HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-03 published
Floyd NATTRASS, Trap Shooter And Salesman: 1918-2004
After competing at the Olympics without a coach, he learned a bitter lesson and became a gifted teacher of marksmanship
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, January 3, 2005 - Page S6
Victoria -- A keen eye for sniping game birds on the family ranch in Alberta led Floyd NATTRASS all the way to an Olympic shooting range. A spectacular collapse in the final rounds at the Tokyo Games in 1964, and his own disappointment with his performance, later made him a shooting coach of uncommon insight.
Mr. NATTRASS taught several generations of Alberta trap shooters, including up-and-comer Ty Bietz, who is regarded as a future Olympian. The student to have enjoyed the greatest success, however, has been his daughter, Susan NATTRASS, who in 1976 became the first woman to compete in trapshooting at the Olympics.
Mr. NATTRASS preached a commitment to the basics of the sport, such as how to weild a shotgun. "Bring it up to your face, not the shoulder," he once instructed a reporter from the Calgary Herald. "Don't muscle the gun. The left hand is like holding a fresh egg. The right hand is like holding a rattlesnake by the neck, so it doesn't bite you."
Born and raised in rural Alberta, Floyd Caldwell NATTRASS spent his early years on a ranch on which his father operated livery stables. As a boy, Floyd's daily duty was to shoot duck, pheasant or partridge for the family supper table. He also earned spending money by plugging such prairie nuisances as gophers and weasels at 50 cents each.
He hunted elk and other larger game as a young adult, although his reputation was as a scourge of coyotes, whose pelts he sold to build a nest egg for married life.
After joining the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Mr. NATTRASS was posted to New Brunswick as a constable. A Golden Gloves champion in his youth, he taught boxing to fellow Mounties until a bad back led to an early retirement.
Mr. NATTRASS became a fruit salesman who moonlighted as a hunting guide. On one such expedition, he struck up a Friendship with the president of an Edmonton clothing manufacturer, who hired the guide as a travelling salesman. For many years, Mr. NATTRASS sold the blue jeans and other durable work clothes made by the Great Western Garment Co., and became national sales manager.
It was during another hunting foray that a client suggested the dead-eye shot take up competitive shooting and Mr. NATTRASS soon won provincial and national titles. He represented Canada at the world championships three times.
In 1958, Mr. NATTRASS won the Sahara Gun Club's annual midwinter trap shoot in Las Vegas by hitting 98 of 100 targets before striking all 25 clay pigeons in a shoot-off against a Kansan and a Californian.
The 1964 Olympic trapshooting competition was held in the Tokyo suburb of Tokorozawa, where Mr. NATTRASS competed without a coach. After six of eight rounds, the Alberta shooter was tied for fourth place, trailing the leader by just three points and in contention for a medal. Then calamity struck. His timing slowed even as he perceived his trigger finger to be too eager and he finished ninth.
Later, the silver medalist from the Soviet Union and a sheik from the United Arab Republic told Mr. NATTRASS they had spotted the flaw in his technique, though they felt it improper to tell him during competition. The disappointed shooter made a lifetime commitment to provide coaching -- the lack of which he felt had cost him a medal.
While he grounded his daughter in the fundamentals of the sport, she found her father's intense presence at competitions to be a distraction. He was asked to stay away and, since 1969, her mother has been her coach. Her parents have long been separated.
At the 1976 Olympics in Montreal, Ms. NATTRASS became the first woman to compete against men at trapshooting. Her lobbying eventually led to women gaining their own shooting events.
Mr. NATTRASS continued to give shooting lessons until slowed by ill health earlier this year. He also tinkered with equipment to improve the sport, especially sights. According to the Herald, he owned a patent for a device he called the Super Sighter.
Floyd NATTRASS was born in Manyberries, Alberta., on January 2, 1918. He died at High River Hospital on December 7, 2004. He was 86. He leaves daughter, Susan NATTRASS, a medical researcher in Seattle; sons Brian NATTRASS, a lawyer and author from Gibsons, British Columbia; and Dr. Gary NATTRASS, an orthopedic surgeon in Australia; their mother, Marie; and three grandchildren.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-22 published
Figure skater dominated national competition
By Tom HAWTHORN, Saturday, January 22, 2005 - Page S7
Victoria -- Sandy McKECHNIE, who has died aged 83, won five national figure-skating championships before going off to war.
Mr. McKECHNIE was aged 17 when he claimed the Canadian junior men's title in a 1939 meet at the Toronto Skating Club.
"Displaying even rhythm in his dance steps and executing the difficult double-loop, lutz and salchows with perfect precision, Sandy gave one of the most pleasing performances witnessed on Toronto ice," wrote Bobbie ROSENFELD in the Globe and Mail.
Mr. McKECHNIE also skated on the winning fours team that year with clubmates Gillian WATSON, Ruth HALL and Donald GILCHRIST. In 1941, he won a national dance title in tenstep with Norah McCARTHY. The following year he won two more Canadian titles with Eleanor O'MEARA, claiming the waltz and pairs championships. His ice partner, who died at age 83 five years ago, became a star with the Ice Capades, with whom she was known as a "ballerina of the blades."
The pair joined others in a "South Seas" extravaganza including 500 performers and a 100-piece orchestra at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto in the winter of 1941. He unlaced his skates to join the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve, serving as a lieutenant aboard the anti-submarine corvette Algoma.
A sportsman all his life, he was later president of the Toronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club.
James Alexander McKECHNIE was born at Toronto on August 25, 1921. He moved to Victoria in 1980, where he died at his home on January 9, leaving his wife, Sally; a daughter; and a sister. He was predeceased by a son.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-19 published
Nancy OAKES, Heiress: 1924-2005
The Toronto-born socialite's courtroom testimony helped save her playboy husband from the gallows. He had been accused in the sensational 1943 murder of her father, the Ontario mining magnate Harry OAKES
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, February 19, 2005 - Page S9
A young Nancy OAKES faced a tragedy beyond comprehension. Her millionaire father, Sir Harry OAKES, was bludgeoned and set afire at his beachfront mansion in the Bahamas; her playboy husband, a Mauritian-born count, was charged with the murder.
Police described to her in sordid detail a killing about which they had no doubt as to guilt. The widow, Eunice Lady OAKES, believed police had fingered the culprit. The opinion was shared by her peers in Bahamian high society, who at last found an excuse for their lingering dislike of the foreigner with a French title.
In the face of overwhelming animosity, with evidence weighing against her husband, Nancy OAKES chose to believe the word of the man with whom she had eloped a scant 14 months earlier. The love affair scandalized her parents, who harboured great antipathy for a son-in-law they suspected of being a gigolo and a gold digger. The daughter's marriage put at risk her inheritance of one of the world's greatest fortunes, created from gold found in Northern Ontario.
Blessed with the good fortune to be born the beautiful daughter of a multimillionaire, with auburn hair that turned heads at the yacht club, Nancy OAKES accepted the role of faithful and trusting wife with a sang-froid beyond her years. She agreed to be the final witness for the defence at her husband's trial.
Her testimony could determine his fate -- freedom, or the gallows. She was just 19.
The murder and subsequent trial bumped war news from the front page of newspapers around the English-speaking world in 1943. The teenaged bride would forever after be known for what happened in those days, a legacy that she would carry to her death, on January 16 in London, at the age of 80.
The case has inspired a television mini-series, as well as Hollywood films and several true-crime books. Novelists also have delighted in the characters: a wealthy gold miner, his beautiful (but spoiled) daughter, her louche lover, and, irresistibly, the Duke of Windsor, the abdicated Edward VIII appointed governor of the colony, who was to have golfed with Mr. OAKES on the day of his murder and whose inexplicable interference with the investigation raises questions that remain unanswered to this day.
Born in Toronto, Nancy OAKES was the first of Harry OAKES's five children. Their father was a gruff and irascible man whose ample generosity did not always extend to his offspring.
Mr. OAKES, who was born and raised in Maine, quit medical school as a young man to join the Klondike gold rush in 1898. He laboured in poverty for years before staking a successful claim near Swastika, Ontario He later sold his share in the claim to finance what would become the greatest gold discovery in the Western Hemisphere, the Lake Shore Mine at Kirkland Lake.
Soon, he was the richest man in the land, owning a lakeside chateau near the mine as well as a hilltop estate on 20 acres overlooking the Niagara River. These would be Nancy OAKES's first homes.
In 1934, he abandoned Canada for the British West Indies to avoid taxes levied on his great fortune by the Conservatives. Five years later, he was granted a baronetcy by the king for his philanthropy.
His eldest daughter was schooled at Heathfield in Ascot, England the Fermata in Aiken, S. C.; and the French School for Girls in New York. She spent holidays with her family on the Bahamian archipelago. On one of those visits she danced with Marie-Alfred Fouquereaux DE MARIGNY, known as Count MARIGNY of Mauritius to the newspapers and as Freddie MARIGNY to his Friends. Majestic at 6-foot-5, dark-skinned from many hours aboard his yacht, he was possessed of many flamboyant skills.
On May 19, 1942, two days after Nancy OAKES attained her majority, she was married to her dashing suitor by a county-court judge in a ceremony in the Bronx. News of the elopement shocked her parents, who disapproved of the groom, who, at 32, was already twice divorced. (Sir Harry seemed to forget he was 48 when he married Eunice McINTYRE, 26, following a whirlwind romance.) Relations were frosty.
On the morning of July 8, 1943, Sir Harry was discovered on his back in bed in his second-floor chambers at Westbourne, a seaside estate surrounded by hibiscus and bougainvillea. He was found by his best friend, Harold CHRISTIE, a wealthy real-estate agent risen from poverty who was the baron's only house guest that night.
As court would be told, Sir Harry's face was blackened by soot, his groin and left hand burned. He had four small puncture wounds above his left ear. Blood from his ear had dried across the bridge of his nose. The body was covered in small pillow feathers, which waved grotesquely from the stirrings in the room.
As governor, the Duke of Windsor decided not to entrust the investigation into the murder of the colony's wealthiest citizen to the local constabulary, nor to Scotland Yard. Instead, he called in two detectives from nearby Miami. If the duke wished a quick resolution, he got it. Within hours, the detectives arrested Mr. DE MARIGNY, announcing they had found his fingerprints on a Chinese bed screen at the murder scene.
The count's wife, who, like her mother and siblings was in the United States at the time of the killing, returned home convinced of her spouse's innocence. She visited him in jail twice a week. "I do all I can to make my husband comfortable," she told a reporter. "I send linens and special dishes to him -- chicken and fish and things like that. I suppose Freddie is what you'd call a gourmet."
Meanwhile, Sir Harry's will was filed for probate shortly before the opening of what was billed as the trial of the century. Rumours of disinheritance proved wrong. The will, representing Nassau holdings only, disposed of £3,671,700. The widow was awarded one-third, with the remainder to be divided among the five children. The countess was to receive two-fifteenths of her father's fortune on turning 30, with an annual living allowance until then.
A Bahamas Supreme Court jury heard the Miami detectives present the Crown's only physical evidence against the count, a single print from the pinky finger of his right hand, introduced as Exhibit J.
The count wept silently in the dock before composing himself as his wife began testifying on November 9, 1943. She was dressed in a black suit with white polka dots, wearing a white hat and white gloves, "an appealing figure," one writer noted, "composed but pale."
The defence wished to use her testimony to rebut the Crown's suggested motive for murder.
"Mrs. DE MARIGNY," asked defence counsel, "at any time during your married life has the accused ever attempted to obtain money from you?"
"No," Nancy replied.
"Has the accused ever made a statement of hatred toward your father?"
"No."
The defence had demolished earlier the Crown's fingerprint evidence, proving the print had come not from the bed screen but likely from an opaque drinking glass, or the cellophane wrap from a pack of cigarettes. Both had been handed to the count by the Miami detectives, raising questions as to their competence, if not criminality.
