HOLDER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-14 published
MANN, Ronald James
At Gateway Haven, Wiarton, on Sunday November 13th, 2005. Ron MANN of Wiarton and formerly of Southampton in his 83rd year. Ron was a Veteran of World War 2 being a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force, Hurricane Fighters and in his retirement loved to fish the Saugeen River. Husband of the Late Beaulah MANN. Dear brother of Lawrence and his wife Shirley of Bancroft, Jean MacPHERSON of Toronto and Shirley HOLDER of Pickering. Predeceased by his daughter, Evelyn STEPPACHER, his parents James and Emma MANN and by his brother Richard. At Ron's request there will be no visitation. Cremation. Friends and family will gather for a Memorial Service at a later date. Expressions of Remembrance to the Heart and Stoke Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton (800) 858-9544. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

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HOLDER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-14 published
BARBER, Ainsley Clement
Suddenly at home on Wednesday May 11, 2005. Ainsley Clement BARBER of Norwich in his 96th year. Born 1909 in Delhi, Ainsley was the son of the late Clayton and Ina Clare BARBER. Dear brother of Vera Grace KLODT of Peterborough. Uncle of Robert KLODT and wife Jackie, Carol HOLDER and husband Arthur, Sylvia REEVE and husband Robert. Also survived by many great nieces and nephews. Predeceased by a sister Ruby. Ainsley was a well known resident for many years. Friends will be received at the Otterville Fellowship Baptist Church 106 John St. N., Otterville on Tuesday 12: 30 p.m. to 1: 30 p.m. Funeral service to follow at 1:30 p.m. with Rev. Richard CROCKFORD officiating. Interment to follow luncheon at Vanessa Cemetery. Donations to the Otterville Fellowship Baptist Church would be appreciated. Funeral arrangements entrusted to The Arn-Lockie Funeral Home, Norwich. (519) 863-3020

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HOLDER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-08 published
HOLDER, " Uncle Buck"
In loving memory of my Godfather, Uncle Buck, who the angels guided home 10 years ago today, November 8, 1995. The memories are our keepsake, With which we will never part, God has you in his keeping, And we have you in our hearts. Time may slip away but we have the memories that will last forever. Love Debi, Pat, Courtney and our guardian angel Jason 2002.

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HOLDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-18 published
HOLDER, Norman Charles
Suddenly, at his residence in Cobourg, on Monday, January 17, 2005. Norman Charles HOLDER was the beloved husband of Helen HOLDER (née ROBERTSON.) Dear father of Jane HUGHES and her husband David of Ajax and Catherine MacNEILL and her husband Ian of Newcastle. Grandfather of Elizabeth, Julia and Sarah. Brother of Joan BROWN of Cobourg, also Margaret HOLDER, predeceased. Following cremation, a service in memory of Norman will be held at the Church of St. Peter (corner of King St. E. and College), Cobourg on Friday, January 21, 2005 at 2 p.m. Interment at the Heritage Cemetery of St. Peter. If desired, donations in memory of Norman can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Condolences to www.maccoubrey.com.

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HOLDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-14 published
CUPPLES, Bruce Carmen
Peacefully at his home in Cannington on Sunday, June 12, 2005 at the age of 82 years. Bruce CUPPLES, formerly of Sutton and Ravenshoe, beloved husband of Evelyn (née CROUTCH.) Dear father of Gary of Cannington and Kevin and his wife Carol of Sutton. Loving grandfather of Amy CUPPLES. Dear brother of Don CUPPLES and his wife Rita of Lindsay and Grace BRETHOUR and her husband Lorne of Sunderland. Predeceased by his sister Ollie HOLDER. Resting at the Taylor Funeral Home, 20846 Dalton Road, Sutton from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Tuesday. Funeral Service in the Chapel Wednesday at 2: 00 p.m. Interment, Queensville Cemetery, Queensville. Donations to the Alzheimer Society or a charity of choice would be appreciated by the family.

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HOLDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-28 published
SINGER, Robert N., Hon. B.Sc., LLB
Peacefully surrounded by his family on Monday, September 26, 2005 after a valiant battle with cancer. Bob, beloved husband of Mary of Newmarket. Proud and loving father of Ryan, Roland and Raymond of Newmarket. Also survived by his brother Richard of Barrie, sister Margaret HOLDER of Glencoe and brother Ralph of Comoka. Bob will be deeply missed by his extended family and many Friends. Friends may call at at Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421), on Thursday, September 29 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held at Trinity Anglican Church, 79 Victoria Street, Aurora on Friday at 11 a.m. Cremation. Donations to Hill House Hospice or Southlake Regional Health Centre Cancer Care Clinic would be appreciated by the family. A special thank you to Dr. Nancy MERROW and her staff at Southlake Cancer Clinic and Anne-Marie DEAN and her staff at Hill House Hospice.

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HOLDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-15 published
MANN, Ronald James
At Gateway Haven, Wiarton, on Sunday November 13, 2005. Ron MANN of Wiarton and formerly of Southampton in his 83rd year. Ron was a Veteran of World War 2 being a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force, Hurricane Fighters and in his retirement loved to fish the Saugeen River. Husband of the late Beaulah MANN. Dear brother of Laurence Frank and his wife Shirley of Bancroft, Jean MacPHERSON of Toronto and Shirley HOLDER of Pickering. Predeceased by his daughter, Evelyn STEPPACHER, his parents James and Emma MANN and by his brother Richard. At Ron's request there will be no visitation. Cremation. Friends and family will gather for a Memorial Service at a later date. Expressions of remembrance to the Heart and Stoke Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton (800) 858-9544. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com

