GUTAUSKAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-19 published
TRUMPICKAS, Algirdas
Suddenly at Soldiers Memorial Hospital, Orillia on Saturday, December 17th, 2005 at the age of 73. Beloved husband of Milda. Loving father of Rimas of Mississauga, Loreta DAUGINIS and her husband Wally of Oakville and Peter of Mississauga. Dear papa of Alicia and Andrius. Survived by his sister Nijole GUTAUSKAS and her husband Algirdas of Waterdown. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario St. (Hwy. 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held from Lithuanian Martyrs Church (Stavebank Road, Mississauga) on Wednesday, December 21st at 11 o'clock. Interment Saint John's Lithuanian Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to the Lithuanian Orphanage fund.

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GUTEJ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-16 published
GUTEJ, Michael
Suddenly, at St. Joseph's Health Centre, on Friday, January 14, 2005, at the age of 80. Beloved husband of the late Zofia. Loving uncle of Nadia, Halina, Zofia, Anna, and Dorota. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Sunday from 6-9 p.m. with prayers at 7 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, 12 Denison Ave., on Monday, January 17th, 2005 at 10 a.m. Interment Assumption Cemetery.

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GUTHERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-31 published
JOBSON, Margaret Mathieson (née GILLIES)
(Adherent of Knox Presbyterian Church, 630 Spadina Ave., past president of The Daughters of Scotland in Canada, past member of "Faith Chapter" of The Order of the Eastern Star, past member of Knox Presbyterian Church Willing Workers, past member of the Prisoner of War Association of Canada, past member of Woodgreen Community Centre Senior Citizens and East Toronto Salvation Army Over 60 Club). Born in Toronto on November 24, 1907, to dear late parents, Alexander and Sophia (DODDS) GILLIES. Entered into rest at the Ina Grafton Gage Nursing Home, on Friday, October 28, 2005. Margaret, beloved wife of the late George JOBSON. Cherished mother of George Alexander JOBSON. Dear sister of Neil GILLIES, the late George, Alexander, William, John, and Jean GILLIES. Survived by her sister-in-law Jesse GILLIES. Predeceased by her sisters-in-law Jacobyna, Nancy, Phyllis, Irene and Nora GILLIES. Fondly remembered by her niece Marion GUTHERSON of Luton, England, and sadly missed by her many other nieces, nephews and their families. Friends may call at the Trull "East Toronto" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1111 Danforth Avenue (one block east of Donlands Subway), from 5: 00 p.m. Wednesday, November 2, 2005, until commencement of celebration of life services in the Chapel at five-thirty o'clock. Memorial refreshments to follow in the Chatham Lounge. Private cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 525 University Avenue, 14th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2L3 or The Knox Presbyterian Church Children's Camp Fund, 630 Spadina Ave., Toronto, Ontario M5S 2H4. Many thanks to her nieces Sandra BAZNICK, Barbara BROOKS and very special thanks to her devoted friend Margaret BROOKS for all of their love and care of my dear mother.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-09 published
CREARIE, Richard Maxwell
Peacefully at Parkwood Hospital on February 8th, 2005 Mr. Richard Maxwell CREARIE of London in his 73rd year. Beloved friend of Dorothy Leyland. Loving husband to the late Jane CREARIE (1993.) Dear mother of Christine D'LUGOS (Gerry.) Grand-father to John, Craig and Paul all of Orillia. Also survived by sisters Barbara EDGEWORTH (Robert) of Burford, Betty GUTHRIE (Peter) of Woodstock, sister-in-law Berna CREARIE of Barrie, brother-in-law Gary McRAE of Goderich and many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by parents Henry and Florence CREARIE (PERRY, MOORE,) sister Peggy (Clarence) HAWKEYE, Doreen (Leroy) CHRISTIAN, Josephine McRAE and brother William CREARIE. Visitation will be held in the Lloyd R. Needham Funeral Chapel, 520 Dundas Street, on Wednesday 7-9 p.m. with Legion and K.V.A. services conducted at 7 p.m. The funeral service will be held on Thursday, February 10th at 11 a.m. with interment to follow at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the London Poppy Fund or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-04 published
FORTH, Sylvia A. (née STEVENS)
