KRISTOLAITIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-23 published
COOKE, Mary (née HAYTON)
Passed away peacefully on Thursday, November 17, 2005 at Leisureworld Home in Elmira, in her 89th year. Mary, beloved wife of the late George "Jim" COOKE. Mother of the late Vaughan COOKE, Christine MAYER- KRISTOLAITIS and her husband Georges, and James 'Jay' COOKE and his wife Erin. Grandmother to Melissa, Ryan, James, Sean, Vaughan, and Alanna. Great-grandmother to Tanner and Jamieson. A private funeral service was held Monday, November 21, 2005 at Trinity United Church in Elmira. Memorial contributions to your local animal shelter would be gratefully appreciated.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRISTOLAITIS - All Categories in OGSPI

KRISTOLOVICH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-17 published
DIACHYNSKY, Tatiana " Kay"
In her 90th year on September 14, 2005. Daughter of Nicholas and Eudoxia (KRISTOLOVICH) of Sandy Lake, Manitoba. Predeceased by her parents, sisters Mary (Andrew PUHACH) and Anne (Harry ZUK) and brother Joseph (Marie.) Survived by Sr. Celeste, S.S.M.I., brother Harry (Marion), beloved nieces and nephews with their families. Moved to Toronto in 1941. Worked in banking for Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce for 35 years. A woman of prayer and action, rooted in Christian convictions, she was grateful for her Ukrainian Catholic heritage and served without counting the cost. She co-founded Saint Mary's Credit Union and was elected first President of the Toronto Eparchial Youth. She was also Treasurer of the Ukrainian Catholic Women's League of Canada on the national, eparchial and parish levels and of the Ukrainian Catholic Council of Canada. She promoted the founding of St. Josaphats Ukrainian Catholic School and supported its mission. She was dedicated to spiritual renewal through weekend retreats, rosary cenacles and prayer vigils and to Pro-Life initiatives until her very death. She supported the needy, and in recent years - immigrants from Ukraine. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Josaphats Cathedral, Sisters Servants Education Fund or Ukrainian Catholic Women's League of Canada charities. Visitation will be held at the Cardinal Funeral Home, 92 Annette Street (near Keele) on Sunday 2-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. Panakhyda 7: 30 p.m. Funeral Service Monday at 9:30 a.m. then to St. Josaphats Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral for Mass at 10 a.m. Interment at Mount Peace Cemetery. Online Condolences at www.cardinalfuneralhomes.com

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRISTOLOVICH - All Categories in OGSPI

KRITCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-26 published
GAMES, Joseph Victor
Born December 28th, 1929, Derby, England. Resided in Georgetown for 35 years until recently this year when he moved to Point Edward to be closer to his family. It is with great sorrow, sadness and heavy hearts that we announce the sudden passing of Victor GAMES on Monday, October 24th, 2005 at the Bluewater Health, Palliative Care, Sarnia with all his family at his side. Victor was the beloved husband of the late Jean GAMES (October 2004) for 54 wonderful years. He was a caring loving father 'Pop' of Diana and her husband John KRITCH. Proud grandfather of Lisa and her husband Toby BOUCHER and Dwayne KRITCH and his fiancée Maricris PANGILINAN. Great-grandfather of Koral and Ethan BOUCHER. Brother of Mavis and her husband Cyril SMITH of South Africa, the late Gerald (2002) and his wife Yvonne of England, and Harold and his wife Mavis of England. He will be greatly missed by his Friends in Georgetown, those newly made Friends in Sarnia and his fraternal brothers of the Masonic Lodges. Victor was Grand Superintendent, Wellington District No. 4 (2000-2001), a member and Past Master of Friendship Lodge, a member and Past Principal of Halton Chapter Royal Arch Mason, a member of Credit Lodge, a member of St. Clair Chapter and a member of the 18th Century Degree Team. Our world has gone a little quieter today as one of the great story tellers has gone on to share his stories with the others on the other side of the rainbow. He has now gone on to be with his beloved wife Jean, may they find each other again. God Bless you both. Special thanks to Dr. CHILVERS, the Nurses and Staff at the Bluewater Health Russell St. Site, and the Nurses and staff at Bluewater Health Palliative Care Unit. Friends will be received at the J.S. Jones and son Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 11582 Trafalgar Road, north of Maple Ave., Georgetown, 905-877-3631 on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Masonic service to follow Thursday evening at 9 p.m. Funeral Services will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 28th, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Cancer Assistance Services of Halton Hills. To send expressions of sympathy visit www.jsjonesandsonfuneralhome.com.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITCH - All Categories in OGSPI

KRITER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-11 published
LAMB, Jennie Marie (formerly LEWIS, née WELDON)
At her residence on Tuesday, May 10, 2005, Jennie Marie LAMB of Rodney in her 77th year. Predeceased by her parents John WELDON and Olive BUTSON, husbands William LEWIS and Harold LAMB and daughter Susan RYBARSKY. Dearly loved and sadly missed by her life-time companion Ronald BLACK of Rodney and children Rose Marie GUYITT and her companion David WYLLIE of Duart, Ruth (Lewis) RYBARSKY of London, William LEWIS and his wife Isabel of West Lorne, Wesley LEWIS and his wife Carrie of Edmonton, Donald LEWIS of Edmonton and Mary CLARKE of Edmonton. Also survived by her sister Jacquiline and her husband Dave KRITER of Rodney and numerous grandchildren and great grandchildren. She was a valued member of Order of the Eastern Star Lodge #169 and an adherent of West Lorne Baptist Church. Friends may call at the Rodney Chapel on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where service will be held on Thursday at 11: 30 a.m. Pastor A. KAUPS officiating. An Eastern Star service will be held Wednesday evening at 8: 00 p.m. Cremation. If desired, donations to West Lorne Baptist Church, Four Counties Health Services or charity of choice would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Padfield Funeral Homes (519-785-0810)

