate jets in the early 1970s, and in 1974 became Imperial Oil's senior pilot. He flew executives and engineers into remote locations across the country. On one occasion, he took a side trip to pick up the Duke of Edinburgh in Greenland and fly him to Canada.
After his retirement in 1980, he kept busy as secretary-treasurer of the Canadian Fighter Pilots Association, and was a keen and successful stock-market investor. In his early days as a bush pilot, he bought and sold penny stocks in mining and oil, but as he grew older, he stuck to the blue-chip variety. His favourite: Imperial Oil, which he had started buying as part of a company stock program.
Lloyd Arthur STEWARD/STEWART/STUART was born in Southey, Saskatchewan., on March 23, 1920. He died in Toronto on April 16. He leaves sons Owen and Barry; brother, Alan; and sister, Netta. His wife Eleanor died last year.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-02 published
Gisela VON RICHTHOFEN, Aristocrat, Farmer: 1909-2005
Born into German nobility, she grew up within a stone's throw of the Kaiser, experienced life under the Nazis and then emigrated to Canada where she became a three-time Ontario dressage champion
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, June 2, 2005, Page S9
Baroness Gisela VON RICHTHOFEN was born into the German aristocracy, but spent more than half her life in Canada, much of it on a farm outside Toronto. The freedom of the rural life in Canada was in sharp contrast to the world into which she born.
She lived for all but 8½ years of the 20th century. Just her name, VON RICHTHOFEN, provides a hint of her life. Manfred VON RICHTHOFEN, known as the Red Baron, was the top fighter pilot of the First World War. But when the famous VON RICHTHOFEN was killed in April of 1918, Gisela was just 8 years old and knew as much about the Red Baron as any other German child. He was a cousin of her future husband.
She was born Countess Gisela VON EINSIEDEL, one notch up from a baroness on the nobility scale. She was the first great-grandchild of Prince Otto VON BISMARCK, the Iron Chancellor who forged the German Empire in the mid 19th century.
The wars of the 20th century shaped her life. Her father survived the First World War; other members of her family did not. One brother was killed in France in 1940. Another brother, a fighter pilot, was shot down three times, the last time over Stalingrad in 1942. He was taken prisoner by the Russians and did not return to Germany until 1951.
As the wife of a diplomat she was a witness to the intrigue of the Second World War. Her first husband was posted to Warsaw before the start of the war and then to Paris during the German occupation. One of her close Friends -- and godfather to her son Manfred -- was Adam VON TROTT, the diplomat executed for his part in the failed plot to kill Adolf Hitler in 1944.
Gisela grew up on an estate in Saxony near Berlin. One of her neighbours was the German empress. When she was about 8 years old, one of Gisela's Friends dared her to climb the wall to the estate next door. Her pluck impressed the empress and she was invited to tea.
At the start of the First World War she saw her father off with his cavalry regiment, though she was more interested in the horses. "I was 5 years old and I went with my mother to the barracks and saw him go off to war," she wrote years later. "The horses being loaded on the train was what fascinated me. I was too young to have a perspective of what the war meant."
She spent the war on an agricultural estate near Heidelberg. After the war, her father worked as an estate manager and then for an agricultural-equipment firm. During the 1920's, Germany was ravaged by a post-war economic collapse and her family lost much of their land. Instead, Gisela went to university and, at 22, was the youngest woman to graduate from the University of Berlin law school. She didn't practise long since the Nazis came to power in 1933 and they didn't approve of women in professions. In 1936, she married a diplomat, Oswalt VON NOSTITZ, and had the first of six children. After the fall of France in 1940, she moved with him to Paris but during that time the marriage collapsed. She soon wed Baron Wolfgang VON RICHTHOFEN, an officer in General GUDERIAN's tank regiment who, before the war, had owned an art gallery in Berlin.
By the time the final months of the Second World came around, Gisela and her three children were staying on the Bismarck estate of Varzin in Pomerania and feared the approach of the Soviet army. Her husband Wolfgang, with the help of her ex-husband, managed to get a car with Japanese diplomatic licence plates (there were almost no civilian cars on the road) and mounted a rescue mission. The baron slipped away from his post for several days (an act punishable by firing squad), and used formaldehyde to fuel the car, since gasoline was impossible to find.
"My stepfather was Absent Without Leave and he had to use the back roads to avoid Gestapo checkpoints," recalls Manfred VON NOSTITZ, who went on to a career in the Canadian diplomatic service as high commissioner to Malaysia and ambassador to Pakistan and Thailand. "In Berlin we experienced some of the heaviest bombing. My mother was always very cool under pressure. At one stage she moved us from one shelter just before it was destroyed by bombs."
Life in Germany after the war was harsh. The VON RICHTHOFEN family was homeless, being from what would soon be called East Germany. For a while, they lived in rooms in a small castle in Ramholz with a friend from Baron VON RICHTHOFEN's regiment. At school, the children were harassed.
"I remember my mother once saw a chicken roaming free, grabbed it, killed it and cooked it for us. For the most part, we survived on cabbage, which I still can't stand," said Mr. VON NOSTITZ.
The VON RICHTHOFENs decided to emigrate. "My parents didn't feel at home in western Germany. They said they saw former Nazis in positions of authority, people like lawyers and doctors, and didn't want us growing up with them," said Carmen VON RICHTHOFEN.
In 1951, the family bought an 80 hectare farm near Campbellville outside Toronto and arrived with little money. Mrs. VON RICHTHOFEN, as she was almost always called in Canada, set out to make her new life a success. Later, her husband concentrated on training race horses, but at first they ran a mixed farm with everything from dairy cattle to field crops and chickens. She took night courses at the Ontario Agricultural College in nearby Guelph. Along the way, Micaela, the last of her children, was born.
Her mother, Bismarck's grand-daughter, also lived in the house. Mrs. VON RICHTHOFEN cooked for 10 people and sewed clothes for her children and for herself. Yet, for all that, her years on the farm were among her happiest. For one thing, it meant a renewal of her love for horses. In the early days on the farm, she jogged trotters up and down Guelph Line, then a dirt road with little traffic and at age 50 she taught herself dressage.
From 1964 to 67, she won three Ontario dressage championships. She continued riding until she was 84. On her 75th birthday, her daughters Carmen and Micaela worked for hours posing her on a horse in her dressage outfit. The idea was to mirror a photograph taken of her ancestor Otto VON BISMARCK on his 75th birthday.
Mrs. VON RICHTHOFEN and her husband left their farm in 1985 and moved to Toronto.
Gisela Sybille Frieda Else Marguerite VON EINSIEDEL was born in Creba, Saxony, Germany, on July 25, 1909. She died in Toronto on April 4, 2005. She leaves her children Christine, Veronika and Manfred VON NOSTITZ and Carmen, Nikolaus and Micaela VON RICHTHOFEN. Her husband died in 2000.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-21 published
Herb COONS, Aviator And Engineer 1918-2005
Royal Canadian Air Force pilot used his DC-3 transport plane to break up an attack by Japanese Zeros. His tenacious action earned him another Distinguished Flying Cross
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, June 21, 2005, Page S9
Herb COONS was one of the few Canadian pilots to serve in the war against Japan. He was decorated for flying his unarmed Dakota, the military version of a DC-3, straight at a Japanese fighter plane.