Suddenly at University Hospital London, with her family at her side, on Monday October 3, 2005. Sylvia A. (STEVENS) FORTH of London age 68 yrs. beloved wife of Gerald FORTH. Loving mother of Debbie COOK and husband Mark and Angela FORTH all of London. Proud grandmother of Chelsea and Michael COOK. Predeceased by her parents George STEVENS and the former Alice GUTHRIE. At Sylvia's request cremation has taken place. There will be a visitation for family and Friends at the L.A. Ball Funeral Chapel, 7 Water St. N., Saint Marys on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A service to celebrate her life will be held at St. James Anglican Church (65 Church St. S. Saint Marys) on Friday, October 7, 2005 at 11 a.m. In Sylvia's memory donations to St. James Anglican Church or charity of choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-26 published
CLARKE, Catherine (née GUTHRIE)
Of 240 William Street, Stratford passed away at the Stratford General Hospital on Thursday, November 24, 2005, in her 81st year. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, she was the daughter of the late Thomas GUTHRIE and the former Catherine TEMPLETON. Catherine was a member of Central United Church, Stratford, a member and former President of the United Church Women at the church, a member and former President of the Stratford General Hospital Auxiliary, a past Regent of the Perth Regiment Chapter Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire and a member of the Friends of the Festival. Beloved wife of Victor CLARKE. Also surviving are several cousins in Scotland. At Catherine's request, cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at Central United Church, 194 Avondale Avenue, Stratford on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 at 11 a.m. Reverend Cheryl-Ann STADELBAUER- SAMPA will officiate. Interment of cremated remains will be in Avondale Cemetery, Stratford. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Victorian Order of Nurses, the Stratford Public Library or a charity of one's choice through the Heinbuck Funeral Home, 156 Albert Street, Stratford at 1-519-271-5062.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.simcoe_county.orillia.the_packet_&_times 2005-03-02 published
Shocked students remember good friend killled in snowmobile crash
‘It's hard to put into words just how to deal with this'
By Monique BEECH, Wednesday, March 02, 2005
When Jonathan MARSHALL died, he shattered the heart of a school community.
To students at Orillia District Collegiate and Vocational Institute he was ‘Marshy, ' a 16-year-old lovable teddy bear of a guy who made everyone around him laugh. He was a stocky, shaggy-haired teen who excelled at football, rugby and hockey, but also felt at home singing with the not-quite-as-cool school choir.
A snowmobile crash took No. 48 from his Blues teammates last weekend. Wearing only a T-shirt, jeans, and without a helmet, Jonathan's snowmobile struck a parked car on Line 7 in Oro-Medonte Township, near Moonstone, at about 10: 30 p.m. He died overnight in Royal Victoria Hospital in Barrie.
It's been an especially sharp blow for Orillia District Collegiate & Vocational Institute's 970 students and its staff. Jon's dad, Robert, is a math teacher there. His younger sister, Jocelyn, a Grade 9 student.
“It's devastating,” said Blues' head football coach Tyler KUDAR. Robert's a co-coach of the team.
“I feel for him and his family. It's hard to put into words just how to deal with this.&rdquo
Since the school bell rang Monday morning, students and staff have gathered to mourn and remember the Grade 11 student. Three candles illuminate a memorial table set up in the school's foyer. Bristol boards are plastered with pictures and loving notes.
“I'll never forget your awesome huge hugs,” writes one student.
“Jon, You will always be an inspiration to me both on and off the field,” writes another.
It was football that drove Jonathan, said Friends Jayson MILLER, 17, and Mackenzie MICKS, 16. A linebacker and leader, the powerhouse player who weighed more than 200 pounds and stood over six feet would rev up his teammates with spirited speeches before a game.
“Keeping our heads in it, pretty much,” said MILLER, a teammate.
“Tellin' us to get pumped up and go out there and win.&rdquo
Shelby GUTHRIE, school president and friend, remembers his winning smile and way of reducing anyone to fits of laughter. He would often break into a rendition of The Gambler by Kenny Rogers or do the Crip walk, a stutter-step, gangster-style dance popular with teens.
