KRENZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-17 published
KRENZ, Kathleen DeWitt (formerly PHILLIPS, née COLEMAN)
Daughter of A.B. COLEMAN and Samena DeWitt COLEMAN of Burlington, Ontario, life partner for 64 years to F.H. Kim KRENZ of Lakefield, Ontario; Aunt Kate, Great Aunt Kate, and Great, Great Aunt Kate to the Baines's, the Coburns, the Harts, the Sissons', the Jefferys, the Fullertons, the Sturgesses, the McCauleys and their offspring of the extended COLEMAN family in Canada. Kate was predeceased by an earlier husband, Frederick G.C. PHILLIPS, in 1937. Kate left this earth on January 15, 2005, four days after her 92nd birthday, with her beloved Kim at her bedside, at the Peterborough Regional Health Centre. She is sorely missed by her sister Elizabeth McCAULEY of Owen Sound, her sister-in-law Margaret Krenz ST. CLAIR of Ashland, Oregon, brother-in-law George SCHOTCH of Vancouver, and by the Schotches of Halifax, by "adopted daughter" Caroline PEARSON and family of Canton, New York, by Felecia STITCHER of Surprise, Arizona, and by all whose lives she touched during a lifetime spent in Canada, Scotland, and Italy. Her two years with Kim in Italy are recorded in her charming book "Our Love Affair With Italy." Her Italian Friends have remained Friends throughout her life. Kate was a beautiful woman, vivacious and full of fun, and was a pillar of goodness, with consideration and concern for everyone she met. With no children of her own, she enriched the lives of many children, and the lives of their parents. Cremation is to be managed by the Hendren Funeral Home of Lakefield. A service of remembrance will be held in Saint John's Anglican Church, Lakefield on Wednesday, January 19th, 2005 at 11: 00 am. The interment of her ashes and a memorial service celebrating her life will be held at Saint John's this coming spring at a date to be announced. Memorial donations may be made to the Lakefield Public Library as expressions of sympathy. Friends may send condolences or make donations at www.hendrenfuneralhome.com

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KREPLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-23 published
Woman dies in river gorge after being swept away
By Oliver MOORE, Saturday, July 23, 2005, Page A9
A woman has died after being separated from an inner tube while playing in the waters of a provincial park near Orangeville.
Ontario Provincial Police said yesterday that a 39-year-old woman was swept over the Cataract Falls, part of Forks of the Credit Provincial Park.
The Ontario Provincial Police said that the woman was caught in a strong current and, unable to avoid the gorge, fell about 12 metres.
According to police, relatives of Lisa KREPLIN made repeated attempts to rescue her, but were unable to save her life.

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KREPLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-23 published
KREPLIN- ONORATI, Lisa Michelle
At Headwaters Health Care Centre, Orangeville, on Thursday, July 21, 2005, Lisa Michelle KREPLIN- ONORATI, Bolton, beloved wife of Frank ONORATI. Dear mother of Michelle. Loving sister of Mark KREPLIN and his family and Karen KREPLIN. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213) Monday afternoon 2-4 and evening 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass will be held in Holy Family Roman Catholic Church, 60 Allan Drive, Bolton on Tuesday morning, July 26 at 10 o'clock. Interment Beechwood Cemetery, Concord. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 555 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 1X8. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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KRESLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-26 published
KRESLIN, Ludvik
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved Ludvik at Mt. Sinai Hospital on September 24, 2005. Cherished husband of Mary. Devoted father of Josey and her husband Jay TELES and Steve and his wife Eleanor. Loving grandfather of Steven, Colin, Erica, Alec, Johnathan, Samantha, Shane, Tiffaney and Caleigh. Ludvik will be sadly missed and fondly remembered by all his Friends and family in Canada and abroad. Friends will be received at the Cardinal Funeral Home "Earle Elliott Chapel" (715 Dovercourt Road, Ossington Subway - Delaware Exit) on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 at 11 a.m. in Our Lady Help of Christians Church (611 Manning Avenue). Interment in Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery to follow. In loving memory of Ludvik donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences at www.cardinalfuneralhomes.com