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HOLDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-31 published
A loving mother's son
Andre BURNETT's five half-siblings all grew into the adults their mother hoped they would
So how did her sixth child end up on the most-wanted list and then in the morgue?
By Jim RANKIN, Staff Reporter, Page A22
Andre BURNETT began life as an independent boy, raised by a loving mother in a poor neighbourhood. At some point, for reasons this city must reckon with, he decided to live by the gun. He was murdered September 10 -- becoming Toronto's 54th homicide victim of the year, and the 36th to be killed by a gun.
His tall, thin frame was draped over a chair, and beneath the brim of a baseball cap, the lucky man's eyes were further obscured by wraparound sunglasses.
He had a criminal record for drug and firearms offences. Not reflected on that record was the fact he'd been accused (but not convicted) of pulling the trigger a couple of times in his 24 years. He'd also, in July 2003, taken a police hollow-point bullet between the shoulder blades, just left of his spine.
Although his left arm, damaged by that police shooting, would take time to heal, that was all in Andre BURNETT's past. He considered himself lucky. He could have found himself in jail -- or not sitting there at all.
On that day this past June when BURNETT sat down for an interview a lawyer to his left, and mother to his right -- there was big hope that his luck would continue.
"I'm going to get a place, my own place, with my girl," BURNETT said. "Stay out of trouble."
He also planned to stay away from Jane and Finch, the neighbourhood where he grew up, was schooled, and had made Friends and enemies.
Three months later, there were funeral plans. "He was slaughtered," says his mom, Cecile CASE HOLDER, in her late 50s.
Andre Malik BURNETT left behind a son, 6, a daughter, 4, and the mother of his children.
In a city hurting from a spate of other gun-and-gang-related killings this year, mostly of young black men, and numb from the shooting death this week of 15-year-old Jane CREBA caught in crossfire while holiday shopping, BURNETT's life and death also leaves behind a list of post-mortem questions.
Perhaps the most instructive is the question of how his four half-brothers and a half-sister grew into the adults CASE HOLDER had hoped they would, and her sixth child ended up in the morgue?
It is Black youth that is unemployed in excessive numbers, it is Black students who are being inappropriately streamed in schools, it is Black kids who are disproportionately dropping out, it is housing communities with large concentrations of Black residents where the sense of vulnerability and disadvantage is most acute, it is Black employees, professional and non-professional, on whom the doors of upward equity slam shut. Just as the soothing balm of "multiculturalism" cannot mask racism, so racism cannot mask its primary target -- Stephen Lewis, Report on Racism in Ontario, 1992
Under circumstances that are the subject of a Toronto Police Service homicide investigation, BURNETT, having just served a 60-day stint in jail for breaching parole conditions, wound up back home the afternoon of Saturday, September 10.
It's believed he was driven to Jane St. and Driftwood Ave., not far from his childhood home, his mother says. What is certain is that he was killed around 3 p.m. Witnesses: heard a loud argument, followed by gunfire. BURNETT was reportedly hit by eight bullets. He collapsed on a footbridge. He was, according to police, unarmed.
BURNETT was no angel when he left this world, and to that his mother attests. But on May 27, 1981, born at Toronto General Hospital, he began as one.
Cecile CASE HOLDER had come to Canada from Jamaica in the late 1970s, leaving behind four sons and a daughter from a previous marriage, with the hope of establishing a new home for them in Toronto. With the birth of Andre in 1981, fathered by a man CASE HOLDER likens to a "bad accident" who had very little to do with her son's life, she was done with having children.
Baby Andre, however, "was very sweet. He was my last of six."
BURNETT spent the first five years of his life growing up in an apartment near Bathurst St. and Lawrence Ave. W. -- a predominantly Jewish neighbourhood where one cannot walk a block without finding a bagel shop, and, today, bungalows are being torn down to make way for the occasional monster home.
He wasn't to go near the stove in their apartment, but on Saturdays, when CASE HOLDER was not working, her young son would show up at her bedside with a cup of tea.
"Here, mommy, is your tea," he would say.
"Sometimes he'd drink half of it before he got up there," says CASE HOLDER. "He was very independent. He would go to his drawer and, in the summer, take out a matching shorts and top. In the wintertime, he would match his clothes."
CASE HOLDER worked for a car parts manufacturer, and by 1985, had waded through the bureaucratic red tape required to sponsor her five children from Jamaica. They joined her in the two-bedroom apartment CASE HOLDER had been sharing with her youngest, and the elder five enrolled in local schools. The apartment would not do for long.
It was clear she had to move, but couldn't afford the rent for the kind of space she needed in that neighbourhood.
"So I went and I applied for the Metro Housing, and that's how I end up in Jane and Finch," says CASE HOLDER. " Didn't know I was going into the lion's den."
This reality of huge housing projects creating what many called "communities in distress" has to be dealt with. They're often under-serviced, and a persuasive case can be made for better transportation, for a Community College campus, for a thriving community centre, for some kind of outdoor recreational space. The list goes on. It all has relevance. -- Stephen Lewis, 1992 report
It may have been only a few kilometres away, but the move to Toronto Community Housing Corp., subsidized housing on Shoreham Dr., east of Jane St. and north of Finch Ave. W., might as well have been to another planet. A very small and concentrated one. Bordered by Black Creek Pioneer Village immediately to the north, and York University to the east, the low-rise brick buildings are home to some of the city's least well off, and historically, a place where gunfire is not unexpected.
In other areas of Jane and Finch, however, gunfire is not expected at all. And this is what Jane-Finch ratepayers not living in the pockets of public housing most susceptible to drug dealing, gangs and associated violence have taken great pains over the years to point out.
All that likely would have been lost on little Andre. He started school at Shoreham Public School, where he quickly fell in love with his kindergarten teacher. His siblings, however, continued to go to school in their old neighbourhood, where they had the kind of role models outside the family young Andre would find in short supply.
"All the older kids were seeing around them was positive things," says CASE HOLDER. " Andre was the baby who started school in the Jane and Finch area."
From the beginning, CASE HOLDER says she didn't like what she was seeing in the new area, and for that reason kept her children on a tight leash. There were curfews, and strict rules. "I started to observe how people live, and their kids running around. I was tough on my kids," she says, recalling one instance where she delivered a walloping to her daughter, at the time an A-student who was starting to cut school. "I busted her behind."
CASE HOLDER tried her best to ensure her work hours didn't interfere with her job of raising six children on her own, but when her youngest was 8 or 9, she took up a new job from midnight to 8 a.m. cleaning luxury boxes at the newly opened SkyDome.
On her very first shift, the police came calling to her townhome. CASE HOLDER says they were looking for a neighbour who had sold cocaine to an undercover officer, but ended up arresting one of Andre's half-brothers. During the nighttime raid, police searched the house with guns drawn, including Andre's room, while he was in bed.
"My house was like five hurricanes passed through it," she says. "They didn't even apologize," she says, "and later they arrested the guy who they wanted."
The charges against her son were eventually dismissed, but the raid left her youngest with an indelible impression of police, and white people. Young Andre soon began seeing a therapist, who happened to be white. His mother remembers he was wary. "The white people are bad," she recalls him saying, "because, why would they put a gun into my head?"
Of all Jamaican children under 19 years of age, 62.7 percent live in lone parent families, as do 54.8 percent of children who are African and Black and 52.1 percent of children from "other Caribbean nations." In these three groups, respectively, 64.5, 63.2, and 57.8 percent of children are below the poverty line Ethno-Racial Inequality in Toronto: Analysis of the 1996 Census, by Michael Ornstein, 2000
When Andre BURNETT was in his mid-teens, CASE HOLDER discovered a gun outside their townhome. That, she says, was "the reason why I took my baby and left Jane and Finch one morning."
She moved right out of Canada, to a city in the northeastern U.S., where she lives to this day and works as a caregiver in a hospital. She enrolled BURNETT in a high school there, but he soon was asking to go home, back to Toronto, to finish his schooling.
Another reason he wanted to go home, says his mother, was tight security at his new high school. He didn't like getting wanded every day. He didn't feel the school was safe. CASE HOLDER, deciding he was old enough at 17 to make his own decisions, let him go home to Jane and Finch.
While violent crime in Toronto has been declining, young people's involvement in, and victimization by crime has been trending upwards over the past eight years. The number of youth is projected to grow by 21 per cent in five years -- Toronto's Vital Signs 2005: The City's Annual Check-up