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-27 published
KRITER, Erma (SIMPSON)
Peacefully, at Bobier Villa, Dutton on Thursday, August 25th 2005 Erma KRITER (SIMPSON) of Dutton and formerly of West Lorne in her 85th year. Predeceased by her husband Wilfred KRITER (1980.) Lovingly remembered by her children Anna Jean RIPLEY and her husband Bob of West Lorne, Lorne KRITER and his wife Helen of Pt. Lambton and Marilyn FODOR and Bill TRASK of West Lorne. Dear grandmother of Carol CRUMP (Mike,) Laura VERSTEEG (Tom,) Brian KRITER (Sara), Brad KRITER, Brenda BELLAIRE and Steve (Lesley). Also survived by her 8 greatgrandchildren. Predeceased by her sister Marge DAWDY and her brother Ralph SIMPSON. Friends may call at the West Lorne Chapel on Sunday, August 28th, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be conducted from the chapel on Monday at 1: 30 p.m. Reverend J. WHITE/WHYTE and Pastor R. KARN officiating. Interment Rodney Cemetery. If desired, memorial contributions to the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, Bobier Villa or the Parkinson's Society would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Arrangements entrusted to Padfield Funeral Homes (519-785-0810).

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITER - All Categories in OGSPI

KRITICOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-02 published
DWYER, Lynn Ann (May 4, 1951-February 1, 2005)
Of Campbell Avenue. Visitation 5-9 p.m. Thursday (Scripture reading at 8 p.m.) at the Ryan and Odette Funeral Home, 1498 Dundas St. W., at Dufferin, Toronto. Service 1: 30 p.m. Friday then to Beechwood Cemetery. Bobby DWYER predeceased his wife. Mrs. DWYER is survived by: children John WEBB, Robert DWYER, Bobbi DWYER (Moose PROANO), Alan KRITICOS; 4 grandchildren. Parking is no problem - simply enter from Dufferin, just north of Dundas.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITICOS - All Categories in OGSPI

KRITZER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-08 published
ARCHER, Vernon R. "Vern" (May 16, 1920-June 6, 2005)
It is with deep sadness that we announce Vern's death on Monday, June 6, 2005 at Toronto General Hospital surrounded by his family. Cherished husband and best friend of Patricia (Pat) for almost 61 years. Devoted and dearly loved dad of Leonore (Nick BARNARD,) Paul (Heather MacDONALD,) Marty (Karen KELLY,) Joanne (Keith KRITZER,) Larry (Kirste SPENCER) and Mary (predeceased May 24, 1974.) Proud grandpa of Matthew, (Clea CLARK) and Martha BARNARD, Mary Elizabeth and Alastair ARCHER, Graham, Erin and Emily KRITZER and Madeleine and Camille ARCHER. Delighted great-grandpa of Ruby Rose BARNARD. Treasured friend and brother-in-law of Sister Frances HAYES (C.S.J.) and Leonore and Vern MOORE. Vern was the youngest son of Margaret and Fred ARCHER. He was predeceased by his brothers Sydney, Leo and Russell. He will be lovingly remembered by Syd's children Adele ARCHER, Rosemary TUCKER, Lucille KENNEDY, Fred ARCHER and their families. Vern will be sadly missed by many nieces, nephews, great nieces, great nephews and a host of wonderful Friends. Vern was a proud Toronto Star employee for 36 years. When he retired in 1985 as Promotions and Public Relations Manager he left a job he truly enjoyed. In retirement he followed his heart to the Toronto Hunt Club where he enjoyed 18 years of golf and many special times with family and Friends.
The family will receive Friends at the Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Road, (west of Victoria Park Ave.), Toronto 416-698-2861 on Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. and Thursday from 2-5 and 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Saint John's Roman Catholic Church (794 Kingston Road) on Friday, June 9, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Michael's Hospital Foundation, Good Shepherd Refuge or a charity of one's choice would be appreciated. The family would like to thank Dr. Sudi DEVANESEN and Dr. Stuart HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON for their Friendship and many years of dedicated care. Heartfelt gratitude to the wonderful staff on the 10th floor Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit at Toronto General Hospital for their kindness and compassion.
"We love you Dad"
"Rest in Peace, Vern"