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KRESS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-03 published
LEDGLEY, Philip Alfred
Peacefully at Craigholme Gardens Nursing Home, Ailsa Craig on Monday, January 31st, 2005, Philip Alfred LEDGLEY of London (formerly Lambeth) in his 96th year. Predeceased by his wife Mary, 2000 sons Lorne and Donald and son-in-law Ernest McINTYRE. He is survived by daughter Connie McINTYRE of Brampton and sons David (Carolyn) and Philip Jr. of London. He will be lovingly and sadly missed by his youngest child Carleen FULLMAN (Robert KRESS) of London. He is also survived by fourteen grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. At his own request a private service was held on Wednesday, February 2, 2005 with interment at Forest Lawn Cemetery. Arrangements were entrusted to McFarlane and Roberts Funeral Home, 2240 Wharncliffe Road South, Lambeth, (652-2020) In celebration of Philips memory a contribution to the charity of your choice would be appreciated. Please sign the family book of condolences at www.obituariestoday.com

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KRESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-15 published
KRESS, Keith Grant
Keith passed away at age 61, on Wednesday, September 14th, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital after a brief battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Lorraine (BERTOL.) Loving and devoted father of daughter Karen and son Scott and his wife Susan. Proud grandfather to Amy and Colin. Survived by his loving sister Diane and her husband John O'CONNOR and their children Kelly, Carolyn, Suzanne and families. Dear son-in-law of Lydia and Nello BERTOL and brother-in-law to Diane HISCOX, Loretta BERTOL, Zora KRIZ and Anita SAUNDERS and their families. Keith appreciated the support of his Friends during his illness. Friends may call on Saturday, September 17th, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Funeral service will be held at the Chapel on Sunday September 18th, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice.
Condolences www.rskane.ca. R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

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KRESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-10 published
KRESS, Arnold
Peacefully in Richmond Hill at York Central Hospital on January 7, 2005. Born in Tartü, Estonia, on December 27, 1917, Arnold leaves his loving wife Silva and his only child Lysa (Stephen). He loved his grand_sons and will be missed by Alexander and Karl (both Tappin). Arnold will be sadly missed also by his relatives and Friends in Estonia. Cremation and private family service has been held. In Arnold's memory, donations to the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 16586 Woodbine Avenue, R.R.#3, Newmarket, Ontario L3Y 4W1 or The Salvation Army, The Salvation Army Estates Section, 2 Overlea Boulevard, Toronto, Ontario M4H 1P4, would be greatly appreciated.

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KRESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-15 published
KRESS, Keith Grant
Keith passed away at age 61, on Wednesday, September 14th, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital after a brief battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Lorraine (BERTOL.) Loving and devoted father of daughter Karen and son Scott and his wife Susan. Proud grandfather to Amy and Colin. Survived by his loving sister Diane and her husband John O'CONNOR and their children Kelly, Carolyn, Suzanne and families. Dear son-in-law of Lydia and Nello BERTOL and brother-in-law to Diane HISCOX, Loretta BERTOL, Zora KRIZ and Anita SAUNDERS and their families. Keith appreciated the support of his Friends during his illness. Friends may call on Saturday, September 17th, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Funeral service will be held at the Chapel on Sunday, September 18th, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Condolences www.rskane.ca.

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KRESTELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-03 published
STONE, Jerome " Jerry"
It is with great sadness the family announces the death of Jerome G. STONE. Beloved husband of the late Pearl N. STONE. Predeceased by four brothers. Loving father and father-in-law of Esther and Sam SARICK, Judi and Herb SPORN, and Marcia KRESTELL and Gord MESLIN. Loved by grandchildren Lila SARICK and Rabbi Chezi ZIONCE, Madeleine SARICK and Mark FINKELSTEIN, Jordan and Shereen SARICK, Howard COLT, Jeff and Vivian COLT, Lisa COLT, Michael and Elana KRESTELL, Stacey KRESTELL- GOODMAN and Andy GOODMAN, Stuart KRESTELL, and adored great grandfather of 15. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, June 5, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. Interment Beth David B'Nai Israel Beth Am section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 80 Antibes Drive #1407. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Jerome G. Stone Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324 or Shriners Hospital For Children, 416-633-6317.

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KRESTELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-04 published
STONE, Jerome G. " Jerry"
It is with great sadness the family announces the death of Jerome G. STONE. Beloved husband of the late Pearl N. STONE. Predeceased by four brothers. Loving father and father-in-law of Esther and Sam SARICK, Judi and Herb SPORN, and Marcia KRESTELL and Gord MESLIN. Loved by grandchildren Lila SARICK and Rabbi Chezi ZIONCE, Madeleine SARICK and Mark FINKELSTEIN, Jordan and Shereen SARICK, Howard COLT, Jeff and Vivian COLT, Lisa COLT, Michael and Elana KRESTELL, Stacey Krestell GOODMAN and Andy GOODMAN, Stuart KRESTELL, and adored great grandfather of 15. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, June 5, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. Interment Beth David B'Nai Israel Beth Am section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 80 Antibes Drive #1407. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Jerome G. Stone Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416780-0324 or Shriners Hospital For Children, 416-633-6317.