On January 15, 1945, Squadron Leader COONS was leading seven Dakota aircraft in a history-making mission over Burma. They were dropping fuel and other supplies to elite British and Indian jungle troops, known as the Chindits, who were fighting behind enemy lines. Never before had a large fighting force been supplied entirely from the air.
The Royal Canadian Air Force planes were attacked by seven Japanese Zeros. "As one of the Zeros bore down on COONS's aircraft, he waited until it was only 400 yards away, then, with super-human effort, he yanked the lumbering transport into as tight and as steep a turn as he could," wrote Arthur Bishop in his book, Courage in the Air, a series of stories about Canadian air heroes.
The Zero slipped by and Mr. COONS repeated the manoeuvre four more times. When the fighter gave up and attacked other planes, he flew at the Zero to draw fire away from his colleagues. Mr. COONS repeated the trick, but was so low his wing scraped the jungle canopy. The fighters called off their attack and he managed to limp back to the airfield in India with a large section of the wing missing. The action resulted in a "bar" to a Distinguished Flying Cross he had earlier won. (The bar, in effect, was a second Distinguished Flying Cross.)
There were two Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons (435 and 436) sent to the Burma campaign in December of 1944. There was political pressure in Ottawa to have the squadrons return as soon as they arrived. For one thing, politicians (and even some senior Royal Canadian Air Force staff) thought flying in Southeast Asia was "as restful as a holiday at a luxury spa," according to Robert FARQUHARSON, a University of Toronto professor who later wrote a book about the Royal Canadian Air Force in Second World War Burma.
"For the squadron as a whole, this January 12 encounter with the enemy was a rude and abrupt awakening to the reality of war," he wrote in For Your Tomorrow: Canadians and the Burma Campaign 1941-1945. "Six squadron member had been killed, five wounded, two aircraft shot down, and one badly damaged."
It was dangerous work flying across unmapped mountains and uncharted jungles. "The real problems for us were flying in the mountains and the monsoon weather," Prof. FARQUHARSON once told Legion Magazine. "We got pretty good at looking ahead and seeing where the darkness in the clouds was and flying around it.
"One day I misjudged which way it was moving and it turned out it was coming towards me. One moment we were going up at about 5,000 feet a minute and the next we were going down at the same rate. The co-pilot and I both had our feet on the dashboard and were pulling on the stick to get out of the downdraft. We then climbed to get free of the mountains."
Pilots and crew, often supplemented by ground crew who volunteered to go along as "kickers" to help push out cargo, regularly made two and sometimes three flights a day. "We had to fly every day," said Prof. FARQUHARSON. " The army depended upon it... Up in the north in the mountains we were dropping supplies all the time. As the army moved south, the land became flatter and we landed more than we dropped."
Herb COONS, who was born on a farm in Matilda Township, grew up in eastern Ontario. His family was descended from Pennsylvania Dutch settlers who had migrated north. His father died when he was a still in public school. His mother later married a teacher who became a high-school principal and then a professor at Queen's University in Kingston. The family lived in several places in eastern Ontario, including Napanee and Collins Bay.
After high school, Mr. COONS went to the University of Toronto, where he was studying mining engineering when the Second World War broke out. He finished his year, then joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in June of 1940 (two brothers followed him). He was commissioned a flying officer 10 months later and was assigned to the Royal Air Force's Coastal Command as a navigator on Sunderland flying boats.
The Sunderland was designed as an airliner, a double-decker plane with sleeping quarters and a galley to prepare hot food. Amphibious, it took off and landed on water. The military version was used in long-range, anti-submarine patrols. A large, four-engine plane one of them once landed on the Atlantic to rescue 34 seamen from a torpedoed merchant ship -- it carried a big payload of bombs and depth charges for use against U-boats.
The Sunderlands were slow at 110 knots, but bristled with firepower. With 14 machine guns pointing in every direction, the planes could hold their own against German fighters. German airmen called them Fliegende Stachelsweine (flying porcupine).
Herb COONS was in a Sunderland that shot down a Focke-Wolfe Kurrier, Germany's only four-engine bomber. On the other hand, two of his aircraft had to ditch in the ocean. Flying Officer COONS, as he then was, distinguished himself by pinpointing the position of the Sunderland so the crew could be rescued. Three times, his Sunderland was attacked by fighters. On one occasion, the plane caught fire and he put it out. It was one of the actions that won him his first Distinguished Flying Cross.
"When on another sortie, the bomb room caught fire... this officer gallantly assisted in extinguishing the outbreak," read part of the citation for his Distinguished Flying Cross. "Flying Officer COONS is an extremely cool and efficient navigator whose courage and devotion to duty have been most praiseworthy."
One of his Friends and fellow airmen said Mr. COONS later described the action with an understated modesty. "There was a fire between me and the door," he told Wally DUMONT. "I had no choice but to put it out."
Mr. COONS flew in long-range missions from bases in Northern Ireland and as far south as Sierra Leone in West Africa. Flights were as long as 20 hours, and the 11-man crew came to appreciate the Sunderland's on-board galley. Some crew members would sleep. Navigator COONS was once woken up and called to the cockpit. The plane was over Spanish territory and was being fired on by anti-aircraft guns. "Where are we?" asked the confused pilot.
"I'd say we're over enemy territory," replied Mr. COONS.
Eventually, Mr. COONS was selected for pilot training and sent home to Canada to learn how to fly. From there he was assigned to the Far East campaign. Until then, like many Canadians, he enjoyed his time in Britain. His Canadian accent meant the class-conscious British couldn't pigeonhole him. As a farm kid from eastern Ontario, he relished spending his leave at a posh estate in England's Lake District. Only once during the war did he manage to meet up with both his brothers, who were also in the Royal Canadian Air Force. His brother Gib was a Spitfire pilot who survived his younger brother Willis, also in Coastal Command, did not.
Herb COONS was not always easy to get along with, said Gib COONS. The temperament that would make a man fly a slow unarmed plane at a fast, armed fighter came out later in life. "He could be abrasive."
After the war, Mr. COONS returned to the University of Toronto and finished his degree. Although he had worked in underground mines during summers before the war, he went into civil engineering. In the early 1950s, he read in the newspaper that E.P. TAILOR/TAYLOR was turning Toronto-area farmland into the suburb of Don Mills. He decided to approach the financier Taylor directly.
"He walked into his office and said he could do the surveying for him," said his son, Bill. "After a long meeting, Dad got the business. Later, he had as many as 40 people working for him and they also surveyed sections for the new 401 highway."
Mr. COONS's business career had its highs and lows. He later got involved in some mining projects where he both made money and lost money. Always a curious man, he took a course in computer programming long before the advent of the International Business Machines Corporation Personal Computer. He had wanted to understand how computers worked.