BURNETT initially moved in with a girlfriend of CASE HOLDER's, then with one of his half-brothers. He had arrived back home with thoughts of going to York University, as one of his brothers had. He was bright, into computers, and also looking at a possible career in music, says his mother.
"He liked to write music. He wanted to be a record producer," she says. "He had some stuff that he wrote, but I don't know where they are, and most of the things that he used to write was against, like, the brutality of police. He used to write heavy stuff, like Tupac Shakur."
CASE HOLDER admits she doted on her youngest, particularly after the others had left home. "The other kids used to say I spoil him, but he was the only one that I had to support. So he used to wear Polo, Tommy Hilfiger, stuff like that.
"Then he started wearing black, and clothes that I didn't like to see him in. He started wearing his pants down, and when I see him I would tell him, 'Pull your pants up.'"
At some point, the independent young boy CASE HOLDER had raised became a follower. Just when, she is not sure, but says her son's life changed some time after he went back home and enrolled at Westview Centennial Secondary School, southwest of Jane and Finch.
"That was the doom. That's when all hell broke loose," she says, blaming the school and poor choices in Friends for what followed. (A vice-principal there, responding to a Star inquiry about BURNETT's days, said senior staff had moved on, and there was little she could say other than he had attended the school.)
With the birth of a son, BURNETT became a father before his 20th birthday. He and his girlfriend later had a daughter as well, and the two grandchildren remain an important part of CASE HOLDER's life. She would come back to Toronto to visit, but she no longer had a strong hold on her son. She did try, though.
She remembers one occasion when the half-brother BURNETT had been staying with called her to say he had taken to coming home at 4 a.m. "And so I asked my son to drive him over to me. I remember very clearly, I was in the kitchen, and (Andre) was talking to me, and I had a mop like that in the corner, and I pulled him up and I beat him, and was beating his ass with the mop.
"And he was, like, 'Mommy, Mommy.' He would never say a word to make me upset. He would never, no matter what I do, and I would rap him, and he would never open his mouth.
"He was never a disrespectful child, never."
He started racking up an adult criminal record, which included drug and firearms offences. He was also fingered in a 2002 non-fatal shooting but later saw charges dropped because of identification problems. In connection with that shooting, he made the Toronto Crime Stoppers 10-most-wanted list.
By then, he looked little like the boy CASE HOLDER had raised. Nor like the young man wearing the red gown in his middle-school graduation picture. In one particular police mugshot, he wears a beard. His eyes look dead.
On July 10, 2003, in a police operation aimed at flushing out a wanted gunman in a park near Jane St. and Driftwood Ave., BURNETT was shot once in the back by police, who alleged BURNETT had fired first. Police found a 9 mm handgun at the scene, but, following a thorough search of the area by the province's civilian Special Investigations Unit, no forensic evidence was found to indicate the gun had been fired that night -- no residue, no shell and no bullet could be found. The Special Investigations Unit found the shooting to be justified, and cleared the two officers who opened fire of any wrongdoing.
BURNETT, badly wounded by the police bullet, found himself charged with attempting to kill the two officers.
One dramatic reversal in policy concerned the equity policies enacted by the Liberal and New Democratic Party governments. The Conservatives shut down an Anti-Racism Secretariat created by the New Democratic Party, and its counterpart in the Ministry of Education, abandoned policies aimed at increasing gender equity in administrative posts in education, and deleted references to pro-equity goals -- Stephen E. Anderson and Sonia Ben Jaafar, Policy Trends in Ontario Education, 2003
On most days, Winston LAROSE of the Jane-Finch Concerned Citizens Organization can be found in a cluttered second-floor office at Yorkgate Mall, a rejuvenated shopping centre on the northwest corner of Jane and Finch. Over the years, LAROSE, a trained psychiatric nurse, has watched and lived the hurt of young black men in the neighbourhood.
He never knew BURNETT, but he knows the story.
"Somewhere along the line, we have failed them as a society," says LAROSE. "We are a particularly impoverished area, in terms of social, cultural values and economics and the whole thing. Single mothers raising children, without the means to do it properly, absent fathers, inadequate material things in the home, hardly can pay the rent, distressed mother, Children's Aid having ready access to their children, police officers coming and knocking on the doors.
"It's not treated in the same way as a kid who goes to Upper Canada College, for instance. They're growing up in different worlds."
Generally, he says, this has all translated into a loss of a proper sense of self-esteem and humanity.
"What's been critically important for our community has been the devaluation of social life -- all together, the devaluation of our sense of humanity. I think it's stepped away from strong traditional values that are critical to developing human beings that respect each other."
Those who choose to pull the trigger and take a life, he says, are detached from that reality. "All that happens is an emotional response to, 'You're wearing my colours,' and bam, you're gone."
Extra police alone, as has been pointed out by many this past year in Toronto, is not the answer, he says. "All we're going to have is like Harlem in the old days, or Chicago, where police with guns are patrolling certain neighbourhoods and other neighbourhoods don't have that experience, and this is where we're heading right now."
The warning signs have been long been there, he points out, dating back decades, and perhaps most ominously as laid out in Stephen Lewis's 1992 report on anti-black racism in Ontario, which was ordered up by Bob Rae, the New Democratic Party premier of the day, following the "Yonge St. riots" that stemmed from the verdict in the police beating case of motorist Rodney King in Los Angeles.
Things have not much improved in Ontario, says LAROSE, who cites funding decisions made during the years of the Mike Harris Progressive Conservative government as one of the root causes behind the trouble many of Toronto's most impoverished youth, and black youth in particular, are in today.
"What he did is he restructured schools, and the schools in this area suffered from that. It reduced the number of teachers in the schools. It removed the schools from the domains of the community itself, where they had access, ready access for things like after-school programs, recreational programs and activities.
"A lot of community activities were conducted in those schools and people literally saw those schools as being some place where they could go. That's gone.
"There's kind of a general disrespect for the black community at large that seems to be acceptable," says LAROSE. " That is still very much in existence, and we need to do something to alter that, to change that.
"It has to start with the children we have right now, that are at the age of 5 and 6 and 7," he says -- and then pauses.
"Many of these kids that are committing all these murders, these are Harris's children, because they were 5 and 6 years old (in 1995), and these were the kids that got neglected."
Following the police shooting, BURNETT spent most of his recovery in jail, where he remained until this past summer, when the most serious charges against him were suddenly dropped after one of the two police officers he was accused of trying to kill, on the eve of BURNETT's trial, changed his story. In a last-minute deal, BURNETT pleaded guilty to possessing the handgun, and walked out of court a free man.
Upon his release from jail, CASE HOLDER noticed changes in her son. His head, in her words, wasn't "right." Still, he was a lucky man, and talked of settling down and perhaps getting back to his education. When he came to the Star to tell his story, he did it with the intention of filing a potential lawsuit against police. He said little, but claimed he never had a gun the night police shot him.
Despite the subsequent launch of an internal police investigation into police testimony and note-taking in the case, the two officers were lauded for their actions the night BURNETT was shot by police. The officers received their awards at police headquarters September 20. By then, Andre BURNETT had been dead for all of 10 days, having been gunned down near his old home, becoming Toronto's 54th homicide victim of the year.
There is no indication BURNETT was in a gang. Nor have police indicated what they think might be a motive for his killing.
To this day, his mother is incensed that police would hand out an award so close to his death. But she is hopeful that she will one day attend the trial of whoever took her son's life.
She says she has an idea who did it -- "Friends," she says, from his high school days. And she blames them, and the old neighbourhood, for his demise. She makes no specific mention of any government policy. BURNETT was 14 in 1995 when the Harris government ushered in its Common Sense Revolution platform. All of his older half-brothers and half-sister, the closest of whom was 21 at the time, were out of the secondary school system by then.
Today, one of his half-brothers is an accountant, studying journalism. Another is an Ontario government worker. The remaining two are a house painter and a self-employed electronics technician. BURNETT's half-sister is a bank supervisor.
Andre BURNETT went home this summer, and lies buried in the most expensive coffin his family could afford.
"I know he's in a better place. You should see him. He looked so peaceful," she says. "The funeral home did a good job by him. It was like the day I gave birth to him. He was that perfect child."