“It was his thing,” said Guthrie, 17, chuckling at the memory.
His thing was also riding snowmobiles. His Friends say Jonathan, who lived just outside Orillia on Carlyon Line, was an experienced sledder.
They're not sure what may have led to last weekend's accident.
But he wasn't a gambler, said MICKS. “He just lived life to the fullest,” he said.
To help students and staff deal with their grief, seven crisis response team counsellors were called in Monday, said principal Lori BERESFORD.
“It's a very difficult situation but one you have to rise to and use the people that you got, much like a family in many ways,&rdquo said BERESFORD. “You're using that family to support each other. And I think that's what I saw (Monday) is everybody coming together, staff and students, to support each other.&rdquo
Moving on is going to be tough.
“If he were here right now he'd be like ‘Come on guys, cheer up,'” said Guthrie. “Without him here it's hard to have the will to just do that.&rdquo
It's been an equally tough lesson about the frailty of life for these teens.
“It's good to be nice to everybody and not take everything for granted,” said MILLER. “Go out there and have fun, but there's times not to be stupid. I think that's clicked into a lot of people's heads.&rdquo
Barrie Ontario Provincial Police say Jonathan was at a friend's house before the accident. Police at the scene tried to determine how fast the sled was going at the time. A call to a police spokesperson was not returned yesterday.
A celebration of Jonathan's life is being held today at 11 a.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion Hall in Coldwater.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-24 published
Tom PATTERSON, Impresario: 1920-2005
He was a hometown boy not long returned from the Second World War when he had the bright idea of holding a Shakespeare festival in Stratford, Ontario, writes John ALLEMANG. In 1953, employing a combination of enthusiasm, chutzpah, good luck and characteristic innocence, he pulled it off
By John ALLEMANG, Thursday, February 24, 2005 - Page S7
Tom PATTERSON, the man whose dreams and determination brought the Stratford Festival to life, has shuffled off his mortal coil.
Shakespearean quotes weren't his line when as a young war veteran he first set out to bring summer theatre to a small southwestern Ontario hometown that improbably was filled with references to the Bard. Stratford in the 1940s may have had a Romeo St. and a King Lear public school and a river Avon where graceful white swans nipped at anyone trying to get too friendly. But it was no outpost of high culture - a steam-locomotive repair plant dominated the local economy, and the idea of a Shakespearean festival in the heart of Ontario farm country should have been dismissed as utter craziness.
Steam turned into diesel, the plant was declared redundant, and suddenly a failing Stratford was open to the inspired lunacy that propelled Tom PATTERSON through life. Though his theatre experience was largely limited to the London music halls he'd patronized during the war - even as a much-feted luminary later in life, he was happy to declare that he didn't know "one damn thing" about the dramatic arts -- he couldn't shake off the marketing man's logic that a place named Stratford should have its own stage.
In 1951, barely 30 years old and something of an itinerant journalist who specialized in writing about sewage plants for Civic Administrator magazine, he took his idea forward to the Stratford town council. The key to understanding the unlikely success of the festival can be seen in what followed - Tom PATTERSON was able to convince a sober group of Ontario burghers that a theatre was a dream worth pursuing, a sign both that Mr. PATTERSON possessed rare powers of persuasion and that the small-town leaders were a lot less sober and a lot more daring than they're ordinarily given credit for.
In 1952, Mr. PATTERSON was dispatched to New York City, reckoned to be the capital of the theatre world, with $125 of civic funds. He admitted in his autobiography First Stage that he didn't quite know how one went about starting a theatre festival, but such innocence was always his greatest asset. He decided to seek the advice and support of Laurence Olivier, who was then appearing on Broadway. When getting through to Lord Olivier proved impossible, Mr. PATTERSON talked his way into the Rockefeller Foundation, which enabled him to report back to his Stratford team in his highly exaggerated way that the Rockefellers were on side - he threw in Lord Olivier's name as well, to tide himself over until he had a comparable big name to wave around.