Mr. COONS stopped working about 10 years ago. He spent the last five years of his life in Fredericton living with his daughter Nancy and her family.
Herbert Lindsay COONS was born near Morrisburg, Ontario, on February 13, 1918. He died in Fredericton on April 29, 2005. His wife, Doris COOKE, died 10 years ago. He is survived by his daughters Nancy, Linda and Annalee and by his son Bill.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-15 published
Harold RENOUF, Ottawa Mandarin: 1917-2005
Plucked from a successful Halifax accounting firm by Pierre Trudeau, he tackled inflation with the Anti-Inflation Board and the oil industry through the National Energy Program, then made VIA's trains run on time
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, July 15, 2005, Page S7
Harold RENOUF was an accountant and company director from Halifax who left corporate life at the peak of his career for a stint in public service and ended up running two of the most controversial agencies of the Trudeau era: the Anti-Inflation Board and the Petroleum Monitoring Agency.
Rising prices and wages were a hot topic of the 1970s. One of the critics of the government at the time was Mr. RENOUF, then president of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants.
In the federal election of 1974, Tory leader Robert Stanfield ran on a platform of bringing in wage-and-price controls to control inflation. The prime minister, Pierre Trudeau, mocked him with the throwaway line: "Zap, you're frozen."
It was one of the issues that won Mr. Trudeau a majority government. But, by the following year, inflation was far from frozen. It was running at an annual rate of 10.6 per cent. Mr. Trudeau changed his mind and introduced wage-and-price controls in the fall of At the time, the Anti-Inflation Board was headed by Jean Luc Pepin, a defeated Liberal candidate and former cabinet minister. Mr. Trudeau wanted to make a change, but there was a matter of regional representation to be considered. In the end, the man the prime minister wanted was from Atlantic Canada. He was Harold RENOUF, an accountant with Liberal Party connections who had criticized government policy on inflation.
"When Trudeau called him on Thanksgiving weekend of 1975, Dad said to us: 'I guess I've got to put my energy where my mouth is.' And he accepted," said Janet RENOUF, his daughter. He retired as chairman of H.R. Doane, the accounting firm where he had worked since 1938, and moved to Ottawa.
When Mr. Pepin left as head of the Anti-Inflation Board, Mr. RENOUF took over as its second chairman. There was much debate at the time whether the government's anti-inflation policies had any effect or whether the natural slowdown of the economy would have produced the same results.
The policy was not popular. Business did not like controls on its prices and profits, and unions didn't like caps on pay increases. Stewart Cooke, head of the United Steelworkers union, said all the controls did was bring in a recession.
Mr. RENOUF defended the Anti-Inflation Board's policies, pointing out that the average wage increase in 1975 was 21 per cent but, by early 1978, pay hikes were down to 7.5 per cent. And furthermore, the Anti-Inflation Board had rolled back $370-million in corporate dividends. The Liberal government gradually wound down the Anti-Inflation Board. In 1978, 27 months after they were brought in, the controls were lifted. Then, in March of 1979, the finance minister, Jean CHRÉTIEN, renamed the body the National Commission on Inflation. Mr. RENOUF was made chairman of the new organization, but, by then, its powers were sharply reduced.
The inflation watchdog soon died altogether when the government switched its attentions to a new bugbear: high oil prices. Mr. RENOUF was at the forefront of that policy, too, and, in 1980, was named head of the Petroleum Monitoring Agency. Its job was to collect information on the oil and gas industry, including measuring what percentage of it was Canadian owned.
The agency was the operating arm of the government's national energy program, brought in by energy minister Marc Lalonde. That policy created an even more virulent reaction from the public than had wage-and-price controls. In Western Canada, it was detested. Later, the National Energy Program would be blamed for reducing Alberta's share of the overall Canadian economy from 14 per cent to a little more than 10 per cent, though the plummeting price of oil -- from $40 (U.S.) in 1980 to $11 in 1986 -- was also responsible.
A diminutive man, Mr. RENOUF was a capitalist at heart, and the criticism of his fellow business leaders upset him. But he was also a man who, once on a mission, did what he set out to do. In this case, it was to increase Canadian ownership in the oil and gas industry.
"He was shocked at the reaction [in Western Canada] and he felt badly about it," said Ms. RENOUF. " But he had a sense of doing what was right for the greater good."
Mr. RENOUF found out about the oil industry's reaction early on. In October of 1980, he went to Calgary to speak to certain business executives who looked on the government's policies as a form of nationalization. The accountant from Halifax tried to reassure them.
"I cannot state that we will always agree with industry on substantive matters, but I can promise co-operation, independence in our actions and attitudes," Mr. RENOUF told that skeptical Alberta audience. "Although I cannot be out front of my minister on the substance of Canadianization programs, it should be obvious that an accurate assessment of ownership levels will be essential."
His audience did not find that obvious at all, and never came round to Ottawa's way of thinking on energy.
After the energy posting, his last major government job was in Montreal as chairman of Via Rail. There, he used to say he was proudest of a small achievement, saving the murals by famous Canadian artists painted on the inner walls of some long-distance rail cars. When he and the president of Via heard they were going to be destroyed, they moved quickly to preserve them.
His family joked that he kept trying to retire, and did so five times before finally returning to Halifax and his beloved cottage at Pictou Landing.
Harold RENOUF was the son of a sea captain, a master mariner named John RENOUF, who gave him a lifelong love of boats and the ocean. He was born in Sandy Point, a tiny community on Newfoundland's southwest coast that no longer exists but whose dunes and salt marshes remain such a favourite location for migrating birds that there is now a movement to turn it into a nature preserve.
There was a lot of French in his background. His mother's maiden name was LEROUX, and RENOUF was originally a French name. The family traces its lineage to Jersey, the largest of Britain's Channel Islands off the French coast. Young Harold's line of the RENOUF family left Newfoundland around 1920 and moved to Halifax. He later studied commerce at Dalhousie University.
In 1938, he joined the accounting firm of H.R. Doane and became a partner in 1942. He was chairman of the firm from 1967 to 1975, when he left for the Anti-Inflation Board. Even before then, he had been involved with government commissions and studies, among them the royal commission on gasoline and diesel pricing in Nova Scotia and the royal commission on the milk industry. The latter was partly responsible for setting up a marketing-board system for dairy farmers in Canada.
Mr. RENOUF was on the board of a number of private companies, including two British insurance firms. An anglophile, Mr. RENOUF enjoyed travelling to directors' meetings in London. A devoted family man, he often extended his visits to private vacations (a scrupulous number cruncher, he always paid his own way) in which he brought along his wife or met some of his children already in London.
When they were growing up, he tried to introduce his children to as much theatre and music as possible. The family would travel to Boston, New York City and Stratford for museums, theatre and plays. At home, he funded a trust to endow part of the New Glasgow Music Festival, an annual event to encourage young musicians from northern Nova Scotia. The winner of the festival receives a silver bowl and a cash prize from the Rose Bowl Trust funded by Mr. RENOUF.