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HOLDER - All Categories in OGSPI

HOLDING o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-03-16 published
BUTTERS, Lois Marjorie (née DILLABOUGH)
Peacefully, with her daughter by her side, at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound on Monday, March 14th, 2005. Lois Marjorie GEORGAS- BUTTERS (née DILLABOUGH,) of Owen Sound, in her 71st year. Beloved Mother of Lili Anne HOLDING, of Owen Sound. Proud Yia Yia of Christopher HOLDING and his fiancée, Angela BARTLEY of Waterdown, Jeffrey HOLDING and Laura HOLDING, of Barrie. Lois will be sadly missed by her brother, Beverley DILLABOUGH & his wife Noreen, of Forest, and her sister-in-law, Arlene DILLABOUGH, of Paris. Predeceased by her son, Bradley GEORGAS, her parents, William and Lillian DILLABOUGH, her brother, James DILLABOUGH and an infant sister, Emily Lillian DILLABOUGH. A Private Family Memorial Service will be held on Friday, March 18th, 2005 in the Chapel of the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (376-7492). Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Canadian Cancer Society as your expression of sympathy.
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HOLDING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-16 published
EWART, Edna Elsie (née HOLDING)
In Hamilton, on March 14, 2005 in her 94th year. Beloved wife of the late Group Captain Frederick J. EWART (1906-1980.) Also predeceased by her second husband, Group Captain Z. Lewis LEIGH, and her sisters, Hilda Grace HOLDING and Iris Lucy MORRISON. Born in Ottawa, the second daughter of William and Harriet HOLDING, Edna was a long-time resident of Grimsby where she was active in St. Andrew's Anglican Church and many community affairs. Survived by her daughter Sondra and son-in-law Dr. Robert ARCHIBALD of Brantford and son Dr. David EWART and daughter-in-law Vivian of Calgary: grandchildren Laurel ARCHIBALD and Shelly BROWN of Toronto Duncan ARCHIBALD of Durham, England, and Matthew, Alistair and Timothy EWART of Calgary: great-grandchildren Samuel and Katherine HALL and Melanie and Jack BROWN of Toronto, and Ellen and David ARCHIBALD of Durham. Visitation at the Stonehouse-Whitcomb Funeral Home, 11 Mountain Street, Grimsby (905-945-2755) on Friday, March 18, 2005 from 9: 30 am until the time of Service at 11 am in the Funeral Home Chapel. Interment St. Andrew's Churchyard. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Association of Ontario or the charity of your choice will be appreciated.

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HOLDING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-15 published
BYRNE, Lois Dorothy
Passed away peacefully on June 14, 2005. Beloved wife of Thomas C. BYRNE. Much loved sister of Margaret BERTRAND and Barbara NOBLE- HOLDING. Sadly missed by her 10 nieces and nephews, 9 grandnieces and nephews and numerous nieces and nephews and grandnieces and nephews on her husband's side. Honours graduate of St. Michael's College, University of Toronto. Former head of Moderns Department at Forest Hill Collegiate. Long-time volunteer at Sunnybrook Hospital. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 6 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, June 16. Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated Friday, June 17, 2005 at 1 o'clock at Blessed Sacrament Church (24 Cheritan Ave at Yonge St.). Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. If desired, donations may be may to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, 1929 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4G 3E8 and would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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HOLDING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-22 published
HOLDING, Fred
Died peacefully, at the Carpenter's Hospice in Burlington, on January 20, 2005, in his 84th year. He is survived by his six children, Keith (Valerie) of Toronto, Brent (Elaine), Sharon COONS (Dave,) and Ronald, all of Burlington, Garth (Joanne) of Dundalk, and Lorraine of Toronto. Companion to Kathy LEMAY of Burlington. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Laura, Kevin, Kane, Vanessa, Christopher and Michael, along with his extended family. Former husband of Jean HOLDING. Predeceased by his brother Harold and sister Marjorie LUXON. A Veteran of World War 2, and retiree of Union Drawn Steel. Sincere thanks are offered to the dedicated caregivers at Joseph Brant Hospital and the Carpenter's Hospice where Fred received exemplary care. In particular, Dr. SALTER and Dr. BERLINGIERI for their kindness and compassion. At Fred's request, cremation has taken place. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street, Burlington, on January 23, 2005 from 3: 00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. - 9: 00 p.m. A celebration of Fred's life will take place at a later date. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy to the Carpenter's Hospice would be sincerely appreciated by the family.www.smithsfh.com