By the next year, he had those names: Tyrone GUTHRIE, Alec Guinness and Irene Worth all agreed to launch a project that would never have happened if they'd reacted with Lord Olivier's common sense. It was one thing to talk about bringing a theatre to Stratford (PATTERSON's early idea was that performances could be held in the town band shell). But to lure the most restless thinker of the British theatre along with two of the genre's leading actors to an empty lot above the small town's baseball diamond - that took some extraordinary combination of enthusiasm, chutzpah and good luck.
Mr. PATTERSON found Mr. GUTHRIE at exactly the right time. The Irish director was obsessed with the idea of producing Shakespeare on a thrust stage that would project right into the surrounding audience and supply the kind of Elizabethan intimacy theatre lost when it moved into the proscenium setting. In England, people scoffed.
He was open to the idea of starting something new, and came to Stratford as artistic adviser in 1952 to see what could be done. In his memoirs, Mr. PATTERSON tells of the subterfuge he'd dreamed up to help win over the sophisticated Irishman to his new setting. Fearful that Stratford's plain-looking downtown might not impress a man used to London's West End, Mr. PATTERSON as chauffeur took a detour along the more presentable Avon and pointed out the rise of turf along the river where both of them could fulfill their dreams.
"His perseverance was indomitable," Mr. GUTHRIE later observed.
Mr. PATTERSON needn't have worried. His future artistic director was no snob, and acted as if he was right at home in the Ontario town, spending half the night drinking and talking with his hotel clerk to get a feel for the spirit of the place. His only real concern was the question of the thrust stage, and the likelihood of something so revolutionary getting a hearing in a conservative Canadian town.
But Stratford's leaders were too practical-minded to be caught up in parochial squabbles about which stage was best. Mr. GUTHRIE had been recommended to them by Dora Mavor Moore, the doyenne of Canadian theatre. If he wanted a thrust stage, so be it.
Mr. GUTHRIE was supremely well-connected, and Mr. PATTERSON found it easier to make his pitch to leading actors after that. While the Festival from the start was determined to make use of Canadian talent - William Hutt, Don Harron and Timothy Findley were among those in the inaugural casts - it was felt that name performers such as Mr. Guinness were needed to get the festival going and ensure that the banks didn't foreclose on the local worthies who'd put their assets up for security. Mr. PATTERSON was also helped by the London connections of his former employer at Civic Administrator magazine, arts patron and Maclean-Hunter chairman Floyd CHALMERS. Making Friends in high places was never a problem for Stratford's first general manager.
Though general manager was his title, Mr. PATTERSON had no gift for the finicky details of administration, and was more likely to be found playing pinochle with actor Jason Robards than analyzing a balance sheet. His methods belonged more to the seat-of-the-pants school of getting things done fast and moving forward. When it came to pricing tickets for the opening night of July 13, 1953, he didn't commission economic studies or embark on a fact-finding mission. Instead, he just bought a New York paper, checked the prices of the best theatres and decided that Stratford should have the bravado to match them.
His high-energy, anything-is-possible style was more of an asset, especially in the festival's feverish first year. Alec Guinness had it written into his contract that he could walk away from the production of Richard III if the Stratford's first tent theatre wasn't ready for rehearsals three weeks before opening night. In fact, the theatre wasn't ready until a week before first night. Until then, the celebrated stars of the London stage made do with a tin-roofed barn filled with mating sparrows. And when they moved over to the festival theatre, it was discovered from Mr. Guinness' first soliloquy that the newly laid concrete bowl effectively muffled all sound.
Members of the Stratford board were pressed into service stapling custom-designed matting into the concrete. On a sweltering opening night, all went splendidly - church bells pealed, a regimental cannon was fired, Louis Applebaum's brass fanfare resounded, and a crazy dream came to be in a tent theatre where you could hear the screams of the town's baseball players on the adjacent diamond.
Nothing in his later life could match that moment for Tom PATTERSON, but he had too much joie de vivre to mind the inevitable conflicts that a growing enterprise created. As Stratford's general manager, he felt more at home with actors than with other managers. "He enjoyed life, sang a lot and had a great time," actor Barry MacGregor last year said of his friend.