The jury deliberated for one hour, 55 minutes before reaching a verdict of not guilty on a 9-3 vote. The verdict was cheered in the courtroom, yet the jury had also called for the count's expulsion from the colony.
With the baron's estate tied up in court, the young couple auctioned household goods to finance their exile in Cuba, where they stayed with Ernest Hemingway.
By 1945, they had separated, the count signing an agreement reneging on claims on her inheritance. He came to Montreal and enlisted in the Canadian Army. In 1949, the New York Supreme Court ruled the count's second divorce had not met statutory requirements at the time he married the heiress. Their marriage was annulled.
In April, 1946, the heiress flew to Copenhagen after receiving news of the death of Joergen Edsberg, a Danish Royal Air Force pilot she planned to marry as soon as each obtained a divorce. She arrived the day after a military funeral attended by the pilot's wife and son, leaving a bouquet of lilacs at a grave left open at the request of the pilot's mother.
Nancy OAKES's life was filled with tragic loss, her father's savage murder being only the best known. An aunt drowned in the sinking of the liner S.S. Mohawk off the New Jersey coast in 1935; a brother, William Pitt OAKES, died of a heart attack complicated by a liver ailment at 27 in 1958; brother Sydney, who inherited Sir Harry's title, was killed at 39 in 1966 when his Sunbeam Alpine failed to negotiate a curve. A sister, Shirley, spent the final years of her life in a coma following an accident.
After the war, Nancy OAKES provided fodder for gossip columnists by being squired by dashing Hollywood stars. "Heiress Nancy OAKES and Philip Reed are Movietown's Big Talk," Walter Winchell wrote in an item typical of what was also to be found under the bylines of Dorothy Kilgallen and Hedda Hopper.
In a candlelight church ceremony performed by the Lord Bishop of Nassau before a society crowd on December 29, 1952, Nancy OAKES wed Baron Ernst Lyssardt VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE of Oberammergau, Germany, a union that would end in divorce less than four years later.
On March 1, 1962, she married Patrick Claude Henry Tritton, a Cambridge-educated importer of typewriters and firefighting equipment. Her third wedding was held before a handful of close Friends at the British ambassador's residence in Mexico City. Mr. Tritton was said to have been the model for the Anthony Powell character Dicky Umfraville, a likeable rogue.
After that marriage failed, she resumed using her second husband's name, not discouraging the practice of being called the baroness.
Erle Stanley Gardner, the creator of Perry Mason, called the baffling case "the greatest murder mystery of all time." Sent by Time magazine to cover the trial, he maintained Sir Harry was not killed in bed, but was moved there after death, as the burns on the bedding did not match those on the body. As well, the dried blood across the bridge of the nose indicated the body had been rolled over after death. The writer raised the spectre of the baron being tortured.
The murder has been attributed to a love triangle, to a voodoo ritual killing, and to mobsters Meyer Lansky and Lucky Luciano, whose dreams of casinos in the colony might have been thwarted by the powerful Sir Harry. Even the Duke of Windsor is not above suspicion.
Count DE MARIGNY, who died in Houston in 1998, wrote a book accusing Mr. OAKES's best friend, Mr. Christie, later Sir Harold, of ordering the murder. The crime remains unsolved 61 years after Nancy OAKES successfully asserted her husband's innocence.
Nancy Oakes VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE was born in Toronto on May 17, 1924. She died in London on January 16, aged 80, and was buried in Nassau, the Bahamas, on January 28. She leaves a son, Baron Alexander VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE, known as Sasha; a daughter, Patricia Oakes LEIGH- WOOD; and a younger brother, Harry OAKES.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-25 published
Harold STAFFORD, Lawyer 1921-2005
Lawyer who rode the Trudeaumania wave to hold onto a seat in Parliament later faced charges of fraud, theft and breach of trust
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, February 25, 2005 - Page S7
As a criminal defence lawyer, Harold STAFFORD anticipated spending much of his life in court. He could not have imagined in law school that he would be doing so as a defendant.
Mr. STAFFORD, who has died at age 83, was a prominent lawyer in Saint Thomas, Ontario, representing clients charged as petty thieves, failed killers and fraud artists.
His experiences with such a wide spectrum of citizenry perhaps prepared him for a career in politics, during which he served seven years as a Liberal member of Parliament.
In the years following his defeat at the polls, Mr. STAFFORD found himself dealing with a succession of personal legal troubles in cases serious, bizarre, and whimsical. Most seriously, he faced fraud charges in court for 4½ years before the matter was stayed.
In 1984, Mr. STAFFORD and another businessman were charged with fraud, theft and criminal breach of trust in the handling of more than $60,000 from the accounts of a cemetery in Woodstock, Ontario
As most of the money had been repaid by the time charges were brought, lawyers for Mr. STAFFORD and his co-accused sought to have the case dismissed for violating the fundamental justice provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. According to press reports, their application was rejected by a district court judge. That decision was upheld by the Ontario Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Canada.
A stay of proceedings was at last ordered in June, 1988, after a Crown attorney told a district court judge that exhibits were missing. Earlier, court was told that the charges caused Mr. STAFFORD to lose clients, suffer depression, and endure the indignity of losing an election to become a delegate to the 1984 Liberal leadership convention.
The end of the matter did not complete his legal woes. In 1999, he signed an agreement to retire and not practice law as part of an undertaking in which a charge of obstruction of justice against him was dropped. Mr. STAFFORD had allegedly attempted to influence the testimony of a witness in a case in which he was acting as a defence lawyer. He continued to work as a paralegal, causing a ruckus when he appeared in a Chatham courtroom with a client the following year. Despite concerns raised by the Crown, he succeeded in getting charges of drinking and driving dropped.
A headline in the Chatham Daily News read: STAFFORD Shows Up And Gets Client Off.
In 1980, Mr. STAFFORD was acquitted of income-tax evasion in provincial court. The charge related to his Erie Properties Ltd., which failed to file a 1979 return. In 1978, a fraud and conspiracy case involving Brazilian gold, Dutch diamonds and Venezuelan fighter planes ended in a mistrial after Mr. STAFFORD alleged jury tampering. He also said an attempt had been made on his life, according to a copyright story in the Woodstock Sentinel-Review.
Mr. STAFFORD made the allegations after being fired as a defence lawyer by one of the accused men. Earlier in the trial, he had been accused of blackmail by a lawyer representing another of the defendants.
In contrast to those dramatic years in court, his political career was serene.
Mr. STAFFORD, a Liberal, needed to contest three elections in the riding of Elgin in Southwestern Ontario before wresting the seat from the Progressive Conservatives. He lost to Tory incumbent James McBAIN, a farmer, by just 78 votes of 27,618 cast in 1962. Mr. McBAIN was re-elected the following year, but in 1965 Mr. STAFFORD ended 20 years of Tory rule, winning by 1,047 votes.
Re-elected during the Trudeaumania campaign of 1968, Mr. STAFFORD lost the seat to dairy farmer John WISE four years later. Mr. WISE would serve as agriculture minister under prime ministers Joe CLARK and Brian MULRONEY.
Born in New Brunswick, Harold Edwin STAFFORD was a sergeant in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. He was stationed at Saint Thomas, where he taught Commonwealth pilots.
He graduated with a bachelor of science degree before earning a civil law degree in 1951 at the University of New Brunswick. A Lord Beaverbrook scholarship allowed him to study at the London School of Economics.
He began practising law in Ontario in 1953, being named Queen's Counsel in 1969.
At least one of his scrapes with the law had a humorous twist. He was on his way to court to represent three men charged with attempted murder in 1991 when he crashed his Cadillac into a pole. When he told police about the accident at the Woodstock courthouse, he was arrested and taken to the police station for a breathalyzer test. He was released without charge. However, his admission to having suffered a minor stroke three years earlier led police to deliver Mr. STAFFORD to hospital to have his blood pressure tested. A three-hour hospital wait after the day's events likely did not improve the reading.
Harold STAFFORD was born in Birdton, New Brunswick, near Fredericton, on April 20, 1921. He died on January 18 at Saint Thomas, Ontario He was 83.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-08 published
Solly CANTOR, Boxer: 1928-2005
Canadian lightweight who was more artful practitioner than brawler skillfully put away a parade of champions but never won a title himself
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, March 8, 2005 - Page S9
Solly CANTOR fought his way into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame despite never having won a professional title. Not blessed with knockout power, yet clever in using a debilitating left fist, Mr. CANTOR was more boxer than brawler. He won 41 professional fights, only six by knockout. He lost 14 and drew eight.
His nemesis in the ring was Montrealer Armand Savoie, against whom he had four fights in 1951 that were remembered for their spilt blood, much of it Mr. CANTOR's. He twice battled Mr. Savoie for the Canadian lightweight championship, losing both by decisions. One of those verdicts was widely considered to have been a travesty.
Mr. CANTOR earned his place among boxing immortals with non-title victories over a talented selection of lightweight titleholders Frank Johnson (a Commonwealth champion); Billy Thompson (British and European); Elis Ask of Finland (European); and Tommy McGovern (British).
A stinging left hand was Mr. CANTOR's calling card in the ring. He was adept at delivering a jab, a hook or a cross with that hand, a skill learned as a cocky amateur fighting out of the Central Young Men's Christian Association in his hometown.
Solly Cantor BONAPARTE was born in Toronto, the son of a taxi driver. His father, Louis CANTOROVICI, was a Romanian native whose family name had been altered to Bonaparte by a mischievous immigration officer. The Bonaparte children -- there would be four in all -- were born and raised in a house on Parliament Street south of Queen. Their Corktown neighbourhood was one in which it was advantageous to know how to punch.
The boy took up fighting after admiring boxers at a gym. His parents disapproved and never watched any of his matches; his siblings attended bouts at Maple Leaf Gardens, but would wait in the corridor, unable to bear the sight of Solly being hit. Happily, he was more likely to administer punishment than absorb it. That fast left fist allowed 17-year-old Solly BONAPARTE to score a close decision over Joe McPHEE -- one of the Fighting McPhees from Oshawa, Ontario -- to claim the Ontario amateur title in the 126-pound division on May 16, 1946.
Turning pro later that year as Solly CANTOR, he moved to Paterson, New Jersey, from where he was often added to the undercard of programs at Madison Square Garden in Manhattan. After building an impressive 24-4-2 record, Mr. CANTOR moved to London, where he defeated Mr. Thompson, Mr. McGovern and Mr. Ask, all by decision.
A dispute with his manager led to a nine-month layoff. Mr. CANTOR returned to his hometown, where his fortunes became a staple of the sports pages. The reporters often called attention to the size of his nose, playing to a racial stereotype in common currency at the time.
Mr. CANTOR's boxing trunks bore a Star of David on the left leg, a sign not only of pride but also a nod to the unsubtle marketing of his sport. Some fans came to cheer a Jewish champion, others to see him beaten.
The first of four battles with Mr. Savoie in 1951 ended after the eighth round, with Mr. CANTOR needing six stitches to close a gash across the bridge of his nose. The losing fighter said a head butt had caused the wound; the victor insisted the cut came courtesy of "a stinging right cross." In any case, Mr. CANTOR had suffered only the second knockout of his career.
Mr. CANTOR won a rematch in June, setting the stage for a much-anticipated third showdown, this one before Mr. Savoie's fans in Montreal, with the Canadian championship in the balance. Mr. CANTOR scored often with his left, staggering Mr. Savoie with a straight-arm right in the sixth round.
As the bell rang at the end of the 12th and final round, the conclusion seemed clear, as boxing promoter Frank Tunney, sitting at ringside, would later describe: "The fight was so one-sided in CANTOR's favour that when the announcer first said, 'Winner by a unanimous decision...,' a bunch of us at ringside were busy talking and took it for granted the decision was CANTOR's, as it should have been. But when he added 'Savoie,' we nearly fell off our chairs. Then he had to correct himself to say it was a split decision. The partisan French fans booed the judges for minutes on end. Solly was jobbed."