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HOLDING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-15 published
BYRNE, Lois Dorothy
Passed away peacefully on June 14, 2005. Beloved wife of Thomas C. BYRNE. Much loved sister of Margaret BERTRAND and Barbara NOBLE- HOLDING. Sadly missed by her 10 nieces and nephews, 9 grandnieces and nephews and numerous nieces and nephews and grandnieces and nephews on her husband's side. Honours graduate of St. Michael's College, University of Toronto. Former head of Moderns Department at Forest Hill Collegiate. Long-time volunteer at Sunnybrook Hospital. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 6 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, June 16. Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated Friday, June 17, 2005 at 1 o'clock at Blessed Sacrament Church (24 Cheritan Ave. at Yonge St.). Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, 1929 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4G 3E8 and would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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HOLDING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-10 published
HINTON, Diane Joyce (née HOLDING)
Entered into rest at the Belleville General Hospital on Tuesday, November 8th, 2005 in her 63rd year. Dear daughter of the late Tom and Joyce HOLDING. Beloved wife of the late Kenneth HINTON. Dear friend of Alan ASHTON of Belleville. Will be remembered by her aunt and uncle Roy and Shirley ALLEN, and by her sister-in-law Shirley VANNORT. With respect for Mrs. HINTON's wishes, cremation to take place. A private graveside service to be held at Pine Hills Cemetery, Scarborough at a later date. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Lung Association would be appreciated by the family. Belleville Funeral Home And Chapel (613-968-5080)

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HOLDITCH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-29 published
PARNEY, Clifford Grover
A resident of Ridgetown, Clifford Grover PARNEY passed away at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance, Chatham, on Friday, August 26, 2005 at the age of 88 years. Born in Howard Township, son of the late Frank and Pearl (SMITH) PARNEY. Beloved husband of the late Norma A. (BETTS) PARNEY (2002.) Dear father of Laraine and her husband Ian OSBORNE of Hamilton and the late Larry PARNEY (1984.) Grandfather of Cathy BISHOP of Dundas, Doug OSBORNE and Sue TREGURTHA of Christchurch, New Zealand and Jo Anna GROMADZKI and her husband Jacek of Boston, Massachusetts. Great grandfather of Andrew and Colleen BISHOP. Brother of Jean and Jack THOMAS of Windsor, Helen and Bill BRIEN of Ridgetown and the late Warren PARNEY (1974.) Also surviving is a former sister-in-law Rita SMITH and her husband Wray. The PARNEY family will receive Friends at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 76 Main Street East, Ridgetown on Monday, August 29, 2005 from 11: 30 until service time. Funeral Service at the Funeral Home at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Dwight HOLDITCH officiating. Interment of cremated remains at Greenwood Cemetery, Ridgetown at a later date. Donations made by cheque to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation or Mt. Zion Presbyterian Church are appreciated. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com.

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HOLDITCH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-05 published
JONES, Inez Beatrice (née RODGERS)
At Extendicare, Port Stanley on Saturday, September 3, 2005. Inez Beatrice JONES of R.R.#2, Aylmer in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late Gordon S. JONES (1993.) Loving mother of Alice GRANNEN and husband Steve of Lambeth, Grace JONES of London, Kenneth JONES and wife Linda of R.R.#2, Aylmer, Connie KESTELOOT and husband Luke of R.R.#6, Aylmer and David JONES and wife Laura of Port Burwell. Dear sister of Evelyn HOLDITCH and husband Douane, Edna CARTER, Harold RODGERS and friend Norma, and Verna GAUDIN. Sister-in-law to Betty RODGERS. Also survived by a number of grandchildren, great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers Marvin, Howard and Alfred RODGERS, a sister Leila SMITH, brothers-in-law Leslie, Ray and Norman JONES, Charlie SMITH and A.J. CARTER, a sister-in-law Mabel KELLY. Born in Charlotteville Township on July 15, 1914 daughter of the late Isaac and Eva Mae (HOWICK) ROGERS. Inez was a member of the Aylmer Baptist Church, past president of the Lakeview Baptist Church Mission Circle and the Lakeview Women's Institute. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Monday 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday September 7, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment, Dunboyne Cemetery. Rev. Cam WATTS, officiating. Donations to the Aylmer Baptist Church or the Victorian Order of Nurses would be appreciated.

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HOLDOM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-20 published
GILLMAN, James
At Humber River Regional Hospital - Church Site on Friday, March 18, 2005, at the age of 86. Beloved husband of the late Margaret BUTLER. Dear father of Lynn and her husband John KIROUAC. Step-father of Janet and her husband Charles HUNT, and Barry and his wife Geraldine BUTLER. Loving grandfather of Jennifer, Melanie, Michelle, Ryan, Noreen and Mark. Great-grandfather of Carson, Madeleine, Joshua, Daniel, Rebecca and Hanna. Brother of Betty and her husband Garnet, Winnifred HOLDOM and the late Doreen DOHERTY. Resting at Lynett Funeral Home, 3299 Dundas Street West (one block east of Runnymede) from 12-2 p.m. on Monday, March 21. Funeral service to follow in the Chapel at 2 p.m. Cremation and graveside service to be held at a later date.

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HOLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-04 published
DROUILLARD, Edmund " Ed"
A resident of Chatham passed away peacefully surrounded by his family at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance on Friday, July 1, 2005 at the age of 70. Born in Windsor, son of the late Anthony and Cornelia (THOMAS) DROUILLARD. Beloved husband of Nancy (BAILEY) DROUILLARD of Chatham. Loving father of Sherry and Ray GUIHER of Michigan, Nancy and George BAGNALL of R.R.#1 Pain Court, Gary CADOTTE of Croton, Rick and Mary-Ann CADOTTE of Chatham, Dave and Tammy CADOTTE of Chatham, Tony and Debbie DROUILLARD of Blenheim, Tom and Tracy of London. Cherished grandfather of many grandchildren and great grandchildren. Dear brother of Joyce HOLE of Windsor, Joan DALLAS of Kapuskasing and Tom DROUILLARD of Windsor. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by a son Bob CADOTTE and a brother Larry DROUILLARD. The DROUILLARD Family will receive Friends at the John C. Badder Funeral Home, 72 Victoria Street, Thamesville on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday, July 5, 2005 from 9: 00 a.m. until the time of the funeral service at 11: 00 a.m. with Fr. Andy DWYER officiating. Cremation to follow. Donations may be made at the funeral home by cheque to the Lung Association. A tree will be planted in Memory of Ed DROUILLARD in the Badder and Robinson Memorial Forest, Mosa Twp.