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-08 published
Vern ARCHER, 85: Bled Star blue
Drive for the business inspired peers
Worked fervently for Star social causes
By Isabel TEOTONIO, Staff Reporter
Vern ARCHER may not have had ink in his veins but he was a newspaperman who bled Star blue.
"The Star was the love of his life," remembered his son Larry ARCHER yesterday. "He loved the newspaper business. He loved the daily adrenaline of it and he loved the people who were attracted to it."
Vern ARCHER, who worked at the Star for 36 years, died peacefully Monday at the age of 85 surrounded by his family in the Toronto General Hospital after a brief battle with cancer.
Born in Toronto's east end in 1920, ARCHER landed a job with the newspaper he'd grown up with in 1948 and started out working in the circulation department. While he toyed with the idea of becoming a sports writer, he found his calling in public relations and promotions. Once there, he poured all his energy into a paper whose mission he fully believed in. He retired from that department as manager in 1985 and was sent off by 300 of his closest Friends who threw a superb bash for him at Maple Leaf Gardens.
"He left the Star at 65 but never really left the Star," said ARCHER's son, Paul, a news editor at the Star. "He constantly had suggestions for me on how to improve the paper.
"The Star was in his blood... My dad is probably reading tomorrow's Star right now wherever he is."
Veteran reporter George GAMESTER described ARCHER as "a great ambassador for the Star," who always had a "twinkle in his eye."
ARCHER believed the Star, because of it size, was uniquely positioned to publicize and promote worthy events and was very conscious of associating the paper's name with only good causes.
"He made no bones about his biases, he bled Star blue," said ARCHER's son Larry.
"He felt that the Star prospered when it stayed true to its roots as a compassionate small-L voice in the community."
ARCHER was heavily involved in publicizing both the Star's Fresh Air Fund and Santa Claus Fund. In fact it was ARCHER who created the annual Christmas Carol concert at St. Paul's Anglican Church on Bloor St. to raise proceeds for the Santa Claus Fund.
While his commitment to the job is legendary, particularly among those who remember his involvement in launching the Sunday Star, readers have ARCHER to thank for pushing to have an Extra edition on the day of the Blue Jays' first game in April 1977. ARCHER kept a framed copy of the edition on his wall.
"He was one of the old loyal Star people," said former colleague Al SURMINSKY. " His passion for the paper drove him."
While his work demanded much of him, there were very few nights when ARCHER wasn't home for dinner with family, said Larry ARCHER, adding, "he led by example."
ARCHER leaves his wife Patricia ARCHER of 60 years, his daughters Leonore BARNARD and Joanne KRITZER and sons Paul, Martin and Larry, as well as nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild.
He is pre-deceased by his youngest daughter, Mary ARCHER, who died in 1974 at 14.
Joanne KRITZER and Martin ARCHER are also long-time Star employees. KRITZER has worked over 30 years in the classified ad department and Martin ARCHER has worked 32 years in the circulation department.
Visitation at the Sherrin Funeral Home and Cremation Centre on Kingston Rd. will be tonight from 6 to 9 and tomorrow between 2 and 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m.
A funeral mass is scheduled for 11 a.m. Friday at Saint John's Catholic Church on Kingston Rd.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZER - All Categories in OGSPI