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KRESTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-16 published
MICKIEWICZ, Antoni
Passed away, at Allendale Nursing Home, Milton, on Saturday, October 15, 2005, in his 95th year. Beloved husband of the late Janina. Dear father of the late Maria, and dear grandfather of George and Kimberly McCONNELL. Beloved uncle and godfather of Barbara O'CONNOR and uncle of Irene KRESTON. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Funeral Home, 436 Roncesvalles Ave. (at Howard Park), from 6-8 p.m. Monday with Prayers at 6: 00 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at St. Casimir's Church, 156 Roncesvalles Ave., on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 at 9: 00 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. For those who wish, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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KRETSCH o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-10-20 published
McINTEE, Ruby Jean (née KIRKWOOD)
Peacefully, at her home, in Owen Sound, on Wednesday morning, October 19th, 2005 in her 80th year. Ruby Jean McINTEE (née KIRKWOOD,) the beloved wife of the late (Bernie) Bernard Patrick McINTEE. Loved mother of Gary, of Kemble and Brenda, of Owen Sound. Loving grandmother of Vanessa. Dear sister of Bernice HORNE, Stewart KIRKWOOD and his wife, Bernice; sister-in-law of Wilfred McINTEE and Christine STEVENS, Bernice and Edward KRETSCH. Fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her brother, Lawrence and three sisters, Viola URBINSKY, Grace GARVIE and Dorothy HARDY. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home, on Thursday from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held at the funeral home on Friday afternoon, at 1: 00 p.m. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. Pastor Mary TURNER officiating. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.
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KRETZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-19 published
METTLER, Ann Philomena (née KRETZ)
Surrounded by her family Ann passed away peacefully on Sunday April 17, 2005, at her home, at Henley House, in her 94th year. Beloved wife of the late Conrad METTLER (2003) and grandmother of the late Sabrina FORD (2005.) Loving mother of Mary METTLER, C.S.J., Bob (Dolly,) Margaret (Brian) FORD, Joan SIM (Greg HALL) and Jim METTLER. Cherished grandmother of Stephen (Lynn) and Colin SIM, Kathryn, Rachel, Sarah, David and Christine METTLER. Great grandmother of Brad and Jeff COUTU. Loving sister of Alois (Norma), Tony (Kitty), Frank (Betty), Alphonse (Margaret), Agnes, Bert, John and Theresa (Hartley) and sister in- law of Helen METTLER. Dear aunt of many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her brothers John, Joe, Conrad, Walther, and her sister Mary FLORENTINA. Mom's life will be celebrated during our visitation at the George Darte Funeral Home, 585 Carlton St. St. Catharines on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Liturgy will be celebrated in St. Alfred's Church on Thursday at 11: 00 a.m. Rite of committal in Victoria Lawn Cemetery. Vigil prayers will be held in the funeral home on Wednesday at 7: 30 p.m. Memorial remembrances to the Niagara Peninsula Children's Centre or a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. Special thanks to Mom's devoted brothers and sisters for their daily visits and loving support, and to the exceptional, caring staff of the 2nd floor Centennial Wing of the Henley House. On-Line Guest Book - www.dartefuneralhome.com

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KRETZSCHMAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-18 published
KRETZSCHMAR, Edith
Suddenly and peacefully at her home, on Saturday, January 15, 2005, in her 85th year. Loving wife of the late Kurt (1986). Dearest mother of Ralph and his wife Myrna, John and Bruce. Edith was a loving grandmother and will be dearly missed. A funeral service will be held on Tuesday, January 18, 2005 at 11 a.m. at Saint Johns Dixie Cemetery Chapel, 737 Dundas St. East, Mississauga (Dundas and Cawthra). Burial to follow at Saint Johns Dixie Cemetery.