The unpopular decision made necessary another obligatory rematch, held in Toronto six weeks later. Having lost the previous fight at ringside, Mr. CANTOR was not eager to allow the judges to settle the match. "I'm going out for a knockout," he said. "Maybe this one won't go the scheduled 12 rounds."
With an uncharacteristic aggressiveness, Mr. CANTOR lunged toward the champion in the opening round. The strategy was at first successful, but Mr. Savoie was soon crowding the challenger, absorbing his best shots with his gloves. A unanimous decision in the champ's favour was regarded as a just verdict.
"Solly is a terrific boxer, but he fought my kind of fight tonight," Mr. Savoie said. "I know if I tried to box him, I was beaten before I started. You have to work all the time against him. You have to stay inside him. And when you do hit him, he fights back and he won't fold."
After losing two fights in Alberta to George Dunn, an American who once arrived at Toronto airport and asked a cabbie to take him to Edmonton, Mr. CANTOR returned to England, where he ended his professional career and took up permanent residence.
His final bout came on October 4, 1955, when he scored a victory on points over Frank Johnson, the Manchester lightweight who had briefly held the Commonwealth title two years earlier.
Only 11 of Mr. CANTOR's 63 fights were held in Canada.
Mr. CANTOR worked as a court clerk after leaving the ring. A first marriage ended in divorce. He became a Methodist when he married his second wife.
In recent years, the old fighter found a renewed sense of purpose by joining the Croydon Ex-Boxers' Association. The group was "one big, happy family," Mr. CANTOR wrote Vancouver Sun boxing columnist Graham Houston seven years ago. "We were all part and parcel of each others' past."
Mr. CANTOR continued to attend meetings last year, even as he lost the use of his limbs from the motor-neuron disease that would claim his life. No one expected any less; he had answered the bell for every round of every fight but for four.
Solly CANTOR was born in Toronto on September 18, 1928 (although some boxing references put his birth date two years earlier). He died at his home in suburban Mitcham, outside London, England, on January 28, 2005. He leaves his second wife, Miriam; Brenda RAWSON, a daughter from his first marriage; brother Harold BONAPARTE and sisters Toby BAZKUR and Sarah MARCHILDON.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-23 published
Rower's Olympic hopes were truly crushed
By Tom HAWTHORN, Wednesday, March 23, 2005, Page S9
Victoria -- Lloyd MONTOUR, a member of Canada's ill-fated rowing team at the 1952 Olympics, has died in Duncan, British Columbia He was 79.
Mr. MONTOUR and three other from the Leander club of Hamilton, Ontario, had qualified for the Helsinki Olympics by winning the Dominion championship. Hopes for a medal were dashed when the freighter carrying the team's boats was rocked by a fierce storm. The boats were crushed by shifting cargo. Later, the Canadians borrowed old Swedish boats that proved to be among the slowest afloat.
Lloyd Daniel MONTOUR was a star athlete in Hamilton in his youth. He won a national championship with the Panthers intermediate football team, as well as a national junior rowing title in the eights.
Mr. MONTOUR worked for many years in Alberta at the Banff School of the Arts, now the Banff Centre. He died at his Vancouver Island home on January 22. He leaves his wife of 38 years, Eleanor a son; and three sisters.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-09 published
Bill BOETTGER, Bowler 1941-2005
Kitchener's 'Captain Canada' commanded both neat-and-tidy lawn bowling and its noisy, indoor five-pin cousin
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, April 9, 2005, Page S9
Bill BOETTGER was adept at bowling his ball, whether working the manicured lawns of a placid club or the waxed wood of a cacophonous alley.
His mastery of both games displayed a skill rare in the sport, where the raucous, blue-collar culture of the indoor game stands in noisy contrast to the serene, white-clad deportment of its outdoor cousin.
By size, if not temperament, Mr. BOETTGER seemed better suited to the game of Ralph Kramden, Fred Flintstone and the Big Lebowski. Yet it was on the greens of the British Commonwealth that he won his greatest acclaim, as well as the nickname Captain Canada.
English fans saw Mr. BOETTGER paired with Ronnie Jones and dubbed them "Little and Large," after the famous comedy duo. The bowling pair won a silver medal at the 1986 Commonwealth Games at Edinburgh, Scotland.
In 1991, Mr. BOETTGER won three gold medals -- in pairs, fours and as top tournament bowler -- at the 13-nation Pacific lawn bowling championship in Hong Kong. The three golds were the first won by Canada at an international bowls championship.
By 1997, he was coach of Canada's national team, a position he would hold for four years. He spent 18 consecutive years as a member of the team.
William Earl BOETTGER was a native of Kitchener, Ontario Introduced to five-pin bowling by his parents, he got a job as a pinboy at Waterloo Lanes. Among his fellow pinsetters was Moe NORMAN, the eccentric golfing genius.
In his final game in the pinboys' league, Mr. BOETTGER rolled a perfect game of 450 points. In 1974, at Regina, he won the Canadian masters singles title.
He wrote a curriculum for coaching and teaching five-pin bowling that is still in use today. He also coached Kitchener's famed blind lawn bowler, Vivian BERKELEY, when he took over duties from her regular coach Don MAYNE. Over the years, Ms. BERKELEY has won national titles, a silver medal at the 1996 Paralympics in Atlanta and a bronze at Commonwealth Games in Manchester three years ago.
In 1997, Mr. BOETTGER was inducted into the Ontario 5-Pin Bowling Hall of Fame as a builder. That same year, he retired as a mathematics teacher after 31 years at Eastwood Collegiate in his hometown.
William Earl BOETTGER was born in Kitchener, Ontario, on October 26, 1941. He died at Grand River Hospital in Kitchener on January 22. He was 63.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-09 published
Saul HOLIFF, Agent and Manager: 1925-2005
Sober-minded businessman from London, Ontario, was Johnny Cash's manager from 1960 to 1973, a provocative period that produced the singer's famed live recordings at Folsom and San Quentin prisons
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, May 9, 2005, Page S6
Victoria -- Johnny Cash had enjoyed modest success as a country artist before meeting Saul HOLIFF, a Canadian restaurateur who saw great potential in the guitar-toting baritone.
Mr. HOLIFF believed Mr. Cash deserved better than ordinary dance-hall gigs. He vowed to book the rough-hewn troubadour at no less grand a venue than Carnegie Hall, a promise he would fulfill shortly after becoming his manager.
Nor was the Manhattan landmark the limit to Mr. HOLIFF's ambitions for the entertainer, who was set along a path that would include appearances in feature films and the hosting of his own variety show on network television.
Along the way, Mr. Cash became a singular figure in pop culture, an icon whose rebel persona was expressed by his monochromatic wardrobe and self-chosen description as the Man in Black, which also served as the title to his autobiography. He achieved great fame before his death in 2003, his exposure owing much to the vision and hard work of Mr. HOLIFF.
Mr. HOLIFF was his manager from 1960 to 1973, years in which Mr. Cash became a fixture in the popular imagination, not the least for his daring live recordings behind bars at Folsom Prison and San Quentin.
They were an unlikely pair, the hard-living Christian from rural Arkansas and the sober-minded businessman from London, Ontario Nor was their relationship free from the strife that was a feature of much of Mr. Cash's life. The manager's response to his artist's benders was to retreat. He would wait at home for the inevitable telephone call from an unapologetic Mr. Cash, who would want to return to the road after getting straight.
Mr. HOLIFF was also responsible for getting June Carter to join Mr. Cash's touring show. She would become the singer's second wife and was credited with saving him from drink and drugs. Mr. Cash announced his intention to marry her during a show in London, Ontario, his manager's hometown.
Over the years, a grateful Mr. Cash presented 28 gold records to Mr. HOLIFF. The pair's success was all the more surprising considering that at their first meeting Mr. HOLIFF knew little about pop music and nothing about country. He preferred jazz and classical.
Mr. HOLIFF was raised in Southern Ontario by immigrant parents. His father, Joel, arrived alone from Russia in 1913, working to earn money to send for his wife, Esther, and two daughters. The plan was interrupted by the outbreak of the First World War and, later, the Russian Revolution and subsequent civil war.
The family was not reunited until 1920, by which time a daughter had died. A son, Morris, was born three years, followed by Israel in 1925. The parents soon decided they did not wish to have their youngest child known as Izzy, so instead called him Saul. He would be an adult before discovering it was not his birth name. During the Depression, he delivered newspapers before and after school and sold magazine subscriptions door to door.
With his older brother, he later made the rounds of the neighbourhood to gather large quantities of recyclable newspaper for the war effort. The HOLIFF brothers also delivered fruits and vegetables, while Saul's busy resume included stints as a truck driver and an iron puddler on the night shift at a steel mill. He also sold ladies garments as a travelling salesman. Though underage, he enlisted with the Royal Canadian Air Force, where he completed training as a rear gunner without, in his words, "causing too much damage to my own side." The Second World War ended before he was sent overseas.
After the war, he indulged a passion for theatre by joining a semiprofessional company in performances at the Grand Theatre in London. Barbara ROBINSON's first glimpse of her future husband came as he played Sgt. Gregovich in Teahouse of the August Moon. They married in 1964.
Mr. HOLIFF was also partner in a drive-in restaurant called Sol's Square Boy. The drive-in boasted electronic ordering machines at each parking stall. Food was delivered by carhop, the servings offered on square platters. Hamburger patties were also formed and cooked square, providing "four extra bites," an innovation later used to great success by the Wendy's fast-food chain.
The foray into music management happened by accident. Mr. HOLIFF became a moonlighting impresario to promote his business. Performers at rock 'n' roll shows were expected to hold autograph sessions at the drive-in, generating much interest among local teenagers.
Among the acts were such trailblazers as Duane Eddy and Bill Haley and the Comets. Mr. HOLIFF rode a teen tidal wave. An early foray was a concert billed as a "rockabilly dance spectacle" held at the Palace Pier in Toronto in 1957. The headlining act was "the Bye-Bye Love Everly Brothers," while concert-goers were eligible for such prizes as rock LPs, a transistor radio, and a 48-piece set of silverware.
Volatile Attractions, the showbiz management company Mr. HOLIFF operated with his wife, attracted exceptional talent. Among his clients were Carl Perkins, Tommy Hunter, Barbara Mandrell, the Statler Brothers, June Carter and the Carter Family. Briefly during 1962, he also managed the hard-drinking and unpredictable George Jones, who proved too volatile for Volatile. Mr. HOLIFF turned down Larry Gatlin and Kris Kristofferson, to his later regret.
At the end of an autograph session at the drive-in, Mr. Cash asked Mr. HOLIFF if they could go elsewhere to eat. The restaurateur was unoffended at this slight, accompanying the singer to a better eatery down the road.
The two men struck a quick Friendship. Shortly after the singer's death, Mr. HOLIFF recounted their meeting for reporter Walter Cordery of the Nanaimo Daily News. Mr. HOLIFF urged Mr. Cash to use the mobile telephone in his Cadillac to call home. Mr. Cash returned with a yellow pad of paper. "He said, 'Sign it,' so I did, then he signed it, and that was our contract," Mr. HOLIFF recalled.
Mr. Cash credited his new manager for taking his show and career to another level.
"Instead of just ballrooms and dance halls around the United States and Canada, he said, I could be aiming at Europe, the Orient, and big places in big cities -- Carnegie Hall perhaps, the Hollywood Bowl," Mr. Cash wrote in a 1997 autobiography. "And that could be just the beginning. I took him on and what he said, he did."
Mr. HOLIFF first booked Miss Carter to appear in Mr. Cash's show at the Big D Jamboree in Dallas on December 5, 1961. The manager and the future wife were the two influences which were to save Mr. Cash from his worst excesses with alcohol and amphetamines, Miss Carter with loving patience, Mr. HOLIFF with a steadying hand.