Mr. RENOUF liked to fish for trout on Lawlor's Lake in Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, and read mysteries and adventures -- in particular, the swashbuckling sea stories of Patrick O'Brian.
In 1979, he was made an officer of the Order of Canada and, in 1981, was awarded an honorary doctorate from Dalhousie.
Harold Augustus RENOUF was born on June 15, 1917, in Sandy Point, Newfoundland. He died in Halifax on July 4, 2005, after suffering a heart attack. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy, and his four children, Janet, Ann, Robert and Susan. A memorial service is planned for Monday at St. Andrew's United Church in Halifax.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-23 published
Bill HARCOURT, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Producer 1925-2005
Newspaper reporter who switched to broadcasting launched Newsmagazine, Ombudsman, Tuesday Night and Marketplace
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, August 23, 2005, Page S9
Bill HARCOURT pretty well invented the television documentary. An experienced reporter and editor who cut his teeth working for Canadian and British wire services, he helped develop two areas of television news: live specials and long features.
He started working in television news in 1960, only eight years after it came on the air in Canada and by 1969 he was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's main man on the biggest story of the year -- if not the decade. In late July of that year, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon and Bill HARCOURT spent 26 hours straight in a control room masterminding coverage for a captivated Canadian audience.
As the head of News Specials, he co-ordinated coverage from the United States and across Canada. It was a complex broadcast, hosted in Canada by the eccentric Gordon DONALDSON, a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reporter with a thick Scottish brogue.
What Mr. HARCOURT was doing was, in fact, creating what is now called a long-form documentary, building excitement into the empty space when the astronauts were just travelling. He had experience with live television -- political conventions and elections -- still the most difficult form of broadcasting since mistakes can't be edited.
The documentary form of television was something he helped mould at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, first as a producer with Newsmagazine, travelling around the world with a cameraman, soundman and reporter, then with a weekly documentary series, Tuesday Night.
"He made a real contribution, in my book, to establishing the documentary on television. There was already the National Film Board of Canada form, but the television documentary had to be invented," said Michael MacLEAR, a television reporter and documentary maker who worked with Mr. HARCOURT in the 1960s.
"Bill HARCOURT is one of the great unsung heroes of news and current affairs," said Mr. MacLEAR. "And he was my favourite executive producer."
Well-read and confident, he let the reporter get on with telling the story -- all of which made him easy to work with. All his former colleagues mentioned his good manners and even temper. Ray HAZZAN, who was executive producer of Newsmagazine before Mr. HARCOURT took the job, said he was so polite and well dressed that others took to calling him The Senator.
Bill HARCOURT grew up in Guelph, Ontario, the son of doctor. He graduated from Guelph Collegiate Institute and went on to Loyola College in Montreal.
During summers Mr. HARCOURT worked on passenger ships on the Great Lakes. At that time, it was a popular form of travel from ports such as Toronto, Detroit and Duluth. He started as a cabin boy and worked his way up to chief purser.
One of the ships on which he was purser was The Noronic, known as the Queen of the Great Lakes. As it happened, a disastrous fire aboard the Noronic was also his first and only front-page story at the Kitchener Waterloo Record where he had taken a job as a junior reporter. The ship was moored overnight in Toronto when a little after 2 a.m. on September 15, 1949, fire raged through its five decks. Of the 571 passengers -- mostly Americans sailing from Detroit -- and 174 crew on board, 119 died.
As luck would have it, Bill HARCOURT was in Toronto that night and reported the tragedy back to his newspaper. "It was particularly tough for Bill," said his wife, Nada HARCOURT. "He knew many of the crew members on board the Noronic."
A short while later, Mr. HARCOURT went to work for Canadian Press in Toronto and almost right away moved to New York to cover two different beats: the United Nations and Broadway. For him, it was no trouble to juggle show business and international politics and that impressed his boss, Gil PURCELL, who wanted him to come home and report from across Canada. Instead, Mr. HARCOURT went to London and worked on the North American desk at Reuters.
After five years, he returned home to a job at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation where he was made a writer and line-up editor on The National, but soon moved to Newsmagazine, a weekly half-hour program that took an in-depth look at stories.
Michael MacLEAR recalled there were two types of stories that made it on Newsmagazine: longer-form news items on stories of the day, and features. During the 1960's and early 1970's, Mr. HARCOURT accompanied such Newsmagazine reporters as Mr. MacLEAR and William STEVENSON to cover stories in South Africa, Vietnam and Russia.
"He was much under-estimated," said Mr. STEVENSON, who went on to write A Man Called Intrepid, the story of the Canadian spymaster William STEPHENSON. " One of the reasons he was so easy to get on with was that he didn't need to bolster his importance as so many executive producers do."
In late 1969, after the success of the moon walk and Newsmagazine, Mr. HARCOURT became executive producer of Thursday Night, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's flagship documentary program. The show later changed its broadcast night and name to Tuesday Night.
In January of 1974, Mr. HARCOURT started the program, Ombudsman, with Robert COOPER, an unknown 28-year-old lawyer. With Mr. COOPER acting as a crusader for the little guy, Ombudsman was a first in Canadian broadcasting.
"He was very serious about his work and kept the program out of legal trouble," remembered Mr. COOPER. "I think I was nervous and difficult at first but he was patient."
After seven years on the program, Mr. COOPER went on to be a successful producer in Hollywood where he still works. "I learned from Bill how to take a subject that seems to be educational and earnest and turn it into compelling television."
In 1977, Mr. HARCOURT also took over as executive producer for Marketplace, the long-running consumer-affairs program. It was perhaps the only time one person was executive producer of two major network programs at the same time. He finished his Canadian Broadcasting Corporation career at The Journal, where he worked as a senior adviser.
William Vernon HARCOURT was born on January 23, 1925 in Guelph, Ontario. He died on August 7, 2005. He is survived by his wife Nada, daughter Shelagh and brother John.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-31 published
James JEROME, Politician and Judge: (1933-2005)
He was king of the hill as Speaker of the House of Commons but less successful as a federal judge. Appointed in a blip of election-day patronage, he encountered unaccustomed criticism
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, August 31, 2005, Page S9
James JEROME was a popular Speaker of the House of Commons who seemingly could do no wrong until he became a federal judge.
Mr. JEROME was the first Speaker chosen from an opposition party, he introduced television coverage of the Commons and he wielded a fair but firm hand during Question Period. Then, in an unusual spasm of election-day patronage, he was made associate chief justice of the Federal Court of Canada, where he came under unfamiliar attack. He stepped down in March of 1998 after his slow handling of war-crimes cases.
James JEROME spent his early years in Kingston, Ontario, where his father was a construction engineer. Later, the family moved to Toronto, where James went to high school, the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School.
After law school, Mr. JEROME moved to Sudbury, Ontario His first step into politics was winning a seat on city council. He then ran for the Liberals in a by-election in May of 1967 and lost but won in the 1968 general election, the year of Trudeaumania. He was re-elected in 1972, 1974 and 1979. Though the Liberals lost that election, he retained his seat with a majority of 12,000 votes.