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KREUGER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-09-07 published
KREUGER, Lane
Peacefully, at the Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound, on Thursday, September 1st, 2005. Lane Christian KREUGER, the loved son of Travis and his wife, Miranda. Loved brother of Clay. Dear grand_son of Larry KREUGER and his wife, Joan; and his late wife, Edith, Carol and her husband, John REID, Howie WEIR and his wife, Gloria. Lovingly remembered by his aunts, uncles and cousins. A private graveside service was held on Tuesday at the Hanover Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.
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KREUGER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-07 published
GAUDIER, Louis H.J.
At the Woodstock General Hospital on Tuesday, December 6, 2005. Louis H.J. GAUDIER of Woodstock, formerly of Woodingford Lodge and Park Place Retirement Centre in his 93rd year. Beloved husband of Jessie E. GAUDIER (née MASTERS) for over 67 years. Dear father of Louis GAUDIER and his wife Judy of Fonthill, Ruth BATTLER and her husband Ted of R.R.#4, Woodstock, Elaine SMITH and her husband Robert of Port Burwell, Harry GAUDIER and his wife Sandy of Cobourg, Donald GAUDIER and his wife Jenny of Woodstock. Loved grandfather of nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Harry KREUGER of Drumbo, Agnes SMART of Woodstock, Hazel RABE of Drumbo and brother-in-law of Jean LEWIS, Gladys SYMONS and Marjory COUCH all of Woodstock. Predeceased by his parents Louisa KREUGER (1993) and Louis GAUDIER and by his grand_son James BATTLER. Louis drove for Schell Transport and Overland Express, owned and operated "Lou's Billiards", drove the "Bookmobile" and retired from the Woodstock Public Library (1977), and was a long time member of Dundas St. United Church, Woodstock. Friends may call at the R.D. Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock, 539-0004 on Thursday, December 8, 2005 from 2: 30-4:30 and 7-9 p.m., where the complete funeral service will be held on Friday at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend John BROWN and Reverend Glen MacPHERSON officiating. Interment later in the Hillview Cemetery. Contributions to the Dundas St. United Church Memorial Fund or the Woodstock General Hospital Building Fund would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com

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KREUTNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-20 published
SMITH, Donald Arthur (1931-2005)
Born in Kitchener on February 27, 1931, Don was a determined and highly motivated individual. First a young Sea Cadet, then following High School at K.C.I. a construction working teenager trying to help ends meet at home. He married Irene VOITEL in 1950, and later landed a job with the H. Boehmer Co. where over a period of 20 years he worked his way from Labourer to President. A true businessman he was instrumental in charting the company successfully through the 1960's. Several years later he accepted a position with his affiliate, Dufferin Concrete in Toronto. Life was not without its challenges for Don and one of them was in 1984 when he lost his first wife Irene at a young age, to cancer. But he pressed on, and made the decision to move to Toronto where he was working. Three years later he met and married his second wife Silvia TRUILLIO. He retired from Dufferin Concrete in 1997, but he did not retire from life. He then purchased a Flower and Gift Shop in Mississauga with his wife, which was his joy and is a thriving business today. Don was a faithful and enthusiastic member of the New Apostolic Church for over half a century, being sealed with his parents in 1946. As a young man he happily served as District Youth Leader and District Choir Leader for many, many years, of which he had the fondest memories. Later in life when asked to help with the overseas missionary work in Sri Lanka and Kenya he jumped at the opportunity, stating it was the most exciting adventure he ever had. Throughout his 74 years Don not only had the joy of being a friend, but also of having true and caring Friends for which he was very thankful. He was a soul with a strong, enduring, unshakable faith, and a man of character, determination, charisma and an endearing sense of humour. Husband, father, grandfather, teacher, friend, missionary and businessman. Lots of big empty spaces he has left behind. We are thankful for the blessing he was for us. Beloved husband of Silvia TRUILLIO for 18 years, and Irene VOITEL for 34 years. Loving father to Janice and her husband Ron, Jennifer and her husband Richard, Maureen and her husband Misak, Anna and her husband Ray. Caring 'Papa' to Heidi, Joanna and her husband Ryan, Colin, Andrea, Julia, Christie, Nicholas, Natalie, Deomie and Nadia and one great-grand_son Jeramy. Also lovingly remembered by Graciella BAEZ. He is predeceased by his parents Lily Ann DOBBIE (1972) and Arthur SMITH (1974,) his sister Delores McCLEMENTS (1974) and his wife Irene. Friends are invited to share their memories of Don and his family at the Ratz-Bechtel Funeral Home, 621 King St. W., Kitchener on Thursday 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. A service to celebrate his life and faith will be held at the New Apostolic Church, 160 Margaret Ave., Kitchener on Friday 7: 00 p.m. officiated by Apostle Ken KREUTNER. Donations may be made to the New Apostolic Foreign Extension Fund. In a note he left to his family he stated it's not the years in your life, but the life in your years. Mine has been tremendous! Special thanks to the Health Care Professionals at Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga and to Peel Hospice. On eagles wings soars high his soul, His faith now sight, he's reached the goal. Ratz-Bechtel Funeral Home 519-745-9495

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KREUTZMANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-14 published
BAUER, Lina
Passed away on Monday, June 13th, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Beloved wife of the late Otto. Loving mother of Harro, Manfred and Ralph (Monique). Adored Oma of Garrett. Survived by her sister Herta KREUTZMANN, Ilse REIM, Martha (Arthur) LOEWEN, Helga WOLSKE and her brother Norbert (Erna) HENKELMANN. Predeceased by her sisters Aurelie KREBS and Ingrid REITZE. Friends may call at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston on Wednesday from 3-7 p.m. Funeral Service to be held at German Church of God, 9 McArthur Street, Etobicoke on Thursday, June 16, 2005 at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Riverside Cemetery.