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HOLFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-07 published
REED, George Bernard " Bern"
After a valiant struggle with emphysema, it is with great sorrow that we announce the passing, in his 80th year, of our dearly loved husband, dad and grandpa at the Huntsville District Memorial Hospital, with his family at his side on Wednesday, April 27, 2005. Beloved husband and best friend of Barbara for over 55 years, a longtime resident of Etobicoke and Mississauga and a recent resident of Huntsville. Cherished father of Shelley Ralph (Bill EVANS) of Owen Sound, Bob (Heather) REED, Cyndie (Bryan HOLFORD) all of Huntsville. Adored grandpa of Nancy, Bobby and Nicci REED, Riley HOLFORD. He will be greatly missed by all of his family and Friends for his giving nature, his sense of humour, his wit and his great capacity for love. We shall never forget him. Born and raised in Etobicoke he was the son of George and Nellie REED. Dear brother of Alberta CANNON, Donald (Leslie) REED, brother-in-law of Margaret REED. Predeceased by brother Charles. At Bern's request cremation has taken place. A celebration of his life will be held at the Billingsley Funeral Home, 430 Ravenscliffe Road, Huntsville on Saturday, May 21, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. If desired, donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated by the family. www.billingsleyfuneralhome.com

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HOLIDAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-12 published
MASUCH, Donna (CORNETT)
The family of Donna MASUCH wish to thank all who assisted Donna in her fight against cancer this past year. Dr. HOLIDAY and staff, Dr. YOUNS, Dr. PERERA and the staff at London Regional Cancer Centre. Linda MOOREHOUSE and the staff of Community Care Access Centre, the paramedics at Thames Valley Ambulance. Thank you to all who expressed their condolences through their support, cards, floral arrangements, food preparation and donations to cancer research.

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HOLIERHOEK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-08 published
MacFARLANE, Bryce Alexander Stuart
It is with unimaginable sorrow that we announce the passing of Bryce Alexander Stuart MacFARLANE on July 6, 2005 as the result of a tragic accident. He had just turned 27 years of age in June. Bryce's journey will allow him to reconnect with his grandfather, David MacFARLANE, his uncles Michael and David and his aunt Zillah. He leaves behind his parents: Bunny and her husband Michael HOLIERHOEK and Ron and his wife Sam; his sister Julia and her husband Dr. David HABING and sister Callei and her partner Andy DEMOE along with a beloved nephew Drew. His grandparents Zillah MacFARLANE (husband Bob THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON,) Terry SCHROCK and Nick and Gerry HOLIERHOEK will miss him deeply. Bryce will also be sorely missed by his uncles and aunts Jim and Nancy MacFARLANE, Bob, Paul, Mike, and Steve WHITE/WHYTE and Pat and Janet SCHROCK, Brenda and Jim GRIERSON, Marsha and Jerry PETCH and Maureen DASCHUK along with many loving cousins. Bryce is resting at the George Darte Funeral Chapel, 585 Carlton Street, St. Catharines where his family will receive visitors on Thursday, July 7th from 7-9 p.m. and Friday, July 8th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Vigil prayers at the funeral home Friday evening at 7 p.m. A Funeral Liturgy will be celebrated on Saturday, July 9th at 11 a.m. at St. Julia's Catholic Church on Glenridge Avenue in St. Catharines. If desired, donations to the Trillium Gift of Life Network or the Canadian Marfan Association would be appreciated by the family. A heartfelt thank you goes to the staff at the Intensive Care Unit of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto. Thank you to Ron, Diane, Toni, Joyce and Cynthia, for supporting us in our time of deep, unrelenting grief. Online Guest Book - www.dartefuneralhome.com

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HOLIFF o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-20 published
HOLIFF, Saul Israel
Saul Israel, on Thursday, March 17th, 2005 in his 80th year, son of the late Joel and Esther HOLIFF. Unwell in recent years, Saul died at home peacefully and with dignity, at a time of his own choosing. His motto for years, and right up to the end, was "Living well is the best revenge" and he did his best to fulfill that philosophy. Saul loved fine food and wines, gardening, music, travel and movies, but no more than he loved their little 10-year-old Tabby, Brio. Born June 22nd 1925 in London, Ontario, Saul said he somehow made it through two years at London's Central Collegiate before leaving at the age of 15 to more or less take on the world. Before and during high school he delivered The London Free Press, The London Echo, sold subscriptions to Liberty Magazine, peddled fruit from door to door in the summer, and in his spare time together with his brother collected large quantities of used newspapers for sale to Leff's scrap yard. As young entrepreneurs, they also operated Holiff Brothers Fruit and Vegetables. During turbulent years before and after World War 2 Saul worked as a truck driver, a puddler on the night shift of the Steel Co. of Canada, a traveling salesman and a self-employed clothing merchant. During the war, although totally unfamiliar with guns of any shape or size, he "managed to graduate as a rear air gunner in the Royal Canadian Air Force without causing too much damage to (his) own side". In the'50's Saul appeared at London's Grand Theatre in a variety of acting roles. Later he was a partner in Saul's Square Boy drive-in restaurant, innovative pioneers in their field. In the ensuing years, with offices in Los Angeles, London and Nashville, he had a successful career as a concert promoter and personal manager of Canadian and American recording and television artists including Johnny Cash, the Statler Brothers Quartet, Tommy Hunter and Debbie Lori Kaye. Retiring in his late forties, Saul and his family, soon after, moved to Victoria, British Columbia. Always having been a voracious reader. Saul fulfilled a lifelong dream of returning to school as a mature student. After a few years at the University of Victoria preceded by some time spent at the University of Western Ontario, he "somehow, in spite of many pitfalls, succeeded in graduating" with a B.A. in history. However, he didn't let his studies interfere with his love of Sports -- tennis in particular -- "but was better at watching than at playing." A few years ago they moved on again, to a condo set in idyllic surrounding in Nanaimo, British Columbia. Saul leaves Barbara, his "soul mate, best friend and muse" of over forty years, and two sons, Jonathan of Los Angeles and Joshua (Kirsti) of Whitehorse, granddaughter Olive CASSIDY, his brother Morris (Jan) of Scottsdale, Arizona, as well as nephews Larry PAIKIN (Marnie) of Hamilton, David (Leah) of Las Vegas and Gary (Janet) of Toronto, and nieces Myra RICHMAN of Scottsdale, Arizona and Lori (Tom) of Burlington, Vermont. Saul and his family would want Doctors Peter Rechnitzer, Bud Faulkner, Dennis Morgan, Barry Bjorgaard and Henk Reems to know that all their patience, humour and good doctoring over the years has been greatly appreciated. At Saul's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation was handled by the Vancouver Island Memorial Society. Telford's Mid-Island Memorial Services. 1-866-503-5553