"I certainly wasn't the easiest of clients," Mr. Cash said. "Saul stayed pretty well insulated from the fallout, though. When I did something that left a mess -- things broken, people abused, money squandered, laws broken, jail cells visited -- his technique was simply to disappear, either back home to Ontario or out of touch, unavailable even by telephone."
Despite a deteriorating personal life, Mr. Cash enjoyed a succession of crossover hits, becoming a regular on the country and pop charts with such numbers as Ring of Fire, Ballad of Ira Hayes, It Ain't me Babe, and Jackson, among others. The 1968 album, Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison, with its novelty song A Boy Named Sue, made the singer an international sensation.
Mr. HOLIFF demanded and won huge payments for his client, earning six figures for appearances in Las Vegas. Mr. Cash was able to win a massive mainstream audience even as he seemed to remain true to his outsider sensibilities.
The singer starred in an eponymous variety show, which debuted on the ABC network on June 7, 1969. Mr. Cash sang duets on the inaugural program with Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell. Gordon Lightfoot and Buffy Saint Marie were other Canadian singers to appear in the first season.
In 1973, Mr. HOLIFF was associate producer of Gospel Road: A Story of Jesus, a feature filmed on location in Israel in which Mr. Cash describes the crucifixion and resurrection through music. His wife, June Carter Cash, played Mary Magdalene. Mr. HOLIFF had tired of his role as manager by then. He also figured, incorrectly as it turned out, Mr. Cash's career had peaked.
"He was as mercurial as they come," Mr. HOLIFF once told Adrian Chamberlain of the Victoria Times Colonist. "He was the quintessential enigmatic everything. He was kind, he was cruel, he was thoughtful, he was selfish. And he was smart."
The retired manager returned to university as a mature student, earning a bachelor's degree in history at the University of Victoria. He later moved to Nanaimo, where he died at home, as his death notice described, "at a time of his own choosing."
Saul HOLIFF was born on June 22, 1925, in London, Ontario He died on March 17 in Nanaimo, British Columbia He was 79. He leaves his wife, Barbara; sons Jonathan of Los Angeles and Joshua of Whitehorse, Yukon; brother Morris of Scottsdale, Arizona.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-06 published
Fast-scoring rookie starred as a Maple Leaf
By Tom HAWTHORN, Wednesday, July 6, 2005, Page S7
Oshawa, Ontario -- Gus BODNAR, a stylish centre who won two Stanley Cups with the Toronto Maple Leafs, has died in Oshawa, Ontario He was 82.
Mr. BODNAR became an instant fan favourite at Maple Leaf Gardens when he scored after only 15 seconds of play in his National Hockey League debut on October 30, 1943. The feat remains a league record. He had 22 goals and 40 assists in his inaugural season to win the Calder Memorial Trophy as the National Hockey League's top rookie.
He helped Toronto win the Stanley Cup in 1945 and 1947, after which he was traded to the Chicago Black Hawks in a blockbuster, seven-player deal.
The 5-foot-11, 160-pound centre earned another place in the National Hockey League record book on March 23, 1952, by assisting on all of Bill Mosienko's three goals in 21 seconds.
A successful coaching career in minor hockey included guiding the Toronto Marlboros to the Memorial Cup championship in 1967.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-09 published
Gus BODNAR, Athlete, Coach And Salesman 1923-2005
In 1943, the handsome and 'dimpled darling' of the Maple Leafs was the quickest, slickest thing on skates when he set an National Hockey League record for the fastest goal scored by a rookie
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, July 9, 2005, Page S9
Vancouver -- On October 30, 1943, Ontario Premier George DREW stepped to centre ice at Maple Leaf Gardens to drop the puck for a ceremonial face-off. The Toronto Maple Leafs had several rookies in the lineup to start the season, as wartime enlistments thinned the ranks. Among those skating into the breach was a handsome 20-year-old centre-man named Gus BODNAR.
Fifteen seconds from the start of the game, Mr. BODNAR pounced on a loose puck in front of the New York Rangers net. He slipped the disk into the net past goalie Ken McAuley. Just like that, the young forward had etched his name in the National Hockey League record book. Nearly 62 years later, the goal still stands as the quickest scored by a player making his debut.
Mr. BODNAR added another goal and an assist in leading the Leafs to a 5-2 win in the season opener, a performance that made him an instant fan favourite in Toronto.
Mr. BODNAR was a wiry centre with a reputation as a savvy playmaker. As a 5-foot-11, 150-pound rookie, he seemed a tad fragile to survive professional hockey's take-no-prisoners combat. Indeed, he would suffer a lengthy list of wounds and ailments in his career. He exited many games on his back courtesy of stretcher bearers and more than once did so while unconscious. Yet, he always seemed to be back on the ice within a week or two.
Sportswriters praised the skills of the "dynamic midget" who was described as a "resourceful young puckster" and "one of the slickest skaters ever."
The "dimpled darling" of "cherubic countenance" received poetry and mash notes from female admirers in those years when so many men were serving overseas. Mr. BODNAR, who had been rejected for army service for heart palpitations, was said to inflict that condition on his bobby-soxer fans. One piece of doggerel that made the newspapers read: "We want Gussy, good or bad/ He's the cutest number you've ever had."
What his erstwhile suitors did not know was that he was carrying a torch for a high-school sweetheart back home in Fort William (now Thunder Bay).
August BODNARCHUK starred with the junior team in his Ontario hometown, his obvious skills catching the attention of Leafs scout Squib WALKER. In his final season of junior hockey, the centre scored 10 goals and 29 assists in just nine games with the Fort William Hurricane-Rangers in 1942-43.
The brash youngster arrived at his first Leafs training camp convinced he would soon be an National Hockey League star.
"I thought I was pretty big stuff," he later told Frank ORR of the Toronto Star. "I had my hair long and all slickered down with goo. I figured I was about the hottest rookie ever to hit the pros, even though I weighed only 145 pounds."
The rookie got a quick and unforgettable lesson in the realities of the National Hockey League when veteran, 205-pound defenceman Bucko McDonald hit him with a stiff bodycheck during a scrimmage.
"I crashed to the ice and figured every bone in my body was broken. The only reason my hair was still attached to my head was because of all the goo I had on it."
He learned to skate with his head up, alert to incoming threats.
The three-point debut was a harbinger of a stellar rookie campaign spent on the Leafs first line between veterans Bob Davidson and Lorne Carr. Mr. BODNAR's talents earned him the Calder Trophy as the National Hockey League's outstanding rookie. Montreal Canadiens goalie Bill Durnan was runner-up, while Leafs rookies Elwin Morris and Teeder Kennedy tied for third. The trophy was announced on the final day of the season. Mr. BODNAR then scored two goals and three assists in a 10-2 shelling of the Boston Bruins.
Mr. BODNAR ended his first season with 20 goals and 42 assists to set a new league mark for scoring by a rookie. The record would stand for a quarter century until beaten by Danny Grant of the Minnesota North Stars in 1968-69. Mr. BODNAR's 62-point season was the Leafs club standard for rookies until bettered by Peter Ihnacak in 1982-83.
While Mr. BODNAR scored just eight goals in his sophomore season, his three playoff goals were all game winners. The Leafs outlasted the Detroit Red Wings in seven games to claim the Stanley Cup in 1945. Mr. BODNAR would also get his name on the Cup with the Leafs in 1947.
In his years with the Leafs, he centred Mr. Carr and Sweeney Schriner to form the Bacon Line, so called because the trio "brought home the bacon." He later combined with Bud Poile and Gaye Stewart to form the Flying Forts. All three players hailed from Fort William and all were part of a blockbuster, seven-player deal with the Chicago Black Hawks in 1947.
The seasons in Chicago were highlighted by a magnificent feat coming in the third period of the final game of the 1951-52 season. Chicago's Bill Mosienko scored three goals in 21 seconds against the Rangers on March 23, 1952. Mr. BODNAR assisted on all three. The record for the three fastest goals -- coming at 6: 09, 6:20 and 6: 30 -- still stands, as does the record for three fastest assists.
"I never left centre ice," Mr. BODNAR once told Paul Patton of the Globe. "I just won the face-offs and [Mosienko] did the rest."
Mr. BODNAR was later traded to Boston, where he ended his National Hockey League career after the 1954-55 season. He had scored 142 goals with 254 assists in 667 games. Along the way, he had also gone and married that hometown sweetheart, Etta MacDONALD. They were wed in Toronto in 1948 at a ceremony which included such Leaf greats as Teeder Kennedy, Syl Apps, Turk Broda, Don and Nick Metz, and Wally Stanowski, who was best man.
The player's popularity was such that a newspaper photographer was dispatched to Wellesley Hospital in Toronto to capture Mr. BODNAR and his bride posing with their first-born child, a daughter named Bonny Lynn, in 1949. He had rushed to the hospital on a Saturday night after playing the Leafs. He then caught a train for Chicago.
A house painter in the off season during his early hockey career, Mr. BODNAR had a long career as a salesman for a steel company. He also coached the Toronto Marlboros from 1965 to 1970, winning the Memorial Cup in Centennial Year with a roster including future National Hockey League defencemen Mike Pelyk, Brian Glennie and an 18-year-old Brad Park, who would become a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame.
Mr. BODNAR's patience and willingness to adapt to his young players' needs made him an ideal junior coach. He was not a screamer, unlike so many of his peers.
He left the Marlies just before the opening of training camp in 1970, when offered the general manager and coaching posts for the Salt Lake City (Utah) Golden Eagles of the Western Hockey League. His first job as a pro coach ended after a season, as the Buffalo Sabres farm team finished with a woeful record of 18 wins, 49 losses, 5 ties.
Mr. BODNAR headed the Oshawa Generals when named Ontario Hockey League coach of the year in 1972.
He also was one of three coaches to handle Canada's junior team in 1977-78, which won a disappointing bronze medal at the World Cup. The roster included Mike Gartner, Rick Vaive and a 16-year-old Wayne Gretzky.
In recent years, Mr. BODNAR often took part in charity golf tournaments. He has been inducted into sports halls of fame at Oshawa and Northwestern Ontario at Thunder Bay.
Gus BODNAR was born on April 24, 1923, at Fort William (now Thunder Bay), Ontario He died on Canada Day in Oshawa, Ontario He was 82. He is survived by his wife, Etta. He also leaves a son and four daughters.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-23 published
James DOOHAN, Soldier And Actor: 1920-2005
He was an 'accidental actor' who got his start when he stumbled into a radio station in London, Ontario He found fame as Scotty on Star Trek, but not before he had already experienced real-life heroics on D-Day
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, July 23, 2005, Page S9
'Och, Cap'n, Scotty cannae work for ye any more."
Star Trek's chief engineer, Lt.-Cmdr. Montgomery Scott, was irascible, excitable and prone to delivering dire warnings in a Scots burr. As portrayed by Canadian James DOOHAN, Scotty became a favourite of the cult television program's legions of fans.
Many assumed the actor shared traits with his character, but out of his red uniform, Mr. DOOHAN was a serious actor with a substantial list of credits. As a young man, he led soldiers as part of the D-Day invasion in an attack which he later described as "giving Hitler the finger."
Mr. DOOHAN's chief engineer character cursed dilithium crystals and coaxed power from overstressed warp-drive engines on the Starship Enterprise. The order to be beamed aboard was directed at Mr. DOOHAN; " Beam me up, Scotty" became a cultural catchphrase, as well as the punchline to innumerable jokes. Mr. DOOHAN became so associated with the command that he used it as the title of his autobiography.
Yet, the program's dedicated fans -- their numbers legion and their allegiance bordering on the fanatical -- insist no character ever uttered the phrase. "Beam me up, Scotty" is to Star Trek what "Play it again, Sam" is to Casablanca.
After the original series ended following a three-year run, Mr. DOOHAN was upset at being typecast as the irascible engineer with the unforgettable burr. After all, he had earlier performed Shakespeare under the direction of Mavor Moore and won notice for his performances in dramas telecast by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. He eventually made peace with the character, whom he portrayed in subsequent feature films. He also became a frequent and well-received guest at Star Trek conventions.