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KREUZER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-11 published
KREUZER, Marylou (née GRAHAM)
Peacefully with her family by her side at her home on Thursday, November 10th, 2005. Marylou KREUZER (née GRAHAM) of Owen Sound in her 64th year. Wife of the late Hans KREUZER. Dear mother of John KREUZER and his wife Kathleen of Owen Sound, Mike KREUZER and his wife Karen of Annan and Liz and her husband Kevin BUMSTEAD of Owen Sound. Lovingly remembered by seven grandchildren. Sister of Cathryn THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Owen Sound, Karen and her husband Charles BOWDER of St. Catharines and John GRAHAM and his wife Linda of Owen Sound. A private family service has been held at Greenwood Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, the family would appreciate memorial donations to the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation or the charity of your choice, which may be placed through the Tannahill Funeral Home, 376-3710. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.tannahill.com
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KREUZER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-12 published
KREUZER, Marylou (née GRAHAM)
Peacefully with her family by her side at her home on Thursday, November 10th, 2005. Marylou KREUZER (née GRAHAM) of Owen Sound in her 64th year. Wife of the late Hans KREUZER. Dear mother of John KREUZER and his wife Kathleen of Owen Sound, Mike KREUZER and his wife Karen of Annan and Liz and her husband Kevin BUMSTEAD of Owen Sound. Lovingly remembered by seven grandchildren. Sister of Cathryn THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Owen Sound, Karen and her husband Charles BOWDER of St. Catharines and John GRAHAM and his wife Linda of Owen Sound. A private family service has been held at Greenwood Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, the family would appreciate memorial donations to the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation or the charity of your choice, which may be placed through the Tannahill Funeral Home, 376-3710. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.tannahill.com