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HOLIFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-21 published
HOLIFF, Saul Israel
On Thursday, March 17th, 2005, in his 80th year. Unwell in recent years, Saul died at home peacefully and with dignity, at a time of his own choosing. His motto for years, and right up to the end, was "Living well is the best revenge" and he did his best to fulfill that philosophy. Saul loved fine food and wines, gardening, music, travel and movies, but no more than he loved their little 10-year-old Tabby, Brio.
Born June 22nd, 1925 in London, Ontario, Saul said he somehow made it through two years at London's Central Collegiate before leaving at the age of 15 to more or less take on the world. Before and during high school he delivered The London Free Press, The London Echo, sold subscriptions to Liberty Magazine, peddled fruit from door to door in the summer, and in his spare time together with his brother collected large quantities of used newspapers for sale to a wartime recycling scrap yard. As young entrepreneurs, they also operated Holiff Brothers Fruit and Vegetables.
During turbulent years before and after World War 2 Saul worked as a truck driver, a puddler on the night shift of the Steel Co. of Canada, a travelling salesman and a self-employed clothing merchant. During the war, although totally unfamiliar with guns of any shape or size, he "managed to graduate as a rear air gunner in the Royal Canadian Air Force without causing too much damage to {his} own side."
In the '50s Saul appeared at London's Grand Theatre in a variety of acting roles. Later he was a partner in Saul's Square Boy drive-in restaurant, innovative pioneers in their field. In the ensuing years, with offices in Los Angeles, London and Nashville, he had a successful career as a concert promoter and personal manager of Canadian and American recording and television artists including Johnny Cash, the Statler Brothers Quartet, Tommy Hunter and Debbie Lori Kaye.
Retiring in his late forties, Saul and his family, soon after, moved to Victoria, British Columbia. Always having been a voracious reader, Saul fulfilled a lifelong dream of returning to school as a mature student. After a few years at the University of Victoria (preceded by some time spent at the University of Western Ontario), he "somehow, in spite of many pitfalls, succeeded in graduating" with a B.A. in history. However, he didn't let his studies interfere with his love of sports -- tennis in particular -- "but was better at watching than at playing." A few years ago they moved on again, to a condo set in idyllic surroundings in Nanaimo, British Columbia.
Saul leaves Barbara, his "soulmate, best friend and muse" of over forty years, and two sons, Jonathan of Los Angeles and Joshua (Kirsti) of Whitehorse, granddaughter Olive CASSIDY; his brother Morris (Jan) of Scottsdale, Arizona, as well as nephews Larry PAIKIN (Marnie) of Hamilton, David (Leah) of Las Vegas and Gary (Janet) of Toronto; and nieces Myra RICHMAN of Scottsdale, Arizona and Lori (Tom) of Burlington, Vermont.
Saul and his family would want Doctors Peter Rechnitzer, Bud Faulkner, Dennis Morgan, Barry Bjorgaard and Henk Reems to know that all their patience, humour and good doctoring over the years has been greatly appreciated.
At Saul's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation was handled by the Vancouver Island Memorial Society. Telford's Mid-Island Memorial Services 1-866-503-5553

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HOLIFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-25 published
He managed Johnny Cash, Tommy Hunter
Canadian Press, Friday, March 25, 2005, Page S7
Nanaimo, British Columbia -- Saul Israel HOLIFF, a former concert promoter and Johnny Cash's manager for 17 years, died March 17 after years of declining health. He was 80.
Mr. HOLIFF, who also managed Tommy Hunter and the Statler Brothers, dabbled in acting before becoming a promoter. He began working as Cash's manager in about 1960, adding Mr. Hunter a few years later.
However, in 1973 he believed Mr. Cash's career had peaked and quit as manager. "I was guilty for underestimating him repeatedly."