After the festival's first year, Mr. PATTERSON founded the touring theatrical company Canadian Players with actor Douglas Campbell, and later served as founding director of the Canadian Theatre Centre, founding president of the National Theatre School of Canada, and founder of the Dawson City Gold Rush Festival. He worked with the Stratford Festival until 1969, when he joined a consulting company. A year later, he criticized the festival organization for being out of touch with local interests. He later described himself as a freelance theatre consultant and worked on arts festivals across North America.
As time passed, Stratford became better able to single out the contribution he'd made to its success and dedicated the Tom Patterson Theatre to him. The town of Stratford also named an island in the Avon after its least solitary citizen - by that point, his store of quotations was good enough for him to joke how Donne was wrong in insisting that no man is an island.
Tributes had come his way long before. In 1967, he was made a member of the Order of Canada in 1967 and promoted to officer 10 years later. He also received honorary degrees from the University of Toronto and the University of Western Ontario.
"I can safely say I think (PATTERSON) has done more as an ambassador of goodwill than any leader of our country has ever done," the Montreal-born Christopher Plummer said yesterday. The actor has performed often at the festival.
In his later years, Mr. PATTERSON was beset by ill health, suffering both a tracheotomy and laryngectomy that took away most of his vocal power but in no way deprived him of his ability to command a room. He spent his last years in the veterans wing of Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital, where he was renowned as a live wire. Despite his disabilities, he still found ways to get back to Stratford - for two seasons he organized a visit for his fellow hospital residents, who delighted as much in seeing their comrade applauded by the appreciative crowds as they did in theatre's more Shakespearean moments. On one trip, he strayed from the group to visit with the actors and actually managed to get himself locked up in the theatre for several hours.
By this time, the ebullient Tom PATTERSON could talk only in short bursts through a often-wonky voice amplifier, but it in no way subdued his good humour. When someone generously observed that he was looking well on his final visit to Stratford, Mr. PATTERSON replied, in his amplifier's deadened monotone, "I don't think I could play Darth Vader with this thing."
Harry Thomas PATTERSON was born in Stratford, Ontario, on June 11, 1920. He died on yesterday at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto after a long illness. He was 84. He is survived by his wife, Pat, and by children Bob, Tim, Lucy Ann and Lyle Scott. He was predeceased by his daughter, Penny. Funeral information was not immediately available, but the festival plans a memorial service on March 13.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-09 published
GORDON, Ralph A., D.S.O., D.F.C., C.D. Brigadier General (Royal Canadian Air Force) Ret'd
Peacefully at home in Ottawa, Ontario on November 8, 2005, aged 87. Predeceased by his beloved wife of 55 years, Esther of New York City, his parents Charles and Mary of Bobcaygeon, Ontario and his brothers Ted of Bobcaygeon and Jack of Ottawa. Much loved father of Larry and his wife Betty of Toronto and Bruce and his wife Cathy of Carleton Place, Ontario. Proud grandfather of Amy, Heather, Christine and Andrew. Sadly missed by his loving companion Nancy GUTHRIE of Fort Myers Beach, Florida. Following operational tours during World War 2 as a pilot in Nova Scotia and England and as the highly decorated Commanding Officer of 436 Squadron in Burma, Ralph remained with the Royal Canadian Air Force where he had a distinguished career with many senior command positions including Air Officer Commanding, Maritime Air Command. After retiring from the Air Force in 1968, Ralph continued his career with the federal Public Service where he represented Canada as Counsellor for the Environment at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. Prior to his recent illness, he enjoyed many years of boating at his cottage on Big Rideau Lake and at his condo in Fort Myers Beach. The family wishes to express their gratitude to the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre, the Victorian Order of Nurses (Ottawa), The Hospice at May Court and Dr. David TOBIN for their outstanding care, compassion and support. Friends may visit at the West Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 150 Woodroffe Avenue (at Richmond Road), Ottawa on Thursday, November 10, 2005 from 1: 00 p.m. until service in the Chapel at 2: 30 p.m. Cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre, the Victorian Order of Nurses (Ottawa) or The Hospice at May Court, Ottawa would be appreciated by the family. Condolences/donations/tributes at McGarryfamily.ca (613-728-1761)