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KREVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-30 published
Samuel GRANGE, Jurist (1920-2005)
Best known for heading the royal commission into the deaths of 24 babies at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, he declined to lay blame and stoically endured any criticism
By Oliver MOORE, Tuesday, August 30, 2005, Page S11
After falling quite by chance into the legal profession, Samuel GRANGE was at the centre of a series of key decisions and headed the controversial inquiry which determined that babies had been murdered at the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children.
"He played an enormous role... he should be remembered because of his contribution," said Horace KREVER, another retired judge who oversaw a commission, in his case a probe of the tainted-blood scandal. "He was everything a judge should be: learned, wise, compassionate, patient and extraordinarily literate."
Judge GRANGE was on the bench at the Ontario Court of Appeal when it ruled the rape-shield law constitutional and when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation miniseries The Valour and the Horror was ruled not to have libelled Canadian airmen. He also backed the decision by that court which allowed the custodial parent in a divorced couple to move the child far away from the former spouse.
But Judge GRANGE was most prominently in the public eye when he headed the royal commission into the deaths at the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children. The probe was called after a series of deaths rocked the hospital, a leading pediatrics institution. From the summer of 1980 to the spring of 1981, the death toll on the hospital's cardiac ward was 625 per cent higher than the previous three nine-month periods.
After 191 days of testimony over three years, Judge GRANGE found that eight babies had been killed by drug overdoses and another 15 had died in suspicious circumstances. He issued his 224-page report in the first few days of 1985. He concluded that the babies had died because of overdoses of digoxin, a heart drug that many should not have been given. The babies' bodies, nine of which were exhumed for the investigation, revealed abnormally high digoxin levels.
Controversially, although Judge GRANGE recommended compensation to Susan NELLES, a nurse charged with several of the murders, he did not assign blame to anyone. He faulted no one and offered no solution to the mystery of who killed the babies.
The report angered parents of some of the babies and brought a wave of public criticism. Ms. NELLES had been released after a preliminary hearing because of lack of evidence and it appeared no one would be held responsible.
But according to his son Dougall, Judge GRANGE had long inured himself from criticism and maintained a healthy distaste for the media, in spite of initially considering a career in journalism. Later, though, he came publicly to the defence of inquiries at a time when they were being criticized as unwieldy and overly time-consuming.
"You can't run an inquiry without letting everybody have his say," he said in the mid-1990s. "You don't know what a person's going to say until he says it -- even though sometimes he says it and you're sorry you ever let him speak."
His father recognized the importance of many of the cases he heard and was keenly aware of the lasting impact of his decisions, said Dougall, a 46-year-old paralegal in Toronto. "Sometimes he didn't come to these decisions easily, he really worked, he was conscientious and would think very, very carefully about what he was doing. Regularly he would be up at three or four in the morning, going over the materials and trying to come up with a solution."
Judge GRANGE felt strongly that the practice of law had fallen into public disrepute and believed that one way to regain the people's trust would be to introduce television cameras into some courtrooms. "The image of justice is poor, I don't think we deserve that image," he said in the mid-1980s.
But he felt no compulsion to play to the public gallery. "He was of the view that you write your judgments, you write your reports, and you let them speak for themselves," said the younger Mr. GRANGE.
Many of the decisions are still with us, their importance being felt still today. The intrusive questioning of rape complainants is a thing of the past in part because of the decision written by Judge GRANGE. In the case of two adults accused of assaulting a 15-year-old girl in the basement of a school, the question of the girl's previous behaviour with men came up. But Judge GRANGE, then sitting on the Ontario Court of Appeal, made it clear that times had changed.
"Sexual reputation is no more an indicator of credibility in a woman then it is in a man," he wrote for the majority in the late summer of 1987. "It should no longer be recognized as relevant to the issue."
Two years earlier he backed another controversial Court of Appeal decision, this one written by then Madam Justice Rosalie ABELLA. Hearing the case of a divorced couple, one of whom wanted to move away with the couple's child, the three judges unanimously agreed that she could.
"The custodial parent's best interests are inextricably tied to those of the child," wrote Judge ABELLA, supported by Judge GRANGE and backed by then Mr. Justice Jean LABROSSE. In effect, they ruled that what is good for the custodial parent should be presumed to be good for the child.
Retired judge KREVER called him "an exemplary member of the profession" and said he was something approaching a poet laureate at the Court of Appeal.
"There are a lot of cases in which he wrote excellent decisions which will stand the test of time," said Judge KREVER, 76.
Dougall GRANGE said that, as a child of two journalists, his father was headed for that career when the war diverted him to Europe. Awarded the Croix de Guerre for his dangerous work as a forward artillery observer, he seems also to have caught the eye of several peers. Military law at the time allowed a serviceman accused of a crime to choose the officer he wanted to represent him. Mr. GRANGE, then a captain, had no legal training or experience but was chosen several times.
In one of the more serious cases, he defended an American who had lied his way into the war before his country became involved. When the United States entered the war he quit his unit with the intention of joining the allied U.S. forces. Caught and tried for desertion, he could have been shot. Then-Captain GRANGE successfully argued his case and the man was released, Dougall GRANGE said.
"He came back here afterwards and thought 'okay, why don't I try this. He loved the practice and he liked the people... it was his life'."
Samuel GRANGE was born on March 19, 1920, in London, Ontario He died on August 26, 2005, at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto after suffering a series of strokes. He was 85. He was predeceased in 2003 by his wife Patricia. He is survived by his son Dougall and daughter Alice.