A first-class mimic, Mr. DOOHAN tested eight accents when auditioning for the role. "Well, if you want an engineer," he told Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry, "it had better be a Scotsman." Mr. DOOHAN settled on a dialect he described as an Aberdeen brogue.
Scotty's accent, it has been noted by one newspaper, fooled no one north of Berwick-upon-Tweed, let alone a Scotsman. Yet the near-comic urgency of his delivery compelled many fans into worshipful imitation. The actor named the character after his maternal grandfather, James MONTGOMERY, a sea captain.
In many ways, Mr. DOOHAN imbued the chief engineer with what could be described as Canadian qualities. His practical warnings ("In four hours, the ship blows up") and excitable protestations ("Ah canna change the laws of physics") always gave way to a resourceful fortitude in completing a task, however dangerous or improbable.
The actor may have drawn on his own experiences as a veteran of the Second World War. He was wounded during the D-Day invasion of Normandy in an incident he described as "giving Hitler the finger."
Those who found his accent unconvincing were not surprised to learn he traced his Scottish roots to an ancestor who lived three centuries ago. He was Irish by heritage and Canadian by birth. James Montgomery DOOHAN, conceived in Belfast, was born in Vancouver on March 3, 1920. His parents and three older siblings had just emigrated to Canada, arriving in Halifax on New Year's Day.
In his 1996 autobiography, Mr. DOOHAN describes his father as a dentist, pharmacist, veterinarian and drunkard. His memories were of a household made unhappy by his father's alcohol-fuelled rages. The family moved to Sarnia, Ontario, when the boy was 6. Two years later, while serving as an altar boy at a Catholic mass, Jimmy suddenly felt delirious and was rushed from church. He was diagnosed with diphtheria.
Around home, he was known to imitate the voices he heard on the radio or at the cinema. At 16, he played the title role in a school production of Robin Hood at Sarnia Collegiate Institute and Technical School.
Eager to leave home, he enlisted as a gunner in the Royal Canadian Artillery immediately after Canada declared war on Germany on September 10, 1939. After learning Morse code and earning a commission as an officer, Mr. DOOHAN spent two frustrating years in training in England. He served as a general's aide-de-camp during the planning for the Dieppe raid.
On June 6, 1944, Mr. DOOHAN commanded 120 men of D Company of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles. In the early morning of D-Day, he joined the landings on Juno Beach. While he saw a captain go insane and another man suffer a grievous stomach wound, Mr. DOOHAN managed to lead his men to the seaside village of Graye-sur-Mer without casualty.
Soon, however, they came under fire from a machine-gun lodged in a church tower. Mr. DOOHAN, a command post officer by rank, borrowed a rifle. His first shot missed, but each of the next two shots felled a German soldier and the nest went silent. He never learned whether he had killed or wounded the enemy.
Shortly before midnight, Mr. DOOHAN was walking to his command post when a "machine-gun opened up on us. It hit me and spun me around. Staggering, I fell down into the shell hole," he wrote in his autobiography. "Then I looked at my right hand and saw the blood covering it. I could see the holes in my middle finger."
He walked to a regimental aid post where it was discovered four bullets had also imbedded in his left leg. In his shock at the three shots that smashed his right hand, Mr. DOOHAN hadn't even noticed the other wounds.
He examined the rest of his uniform, discovering a bullet hole in his shirt. He reached his left hand to his right breast pocket. "I pulled out the sterling silver cigarette case that my brother Bill had given me when I was his best man. And there I discovered a dent in it.
"The bullet had come in at an angle, ricocheted off the cigarette case, and bounced away. Four inches from my heart."
The finger was amputated. Years later, Star Trek fans would detail scenes in which the absence of the digit is noticeable. For his part, Mr. DOOHAN was always self-conscious about the loss. He often subtly camouflaged his right hand.
After six years in uniform, he was left with few plans for the future at the end of war. He became an actor by accident. Annoyed by poor performances in a radio drama, Mr. DOOHAN went to radio station CFPL in London, Ontario, to record himself reading from Shakespeare and other works. He disliked what he heard, but an enthusiastic sound engineer convinced him he was a natural. By coincidence, a brochure for a Toronto drama school had arrived at the station not an hour earlier. The novice signed up, and soon won a scholarship to study at the Neighbourhood Playhouse School of the Theater in Manhattan.
Mr. DOOHAN was taught by Sanford Meisner, whose eponymous technique of self-investigation was heavily influenced by the great Russian director Constantine Stanislavsky. Others attending the school in those years included Lee Marvin and Leslie Nielsen, a fellow Canadian who became a close friend.
A versatile performer, Mr. DOOHAN did not want for work. From 1950 to 1958, he appeared in, by his count, 450 live television broadcasts and 4,000 radio shows, shuttling from New York to Toronto. He was called Canada's busiest actor. He starred in Flight into Danger, an hour-long television drama aired on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's General Motors Theatre in 1956. Mr. DOOHAN portrayed a traumatized fighter pilot who takes over the controls of a commercial airliner after both pilots are incapacitated by food poisoning. The script was the first written by Arthur Hailey, a British émigré who settled in Canada after the war and went on to write such blockbusters as Airport and Hotel.
A role as an agent on the television series Treasury Men in Action evaporated without explanation soon after director David Pressman was identified as a Communist. Only later did Mr. DOOHAN learn he had lost the gig to an actor who secretly accused him of being a Red.
In 1963, Mr. DOOHAN appeared as a defence attorney in his first feature film, The Wheeler Dealers, a romantic comedy starring James Garner and Lee Remick, directed by Edmonton-born Arthur Hiller. Meanwhile, his list of television credits reads like an anthology of cult hits. He appeared in episodes of Bewitched, Ben Casey, Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Outer Limits, The Twilight Zone, The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.
The three-year run of the original Star Trek series cemented the actor's image in the public mind as a blustery but dependable miracle worker in a red uniform. He was paid just $850 U.S. per episode in the inaugural season.
A cast so familiar now -- with William SHATNER, another Canadian, starring as Capt. James T. Kirk; Leonard Nimoy as the logical Mr. Spock, a pointy-eared Vulcan; and DeForest Kelley as the crusty Dr. Leonard H. (Bones) McCoy -- won only a modest audience at first. The series lasted just three seasons, two years short of the Enterprise's promised "five-year mission to explore strange new worlds."
The low-budget series allowed for strong characterizations, which in part explains Star Trek's success in syndication. The series became a phenomenon, sparking an industry of collectables and conventions. Fans memorized large chunks of dialogue. Among the engineer's most repeated quotes: "The best diplomat that I know is a fully loaded phaser bank."
Mr. DOOHAN often failed to mask his antipathy for the star's hammy acting. The kindest praise he offers for Mr. SHATNER in his autobiography is a grudging acknowledgment that one episode's performance was "pretty okay."
The Scotty character was not often the focus of plot twists, although in an episode titled The Changeling, Bones leans over the engineer's body to deliver the shocking line, "He's dead, Jim."
Happily, the engineer is revived before hour's end.
In The Trouble with Tribbles, perhaps the best-loved of all episodes, Scotty disobeys captain's orders and precipitates a bar brawl with Klingons. The episode concludes on a pun ad-libbed by Mr. DOOHAN, after he dispatches a growing horde of furry creatures to a Klingon ship. "I transported the whole kit 'n' caboodle into their engine room," he tells the captain, "where they'll be no tribble at all."
Cancellation left Mr. DOOHAN unemployed and, he feared, unemployable. He complained of being typecast to his dentist, who said, "Jimmy, you're going to be Scotty long after you're dead. If I were you, I'd go with the flow."
He did so, reprising his role as Scotty in seven films. In Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, the engineer attempts to give voice commands to a 20th-century computer, including speaking into a mouse. Audiences roared with laughter.
After surviving a massive heart attack in 1989, Mr. DOOHAN seemed ever more frail. He deferred questions about the rumoured deterioration of his health by quipping: "If I had Alzheimer's I think I'd remember."
What would be his final public appearance came last August at a five-day event in Los Angeles billed as "Beam me up, Scotty one last time." He posed in his wheelchair in front of his star along the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
James DOOHAN was born on March 3, 1920, in Vancouver. He died on Wednesday at home in Redmond, Washington., a lakeside suburb 30 kilometres east of Seattle. Alzheimer's disease was one of many afflictions he suffered, including diabetes, lung fibrosis and Parkinson's. He was 85. He leaves his wife, Wende BRAUNBERGER, and their three children, Eric, Thomas and five-year-old Sarah. He also leaves four adult children -- Larkin, Deirdre and twins Montgomery and Christopher -- from his 15-year marriage to Janet YOUNG, which ended in divorce in 1964. A marriage to Anita YAGEL in 1970 ended in divorce two years later. Space Services Inc., a Houston-based company, will send his ashes into space, as he requested.
Toronto Trekkies will gather tonight at the Auld Spot Pub, 347 Danforth Ave., where fans can sign a condolence book to be presented later to the family.
2005-0-7-23 DAWSON, Nora -- Dispatch:
By Oliver MOORE, Saturday, July 23, 2005, Page M4
Wielding a chainsaw into her mid-80s and riding her bicycle around Toronto a few years after that, Nora Claire Elizabeth DAWSON was not one to sit still.
Relatives describe a woman who took hiking trips to the Alps, bought a computer at 85 so she could trade e-mail messages with a grand-nephew in Panama and insisted that her relatives have certain tools on hand, for when she came over.
"When she came to visit us, she'd get the pruning shears and work in the garden," said Dan Walker DAWSON, a nephew who lives in London, Ontario
Her niece, Georgie Dawson DOCKER, tells a similar story. "She would arrive here, aged 85 and up, with her chainsaw and loppers, and she'd be up on the ladder pruning whether you liked it or not," said Ms. DOCKER, who now lives in Dunnville, Ontario
She was physically vigorous and capable, her relatives say, but she was also a well-educated and intellectually active woman. She did The Globe and Mail's cryptic crossword every day until she was 90.
Ms. DAWSON graduated from the University of Western Ontario, in her hometown of London, at only 17 and went on to take a master's degree at Laval University. But when she submitted her work, they gave her a doctorate instead.
As a young woman she moved to Toronto to teach French. She lived in North Toronto and then North York as she moved through a succession of schools including Havergal College and East York Collegiate Institute. She was head of languages at King and Wexford Collegiate Institutes. She was also closely involved in the Women's Musical Club of Toronto, though she didn't play an instrument herself.
Ms. DAWSON did not marry. She died early last month at 92. She leaves two nephews, a niece, and six grand-nephews and grand-nieces.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-17 published
Arthur WOOD, Pedodontist And Inventor: 1917-2005
Ontario dentist and minor-hockey coach helped develop the mouthguard. At first, young players rejected his device but later he became at least to parents -- a real-life tooth fairy
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail; Globe and Mail archives, Wednesday, August 17, 2005, Page S9
As a children's dentist, Arthur WOOD was appalled by the injuries caused by hockey pucks. Young patients filled his dental chair every winter, presenting mouthfuls of what were known among their peers as bloody Chiclets.
After a neighbour's son suffered broken teeth, Mr. WOOD made it his calling to end what he regarded as needless damage.
What he devised, with the help of Charlie PATTERSON and others, would cause the dentist to later be known as the Father of the Mouthguard.
He received many honours for his invention, not the least of which was the Order of Canada.
The son of a nurse and a store owner, Arthur WOOD was born in rural Saskatchewan near Estevan, about 20 kilometres from the North Dakota border. He learned to play hockey outdoors, stuffing department-store catalogues down his socks to act as shin guards. Like many of his future patients, he had no protection for his teeth.
In 1935, Gopher, as he had been nicknamed, was hired as a teacher at public schools, although the deprivations of the Depression forced him to defer some of his salary. He would later note with satisfaction that he had been paid in full, a decade after retiring as a teacher.