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-10 published
GORDON, Ralph A., D.S.O., D.F.C., C.D. Brigadier General (Royal Canadian Air Force) Ret'd
Peacefully at home in Ottawa, Ontario on November 8, 2005, aged 87. Predeceased by his beloved wife of 55 years, Esther of New York City, his parents Charles and Mary of Bobcaygeon, Ontario and his brothers Ted of Bobcaygeon and Jack of Ottawa. Much loved father of Larry and his wife Betty of Toronto and Bruce and his wife Cathy of Carleton Place, Ontario. Proud grandfather of Amy, Heather, Christine and Andrew. Sadly missed by his loving companion Nancy GUTHRIE of Fort Myers Beach, Florida. Following operational tours during World War 2 as a pilot in Nova Scotia and England and as the highly decorated Commanding Officer of 436 Squadron in Burma, Ralph remained with the Royal Canadian Air Force where he had a distinguished career with many senior command positions including Air Officer Commanding, Maritime Air Command. After retiring from the Air Force in 1968, Ralph continued his career with the federal Public Service where he represented Canada as Counsellor for the Environment at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. Prior to his recent illness, he enjoyed many years of boating at his cottage on Big Rideau Lake and at his condo in Fort Myers Beach. The family wishes to express their gratitude to the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre, the Victorian Order of Nurses (Ottawa), The Hospice at May Court and Dr. David TOBIN for their outstanding care, compassion and support. Friends may visit at the West Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 150 Woodroffe Avenue (at Richmond Road), Ottawa on Thursday, November 10, 2005 from 1: 00 p.m. until service in the Chapel at 2: 30 p.m. Cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre, the Victorian Order of Nurses (Ottawa) or The Hospice at May Court, Ottawa would be appreciated by the family. Condolences/donations/tributes at McGarryfamily.ca (613-728-1761)

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-29 published
Ralph GORDON, Air Force Brigadier-General (1917-2005)
As a 28-year-old, he commanded a Second World War Royal Canadian Air Force supply squadron under monsoon conditions in the Far East and went on to become a high-ranking officer
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Thursday, December 29, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Fighting the Japanese in the Far East during the Second World was one thing but fighting monsoons at the same time was quite another. When heavy rainfall struck in June of 1945, Ralph GORDON, the 28-year-old commanding officer of the Royal Canadian Air Force's 436 Squadron, knew he had a problem.
Not only did his squadron have to supply the British Army with fuel, food, medical supplies, cargo and men in its struggle to dislodge the Japanese from Burma, but it had to fly around the clock in a region that experienced about as much rain in one month as Vancouver received in a whole year.
Five months earlier, the newly-formed squadron had moved to Kangla, in India's Imphal Valley, to support Field Marshal Sir William Slim and his 14th Army. With Mr. GORDON commanding hundreds of pilots, navigators, ground crew, cooks and other tradesmen, the squadron shared in the fall of Mandalay and Rangoon but found the monsoon to be as daunting an enemy as the Japanese.
That June, meteorologists recorded a rainfall of 47 inches. According to Canucks Unlimited, a history of the squadron, "only the most limited of radio facilities were available and forecasting services just did not exist. Each airman was on his own and could count on little practical help."
Instead, Mr. GORDON, then a wing commander, came up with the idea of using one aircraft at a time, in rotation, to go into the air and report on meteorological conditions in a kind of informal weather network he dubbed "Watchbird." In this way, the squadron beat the monsoon and flew 1,000 hours in the "wettest and most difficult base in all of India and Burma." It was also the only air force unit that made it through the monsoon without casualties.
The heavy rain meant Mr. GORDON and his men continually improvised. "No one had operated under monsoon conditions before," he once recounted. "We didn't have proper equipment for changing engines on aircraft, or for doing laundry, or for lighting lamps, so we had to scrounge a lot.
"The technicians cut bamboo and made tripods and chain blocks to lift engines out of aircraft. They had no hangars and had to work in the rain. The runways were simply made of heavy tar paper, with steel mesh laid over them, so when it rained, the runway floated on the water. You got water over the windshield, and everywhere, when you took off.
"The Royal Canadian Air Force sent us stoves that burned wood to cook with [but] there was no wood to burn because bamboo is full of water. So we had to design stoves that burned aviation fuel."