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-27 published
Shizuye TAKASHIMA, Artist And Writer: (1928-2005)
Japanese Canadian who was interned during the Second World War published a moving and furious account of her experiences for children and then lost her spark, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Thursday, October 27, 2005, Page S7
Painter, writer and teacher Shizuye TAKASHIMA was the author of A Child in Prison Camp, the first book about the internment of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War. Called Shichan by family and Friends, Ms. TAKASHIMA was the youngest of six children of Senji and Teru TAKASHIMA, a first-generation (Issei) gardener and a housekeeper.
She was born three months prematurely, weighing less than three pounds, and suffering from a congenital dislocation of both hips. As a small child she spent a year in traction in hospital as doctors tried unsuccessfully to correct her birth defect, which meant she was a year late enrolling in elementary school. She walked with a pronounced limp for the rest of her life.
After Japan bombed Pearl Harbour on December 7, 1941, the TAKASHIMA family was caught up in reprisals against Japanese Canadians. Before the war, there were more than 22,000 Japanese Canadians in British Columbia, most of them either naturalized or native-born Canadians. Their homes, farms and fishing boats were confiscated and sold for paltry sums, single young men were sent to labour camps, and families were relocated to eight internment camps in the interior of B.C.
Her four older brothers were sent to work on road gangs in Ontario, while Ms. TAKASHIMA, her father, mother and older sister were removed to an internment camp outside the village of New Denver, in the Kootenay Mountains near the Alberta-B.C. border. They lived under surveillance in a hastily built one-bedroom wooden house without electricity or running water, and were forced to share their accommodation with another family. They had to walk more than a mile to get drinking water and there was no school beyond Grade 8.
In 1944, William Lyon Mackenzie King's Liberal government passed a law saying Japanese Canadians who returned to British Columbia after the end of the war were liable to be deported. Ms. TAKASHIMA joined her older sister Mary in Hamilton in September of 1945 and was reunited with the rest of her family in Toronto a year later. She studied commercial art at Central Technical School and then went to the Ontario College of Art (now the Ontario College of Art and Design), graduating in fine arts in 1953.
She spent most of the next two decades travelling and studying art in Europe, Mexico (at the Fine Arts Institute in San Miguel Allende), New York (at the Pratt Graphic Art Centre), India, Asia and Europe. Toronto remained her home base, where she showed paintings, influenced by her travels, at the Jerrold Morris Gallery in Toronto. Writing in The Globe, art critic Kay KRITZWISER praised the paintings from her 1964 show as "mummified figures blindly searching in non-colour space."
A friend from those days says Ms. TAKASHIMA had a studio on the top floor of a mansion on Jarvis Street in Toronto. "She was a tiny little thing, with a pronounced limp and the biggest mouth I had ever heard. She could swear and she was sharp-tongued," said a friend who asked not to be named. "I remember her snapping at a visitor, 'If I knew why I painted bound figures, I'd be a writer.' "
May Cutler, founding publisher of Tundra Books, met Ms. TAKASHIMA at the Fine Arts Institute in San Miguel Allende, probably in 1968. Ms. TAKASHIMA was painting and weaving and "I was immediately interested in her background," said Ms. Cutler, with the result that Ms. TAKASHIMA wrote and illustrated a book for children about life in the internment camps.
Reading the ensuing manuscript, her "heart sank," Ms. Cutler said from her Montreal home. "It was so awful... just a kind of indignation letter that somebody might write to a newspaper... with none of the living information. But every so often she had these little sections that looked like poetry and suddenly it came alive."
In one of these scenes, Shichan and her older sister (called Yuki in the book) walk by an Royal Canadian Mounted Police office "half hidden among the dark pines" and Yuki warns they are being watched. Shichan looks at the closed door and says: "Their power seems to come through the very walls. We walk quietly past."
"Do the whole book like this," commanded Ms. Cutler. The result is an evocative and poignant account of daily life in an internment camp, with all its deprivations, rivalries and small joys, accompanied by Ms. TAKASHIMA's impressionistic watercolours (which are now in the Osborne Collection of the Toronto Public Library).
The book had a huge impact. It went into several reprints, was excerpted in newspapers and magazines, won a gold medal from the Canadian Children's Library, and was published in several countries, including Japan, where it was also turned into a musical.
A Child in Prison Camp marked a transition for Ms. TAKASHIMA, from painter to writer and illustrator, but there were other more fundamental changes going on that had a profound impact on her life and her art.
During her travels, she had embraced Agni Yoga, sometimes called the teaching of "Living Ethics," a philosophy founded by the Russian painter Nicholas Roerich and his wife, Helena Roerich in the 1920s. In the five years she spent in New York at the Pratt Institute, she became devoted to an Agni Yoga guru named Ralph Harris Houston. She dedicated A Child in Prison Camp to him.
Lorne Berkowitz met Ms. TAKASHIMA in New York in 1969. They were both followers of Mr. Houston and they went to classes and meditated together. She believed that all the great religions were different paths toward a greater consciousness of God and the boundaries and distinctions between them were mainly cultural, he explained.
Her art, as Ms. KRITZWISER wrote in The Globe in 1971, altered "largely due to her change in philosophy," to pastel paintings based on interpretations of the planets, the cosmic system, and peaceful cohabitation. "Our basic problems occur because we isolate our religions," Ms. TAKASHIMA told Ms. KRITZWISER. "As long as we think in 'I' terms, we'll never change."
Ms. Cutler also noticed the transformation. "Her early art was fascinating, and then she became interested in eastern religions and her art became very happy, lovely, pastel flowers." Noting the contrast from the marvellous "spooky" and powerful works done in the days when Ms. TAKASHIMA was bitter at what had happened to her family, and her later art, Ms. Cutler said, "I was glad that she found happiness even though her early art was the most powerful." Another observer said: "When she lost her anger, she lost her edge as a painter."
In 1976, Ms. TAKASHIMA began teaching watercolour classes in the drawing and painting department of the Ontario College of Art, a position she held until she reached retirement age. In the 1980s she did the illustrations for a book called Kenji and the Cricket written by the late Adele Wiseman.
She also became a supporter, although not a very vocal one, in the movement to seek redress from the Canadian government for the shame and economic loss the Japanese community suffered during the war. She attended a press conference in Toronto in June of 1984 at which David Dingwall, then multiculturalism minister in Pierre Trudeau's last Liberal government, announced that the federal government couldn't apologize for the internment of Japanese Canadians because the action was "legitimately taken by elected representatives."
As reported in The Globe and Mail, she told him that his statements did not "ring the right bell" for the community. "The government is made up of human beings and they made an error. Why can they not admit it?"
The Tory government of Brian Mulroney had no difficulty apologizing for the actions of Mackenzie King's cabinet four decades earlier. He signed a $12-million compensation package in 1988.
Ms. TAKASHIMA retired from the Ontario College of Art and Design in 1993 and moved back to Vancouver, mainly to be nearer a brother and sister who had also relocated to the West Coast and to avoid the harsh Ontario winters. By then, Ms. TAKASHIMA was very lame and suffered from chronic bronchitis in the cold weather. She wanted a respite from the climate and the slippery sidewalks. Just before she left she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She put off treatment until she had relocated.
Although she reconnected with her siblings and some old Friends in Vancouver, she missed those she had left behind. Writer Joy Kogawa, author of Obasan, the seminal novel about the Japanese-Canadian experience, was visiting Vancouver this summer and went to see her. "She was living in a basement apartment and all of her work was around her, but she was very weak and very lonely. 'Never move for the weather -- you can't leave your Friends,' she told me."
A few weeks ago, Ms. Kogawa heard that Ms. TAKASHIMA was in hospital and went to visit. "She was very peaceful. She wasn't in any pain and she knew what was happening to her, but she seemed okay with it." Ms. Kogawa wrote "with love from all of your Friends in Toronto," on a board in her room. "And the next day I heard she had died."
Shizuye (Shichan) TAKASHIMA was born in Vancouver on June 12, 1928. She died of breast cancer in the palliative-care unit at Vancouver General Hospital on September 21, 2005. She was 77. She is survived by an older sister and brother and by many nieces and nephews.
A memorial service is to be held on Friday evening at the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre, 6 Garamond Court, Don Mills, Ontario