Along the way, he had taught himself French to advance his political career and it probably helped land what some call the best job in the House of Commons. The post of Speaker comes with a staff of 3,000 and includes a rent-free, country estate called Kingsmere and a social life as glittering as that of the Governor-General.
The Commons first elected Mr. JEROME the Speaker in September of 1974 after the Liberals had won a majority government. Yet it wasn't a unanimous vote for the new Speaker. In an interesting footnote, Robert STANFIELD, leader of the opposition, refused to second his nomination.
Mr. JEROME remained in power through the long Trudeau Parliament. His most lasting change to the House of Commons was bringing in television coverage in 1978, which he said led to "a far higher quality of journalism in reporting the proceedings of the Commons." His ground rules for broadcasters were eventually copied by other parliaments, including the British House of Commons.
As Speaker, he managed to steer clear of problems. He was involved in only a few major battles while ruling as arbiter of taste and as master of debates in the Commons. He did, however, get into a fierce war of words with The Globe and Mail when the Speaker sided with a 1976 vote by the parliamentary press gallery to bar Canadian Press managers who were working as reporters during a strike. Parliamentarians said The Globe had committed a "gross libel" against the Speaker. The newspaper's view, as expressed in two editorials, was that the Speaker shouldn't be allowed to decide who can or cannot sit in the press gallery.
In October of 1979, during the short-lived Tory government of Joe CLARK, Mr. JEROME refused to recognize Warren ALLMAND after the former Liberal cabinet minister showed up in the House wearing a turtleneck sweater under a tweed jacket. Mr. ALLMAND wasn't happy, but before he get to his feet to complain, he first had to rush out and borrow a tie.
"Men in this House should have the same freedom of dress as women," Mr. ALLMAND eventually responded, pointing out that cabinet minister Flora McDONALD was not wearing a tie. The Speaker was not moved and cries of "Wear a dress, Warren," arose from the government side.
Mr. JEROME's election as Speaker during a Conservative government had been a minor triumph. In June of 1979, the Tories won a minority government and, in a surprise move, prime minister Joe CLARK allowed Mr. JEROME to remain in the Speaker's chair.
It was the first time in Commons history that a Speaker had been chosen from an Opposition party, a testament to the high esteem in which Mr. JEROME was held on all sides of the House and a recognition by the Tories of the benefits of reducing potential Opposition votes by one in a minority situation.
As it turned out, the arrangement did not last. The Clark government was defeated in a no-confidence vote that December.
A general election was called for February 18, 1980, and Mr. JEROME chose not to run. Instead, as Canadians went to the polls, Mr. CLARK named him associate chief justice of the Federal Court of Canada. Since the Conservatives were, in theory, still in power, they likely made the appointment at the request of the Liberals. It was a most unusual development, as outgoing prime ministers seldom make appointments on election day. In this case, it seemed all parties had agreed to making a judicial appointment for the sake of the retiring Speaker.
His new job, however, was not so cozy. As a judge, he soon found his decisions open to criticism. His biggest troubles arose during his last years as a Federal Court judge. Two incidents exposed the question of whether former senior politicians and government officials should be named to the bench.
In 1996, the chief justice of the Federal Court, Julius ISAAC, had a dinner meeting with a senior official of the department of justice who complained that Mr. Justice James JEROME was taking too long in the deportation hearings against three alleged Nazi war criminals.
The chief justice then intervened privately with Judge JEROME. Later, the Supreme Court ruled that Judge JEROME and another judge could not have any further connections with the case. Around the same time, Judge JEROME became involved in another controversy, related in part to the war-crimes case.
In making a comment about a case involving an aboriginal band, Judge JEROME was reported to have said he would never put a native judge on a native case and would never put a Jewish judge on a war-crimes case. This remark caused outrage from Jewish and aboriginal leaders, and a rebuke by the then-justice minister, Anne McLELLAN.
Both incidents led to a reform of how judges were named by the federal cabinet. For a time, at least 10 judges in the federal court's trial and appeal divisions had been former federal members of Parliament or government employees -- including Judge ISAAC, who was a former employee of the Department of Justice.
The appointments had been made by the Liberals during their long run in power from the 1960s to the early 1980s. On his last full day as prime minister in 1984, Pierre TRUDEAU appointed two cabinet members to the court. Two weeks later, his successor John TURNER appointed another former cabinet minister. The practice had made the court the object of criticism over its independence from the government.
In 1998, changes were finally made to the way judges are named.
"Now, it would appear to be impossible to name a cabinet minister as a judge," said Ian BUSHNELL, a retired law professor from the University of Windsor who wrote the history of both the Supreme Court and the Federal Court. "He [Mr. JEROME] was caught up in the patronage binge of the Trudeau/Turner era. No one who was appointed was a dud or a failure. As a judge, Mr. JEROME was certainly adequate."
Even so, it was as Speaker that he had shone. After his retirement from the Commons, Mr. JEROME wrote a memoir titled Mr. Speaker. In a review of the book, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reporter Larry ZOLF recalled Mr. JEROME's years in the House: "Few parliamentarians have ever been as popular with members of Parliament, reporters or constituents as the Toronto Irish Liberal member from the mining constituency of Sudbury.... JEROME's sensibilities are certainly missed in the carnival atmosphere into which the House, alas, has lately degenerated."
In his private life, Mr. JEROME was very much the family man. After he moved to the Speaker's house north of Ottawa, he bought a family cottage on Ramsey Lake near Sudbury. Mr. JEROME was an accomplished piano player and loved card games, especially bridge and gin. He was a keen golfer and he and his family skied at Camp Fortune near Ottawa.
James Alexander JEROME was born on March 4, 1933. He died in Ottawa on August 21 of Huntington's disease. He is survived by his wife Barry Karen and his children, Mary-Lou, Paul, Jim and Megan. Another son, Joseph, died in an accident in 1986.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-14 published
James KENNEDY, Airman, Car Dealer And Arts Patron: (1918-2005)
Shot down over Europe in 1944, he later helped build an arts centre
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, October 14, 2005, Page S9
When it came to luck in bombing runs over Europe, Jim KENNEDY was one of the rare ones. Of every 100 aircrew that flew in heavy bombers, only 24 survived unscathed. Many were killed over Europe, others were badly injured and some ended up as prisoners of war.
James KENNEDY was the one airman in 100 who bailed out and made it back to his base in England. In late May, 1944, about two weeks before the Allied invasion of Normandy, the Lancaster bomber in which Flying Officer KENNEDY was the navigator was shot down while on a bombing mission to Metz in Alsace-Lorraine, French territory annexed by Germany in 1940.
Shot down near Paris, all the crew parachuted to safety, but only Mr. KENNEDY avoided capture. He found himself alone in a wooded area with his escape kit, which included a needle and thread, a razor, soap and a compass.
Jim KENNEDY followed instructions airmen were given: Bury your parachute and contact the local parish priest. He did and was soon in the hands of the French Resistance. Since he didn't speak French, he posed as someone who couldn't speak at all as he travelled across France toward Spain.