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KREVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-25 published
LASKIN was Supreme
The late Supreme Court chief justice Bora LASKIN went where no Canadian had gone before A non-conformist, he reinvented a stuffy bench while appealing to the layman, writes Tracey TYLER, Page F3
Canada's great chief justice of the 20th century had a word for his successes in life: accidentalism. If true, Bora LASKIN's arrival at the Supreme Court in the spring of 1970 might have been one of the best-timed accidents in Canadian history.
To the south, the United States Supreme Court was coming off a series of star turns with its history-making decisions on civil rights, from an end to school segregation to the Miranda ruling on the right to remain silent.
Life at Canada's top court had little of the same electricity.
Caught in a straitjacket of English law, never daring to take the pulse of the public, its nine male judges saw their job as correcting errors of courts below rather than developing a body of Canadian-made law, an approach that earned the court no profile internationally and little respect at home. Lawyers bemoaned its hidebound style.
Within a decade, however, an unassuming former law professor delivered the shock treatment many felt it needed.
LASKIN's appointment was the legal equivalent of Pierre Elliott Trudeau sweeping into office, Supreme Court Justice Ian BINNIE told a recent Toronto symposium that examined LASKIN's legacy and his enduring appeal -- 35 years after his appointment to the court, as its first Jewish judge, and 40 years after his appointment to the Ontario Court of Appeal.
Many judges have served on the Supreme Court longer, but LASKIN had an indelible impact.
The court that captured the country's attention this month with a landmark ruling on health care was essentially one he created. He took a court that banned lawyers from citing works by living authors and "reinvented" it -- opening its doors to interveners and narrowing its focus to issues of national importance, BINNIE said.
LASKIN, who died in 1984 at age 71, never lived to see the impact of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. But as they assess his place in history, many legal scholars credit him with paving the way for the Charter by pushing judges to look beyond the letter of the law and consider social realities.
There's something more.
"He was the only serious, intellectual, non-conformist disturber to serve as chief justice," BINNIE said.
It seems Canadians liked what they saw.
"In my research, everyone knew Bora LASKIN... but no one who was not a lawyer could ever identify any chief justice after him," said Philip GIRARD, an associate dean at Dalhousie Law School and author of Bora LASKIN: Bringing Law to Life, a new book out this fall.
"LASKIN had a certain spark and he was associated with a lay person's idea of justice. He sort of helped convince them the court was on their side."
It helped that he appealed to notions of what a chief justice should be. Looking every inch a part of the establishment, LASKIN fit perfectly with his mutton-chopped predecessors pictured around the Supreme Court, BINNIE said.
In truth, he was the justice system's most trenchant critic and an anti-establishment figure, a trait sometimes discernible through an "armour-piercing gaze" that would put former Montreal Canadien Rocket Richard to shame, he said.
LASKIN enjoyed the oyster special at Ottawa's Rideau Club, but his favourite snack was a sardine and onion sandwich. He once pinch-hit for the governor general by delivering the throne speech (coached in French by daughter Barbara) but considered his proudest achievement belting the longest home run out of the ballpark in his hometown of Fort William, now part of Thunder Bay.
Frequently parting company with fellow judges on the law, he earned a reputation, some say undeservedly, as a "great dissenter" and some detractors.
"There were many lower court judges who hated him. They thought he was totally crazy," GIRARD said.
LASKIN dissented in no less than 108 cases in his 14 years on the court and many of his opinions, considered radical at the time, did become law, including a groundbreaking 1975 ruling that Iris Murdoch was entitled to an equal share of the family's Alberta ranch after separation.
He most famously broke rank in the politically charged 1981 patriation reference. True to his belief in strong central government, LASKIN found it would not defy convention to bring the Constitution home from England and entrench a Charter without consent from the provinces. The majority view forced a first ministers' conference and a deal that alienated Quebec.
BINNIE said LASKIN's independent streak is why he remains intriguing. Trudeau's decision to name him chief justice in 1974 would have been like making Martin Luther the Pope, he added.
It couldn't have helped that he leapfrogged over other judges with more seniority.
A chilly atmosphere predated his arrival at the court and may explain why he felt one of his great contributions had nothing to do with law. It was building a lunchroom, said his son, John, a judge on the Ontario Court of Appeal.
"At times, I think my dad found the Supreme Court of Canada to be a pretty isolated place. Judges tended to go their own ways."
LASKIN said he's not sure what his father would have thought of the symposium. He preferred to look to the future, not the past. But the irony of the Law Society of Upper Canada hosting the event in Osgoode Hall would have brought a smile to his face, he said.
The law society snubbed LASKIN and two fellow professors, Caesar WRIGHT and John WILLIS, by refusing to recognize the faculty of law they created at the University of Toronto after they quit their Osgoode Hall teaching jobs in 1949.
LASKIN studied undergraduate law at U of T, then completed a master's and his legal articles before heading to Harvard University to study for a master of law under future U.S. Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter in 1936-37.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal was in full swing and people like Frankfurter were challenging conventional legal thinking. A similar skepticism permeated LASKIN's academic writings.
"His basic message was the courts are really out of touch. They don't understand modern conditions and are living in a nostalgic dream world," GIRARD said.
LASKIN was born in Fort William on October 5, 1912, to Russian immigrants whose priority was a good education for their sons and who helped pay for it by renting out their home.
LASKIN's father moved into a hotel and ran the family's furniture store, while LASKIN's mother went to work as a housekeeper in Toronto. LASKIN and his brothers followed.
The academic credentials he racked up at Harvard weren't enough to get him a job after graduation.
Shut out of Toronto law firms by restrictions on Jewish lawyers, he wrote case summaries at 50 cents each for law reports. In 1940, he took over for his former teacher at University of Toronto and became a "workhorse" later at the law school, teaching more courses than anyone else, said former student and retired judge Horace KREVER. LASKIN's children say he would have happily stayed a professor.
"I think he enjoyed his work more than anyone I have known," said his son. "He also had a capacity to work extremely long hours and a tremendous ability to survive on very little sleep, which I don't have."
Two and 3 a.m. bedtimes were common, said daughter, Barbara, who recalls her father coming down the hall late at night, rubbing his hands "in glee" after knocking off another judgment.
LASKIN worked in a basement office his children called "the dungeon" but always had dinner with his children and wife, Peggy.
There were many family vacations by car. Though not a good swimmer, LASKIN liked being near water and found it soothing. When they were together, he rarely talked shop.
"My dad had two great loves in his life. One was law. The other was his family," his son said. "He watched me play basketball he watched Barbara dance."
"The LASKINs had a hoop in their driveway and it got a lot of use from the neighbourhood," said Justice Stephen GOUDGE of the Ontario Court of Appeal, who got to know LASKIN as the father of his nursery school friend John.
Later, he came to appreciate LASKIN's role in shaping the country's postwar labour law.
Courts were hostile to administrative tribunals, such as labour relations boards, but LASKIN argued they should be left to do their work. He was also in high demand as a labour arbitrator and GIRARD considers LASKIN's arbitration rulings among his most significant.
They include his decision during a 1958 strike at a Scarborough plant that arbitrators could award damages for breach of a collective agreement.
On the Supreme Court, LASKIN was in the minority in siding with Sophie Carswell's right to picket her employer's business at a Winnipeg shopping centre, considered off limits as private property. LASKIN likened malls to modern-day town squares.
As a judge, LASKIN liked nothing more than having former law students appear before him. But nothing "peeved" him more than sloppy English, Barbara said. A lawyer who uttered the words "at this point in time" was likely to be met with a stern stare, followed by the question, "You mean, 'today?'"
He was proud when a former English teacher called to say she used one of his judgments as an example of good writing. He always wrote in longhand, said his son, who does the same.
As he settled in on the court, LASKIN churned out more judgments every year, said symposium organizer Neil FINKELSTEIN. He dissented less often. When he did, Justices Wishart SPENCE and Brian DICKSON/DIXON often joined him. They were known as the " LSD gang."
And the others? LASKIN rarely spoke candidly of those who disagreed with him, but former law clerk John McCAMUS, now an Osgoode Hall Law School professor, recalls him letting down his guard just once. When he arrived at the chief justice's office, LASKIN, with a twinkle in his eye, handed him a dissenting judgment.
Then, he dusted off an apocalyptic phrase, one used by reporters to describe conservative judges who blocked progressive U.S. legislation in the 1930s. "I wonder," he said, "what the Four Horsemen will think."