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-09 published
Kay KRITZWISER, Journalist: (1910-2005)
Reporter who started out as a 17-year-old editor of a children's magazine became a fearless feature writer, provocative art critic and 'a kind of Welcome Lady' for The Globe and Mail, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN With files by the late Donn DOWNIE, Friday, December 9, 2005, Page S9
When most women reporters were writing about teas, weddings and the latest in hemlines, Kay KRITZWISER was reporting on immigrants' problems, starving children, battered babies and the status of the working woman. She was among the first women reporters in Canada to compete head-to-head with her male counterparts. The newspapers she worked for were better because of her verve and insight.
"The lady knows how to bat an eyelash, swivel a hip, show off an ankle or arch an eyebrow," the late Richard "Dick" DOYLE said about her in a tribute in which he described her as the "daughter of Cartier, the sister of Givenchy -- the nemesis of Levi Strauss." He went on to deconstruct her devastating brand of seduction and betrayal as an interview technique.
"A rustle of silk announces her arrival, a breathless voice begins the interview, a laugh like Bacall's punctuates the questions. Tiny gasps greet the most mundane of responses to her guileless prodding into the dark recesses of the hapless fellow on the other side of her note pad. How gently she applauds the confession, how sympathetically she receives the acknowledged weakness.... Until the interview appears in print."
Veteran Globe journalist Michael VALPY remembers meeting her in the 1960s. "Kay was an incredibly elegant, warm, sophisticated woman, a female boulevardier with a healthy soupçon of Auntie Mame. She dressed very stylishly. I recall seeing her at events in hat and gloves -- I mean, not decades ago but as a matter of course. She was a rarity in journalism, an intellectual, well-read, an engaging conversationalist. I think of her as sparkling."
None of that famous style belies her success as a fearless feature writer and an engaging and provocative art critic. Art historian David Silcox, now president of Sotheby's Canada, predated Ms. KRITZWISER as an art critic at The Globe. "She was a very, very good reporter, more than a critic, but she was always curious and she loved writing about art and artists. She was somebody who was known and respected and liked by artists, curators and collectors."
Former Globe art critic John Bentley MAYS met her in the newsroom after he was appointed art critic of The Globe in 1980. "I came upon this birdlike lady with sharp clear eyes and a great smile and she said 'I'm Kay KRITZWISER,' he said. "That meant something to me because she was the witness to a generation of Toronto and Canadian artists dominated by Harold Town and the Isaacs Gallery."
She was a great chronicler of that period, he said, as a feature writer who could do wonderful interviews. "She knew the game and the players very well."
Kathleen Alice MULLAN was born in Regina five years after Saskatchewan joined Confederation and while Sir Wilfrid Laurier was prime minister. She was one of seven children of Joseph MULLAN, an Englishman who had served in the Boer War before immigrating to Canada, and his wife Lucy.
Ms. KRITZWISER began writing as a teenager, submitting articles to The Torchbearers Magazine, a supplement designed to encourage young writers that was part of the Regina Leader-Post's Saturday edition. After taking a secretarial course, she worked for an insurance company before being appointed, at the age of 17, the editor of the Leader-Post's young people's magazine.
She became a full-time reporter, but quit in 1933 to marry Harold H. KRITZWISER, a reporter and editorial writer at the paper. He was in his early 40s when he died of a heart attack in 1946, leaving Ms. KRITZWISER with a six-year-old son, David Erik to raise.
She went back to the Leader-Post as an editorial writer and wrote K.M.K.'s column three times a week. It appeared on the editorial page and was "about anything and everything" that caught her fancy, but usually about social and current affairs, according to her son, who is now a freelance writer in Vancouver. She was hired away by The Globe and Mail as a feature writer in 1956.
The late Oakley DALGLEISH was editor of the newspaper at the time, but her real mentor was the late Dick DOYLE, who was the first managing editor of the Weekly, The Globe magazine that began publication on May 4, 1957.
In his memoirs, Hurley-Burly, Mr. DOYLE recalled assigning her to write "the human side" of a big series on immigration. She was "a kind of Welcome Lady who gave special attention to the day-by-day problems of the newcomers and their old Canadian neighbours, the resident White, Anglo-Saxon, Protestants who didn't always know what to expect of the recent arrivals," Mr. DOYLE wrote. He said her major impact came, though, with a series on child welfare, "The One Who Never Grew Up."
Ms. KRITZWISER had a distinctive style that defied the conventional rules of daily journalism. She spurned the "who, what, where, when and how" first paragraph, preferring instead a scene-setter or an anecdote that would get the reader into the story. The essential facts would still be there, but the reader was permitted to swallow them in small gulps while she told her story.
"When Shirley Ann Barnhardt, in the first few weeks of her life, went to live in one of the Sunset cabins on Highway 17, a mile west of the town of Pembroke in Renfrew County, there were still a few stubborn roses blooming among the painted jockeys and ornamental birds in the circular garden," she wrote in a classic example of her style. "The hills of the upper Ottawa Valley were a backdrop for the white frame cabin and not too far away ran the Ottawa River. It promised to be a fine place to put out a baby's pram come the next summer."
She followed up that painterly opening with a zinger of a second paragraph: "When Shirley Ann Barnhardt died on January 27 in the seventh month of her life of malnutrition, dehydration and pneumonia, an icy wind blew in a broken window of the squalid cabin and the rose bushes scraped in the wind above the snow. A dog sniffed at frozen garbage outside the door. Inside, the cold air blowing in from the river could not clear the smell."
In his analysis, Mr. DOYLE wrote that the "poignancy of the scene set the stage for a ruthless examination of society's failure to provide even the flimsiest protection for the helpless."
The subjects of many of Ms. KRITZWISER's stories are still in the headlines today. In 1959, when credit cards were a new and a largely unfamiliar phenomenon, she wrote that they would eventually replace cash. In 1961, she spotted Metro Toronto's urban sprawl and the problems it created for the commuter. She noted, as others are still noting, that commuters are wedded to their cars and will take them to work regardless of parking costs and inconvenience.
Although much of her work appeared in the old Globe magazine, she was frequently assigned to cover Royal tours when they were regarded as big news by Canadian newspapers. She was also often asked to interview visiting celebrities. The list included Edward G. Robinson, Liberace, Cary Grant, Truman Capote, Elvis Presley and Zsa Zsa Gabor. Her byline also appeared on book and movie reviews.
She was best known in the latter part of her career as an art critic, a position for which she had no formal training. When she was offered the job, after The Globe's art critic, Pearl McCARTHY, died in 1965, she said, "I don't know anything about art," according to her son. "Well, you can learn," her son remembers Mr. DOYLE retorting.
She held the post for a decade until she retired in 1975. Turning 65 didn't mean she stopped working. She went to India, China, and South America, either privately or on assignment as a travel writer, for The Globe and other outlets. As well, she wrote extensively about the arts, read widely and kept up with a wide circle of Friends, until illness finally slowed her down in her 90s.
Kay KRITZWISER was born in Regina, Saskatchewan., on February 25, 1910. She died in Toronto yesterday of cancer. She was 95. She leaves her son David and his wife. A memorial service is being planned in Toronto.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-10 published
KRITZWISER, Kay -- I Remember
By Karen YORK, Saturday, December 10, 2005, Page S9
Karen YORK, former Globe and Mail arts editor, also writes about Kay KRITZWISER:
At a time when journalists seemed to pride themselves on unconventional (read sloppy) attire, Kay was always impeccably turned out: matching coat and hat, gloves (usually), rarely pants (if ever), but always with a distinctive, rakish little thumb-your-nose-at-convention detail such as an outrageous brooch, an eye-catching colourful scarf, or a purse that looked more like a sculpture than a functional object. And always with bright lipstick that was matched only by the sharp sparkle in her eyes. She went to the galleries tirelessly, always determined to catch the work of the young up-and-comers as well as established artists. She always had an encouraging word, but never pulled her punches in her reviews, which were balanced and sensible and assumed the reader had some smarts. She could be quite scathing, but never nasty. She didn't condescend to either her readers or the artists.
One of my most treasured little "objets" is a carved wooden head of a cherub that Kay brought back for me from one of her trips to Europe. It is a memento of a kind and generous soul. Today, I treasure it even more.
A memorial service for Kay KRITZWISER will be held at 2 p.m. on December 19 at The Arts and Letters Club, 14 Elm Street, Toronto.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-10 published
KRITZWISER, Kay -- I Remember
By Lyman POTTS, Saturday, December 10, 2005 Page, S9
Burlington, Ontario, -- Former broadcaster Lyman POTTS of Burlington, Ontario, writes about Kay KRITZWISER, whose obituary appeared yesterday.
Six years younger than Kay, I was one of the avid readers of the Torchbearers Magazine. So was my wife-to-be, Micky BOLE, who contributed poetry and was encouraged by Kay and became a "torchbearer." (There were "torchbearers" from as far away as Australia.) In my teens, while haunting the halls, press room, editorial room and radio station in the Regina Leader-Post building, I got to know Kay and her husband, Harold. When I was moved to the Toronto head office of Standard Broadcasting in 1963, after launching the Canadian Talent Library the previous year, Kay gave me a nice review in The Globe and Mail.
Kay was a long-time friend of Nancy (GRAHAM) CALDWELL -- another Regina girl -- who married Spence CALDWELL, founder of the CTV television network. When he sold CTV to the participating stations, Spence and Nancy retired to a farm near Bolton, Ontario One night, Kay was coming to join the CALDWELLs for dinner. Spence picked her up at a bus stop near the farm. On their way to the farm, a tractor-trailer pulled out from a coffee shop and Spence crashed into it. Spence was killed, but Kay survived. Kay and Nancy remained close and often travelled together.
I lost track of Kay when Nancy went to live with a relative in Edmonton and died there. My wife and I often wondered what had become of Kay, and we are saddened to hear of her passing.
A memorial service for Kay KRITZWISER will be held at 2 p.m. on December 19 at The Arts and Letters Club, 14 Elm Street, Toronto.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-14 published
KRITZWISER, Kay -- I Remember
By Jean JOHNSON, Wednesday, December 14, 2005, Page S9
Jean JOHNSON of Harbourfront Centre Craft Projects in Toronto writes about Kay KRITZWISER, whose obituary appeared on December We became Friends in the 1970s when I was the curator of the Merton Gallery in Toronto and Kay came to review our exhibitions. Her interest was open and sincere, never superficial, but always positive, as if she were seeing them for the first time.
Kay was always dressed immaculately, creatively and confidently with a courageous use of warm colour and style that was always in good taste. No matter where she was, in the country, the city or the jungle, she looked fabulous. Until the very end, she had to have "her face on" before she could converse.
Kay and I travelled together often and I learned that she was a natural flirt. One Christmas in the 1980s, we visited Caracas. We flew down to Angel Falls for New Year's Eve, stayed in a jungle hut and joined a large group of Japanese tourists for dinner in a large, straw-roofed dining room. While we boated down the Caroni River, she found time to flirt with the Guardia Nacional while enjoying the jungle on either side.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-15 published
KRITZWISER, Kay -- I Remember
By Erika RITTER, Thursday, December 15, 2005, Page S9
Toronto writer and broadcaster Erika RITTER writes about Kay KRITZWISER, whose obituary ran on December 9.
In Regina back in the 1950s, Kay KRITZWISER was an elegant young widow who worked for the Leader-Post, while raising a small son on her own. That would have been enough for most women -- or men. But Kay also set herself the challenge of starting up a children's theatre. My mother made sure my brother and I got to see those shows. But it's Kay I credit -- or blame -- for leading me, however unintentionally, toward a life in the theatre. In a parochial Prairie city of half a century ago, she opened up a world of dramatic possibility for hundreds of suggestible kids.
My mother took me and my brother to see those plays. She had worshipped Kay ever since the early 1930s, when the two women met at the Leader-Post. Kay, still a teenager herself, edited a supplement to showcase the work of adolescent authors. As one of those young writers, my mother never forgot Kay's kindness, nor her editorial gifts -- nor her outstanding chic.
Later, Kay left Regina for a job down east at The Globe and Mail. After moving to Toronto myself many years later, Irenewed the contact -- initially for my mother's sake, but ultimately for my own.
In her Davisville Avenue apartment, hung with wonderful art, Kay would demand, "Ideas! I'm hungry to hear some fresh ideas!" Mindful of all that she'd given my mother and me back in Regina, I always did my best to oblige her.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-21 published
KRITZWISER, Kay -- I Remember
By Frances GAGE, Wednesday, December 21, 2005, Page S7
Sculptor Frances GAGE also writes about Kay KRITZWISER.
What a wonderful memory I have of Kay. She covered the construction and shipping of my statue Discovery of the Hands for what is now Fanshawe College in London, Ontario To make it I had to rent a now-razed coach house at Davenport and Dupont in Toronto. My biggest surprise came when it was safely loaded on to Robert FLAHERTY's flat bed, on it's way to London, and I saw tears in her eyes. She was a great mix of tough and sweet.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-21 published
KRITZWISER, Kay -- I Remember
By Rudy BIES, Wednesday, December 21, 2005, Page S7
Mississauga, Ontario -- Rudy BIES of Mississauga, Ontario, writes about Kay KRITZWISER, whose obituary appeared on December 9.
For many years, we had enjoyed only intermittent telephone contact regarding Arthur Shilling, a favourite artist. In 1986, he died and I phoned Kay with the news and she finally asked to meet me. I went to her apartment and she greeted me with fresh-baked muffins and tea and showed me a log of phone calls where she had kept notes on 10 years of our conversations. Later, we visited Arthur Shilling's studio together. For many years after that, my wife Gloria and I accompanied Kay to art shows and other events with our young family in tow.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-22 published
KRITZWISER, Kay -- I Remember
By Walter GRAY/GREY, Thursday, December 22, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- Walter GRAY/GREY of Toronto writes about Kay KRITZWISER, whose obituary appeared on December 9.
I knew her as a Globe and Mail colleague and as a dear friend, party playmate and artiste. With her early training at the Regina Little Theatre, she treasured the memory of her dance with a ruby jewel in her navel before an enthusiastic Regina audience as a particular artistic triumph. At office parties, she vied with beloved columnist Lotta DEMPSEY, a frustrated tap dancer who did an energetic Shuffle off to Buffalo. My family recalls Kay's table-top performance of her Duck Lake Ballet for the benefit of then Mr. Canada, John Fisher. She reached artistic heights at the family chalet at Blue Mountain -- with me at the piano, my nephew on the drums -- doing a Gypsy Rose Lee striptease -- right down to her body stocking. She had great legs.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-28 published
KRITZWISER, Kay -- I Remember
By Shirley ENDICOTT, Wednesday, December 28, 2005, Page S7
Shirley ENDICOTT of Toronto writes about Kay KRITZWISER, whose obituary appeared on December 9.
Kay was my neighbour in the dining room at the retirement centre where I have been living for 2½ years. About six weeks before she died, I went to visit her in palliative care. "I used to read poetry at night to get myself to sleep," she said. I offered to read aloud to her from her bedside collection of 1,500 poems. I began with ones she had marked. She was thrilled. Not only did she recite some of the words with me, she lifted up her arms and waved them as though to conduct me through the rhythm of the lines. I usually have trouble speaking loudly enough for people to hear, but this response enabled my voice to be strong and have lots of expression.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRITZWISER - All Categories in OGSPI