"He and the brave young French woman guiding him walked right through the centre of Paris. Challenged by a German, the woman flew into a rage about German bullying, saying her brother was a mute and terrified -- and it worked," said Geoff GODDARD, Mr. KENNEDY's son-in-law.
The progress of an airman evading capture was never a secret. The British had a special group, Military Intelligence 9, set up just to deal with making sure captured airmen made it out. There were several routes, the shortest one from Brittany in northern France to Cornwall in England. Jim KENNEDY took the long route over the mountains to Spain.
Five weeks after being shot down, he crossed the Pyrenees. This was dangerous; the entrances to the mountain passes were guarded by the Germans and the Vichy French. Once in Spain, he contacted the British authorities and was back in England around June 29. That day, his family in Canada received a telegram to say he was safe.
Military intelligence interrogated returning airmen, to find out details of their escape and to stop Germans from infiltrating any spies (which never actually happened.) Mr. KENNEDY was allowed to return to his squadron, though he never flew another mission. Almost all airmen who evaded capture were not allowed back to regular operations in case they were captured and disclosed anything about the escape route.
Jim KENNEDY was born in Vancouver. His father had been a prospector in the Yukon, but later opened a general store in New Westminster, British Columbia When that failed in the Depression, the family moved to Windsor, Ontario After finishing high school in Windsor, Jim worked as a salesman in a local store until he joined the Air Force in 1942.
After the war, Mr. KENNEDY went to work for the Ford Motor Co. of Canada and moved up in the marketing department, relocating to Winnipeg, Montreal and then Toronto. He ended at Ford headquarters in Oakville, Ontario, as director of passenger-car marketing. In 1960, he took over a failing Ford dealership in Oakville and renamed it Kennedy Ford.
The dealership became a success, moving locations as it expanded and prospered. He was the sole owner of, and ran, the dealership until 1983, when he sold the franchise to his sales manager. It is still named Kennedy Ford.
Like a character from a Sinclair Lewis novel, Mr. KENNEDY was involved in all levels of his community, from Oakville and Ontario provincial politics -- where he was a diehard Tory -- to raising money for the local arts centre. He and other business leaders would discuss politics and the future of the city over a few games of cribbage and lunch at the Oakville Club. He was also a member of the local Rotary Club.
One of Mr. KENNEDY's lasting achievements was helping to build the Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts (he served as its founding chairman in 1974). At first, he had wanted to convert Oakville's old Odeon Theatre; when that didn't work, Mr. KENNEDY raised a lot of money, including a large donation from Ford, Oakville's largest employer. The theatre opened in 1977.
"It was designed by Ron THOM, of Shaw Festival fame, and it remains one of the finest smaller theatres of its type," said Ron PLANCHE, a Liberal Party organizer in Oakville at the time. "Without Jim's leadership, the theatre would have ended up as just another two-rink arena."
James F. KENNEDY started his car dealership the same year John F. KENNEDY was elected president of the United States. Mr. KENNEDY always liked to use the initials J.F.K., and that's what many members of his family called him.
After he sold his business, he spent half the year in North Palm Beach, Florida, the other half in Oakville. This meant that he could play golf 12 months a year -- and he did.
James Flood KENNEDY was born in Vancouver on May 8, 1918. He died in Oakville on September 24. He is survived by his wife, Margaret, and his daughters Kim and Shannon.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-01 published
David BAZAY, Journalist (1939-2005)
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ombudsman started out as a bilingual reporter who specialized in human-interest stories. He liked to wear funny hats on camera when he disapproved of an assignment
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, November 1, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- David BAZAY was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's second ombudsman. For 10 years, he dealt with thousands of complaints from the public about everything from the contents of radio and television programs to the perceived bias of reporters.
Though he came from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation himself, Mr. BAZAY didn't always side with the network. In the last report he issued, he said the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation should follow the example of the British Broadcasting Corporation and publish a complaints page on its website.
"David always had an open mind, both as a reporter and as ombudsman. He wouldn't rush to judgment," said Vince CARLIN, who takes over as ombudsman in January and who worked with Mr. BAZAY at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Montreal in the 1970s. Mr. BAZAY was to have retired this month but had agreed to stay on until Mr. CARLIN took over.
Mr. BAZAY grew up in Elma, Manitoba, near Winnipeg, where his father ran a general store. He graduated from the University of Western Ontario in 1961 and then went to Montreal, where he studied at the Université de Montréal, perfecting his French.
He worked for The Canadian Press for three years before heading to Paris to work as a freelancer, filing reports for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, among others. He joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Montreal in 1972 as a regional reporter in local television news. He quickly graduated to the post of national reporter, covering Quebec during the 1976 election when the Parti Québécois took office.
Mr. BAZAY was not only bilingual, but had a deep understanding of French culture through his wife, Viviane, and her family. He spoke French at home with his wife and their two children.
He was also involved in a strawberry-farming business with his father-in-law and brother-in-law. During the summer, Mr. BAZAY would work on weekends and during his vacation at the family "u-pick" farm south of Montreal.
While working on his farm, Mr. BAZAY thought about how television covered the news. He felt the audience was bored with pictures of news conferences and clips of politicians. He found a way to tell stories that held people's interest and still conveyed the same information.
"He specialized in human-interest stories and would always find something to illustrate an issue," recalled Bill Casey, who, as a cameraman, worked with Mr. BAZAY in Montreal from 1976 to 1980. "David found a man in the Gaspé who was a federalist married to a separatist. He and his wife would argue in the kitchen, and it became a metaphor for the tensions in Quebec leading up to the 1980 referendum."
After the referendum, Mr. BAZAY was assigned to Paris, where he covered Europe and the Middle East.
"He was one of the first reporters to arrive after the massacre at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camp in Lebanon," said John Owen, who was foreign editor of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News at the time. "I can still remember the tone of his voice. Calm, without adjectives, just describing the horror there."
In September of 1982, Lebanese Maronite Christian militias had entered the camps and massacred hundreds of Palestinian who lived there.
Because he was fluent in French, Mr. BAZAY was able to report for both the French and English networks of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. At home and overseas, he had adopted an unusual habit of signalling whether he liked the story he had been assigned. If he disapproved of it, he would wear a funny hat -- either a tuque or a beret -- on camera. In those days, he filmed his pieces at the last minute, so editors couldn't change the shot.
When he returned to Canada, Mr. BAZAY became a producer, eventually becoming executive producer of the national news and chief news editor in 1993. He became ombudsman on November 1, 1995.