Mr. WOOD enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1938, completing a doctor of dental surgery degree in 1943. He married that same year and became a member of the Canadian Dental Corps with the rank of captain. Mr. WOOD served in Britain, Europe and Asia, although the only action he saw was hand-to-mouth combat. His final posting came aboard H.M.C.S. Ontario, a light cruiser serving in the Pacific, in 1946.
After the war, the dentist returned to the classroom for post-graduate studies in pediatric dentistry. He studied at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University in 1948 and 1949 under a fellowship provided by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
He returned to Canada for a position in the University of Toronto dentistry faculty. He would later become president of the Canadian Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. He was also president of the Royal College of Dentists of Canada and served on the board of the American Academy of Pedodontics.
Mr. WOOD maintained his boyhood passion for hockey throughout his life. In the 1950s, he became president of the Cooksville Hockey Association in what is now suburban Mississauga, Ontario He also coached a boy's team. With so many players becoming patients, he began to wonder if something couldn't be done to protect them.
The last straw landed in the early 1960s when a 17-year-old neighbour, who had only just had his teeth straightened, gave up four of his young pearlies to a hockey stick. Mr. WOOD got to work on some sort of protector that players would wear in their mouths.
At about the same time, Mr. PATTERSON, a researcher at York University who was also a fellow Cooksville coach, began tinkering with hockey helmets after his son, Dan, suffered a concussion in a nasty spill. At the time, helmets were little more than a leather skullcap. From there, the two men collaborated on developing what was known at first as a "mug guard" or "teeth guard." They also worked together on helmets.
In 1954, Mr. WOOD made mandatory for his players the wearing of his dental protector. By 1961, the equipment had become obligatory for all skaters in what was then the Toronto Township Hockey League.
He made a presentation about his innovation to the annual convention of the Ontario Dental Association the following May. In time, the mouthguard was adopted across the country, becoming an essential piece of protective equipment in hockey and many other contact sports.
"As a pediatric dentist, I used to see 200 hockey accidents a year," Mr. WOOD told the Toronto Star in 1991. "Now there are practically nil."
Still, the culture of the national game was such that many junior, senior and professional players refused to wear the gear, as though missing teeth were emblematic of a devil-may-care ferocity.
Mr. PATTERSON's head gear was also dismissed by some as an attempt to sissify a man's sport. Not until the start of the 1979-80 season was the wearing of helmets made compulsory for new players entering the National Hockey League. By that time, a generation which had grown up with unbroken smiles and uncracked skulls had climbed to the pro ranks.
Later, he took to visiting high school, university, even National Hockey League locker rooms to gather feedback from athletes. "Every year we try to build a better mousetrap," he once said.
Less well known was his work on building what he called "Allan Average," a kind of adjustable head form that could be used for testing all sizes of helmets. Along the way, he also became interested in developing mouth protection for basketball players.
Mr. WOOD's concern for safety also extended beyond dental well-being. He helped found the local traffic safety council in 1956, for which he later devised a "Kiss and Ride" drop-off program for schoolchildren and parents.
Even at age 75, he could be found at curbside making inspections on behalf of the council, which honoured him by appointment as a life member.
The dentist was inducted into the Mississauga Sports Hall of Fame in 1984. He was appointed a member of the Order of Canada in 1991. "It is gratifying to be a member of a team that greatly reduced facial and dental injuries," he said at the time.
His family says he never held a patent on any of his designs, taking as his reward the knowledge that athletic children could reach adulthood with their teeth intact.
Arthur WOOD was born on June 22, 1917, at Alameda, Saskatchewan. He died on July 11 at home in Mississauga, Ontario He was 88. He leaves his wife Mary Ruth, known as Molly; sons Peter WOOD of Toronto and John Kenneth (Kim) WOOD of Dallas, Texas; daughter Mary Sue Phillips of Ottawa; and seven grandchildren.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-27 published
Tom PASHBY, Ophthalmologist (1915-2005)
In 1959, appalled by a hockey injury to his son, he campaigned relentlessly for the adoption of protective devices. Today, young players across Canada owe him their health, their eyesight and, in some cases, even their lives
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, August 27, 2005, Page S9
At a Saturday morning hockey game in 1959, 13-year-old defenceman Bill PASHBY was carrying the puck when checked from behind by an opponent. The boy fell awkwardly, striking his bare head on the ice at Leaside Arena in Toronto. He suffered a severe concussion and a broken collarbone; he also swallowed his tongue, and was saved from suffocation by the quick action of a doctor in the stands.
Bill awoke briefly in a speeding ambulance, still dressed in his hockey gear. One of the first to arrive at his bedside at the Hospital for Sick Children was his father, Tom PASHBY, an ophthalmologist on staff.
The young defenceman survived the injury and, today, William T. PASHBY is a partner in the Toronto law office of Borden Ladner Gervais. Yet, the terrible morning during which his eldest son was unconscious so disturbed his father as to change his life. The close call led to a lifelong search for a means to halt such potentially catastrophic injuries. Dr. PASHBY's quest became a campaign and, eventually, a crusade.
Over the years, he overcame hockey's macho posturing, as helmets and visors became as much a part of a player's equipment as skates and a stick. Generations of hockey players, from professionals in the National Hockey League to weekend warriors playing pickup, owe their health, their eyesight and, in some cases, their lives to his unwavering advocacy.
Dr. PASHBY won many awards during his career, including an Order of Canada and induction into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. He always said his greatest satisfaction came from annual statistics, as helmets and visors prevented young hockey players from losing eyes to high sticks and stray pucks.
Thomas Joseph PASHBY was the son of a butcher who traced his ancestry to Yorkshire. The only child of Norman and Florence PASHBY attended Frankland Public School and Riverdale Collegiate Institute in east-end Toronto. After school and on weekends, he made deliveries by bicycle for his father's butcher shop. The job kept him in shape for hockey, football and baseball, sports in which he participated with more enthusiasm than skill.
At a tea dance at Riverdale, he met Helen CHRISTIE, daughter of the neighbourhood doctor. They would wed in 1941, by which time Dr. PASHBY had graduated with a medical degree from the University of Toronto.
As a squadron leader in the Royal Canadian Air Force, he spent the war years in domestic postings, conducting eye tests while also being involved in recruitment campaigns, according to his son. While in uniform, he became interested in eye injuries and diseases, and that became his specialty in the years following the war.
The Toronto Maple Leafs asked him to treat National Hockey League players, including captain George Armstrong and Tom Johnson of the visiting Montreal Canadiens. The doctor befriended many of his patients.
On most Saturday mornings, he could be found at Leaside Arena, where he coached and managed hockey teams for 40 seasons. In the days when players of every age skated with bare faces and heads, Dr. PASHBY's nimble fingers were often called on to stitch a patient or two at the bench.
He played a similar role at the annual peewee hockey tournament at Quebec City. At one tournament, he bought skates for a child whose parents were too poor to replace his broken pair. The boy went on to an National Hockey League career.
Dr. PASHBY was on duty at the hospital when his son was injured in 1959. He decided he would not allow his boys to play without headgear. "No one wore helmets then," he told the Medical Post in 1999.
"I was doing work with the Toronto Maple Leafs at the time and Bert Olmstead, a left winger, said that you couldn't get any helmets around here that are any good and offered to get me one from Sweden.
"My younger son Bob wore that helmet. At first, he didn't want to go on the ice with it. I said, 'You wear that helmet or you don't play.' Bob PASHBY, who would later join his father as an ophthalmologist, is believed to have been the first player in the Toronto Hockey League to have worn a helmet. The primitive headgear, jokingly called a "white eggshell," is now part of the Hockey Hall of Fame's collection.
While his advocacy now seems so commonsensical as to be inevitable, Dr. PASHBY faced a long battle to change the culture of a sport that regarded the wearing of helmets as a manifestation of sissiness. His son's initial reluctance was shared by other players even as most parents accepted the change. By 1965, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (now Hockey Canada) made the wearing of helmets mandatory.
Dr. PASHBY, meanwhile, worked with the Canadian Standards Association to develop safe and affordable headgear. Over the decades, the doctor's campaigns went from helmets to visors to neck guards. He also argued for an end to checking from behind as well as to checks to the head, a rule change adopted by Hockey Canada three years ago to reduce the number of concussions.
In 1972, on his own initiative, Dr. PASHBY embarked on a survey of all 700 of the nation's ophthalmologists. In the 1974-75 season, before face masks became mandatory, 258 eye injuries were suffered, including 43 blindings. The average age of the victim was 14. "The injuries are shocking, alarming and generally unnecessary," Dr. PASHBY said at the time.
By the 2001-02 season, only four eye injuries were reported, including two blindings.
According to the Canada Safety Council, 311 eyes have been blinded since Dr. PASHBY's first survey in 1972. Not a single one of those was suffered by a player wearing an approved full-face protector.
His untiring dedication to sports safety earned him numerous awards from sporting and medical bodies. As well, the Ontario Women's Hockey Association has named its trainer-of-the-year award after him.
Dr. PASHBY was a long-time teacher in the medical faculty at the University of Toronto, winning the ophthalmology department's Jack Crawford Teaching Award in 1992. (His youngest son won the same award four years later.) He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Waterloo in 1996.
Dr. PASHBY was named a member of the Order of Canada in 1981. He was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
The Toronto hall also provides a permanent home for the Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Safety Award, a trophy honouring "outstanding contributions toward the prevention of catastrophic injuries in sports and recreational activities." The award comes with a $10,000 prize.
Patrick BISHOP, a Waterloo professor and amateur hockey coach, was the inaugural winner last year for his work on impact biomechanics. This year's winner is Karen JOHNSTON, a McGill University neurosurgeon who researches concussions.
Dr. PASHBY retired from medical practice five years ago at 85, although he remained an active crusader until last month.
Tom PASHBY was born on March 23, 1915, in Toronto. He died at his Toronto home on Wednesday. He was 90. He leaves a daughter, two sons, six grandchildren and a great granddaughter. He was predeceased by his wife of 61 years, Helen, who died in 2003. The family has requested that donations be made to the Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Safety Fund, a charity founded in 1990.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-03 published
Gus CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, Sergeant-At-Arms (1935-2005)
The House of Commons' longest-serving sergeant-at-arms presented the image of a man one would not wisely cross. He ran Parliament Hill as a 'private fiefdom'
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, September 3, 2005, Page S7
Gus CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER paraded daily into the House of Commons with a military bearing befitting a retired major-general. As sergeant-at-arms, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER handled responsibilities ranging from security to the allotment of parking slots. His duties that gave him much control over the day-to-day lives of members of Parliament, a power exercised out of public sight.
More conspicuous was Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER's role in leading the parades that open and close a day's sitting. In preceding the Speaker on entering and leaving the House, the sergeant-at-arms carries the ceremonial mace, a symbol of authority.
Dressed in a black court coat and a tricorne hat, the mace gripped by his right hand as it rested on his right shoulder, a ceremonial sword carried at his left hip, with service ribbons on his breast adding a dash of colour, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER presented the image of a man one would not wisely cross. For all that, his long tenure as sergeant-at-arms coincided with a breakdown in traditional parliamentary behaviour. On two occasions, members grabbed the mace, a shocking breach of decorum considered a gross contempt of Parliament.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was the longest-serving sergeant-at-arms since Confederation. His 27-year tenure surpassed that of the other seven men to have held the position.
A long climb through the ranks of the armed forces prepared him well for doing battle with civilians, as Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER proved a wily adversary in bureaucratic squabbles.
Born in Drummondville, Quebec, Maurice Gaston CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was educated at Mount Allison University at Sackville, New Brunswick, and, later, at the University of Liege in Belgium. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1952 while still a teenager, and married Joan CAHILL of Summerside, Prince Edward Island, before he was 20.