Mr. GORDON's methods earned the respect of former airframe mechanic Art ADAM/ADAMS of Hamilton, Ontario "We all thought he was a tremendous commanding officer."
Mr. ADAM/ADAMS, currently the squadron's honorary colonel, said Mr. GORDON flouted tradition and allowed officers and men to eat together, which, in the stuffy view of neighbouring Royal Air Force squadrons, violated protocol.
"He said, 'If our squadron is going to work together and fly together, then by God, we will eat together!' [That is] one of the reasons we had such a happy and determined squadron."
Art IRWIN of Ottawa also admired his commanding officer's can-do ability. "We had a high disability rate from dysentery and other gastric disturbances, which had to do with a lack of hygiene. One of the first things he did was remove the native cooks as food handlers and have only Canadians working [in the kitchen]. His move quickly reduced our [health] problems. That was a big, big step."
For all his success, being the boss was a lonely job, Mr. GORDON told his granddaughter Heather GORDON in 1996. Commanding men in battle meant he dealt with his responsibilities in isolation from everyone else. "You couldn't be Friends and still be their boss at the same time," he said. "You knew that what you did impacted all those who served under you."
For the leadership he displayed during the nine months he commanded 436 Squadron, along with the operational missions he flew with 415 Squadron over Europe in 1944, Mr. GORDON was awarded the Distinguished Service Order on January 15, 1946. Three months earlier, he had been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for "showing outstanding devotion to duty and efficiency. Most of [his] flights have been in unarmed aircraft across mountainous jungle country within range of enemy fighters. His operational flying has always been of the highest standard."
Mr. GORDON had also been mentioned in dispatches on June 14, Ralph GORDON grew up in Bobcaygeon, in Ontario's Kawartha Lakes cottage region, where his father Charles owned a boating business. After joining the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1939, he was awarded his pilot's wings in June, 1940. Two years of instructing followed before he went to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, to fly Canso maritime patrol aircraft for No. 162 (Bomber/Reconnaissance) Squadron. In May, 1944, he was sent to Britain to fly Wellington bombers against enemy shipping.
After the war, Mr. GORDON remained in the Royal Canadian Air Force and experienced first its reduction and then its dramatic Cold War expansion. By the end of the 1950s, the Royal Canadian Air Force flew 2,000 aircraft and counted 55,000 men and woman among its ranks. From 1961-65, as a group captain, he commanded Royal Canadian Air Force Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia, a key Maritime Air Command base. In August of 1965, he was promoted air commodore and given command of Maritime Air Command, making him responsible for the security of both East and West Coasts. As it turned out, he was its last commander.
In January of 1966, Maritime Air Command was amalgamated into the new Maritime Command as part of the integration of the army, navy and air force, a scheme that caused enormous controversy. When four senior admirals resigned in protest, Mr. GORDON found himself in temporary command, on July 19, 1966, of Maritime Command, which included the Atlantic fleet and Royal Canadian Air Force maritime units. His command lasted all of eight hours. The sight of Mr. GORDON's personal Royal Canadian Air Force flag flying at the heart of the navy's headquarters in Halifax caused one salty chief petty officer to growl, "It's a disgrace!"
During his career, Mr. GORDON spent more than 3,000 hours flying about 25 different types of aircraft. After retiring as a brigadier-general in 1968, he worked for the federal public service.