KRIVONOSOV o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-01 published
KRIVONOSOV, Walentyna
At Versa Care Nursing Home on Tuesday, November 29, 2005. Walentyna KRIVONOSOV, in her 82nd year. Beloved wife of Alex and dear mother of Liz and her husband John KENNY. " Lena" was kind and generous of spirit to the end. Friends will be received at the Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Road (west of Victoria Park Avenue), Toronto (416-698-2861) on Friday, December 2, 2005 from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. Cremation to follow.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRIVONOSOV - All Categories in OGSPI

KRIVY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-07 published
STATE, Albert
Albert passed away suddenly on February 28, 2005, in his 97th year. Beloved husband for 69 years of Millie, dearly loved father of Rochelle KRIVY (Boris), Mark and Jay (Diana). Greatly missed by grandchildren and great-grandchildren, sister Rose GERRARD and brother Dr. David STATE. Sadly predeceased by brother Jack and grand_son Colin KRIVY. Albert was an accomplished and respected educator and a leader in his community in Hamilton for 58 years. Donations in his memory will be welcomed and may be made to the State Youth Library, c/o Temple Anshe Sholom, 215 Cline Avenue North, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4A1. Phone 905-528-0121.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRIVY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-25 published
VAN WATTEGHEM, Richard Alan (1956-2005)
Dick VAN WATTEGHEM, after a courageous battle, passed away on June 22, 2005. Dick was born on August 17th, 1956 in Chatham, Ontario, graduated with a B.A.A. - Interior Design from Ryerson in 1979. Dick moved to Calgary in 1990, to form Martens/VanWatteghem Design Consultants Ltd., with Sharon MARTENS, but due to illness, stepped away from the business in 1995. Dick brought his great sense of style, his creative talent, and his unique, sweet sense of humour to everyone he met. Leaving to mourn his loss is his mother Vi VAN WATTEGHEM of Chatham, his brother Frank (Cathy) of Windsor, his niece Shannon (Randy LEVASSEUR) and nephew Trevor (Karen KENNY) and their children Tommy, Madeline and Mia. Dick was predeceased by his father Frank in 1973, his great friend and colleague Peter RICE in 1994 and his little 'Angel' Dillon in 2004. Dick will also be missed but will live on in the hearts of his extended family - Lynn McGREGOR from Toronto and from Calgary - Sharon MARTENS and Robert HLADY, Pat LARSON, Wendy ARNETT, Jeff KAPLER, Britt SIMMONS, Wendy Ovaris ANDERSON and Gary KRIVY. Memorial tributes may be made to Beswick House (c/o The Sharp Foundation, Suite 530, #2, 3012 - 17 Avenue S.E., Calgary, T2A 0P9); in thanks for the caring attention Dick received.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRIVY - All Categories in OGSPI

KRIZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-15 published
KRESS, Keith Grant
Keith passed away at age 61, on Wednesday, September 14th, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital after a brief battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Lorraine (BERTOL.) Loving and devoted father of daughter Karen and son Scott and his wife Susan. Proud grandfather to Amy and Colin. Survived by his loving sister Diane and her husband John O'CONNOR and their children Kelly, Carolyn, Suzanne and families. Dear son-in-law of Lydia and Nello BERTOL and brother-in-law to Diane HISCOX, Loretta BERTOL, Zora KRIZ and Anita SAUNDERS and their families. Keith appreciated the support of his Friends during his illness. Friends may call on Saturday, September 17th, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Funeral service will be held at the Chapel on Sunday September 18th, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice.
Condolences www.rskane.ca. R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRIZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-15 published
KRESS, Keith Grant
Keith passed away at age 61, on Wednesday, September 14th, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital after a brief battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Lorraine (BERTOL.) Loving and devoted father of daughter Karen and son Scott and his wife Susan. Proud grandfather to Amy and Colin. Survived by his loving sister Diane and her husband John O'CONNOR and their children Kelly, Carolyn, Suzanne and families. Dear son-in-law of Lydia and Nello BERTOL and brother-in-law to Diane HISCOX, Loretta BERTOL, Zora KRIZ and Anita SAUNDERS and their families. Keith appreciated the support of his Friends during his illness. Friends may call on Saturday, September 17th, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Funeral service will be held at the Chapel on Sunday, September 18th, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Condolences www.rskane.ca.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRIZ - All Categories in OGSPI

KRIZMANCIC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-11 published
HURREN, Mona (formerly RANSOM, née FERRIER)
Gone to be with her Lord on Wednesday, August 10, 2005 at The William Osler Health Centre. Mona HURREN (RANSOM) (née FERRIER), beloved wife of the late Tony RANSOM and Douglas HURREN. Loving mother of Judy Ann and her husband Ron CLAYTON, Joan Marie and her husband Tom KRIZMANCIC and Sharon TONI. Sadly missed by her grandchildren Joe and Angela PARKS, Daniel KRIZMANCIC, Brenda and Wayne SCHREIBER and Michael, Jason and Leanne BREESE and her great-granddaughter Tonya TONI. Dear sister of Doreen SCOTT, and the late Lois WHITE/WHYTE and Glenn FERRIER. Also missed by her longtime friend Aunt Cressy. Friends may call at The Scott Funeral Home "Brampton Chapel", 289 Main St. N., Brampton (905-451-1100) on Friday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held on Saturday, August 13, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. in The Heart Lake United Church, 85 Sandalwood Pkwy. Private interment to take place in Erin Cemetery. Friends are invited to sign the book of condolences at www.obituariestoday.com.

  K... Names     KR... Names     KRI... Names     Welcome Home

KRIZMANCIC - All Categories in OGSPI