Serving as a navigator with Maritime Air Command, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER became an air instructor at the Air Navigation School at Winnipeg in 1960. He was appointed resident staff officer at Laval University at Quebec City two years later.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER relocated to Europe in 1964, serving as protocol chief for the armed forces. He was also appointed executive assistant to the commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force air division. After graduating from the Canadian Forces staff college in 1969, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was named bilingual policy adviser to the personnel chief. He was promoted to the rank of major-general in 1975.
He became executive assistant to Liberal defence minister Donald MacDONALD in 1970, remaining in the post under Edgar BENSON, C.M. (Bud) DRURY, James RICHARDSON and Barnett (Barney) DANSON.
The retired general was appointed sergeant-at-arms on April 27, 1978, by Pierre TRUDEAU, the first of seven prime ministers for whose security on Parliament Hill he was responsible. Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER succeeded David CURRIE, a decorated war hero awarded the Victoria Cross who had been sergeant-at-arms for 18 years.
As the official Commons guard, the sergeant-at-arms places the mace on a table before the Speaker. He then sits patiently throughout proceedings adjacent to the entrance to the House. The role of sergeant-at-arms carries with it a centuries-old responsibility for security, hence the mace and sword.
Yet, one of Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER's first public statements regarded the diminished size of the Christmas tree installed in the lobby of the House. Several controversies generated headlines in his first years. A stern report from the auditor-general was highly critical of Parliament's administration, noting an annual $3.5-million deficit from restaurants and cafeterias.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was soon embroiled in a public squabble over spending with Speaker Jeanne SAUVÉ. Without her knowledge, he had ordered $10,000 of riot gear, including vests, helmets, handcuffs and 12-gauge shotguns. He had also neglected to inform her of the creation of a new restaurant to address overcrowding in Parliament's main dining room. Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER opened an elegant, 70-seat restaurant for senior bureaucrats in the South Block in 1980. The first-class restaurant served $2.75 gourmet meals, a bargain for top mandarins as each meal served cost $12 in subsidies.
The Speaker called the restaurant scandalous, ordered it closed (after having allowed it at first to remain open), and issued a public rebuke of the sergeant-at-arms' spending habits.
An attempt soon after to end wasteful spending left Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER with egg on his face. A special Commons-Senate committee decided laying off 30 cafeteria workers would save money. But members of Parliament and bureaucrats proved sadly incapable of tidying up after themselves, and the federal health department sent a letter of reprimand to the sergeant-at-arms insisting the unhygienic practice not continue.
Over the years, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER has also had to sweep offices for bugging devices, and ordered walls rebuilt to prevent eavesdropping among rival caucuses and research staffs.
Two incidents in 2002 raised questions about security in the wake of the previous year's attacks on New York and Washington. A protester crashed the official unveiling of former prime minister Brian Mulroney's portrait. Two weeks later, a man left a grenade at the front desk of the Langevin Block, across the street from Parliament Hill and outside of the sergeant-at-arms' jurisdiction.
At the adjournment of the House on October 30, 1991, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER shouldered the mace when rushed by an member of Parliament. Angered by a ruling by the deputy speaker, New Democrat Ian WADDELL tried to grab the mace from the sergeant-at-arms.
An apologetic Mr. WADDELL was called to stand at the bar of the House the next afternoon, where he was reprimanded for a breach of privilege and gross contempt of the House.
In 2002, member of Parliament Keith MARTIN, then with the Canadian Alliance, touched the mace in protest the loss off his private member's bill on marijuana decriminalization. He was censured by the House.
In 2002, all five parties in the House paid tribute to Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER for his 50 years of public service. (By coincidence, the honour came 11 years to the day after the WADDELL incident.) The unanimity among the speakers led Progressive Conservative leader Joe CLARK to quip: "Mr. Speaker, it is a good thing there are only five parties in the House or these tributes could cause an outbreak of order."
Earlier that month, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER co-ordinated the royal visit to Canada as the Canadian Secretary to the Queen. He became the longest-serving sergeant-at-arms since Confederation last year, surpassing the 26-year tenure of Henry Robert SMITH (1892-1917.)
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER took his responsibilities most seriously. In December, 1995, a Liberal member of Parliament in a Santa Claus costume and accompanied by an elf arrived on the floor of the House to spread bonhomie. Hansard reporters captured the interruption in typically understated fashion, inserting a note in the account of daily proceedings. It read: "Editor's note: Whereupon a visitor in red entered the Chamber."
The sergeant-at-arms, perhaps not fully appreciating the spirit of the season, gave the bum's rush to Santa, ushering Stan DROMISKY off the floor.
Gus CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was born on June 6, 1935, at Drummondville, Quebec He died of colon cancer on Tuesday at the Elizabeth Bruyere Health Centre at Ottawa. He was 70. He is survived by his partner, Mary-Lynn GALLANT. He also leaves son Michael, and daughter, Nancy, as well as their mother, Joan, from whom he was separated.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-24 published
Fred KELLY, Artist and Realtor (1921-2005)
He drew the original Mr. Monster, a wartime superhero drafted by comic-book publishers during trade restrictions
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail; Globe and Mail archives, Saturday, September 24, 2005, Page S9
Victoria -- Fred KELLY was an artist from Canada's brief golden age of superhero comics. He created the original Mr. Monster and then vanished until tracked down last year by a diligent fan.
Mr. KELLY drew for Bell Features of Toronto during the Second World War, as government restrictions on American periodicals gave birth to a homegrown comic-book industry. In place of Superman, Batman, Torch, The Shield and countless others, Canadian artists churned out scores of characters. Among Mr. KELLY's creations was Dr. Jim (Doc) Stearne, a medical doctor and crack marksman who hunted monsters. Mr. Monster, as his alter ego was known, appeared in the third issue of "Super Duper Comics." Mr. Monster wore black boots and white gauntlets, a helmet with goggles, and a red body stocking with a white skull on the chest. He was armed with a pistol and boasted no special powers other than his wits.
According to Library and Archives Canada, Bell comics varied in quality but were identifiably Canadian. Mr. KELLY joined a stable of such Canadian artists as Adrian Pringle, who produced the heroes Nelvana of The Northern Lights and the Penguin, and illustrator Edmund Legault, who drew Dixon of the Mounted. Also part of the Bell lineup was Phantom Rider by Jerry Lazare and the character Rex Baxter, drawn by Edmond Good. Best known, however, was Johnny Canuck. Drawn by Leo BACHLE, who died in 2003 and also went by the name of Rex BARKER, " Johnny Canuck -- Canada's answer to Nazi oppression" had no powers other than an inexhaustible source of courage and a killer right-hook.
Bell Features was not alone in stepping into the regulatory gap. Such other publishers as Vancouver's Maple Leaf Publishing and Anglo-American Publishing of Toronto also offered their own fighters of crime and fascism, including such homegrown heroes and heroines as Freelance, Black Wing and Commander Steel, to name a few.
Interestingly, Mr. KELLY also chose to work for a less dashing line of characters offered by Educational Projects of Montreal. Published as Canadian Heroes, the series featured profiles of prime ministers and other worthies, and was surely more popular among parents and teachers than the children on whom they were foisted. Among the real-life figures given the comic treatment was First World War air ace Raymond COLLISHAW, hockey star Howie MORENZ, and Sir John A. MacDONALD. Canadian Heroes did offer one clean-cut fictional hero, a stalwart named Canada Jack who combined healthy outdoor activities with crime-busting and spy-fighting.
Among the other characters he created for Bell were Betty Burd, a shapely roving reporter who found every opportunity to wear a revealing swimsuit; Cinder Smith, the manager of a train station in the Rockies; Steve Storm, a monocle-wearing British commissioner in colonial Africa; and race car driver Clip Curtis, The King of the Dirt Track.
After the war, Mr. KELLY and Mr. Monster returned to obscurity, as Canadian publications became overwhelmed by American imports, but not before trying his luck in the United States. In 1946, he worked with Damon Runyan and produced a comic strip that featured characters from the writer's popular stories about the gamblers, petty thieves, actors and gangsters of New York's Prohibition period. To be titled The Other Half, it was on the cusp of acceptance by a major publisher when Mr. Runyon died and the project collapsed.
After that, Mr. KELLY returned home and attended the University of Toronto to study medical illustration. He graduated in 1949, found steady work as an illustrator and then took up a successful career selling real estate in the Toronto area, most notably in the Willowdale area where he was a partner in Kelly and Craig Realtors.
The Mr. Monster character was revived in 1984 by Michael T. Gilbert, an American illustrator who had purchased a coverless copy of the original in 1971. The rejuvenated hero was presented as the son of Doc Stearne.
Just last year, Toronto comics historian Robert PINCOMBE tracked down Mr. KELLY, who had retired and divided his time between Mexico and Owen Sound, Ontario Mr. KELLY, who taught art classes in his retirement, attended the Toronto Comicon 2004 convention in June, where he appeared on a panel with contemporaries Ed Furness and Jerry Lazare. He also got to meet Mr. Gilbert.
"He was gratified, but thought the whole thing was all a bit silly," said Mr. PINCOMBE. "He felt it was great to be remembered and was pleased to learn that Mr. Monster had come back but didn't want a piece of it. He was a very pragmatic man."
Frederick George KELLY was born in Toronto on September 8, 1921. He died in Owen Sound, Ontario, on September 14 as the result of a stroke suffered in 2003. He was 84. He leaves his wife, Rita, a son; two daughters, nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-28 published
Kiran VAN RIJN, Graduate Student And Athlete (1975-2005)
B.C. rower who competed for Canada had devoted himself to the sport since boyhood
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, September 28, 2005, Page S9
Victoria -- The first sign of trouble was the sculler rolling from his shell into the lake. Kiran VAN RIJN, a former national team member, was rowing in an ordinary training session on Burnaby Lake last Wednesday when he collapsed.
Mr. VAN RIJN managed to haul himself from water into a powerboat operated by Dick McCLURE, a hall-of-fame coach who won a silver medal for Canada in the eights at the 1956 Olympics.
Mr. VAN RIJN complained of giddiness and lightheadedness. As his statements became nonsensical, Mr. McCLURE raced to shore. The rower collapsed again in the boat and stopped breathing. He was lifted from the boat and placed on the dock where a lifejacket was used to support his head.
An ambulance was called, but despite the efforts of paramedics Mr. VAN RIJN died. He was 29.
On August 7, he had finished fifth as a finalist in the senior men's single sculls at the Royal Canadian Henley Regatta at Port Dalhousie, Ontario
In 2001, he rowed for Canada in the double sculls at the Princeton World Cup. Mr. VAN RIJN, paired with Brian Siebert of Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta., finished fourth on Mercer Lake in Princeton, N.J. The same pair won the men's senior double sculls at the Henley in In recent years, Mr. VAN RIJN rowed for the varsity team at the University of Toronto, where he was completing his doctorate. He teamed with Ming-Chang TSAI to win the Ontario University Athletics gold in the men's doubles earlier this year. He also won men's singles titles at consecutive regattas for the Blues in the 2003 season.
"Rowing is a sport that can reward those who keep at it for a long time," he told the Varsity student newspaper two years ago. "Getting to where I am now was a very gradual process, achieving little bit by little bit."
In 1998, Mr. VAN RIJN won four gold medals at the Central Ontario Rowing Championships on Martindale Pond at St. Catharines, Ontario He took the intermediate heavyweight single title and belonged to Ridley Grad Boat Club crews that won the men's double, quad and eights.
He had taken up rowing at the suggestion of his Grade 9 teacher. A graduate of St. George's School in Vancouver, Mr. VAN RIJN later earned a bachelor of science degree at the University of British Columbia, followed by a bachelor of arts in English and history at the University of Victoria.
He completed a master's degree at Toronto and had been working on a doctorate at the university's Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology. He was examining the marketing to hospitals of expensive medical-imaging technologies such as ultrasound in the latter half of the last century.