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HOLIFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-09 published
Saul HOLIFF, Agent and Manager: 1925-2005
Sober-minded businessman from London, Ontario, was Johnny Cash's manager from 1960 to 1973, a provocative period that produced the singer's famed live recordings at Folsom and San Quentin prisons
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, May 9, 2005, Page S6
Victoria -- Johnny Cash had enjoyed modest success as a country artist before meeting Saul HOLIFF, a Canadian restaurateur who saw great potential in the guitar-toting baritone.
Mr. HOLIFF believed Mr. Cash deserved better than ordinary dance-hall gigs. He vowed to book the rough-hewn troubadour at no less grand a venue than Carnegie Hall, a promise he would fulfill shortly after becoming his manager.
Nor was the Manhattan landmark the limit to Mr. HOLIFF's ambitions for the entertainer, who was set along a path that would include appearances in feature films and the hosting of his own variety show on network television.
Along the way, Mr. Cash became a singular figure in pop culture, an icon whose rebel persona was expressed by his monochromatic wardrobe and self-chosen description as the Man in Black, which also served as the title to his autobiography. He achieved great fame before his death in 2003, his exposure owing much to the vision and hard work of Mr. HOLIFF.
Mr. HOLIFF was his manager from 1960 to 1973, years in which Mr. Cash became a fixture in the popular imagination, not the least for his daring live recordings behind bars at Folsom Prison and San Quentin.
They were an unlikely pair, the hard-living Christian from rural Arkansas and the sober-minded businessman from London, Ontario Nor was their relationship free from the strife that was a feature of much of Mr. Cash's life. The manager's response to his artist's benders was to retreat. He would wait at home for the inevitable telephone call from an unapologetic Mr. Cash, who would want to return to the road after getting straight.
Mr. HOLIFF was also responsible for getting June Carter to join Mr. Cash's touring show. She would become the singer's second wife and was credited with saving him from drink and drugs. Mr. Cash announced his intention to marry her during a show in London, Ontario, his manager's hometown.
Over the years, a grateful Mr. Cash presented 28 gold records to Mr. HOLIFF. The pair's success was all the more surprising considering that at their first meeting Mr. HOLIFF knew little about pop music and nothing about country. He preferred jazz and classical.
Mr. HOLIFF was raised in Southern Ontario by immigrant parents. His father, Joel, arrived alone from Russia in 1913, working to earn money to send for his wife, Esther, and two daughters. The plan was interrupted by the outbreak of the First World War and, later, the Russian Revolution and subsequent civil war.
The family was not reunited until 1920, by which time a daughter had died. A son, Morris, was born three years, followed by Israel in 1925. The parents soon decided they did not wish to have their youngest child known as Izzy, so instead called him Saul. He would be an adult before discovering it was not his birth name. During the Depression, he delivered newspapers before and after school and sold magazine subscriptions door to door.
With his older brother, he later made the rounds of the neighbourhood to gather large quantities of recyclable newspaper for the war effort. The HOLIFF brothers also delivered fruits and vegetables, while Saul's busy resume included stints as a truck driver and an iron puddler on the night shift at a steel mill. He also sold ladies garments as a travelling salesman. Though underage, he enlisted with the Royal Canadian Air Force, where he completed training as a rear gunner without, in his words, "causing too much damage to my own side." The Second World War ended before he was sent overseas.
After the war, he indulged a passion for theatre by joining a semiprofessional company in performances at the Grand Theatre in London. Barbara ROBINSON's first glimpse of her future husband came as he played Sgt. Gregovich in Teahouse of the August Moon. They married in 1964.
Mr. HOLIFF was also partner in a drive-in restaurant called Sol's Square Boy. The drive-in boasted electronic ordering machines at each parking stall. Food was delivered by carhop, the servings offered on square platters. Hamburger patties were also formed and cooked square, providing "four extra bites," an innovation later used to great success by the Wendy's fast-food chain.
The foray into music management happened by accident. Mr. HOLIFF became a moonlighting impresario to promote his business. Performers at rock 'n' roll shows were expected to hold autograph sessions at the drive-in, generating much interest among local teenagers.
Among the acts were such trailblazers as Duane Eddy and Bill Haley and the Comets. Mr. HOLIFF rode a teen tidal wave. An early foray was a concert billed as a "rockabilly dance spectacle" held at the Palace Pier in Toronto in 1957. The headlining act was "the Bye-Bye Love Everly Brothers," while concert-goers were eligible for such prizes as rock LPs, a transistor radio, and a 48-piece set of silverware.
Volatile Attractions, the showbiz management company Mr. HOLIFF operated with his wife, attracted exceptional talent. Among his clients were Carl Perkins, Tommy Hunter, Barbara Mandrell, the Statler Brothers, June Carter and the Carter Family. Briefly during 1962, he also managed the hard-drinking and unpredictable George Jones, who proved too volatile for Volatile. Mr. HOLIFF turned down Larry Gatlin and Kris Kristofferson, to his later regret.
At the end of an autograph session at the drive-in, Mr. Cash asked Mr. HOLIFF if they could go elsewhere to eat. The restaurateur was unoffended at this slight, accompanying the singer to a better eatery down the road.
The two men struck a quick Friendship. Shortly after the singer's death, Mr. HOLIFF recounted their meeting for reporter Walter Cordery of the Nanaimo Daily News. Mr. HOLIFF urged Mr. Cash to use the mobile telephone in his Cadillac to call home. Mr. Cash returned with a yellow pad of paper. "He said, 'Sign it,' so I did, then he signed it, and that was our contract," Mr. HOLIFF recalled.
Mr. Cash credited his new manager for taking his show and career to another level.
"Instead of just ballrooms and dance halls around the United States and Canada, he said, I could be aiming at Europe, the Orient, and big places in big cities -- Carnegie Hall perhaps, the Hollywood Bowl," Mr. Cash wrote in a 1997 autobiography. "And that could be just the beginning. I took him on and what he said, he did."
Mr. HOLIFF first booked Miss Carter to appear in Mr. Cash's show at the Big D Jamboree in Dallas on December 5, 1961. The manager and the future wife were the two influences which were to save Mr. Cash from his worst excesses with alcohol and amphetamines, Miss Carter with loving patience, Mr. HOLIFF with a steadying hand.
"I certainly wasn't the easiest of clients," Mr. Cash said. "Saul stayed pretty well insulated from the fallout, though. When I did something that left a mess -- things broken, people abused, money squandered, laws broken, jail cells visited -- his technique was simply to disappear, either back home to Ontario or out of touch, unavailable even by telephone."
Despite a deteriorating personal life, Mr. Cash enjoyed a succession of crossover hits, becoming a regular on the country and pop charts with such numbers as Ring of Fire, Ballad of Ira Hayes, It Ain't me Babe, and Jackson, among others. The 1968 album, Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison, with its novelty song A Boy Named Sue, made the singer an international sensation.
Mr. HOLIFF demanded and won huge payments for his client, earning six figures for appearances in Las Vegas. Mr. Cash was able to win a massive mainstream audience even as he seemed to remain true to his outsider sensibilities.
The singer starred in an eponymous variety show, which debuted on the ABC network on June 7, 1969. Mr. Cash sang duets on the inaugural program with Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell. Gordon Lightfoot and Buffy Saint Marie were other Canadian singers to appear in the first season.
In 1973, Mr. HOLIFF was associate producer of Gospel Road: A Story of Jesus, a feature filmed on location in Israel in which Mr. Cash describes the crucifixion and resurrection through music. His wife, June Carter Cash, played Mary Magdalene. Mr. HOLIFF had tired of his role as manager by then. He also figured, incorrectly as it turned out, Mr. Cash's career had peaked.
"He was as mercurial as they come," Mr. HOLIFF once told Adrian Chamberlain of the Victoria Times Colonist. "He was the quintessential enigmatic everything. He was kind, he was cruel, he was thoughtful, he was selfish. And he was smart."
The retired manager returned to university as a mature student, earning a bachelor's degree in history at the University of Victoria. He later moved to Nanaimo, where he died at home, as his death notice described, "at a time of his own choosing."
Saul HOLIFF was born on June 22, 1925, in London, Ontario He died on March 17 in Nanaimo, British Columbia He was 79. He leaves his wife, Barbara; sons Jonathan of Los Angeles and Joshua of Whitehorse, Yukon; brother Morris of Scottsdale, Arizona.

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