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KREVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-03 published
MITCHELL, Velma Margaret
Peacefully, at her home, on Thursday, December 1, 2005, after a valiant struggle with Lung Cancer, in her 70th year. Predeceased by her husband John. Loving mother of David, Kathleen BOND (Robert,) Anne Mitchell LEGUE (Larry), Elle KREVER, Patricia (John KASOWSKI) and Jacqueline (Daniel GORDON.) Velma will be lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Michael, Stephen, Brianne, Heather, Benjamin, Anne-Marie, William and Jennifer. Dear sister of Shirley. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere Ave., east of the Jane subway, on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Wednesday, December 7, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Interment York Cemetery. If desired, remembrances made to the Lung Association would be appreciated by the family.

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KREWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-23 published
I Remember -- Stanley MANSBRIDGE
By Bernie KREWSKI, Saturday, April 23, 2005, Page S9
Bernie KREWSKI of Edmonton writes about Stanley MANSBRIDGE, whose obituary appeared on April 16.
I was Stanley MANSBRIDGE's executive assistant when he arrived in Alberta as chief deputy minister. He was a true public servant. Everyone who worked with him learned about the operations of government by his example, and his reputation for fairness and objectivity was unparalleled.
Mr. MANSBRIDGE was dignified, serious and appeared stern at times. But his very human side was also apparent. In 1977, our department was invited to nominate staff for the Queen's Silver Jubilee medal. His management committee decided that only staff of lesser stature would be recognized. Senior managers were to be excluded.
One day, he stormed into my office with a jubilee medal. "Are you responsible for this?" he demanded in an angry voice. My chuckle was louder each time he repeated the question. Later, he discovered that his minister, our boss, had secretly put forward his name and committed a "terrible deed." Too late, we learned that Mr. MANSBRIDGE was a less-than-enthusiastic royalist!

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