Away from work Mr. BAZAY was a keen golfer and skier. He enjoyed fly-fishing and would often go salmon fishing with a friend near Bathurst, New Brunswick He spent much time of late at a family cottage north of Kingston, Ontario
David BAZAY was born in Winnipeg on July 12, 1939. He died of a heart attack in Toronto on October 30, 2005. He was 66. He leaves his wife, Viviane, and his children Dominique and Thierry.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-05 published
Businessman established Top 40 radio, MuchMusic
A money-losing station at the outset, CHUM became broadcasting empire
By Fred LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, December 5, 2005, Page A3
Allan WATERS, who died Saturday at the age of 84, started Top 40 radio in Canada, making a huge success of CHUM, the small money-losing Toronto radio station he bought in 1954. He built his stake in CHUM into a radio and television empire that included Toronto's CITY-TV and other television stations across the country.
CHUM went on the air in 1945 and was Toronto's fifth radio station. It broadcast on a weak signal and only from sunrise to sunset. Mr. WATERS, who had made some money in advertising and the pharmaceutical business, bought the station in 1954 from a man he worked for, Jack PART.
He took his time learning the radio business and the station began to break even. He increased its power to 50,000 watts -- the maximum allowed in North America. He also started to listen to recordings of the kind of radio stations that were making money in the United States. He liked the style of the Storz family of Omaha, Neb., which is credited with inventing Top 40 radio on their U.S. stations.
In a speech in May of 1957, Mr. WATERS told the small staff at CHUM: "I haven't been in the radio business as long as anyone in this room, but if I was in the shoe business and operating a poor shoe store, I think I would find out who is running a good shoe store and copy his style. CHUM is going to be patterned after a Storz station. As Storz owns five stations and is first in each market, it's actually not a bad pattern to follow."
All Shook Up by Elvis Presley was the No. 1 song on CHUM's Top 40 radio when it started on May 27, 1957. Within five weeks, CHUM's slice of the audience went from 5 per cent to 24 per cent. By 1958, its 1050 CHUM was the No. 1 radio station in Toronto. By 1968, CHUM Ltd. was listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and Mr. WATERS was a rich man.
He was born in east-end Toronto. At 16, he finished school and went to work as an office boy for $16 a week. Mr. PART, his employer, ran a successful patent medicine operation. Mr. WATERS worked his way up the ladder in sales and advertising. All his life he would say modestly, "I'm just a salesman."
The war interrupted his business career as he served overseas with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1942 to 1946. He returned to work for Mr. PART, who had also started York Broadcasting and established CHUM at the end of the war.
CHUM's success allowed the WATERS empire to expand. He had the rights for Muzak in Canada. In 1963, he started CHUM-FM and later bought a television station in Barrie, north of Toronto. He was frustrated when he was not allowed to move the station's transmitter closer to Toronto to tap into the larger metropolitan market.
Expansion into television came slowly. He bought into the Maritimes, but failed to win regulatory approval to buy CFCF in Montreal. With his television stations he became one of the owners of CTV, the private television network that at the time was a kind of co-operative.
Perhaps his biggest success in television occurred in 1981, when he bought the floundering CITY-TV. He left the charismatic Moses ZNAIMER in charge, but the station was owned by CHUM Ltd. It expanded into pop video with MuchMusic, as successful and innovative as Top 40 radio in the 1950s. This decade, 1050 CHUM.com became the world's first all Internet radio station.
"Everyone criticized him when he [went with the Top 40 format]," his son, Jim WATERS, said on the weekend. "They said: 'Allan, you must be crazy. You're not going to really play that loud music are you?' Even my mother criticized him."
The son, now chairman of CHUM, said his father had a knack for picking winners, whether it was Top 40 radio or a new local television format.
"I think a very significant move that Dad made was buying CITY-TV in Toronto. We weren't in television. The move into specialty television was groundbreaking with MuchMusic," Mr. WATERS said.
Allan WATERS didn't have a gift for picking records or television programs, but he knew how to pick people who did.
"His great talent wasn't as a programmer, but as a salesman. Mr. WATERS was a super salesman. He had a system where he knew what every salesman and every station was doing week by week," said Senator Jerry GRAFSTEIN, who co-founded CITY-TV and worked with Mr. WATERS for decades.
His personal life was the opposite of his business life. While the music was flashy, he was not; while his station thrived on publicity, he was a private person. MuchMusic was hip; he sported a crew cut and glasses. Most entrepreneurs and business people in Canada are listed in Who's Who, but there was never an entry for Allan WATERS. He wasn't interested.
He also thought long hours were a waste of energy. Most days he went home to his wife at 5: 30. "If you work 20 hours [a day], you're doing too much or you're doing something wrong," he told a reporter.
Mr. WATERS was a frugal man. For many years he walked to work from his home in the neighbourhood of Leaside. His office was relatively modest. His companies almost never borrowed to make purchases. And in a business that thrives on global glitz, he never invested outside Canada.
He was generous and loyal to his employees and in a business where hiring and firing was the norm, even some disc jockeys and announcers -- such as Gord MARTINEAU at CITY-TV -- stayed with his stations for decades. Mr. WATERS did part company with announcer Larry SOLWAY after the boss refused to allow him to discuss a sex manual on the air. Later, CHUM Ltd. would own Sex-TV.
At his death, the CHUM empire Mr. WATERS built owned and operated 33 radio stations, 12 local television stations and 21 specialty channels, including MuchMusic and Space. It also controlled other sideline businesses, including Muzak.
When he died peacefully in his sleep Saturday morning in hospital, he was surrounded by family, including his wife of more than 50 years, Marjorie. He also leaves two sons; Ronald, deputy chairman, and Jim, chairman of CHUM Ltd. The funeral is private. A public memorial will be held on Wednesday in Toronto.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-10 published
Max CARSON, Doctor And Pilot (1923-2005)
The sole survivor of a mid-air collision by two Halifax bombers became a family physician who delivered 2,000 babies
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, December 10, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- Pilot Max CARSON was the only survivor of a crash of two bombers over Belgium in the winter of 1944. The man who later went on to become a doctor was just 21 at the time. He was flying an Royal Canadian Air Force Halifax when it collided with an Royal Air Force Halifax during a night raid on Duisberg, Germany.
The flight had been his 35th mission, after which he and his crew were supposed to go home. In his memoirs, Mr. CARSON recalled that one of his crew had a premonition about the last sortie. He was right. It was the night of the collision.
"I had no warning from any of my crew, and I felt this plane crash into ours," wrote Dr. CARSON. His plane caught fire and the floor beneath him gave way. "I fell through the flames clear into the sky. As I looked up, I could see my airplane on fire. I counted to 10, pulled the ripcord and my parachute opened."
He survived because, as the pilot, he was probably one of the few to be wearing his parachute. For the others, the tight space on board meant their parachutes had to be hung on hooks. In a collision, there was no time to put them on. The 14 other men died.
Dr. CARSON almost didn't survive the landing. At the time, his name was KRAKOVSKY, which he changed after the war. He landed among a group of American soldiers who were fighting the Battle of the Bulge, the last major German offensive in Europe. When they heard his name they suspected he was an English-speaking German parachuted in to cause havoc.
By luck, one of the Americans was from Buffalo, and he quizzed the flier from Toronto. They soon realized he was the real thing and he was back at his base in England on December 27, eight days later. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and returned home.