On the death of his 90-year-old paternal grandmother two years ago, Mr. VAN RIJN wrote an obituary for the Globe and Mail's Lives Lived column. He noted how in her years of travel she had presciently left Berlin in 1939, Japan in 1941, and China on the evening of the bloody crackdown at Tiananmen Square.
On Saturday morning, 75 members of the Burnaby Lake Rowing Club gathered at lakeside to observe a moment of silence. Mr. McCLURE spoke a few words. Flowers and petals were scattered on the placid waters. So many attended the brief service, the floating wooden dock began to sink, so the mourners retreated to the concrete wharf, their ankles wet and their hearts heavy.
Kiran VAN RIJN was born in Vancouver on December 18, 1975. He died of cardiac arrhythmia on September 21, 2005. He was 29. He leaves his parents, Carol and Dr. Theo VAN RIJN, and a younger sister, Catriana, as well as a grandmother, Katherine HICKEY, of London, Ontario

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-11 published
Week Of Remembrance: Ted BEAMENT, Brigadier And Lawyer (1908-2005)
Military strategist's final campaign was to be allowed to live in the same nursing home as his wife of 63 years
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, November 11, 2005, Page S7
He helped plan the Normandy invasion and the liberation of France and the Netherlands, but the final victory in a brilliant military career came at the age of 95 as he battled to be reunited with his wife.
Ted BEAMENT, a retired brigadier, was forced to live apart from Brenda, his Scottish war bride.
His room was in an Ottawa veterans' hospital, while she lived across town in another facility.
Their heartbreaking separation, detailed by the Ottawa Citizen in an article published on Valentine's Day last year, won the couple great sympathy. The BEAMENTs celebrated their 63rd wedding anniversary days later while still living at different addresses. They were able to visit only three times a week, while difficulties in hearing made telephone conversations frustrating.
"My mum is weepy and my dad is distressed," their daughter said at the time.
Mrs. BEAMENT was on a waiting list to join her husband at the Perley and Rideau Veterans' Health Centre, a delay that the family was told could last from six to 18 months.
Their plight led the War Amps of Canada to launch a national campaign to discover and reunite veterans unwillingly separated from their spouses.
After five months apart, the BEAMENTs were reunited at the Perley in March. They spent 15 precious weeks under the same roof before Mrs. BEAMENT died of causes related to old age. She was 91.
Mr. BEAMENT, who survived his wife by 15 months, enjoyed success in several arenas. He was a national champion as a figure skater, a first-class lawyer named king's counsel, and a decorated military strategist.
Family lore has it that Mr. BEAMENT was conceived in the summer of 1907 aboard a gondola afloat on the Grand Canal of Venice. His parents may well have had romantic notions regarding transportation, as they had met as members of the Bytown bicycle club.
Thomas Arthur BEAMENT was a prominent barrister who, in 1904, would be one of the 16 founding members of the Laurentian Club, formed by those businessmen excluded from other men's clubs because of their lack of social standing. Mr. BEAMENT's wife, Edith Louise BELFORD, had been orphaned at a young age and worked as typist in the civil service. George Edwin BEAMENT, known as Ted, was the youngest of their four children.
Educated at Ottawa Normal School and Lisgar Collegiate, the young man followed his father's demand that he attend Royal Military College, graduating in 1929. The yearbook noted the left sleeve of his cadet's uniform was not long enough to hold all his badges of distinction.
A degree in mechanical engineering was achieved at the University of Toronto two years later. He then attended Osgoode Hall, graduating in 1934, being called to the bar the same year. He was an associate in the family law firm of Beament and Beament.
It was as an engineering student that Mr. BEAMENT teamed with Elizabeth FISHER, Mary LITTLEJOHN and Hubert SPROTT to win the Canadian fours championship in figure skating at a meet at Winnipeg in February, 1930.
Mr. BEAMENT put aside his legal career with the outbreak of war in 1939. As commanding officer, he mobilized and led to England the 2nd (Ottawa) Field Battery, the famed Bytown Gunners whose members would see action at Dieppe and on D-Day. He even borrowed $2,000 from his father to outfit the men.
On Christmas Eve, 1940, he was a guest of a liaison officer for the British artillery who brought the Canadian officer to the family home in Oxford for a holiday meal. There, he met Brenda Yvonne Mary THOMS, a lithe, 27-year-old practitioner of the Dalcroze method of eurythmics, which intensifies the experience of music through movement and physical exertion. He proposed marriage the next day. Her polite rebuff did not deter such a persistent suitor. They married the following February, the bride wearing a silk wedding dress tailored from ivory-coloured curtains.
Many years later, a granddaughter, Ariana BRADFORD, questioned the brevity of the courtship. "Well, there was a war on, you know," Mr. BEAMENT replied. Two children would be born before the end of hostilities, neither, as far is known, conceived in a gondola.
A succession of command and staff appointments provided Ted BEAMENT with a series of promotions and ever greater responsibilities during the war. He was brigade major of the 1st Armoured Brigade in 1941; lieutenant-colonel and commanding officer of the 6th Canadian Field Regiment in 1942; general staff officer, grade 1, of the 4th Canadian Armoured Division, also in 1942; and, general staff officer, grade 1 (operations), of the First Canadian Army in 1943.
On November 14, 1943, he was appointed colonel (later brigadier), general staff, of the First Canadian Army. As such, he was intimately involved in the planning of the D-Day invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. He helped guide the liberation campaign through northwest Europe, during which Canadian forces often faced fierce resistance from German defenders.
In April, 1945, during the dying days of the Nazi regime, Mr. BEAMENT was based in the Netherlands when the headquarters of the First Canadian Army learned about a prison camp holding Polish women just across the frontier. The 1st (Polish) Armoured Division was ordered to free the inmates at Oberlangen. The camp was secured on April 12, Mr. BEAMENT's 37th birthday.
Back in England on September 27, Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery opened the Khaki University of Canada in the United Kingdom, an army-operated school on the outskirts of northwest London preparing servicemen for their demobilization. Mr. BEAMENT served as university president.
The king and queen visited the school the following year on the day before the president's fifth wedding anniversary. The queen was presented a bouquet of tulips by the president's young son.
Mr. BEAMENT was appointed an officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1943. His other awards for wartime service included a Croix de Guerre (avec Palme) from France and a Military Cross from Czechoslovakia. Mr. BEAMENT had assisted the Czechoslovak Brigade in Britain, for which he was also made a member of the Order of the White Lion. He was also mentioned in dispatches.
Returning to Canada in 1946, he rejoined the family law firm with brother Warwick BEAMENT, who had also been a brigadier with the Canadian Army in Europe. The reception was not quite as welcoming as he had imagined, as his father asked for repayment of the $2,000 loan. Worse, Mr. BEAMENT faced a large tax bill.
The tax appeal board rejected his position that he should not be taxed as a Canadian resident even though he had been overseas for more than five years. The storage of civilian clothes with his father and the ownership of a bank account and safety-deposit box, coupled with his intention to return to Canada, where taken as prove of residence. He then lost an appeal to the Exchequer Court in 1951.
Finally, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in 1952 that "the appellant was physically absent from Canada" and should be taxed accordingly. BEAMENT v. the Minister of National Revenue benefited many returning veterans and the Income Tax Act was subsequently revised.
The family law firm became involved in one of the most sensational cases in the immediate postwar period, as Warwick BEAMENT acted as defence counsel in a spy trial following the defection of Soviet cipher clerk Igor GOUZENKO.
Two years after his brother's death in 1966, Ted BEAMENT moved his practice to Beament, Green, Dust until retiring at 86, by which time he had been made a life member of the Law Society of Upper Canada. He served from 1961 to 1966 as a commissioner for the National Capital Commission in Ottawa. His charitable work included high posts on behalf of the Red Cross, the local Young Men's-Young Women's Christian Association, and Ottawa's Community Chest. He was on the board of governors of Carleton University and was honorary governor of the Corps of Commissionaires.
Befitting his sterling war service, he served as honorary colonel of the 30th Field Artillery Regiment, as the amalgamated Bytown Gunners are now known.
Mr. BEAMENT was appointed a member of the Order of Canada in the waning days of 1986. The honour was conferred for his ardent support of charitable groups, most notably his 30 years of service on behalf of the Order of Saint John of Jerusalem, for which he was elected chancellor of the priory of Canada.
The successful campaign to reunite Mr. BEAMENT with his wife allowed him to be at her side as she breathed her last. Even in mourning, the retired brigadier remained a stickler for detail, ensuring the date of death was recorded as June 17, 2004, as his wife had passed 15 minutes before midnight. He had held her hand as she died.
Ted BEAMENT was born on April 12, 1908, in Ottawa. He died there on September 28. He was 97. He leaves a son, Justin BEAMENT, of Down Saint Mary, Devon, England; a daughter, Meriel BRADFORD, of Old Chelsea, Quebec; five grandchildren and four great-grand_sons. He was predeceased by his wife of 63 years, the former Brenda THOMS, who died last year. He was also predeceased by a sister, Ethel, and by brothers Warwick and Geoffrey.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-23 published
He sailed for Canada at the Olympics
By Tom HAWTHORN, Wednesday, November 23, 2005, Page S9
Kingston, Ontario -- Donald TYTLER, who sailed for Canada in two Olympic regattas, has died at Kingston, Ontario He was 81.
In 1952, Mr. TYTLER joined skipper Bill GOODERHAM and other crewmen aboard the six-metre Canadian yacht Trickson VI in the waters off Finland's Harmaja lighthouse. The crew finished seventh overall in an event won by Americans aboard Llanoria. The Canadians' best result came with a second-place finish, three minutes behind Llanoria, on the fourth of seven race days. It was a day of gentle but constantly changing winds that demanded immediate decisions about sails.
Mr. TYTLER returned to Olympic competition in 1956, joining helmsman Dave HOWARD and his brother Cliff HOWARD on Tomahawk III. The Dragon-class racing sloop was sailed from Toronto to Montreal, where it travelled to Australia as deck cargo on a freighter. The journey lasted seven weeks.
Racing in the open waters of Port Phillip Bay, outside Melbourne, the Canadian crew finished eighth in the Dragon competition.
While his crews were competitive if not victorious at the Olympics, Mr. TYTLER could claim a share of the North American six-metre championship in 1954. He joined a Royal Canadian Yacht Club crew skippered by Mr. GOODERHAM aboard Buzzy II, which defeated 12 other crafts in three days of racing on Lake Ontario. The sailors were awarded The Globe and Mail Trophy by the newspaper's publisher.
Donald Milne TYTLER was born in Toronto on March 8, 1925. During the Second World War, he served in the navy. In 1949, he graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in mechanical engineering and worked for the Toronto school board for 20 years. He died at Kingston General Hospital on November 15.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-29 published
He led 'The Patricias' in the Korean War
By Tom HAWTHORN. Tuesday, November 29, 2005, Page S9
Victoria -- Jim STONE, the fierce disciplinarian who famously commanded the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry during the Korean War, has died. He was 97.
In April, 1951, the Canadians were defending Hill 677 on the approaches to Seoul near the village of Kap'yong. They were vastly outnumbered by an advancing Chinese force. The commanding officer's orders were precise in their instruction: "Be steady! Kill, and don't give way."
The defenders withstood waves of assaults, even ordering an artillery barrage on their position during one desperate engagement. After two days and nights of fierce fighting, the Canadians had held the hill at the loss of only 10 men killed and 23 wounded. Enemy losses were substantial.
Big Jim STONE's Patricias, as they became known, were awarded the U.S. Presidential Distinguished Unit Citation.
Mr. STONE arrived in Korea as a decorated officer of the Second World War, during which he had been awarded the Military Cross and the Distinguished Service Order (with bar). He gained another bar to the Distinguished Service Order in Korea.
He was named to the Order of Canada in 1984 for his charitable work.
James Riley STONE was born on August 2, 1908, at Winterbourne, Gloucestershire. He died Thursday at a veterans' home in suburban Victoria.

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