Max CARSON was born in Northern Ontario, the son of Jewish immigrants who later moved to North Bay to join 30 or 40 other Jewish families. His father ran a rooming house, but the Depression meant that tenants were often unable to come up with the 10 cents-a-night rent. So, in 1932, the KRAKOVSKYs packed their belongings into a truck and drove to Toronto.
In his memoir, Max CARSON listed the various places his family had lived in Toronto. On Markham Street, his family of eight shared a house with another family of four. In the basement, he kept a hockey stick and perfected his shot using lumps of coal. He was a die-hard Toronto Maple Leafs fan, and once talked his way into a seat in the reds at a special night for young fans at Maple Leaf Gardens.
Maxie, as he was known, was a whiz at school. In Grade 7, he got 100 per cent in arithmetic "when most of my Friends flunked." He went to high school and technical school, then worked in a series of dead-end jobs. In 1942, he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force with his brother, Morris, who became a bomb aimer.
After the war, Dr. CARSON was promised a job by a man who was impressed with his Royal Canadian Air Force exploits. But when the man learned he was Jewish, he changed his mind. Dr. CARSON felt so frustrated that, on June 8, 1945, he and his brother changed their name to CARSON. It cost $75 each.
Max CARSON finished high school at a special postwar school set up for veterans. In September of 1947, he enrolled in medical school at the University of Toronto. After interning, he went into partnership with Sid DAVIS on Parliament Street in Cabbagetown. He practised in that same Toronto neighbourhood for more than 40 years and delivered more than 2,000 babies.
In retirement, he worked on his memoirs, which he wrote because he knew nothing about his own grandparents and wanted his descendants to know some details.
He was active in veterans groups and was always proud of his contribution in bringing the war to an end. "I like to think that maybe I'm the guy that flew the plane that dropped the bomb that broke Hitler's back."
Max CARSON was born in Cobalt, Ontario, on September 15, 1923. He died in Toronto on September 3, 2005. He was 81. He is survived by his wife, Nan, and their five children.

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LANGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-13 published
Cancer battle claims admired journalist
By Antonia ZERBISIAS, Media Columnist
The wonder is, Bill CAMERON did not author his own obituary.
For here was a man who is acknowledged as the greatest writer of his generation of Canadian journalists, whose words graced the page, the stage, the screen, the classroom and, of course, the airwaves.
CAMERON, 62, died at his Toronto home just after midnight yesterday, after a 20-month struggle with esophageal cancer, surrounded by his wife, Cheryl HAWKES, and his children Patrick, 22, Rachel, 21, and Nick 15.
"He was trying to hold us in his arms," said HAWKES yesterday. "But he was too weak."
Respected, admired, and loved, CAMERON was, what friend and former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation colleague Fred LANGAN called yesterday, "a triple threat," the consummate anchor, journalist and writer.
But he was more than that.
From his start as a freelance entertainment critic for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and CTV, to penning an editorial column at the Toronto Star at the age of 25, to editing for the nascent Global news, to anchoring at Citytv in the 1970s, to covering foreign assignments and co-hosting for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's nightly newsmagazine The Journal, to anchoring Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television's local news, to fronting Newsworld's morning show, to writing novels and ghosting documentary scripts for others, to playing the anchor on the Comedy Network's Puppets Who Kill, there was no journalism job CAMERON could not do -- and do well.
"Who the hell is good at all those things?" asked Mark STAROWICZ, the producer who hired CAMERON in 1983 to report and fill in as an anchor on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's The Journal and Midday.
Which is why, when the Journal went off the air in 1992, it was CAMERON, tapped to succeed the late Barbara FRUM as host, who delivered the eloquent goodbye to viewers: "I'd like to leave you with the words you find on the back of the cheque you get at any coffee shop in Canada. Thank you for letting us serve you."
What CAMERON had was a voice, and even at the end, when he could barely use it, he still slapped on his make-up to host his i-channel talk show, as well as act as fill-in interviewer on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's As It Happens.
His last big interview was with the Dalai Lama, for the documentary The Dalai Lama: The Power of Compassion that aired last week on i-channel.
"He was a master of the interview," said Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Peter MANSBRIDGE, who recalled CAMERON giving him some pointers last fall at a party in his honour.
About 200 Friends and colleagues, from all the networks and the print media where CAMERON had worked, gathered at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to show their support.
"He really kept his sense of humour," said Global's Peter KENT. "He'd go through the chemo sessions -- and was brutalized by them -- but then he'd come up for air and talk to Friends and inquire about others."
"Everybody has this idea that he was such a serious guy," said Valerie PRINGLE, with whom he worked on Midday. "But I remember when the opportunity came up to interview Big Bird, he wrestled me to the ground and said, 'It's mine.'
"I can remember he was doing an interview, with a cop or something, and he said, 'Well, I've shoplifted, I've smoked dope,'" PRINGLE laughed. "We all just dropped our coffees."
What CAMERON cared about was his family and journalism.
"He worshipped his wife and children," said PRINGLE, describing a Valentine's Day tribute that CAMERON had published. "It just made you cry. I thought this guy was so madly in love with Cheryl, I can't even stand it."
In fact, it was love at first sight.
HAWKES met him in 1980, when she was doing a freelance profile on him for Star Week magazine.
"He followed me out of the restaurant and tried to talk me out of writing the story," she said yesterday. "He said 'I don't need publicity; I need to marry you.'"
They were wed four months later. But he would leave her often to take on dangerous assignments for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, flying in and out of the hellholes of the world.
STAROWICZ described one assignment in which CAMERON was talking to the camera, with bombs exploding around him, but he barely flinched.
In fact, "he was talking in perfect paragraphs."
But it seems that CAMERON, who has held the journalism ethics chair at Ryerson University, also worried about the ethical hazards of war reporting.
As he wrote in 1990, "That's the dreadful suspicion: That we dip into the surface of deep events, paddle with our feet, guard our comforts, patronize our contacts, exploit great tragedies for the good of our careers, and get the story wrong."
CAMERON wanted to get the story not only right, but also exactly, perfectly, precisely right.
"He had one of the most discerning ears," said Citytv's Mark DAILEY, who worked with CAMERON when he was the anchor of the 10 p.m. newscast. "He was a very important part of our early conscience at Citypulse."
MANSBRIDGE remembered one evening co-hosting with CAMERON on the Journal. It was a time of intense rivalries between the National and the newsmagazine and few people expected the pairing to go well.
But, said MANSBRIDGE, in the middle of a technical interview on a financial story, CAMERON slipped him an idea, which improved the segment.
"That underlined that this was a guy who cared about the product, who cared about how we did things," MANSBRIDGE said.
"He studied acting which is one of the reasons he could be a little arch on television," LANGAN said. "He knew how to manipulate words more than the average announcer."
A journalist to the end, CAMERON documented his battle with his cancer for an upcoming feature in Walrus magazine. His most recent piece was a witty look... at caskets.
That's why it is so surprising he didn't leave some notes for the occasion of the death, one he knew was coming much too fast and too soon.

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