Ralph Alan GORDON was born on November 16, 1917, in Toronto. He died of cancer on November 8, in Ottawa. He was 87. He leaves his sons, Larry and Bruce, and his companion, Nancy GUTHRIE. He was predeceased by his wife Esther.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-01 published
LITWILLER, Norma (née TURNER) (1919-2005)
Passed away peacefully at the Kitchener-Waterloo Health Centre of the Grand River Hospital on Sunday, February 27, 2005 at the age of 85 years. Norma was predeceased by her beloved husband Gordon LITWILLER on August 12, 1998. Dear mother of Mary Jane HURST and her husband Don of Fonthill, Brenda REBBECK and her husband Jim of Port Rowan, Don and his friend Bev of Kitchener and John and his friend Arthur of Brampton. Sadly missed by seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Also survived by her twin sister Adell GUTHRIE and her brother Tommy TURNER and many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by one grand_son Brian MITCHELL, and by her brothers Murray and Gerald TURNER. Norma was a Charter Member of First Baptist Church in Waterloo. Friends are invited to share their memories of Norma with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South in Waterloo on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service to celebrate Norma's life and faith will be held in the funeral home chapel on Thursday, March 3, 2005 at 3 p.m. with Pastor Robert SNELL officiating. Immediately following the service, Friends are invited to join the family in the funeral home's Fireside Reception Room for a time of fellowship and refreshments. A private family interment will take place at Parkview Cemetery. In kindness, the family would appreciate donations to your favourite charity. Condolences/donations/flowers: 519-745-8445 www.edwardrgood.com

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-03 published
HODGSON, Effie
The death occurred peacefully at Rowanwood Retirement Lodge, Utterson on Tuesday, March 1, 2005. Effie HODGSON of Novar in her 102nd year was the beloved wife of the late Elgin HODGSON and dear mother of Kendrick (Kay) and his wife Marilyn of Mississauga and Allen and his wife Wendy of Ballantrae. Loving grandmother of Robert (Audrey), Tom (Kathy), Lisa (Philip); and Catherine (Ian), Sherry (Richard) and Anne (Rob) and 13 great-grandchildren. Aunt of Alice McCLOY, Bill METZGER, Helen GUTHRIE, Effie GAMMON and Myrtle FAWCETT. Effie was a long time resident of Novar, dedicated organist and choir leader of Novar United Church and tireless United Church Women worker. Visitation for Mrs. Effie HODGSON will be held at the Mitchell Funeral Home, 15 High Street, Huntsville, P1H 1N9 705-789-5252 on Friday, March 4, 2005 from 2-4 p.m. and Saturday from 12: 30 to 1:30 p.m. A funeral service will be held in the Addison Chapel of the Mitchell Funeral Home on Saturday, March 5 at 1: 30 p.m. If desired, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the charity of your choice, would be appreciated.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-08 published
PERERA, Harry
Peacefully on April 6, 2005, in Pickering, Ontario. Harry, loving father of Samantha, Michelle and Nicole (Rick GUTHRIE,) dear grandfather of Cody and Brandy, husband of Gloria. Friends and family are invited Monday, April 11th, visitation 12: 00-2:00 p.m., Funeral Service 2: 00 p.m. at The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre, 275 Lesmill Road, 416-441-1580. Private cremation to follow. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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GUTHRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-17 published
GUTHRIE, Mary E. (GAYNOR)
Formerly of Toronto. Mary passed away peacefully on Friday, April 15, 2005, at Sunnyside Home, at the age of 77 years. Mary was predeceased by her husband Richard GUTHRIE (2004.) Survived by son William GUTHRIE and his wife Christine of Cambridge, daughter Diana LINDSAY and her husband Brian of Kingston; grandmother of Christopher, Lauren, Sarah, Joshua and Michelle; sister of Anne JACKSON and Ruth WILLIAMS and the late Bill GAYNOR. Mary was a High School Teacher at Burnhamthorpe Collegiate of Etobicoke for over 20 years. A member of Brampton Golf and Country Club for over 25 years. Cremation has taken place. A Memoral Service will be conducted in the Chapel of Little's Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main St. E., Cambridge (519-623-1290) on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 at 2 p.m., with reception to follow at the home of William and Christine. In memory of Mary, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society.

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GUTKOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-07 published
GUTKOWSKI, Wladyslaw
Sadly with his family at his side at the Rouge Valley Ajax Pickering Health Centre on Saturday, November 5, 2005, at the age of 85. Predeceased by his wife Clara and his granddaughter Tamara. Dear father of Friedrich (Helene,) Halina (Randy) BERTA, Walter (Krystyna NOWAK,) Leokadia (Jan) WLODARCZYK, Frank, and Henry (Jeanine LASON.) Proud grandfather of Sylvia, Suzanna, Natasha, Kevin, Curtis, Tara, Amanda, Kiana, Sean, and great-grandchildren. Resting at Collins Clarke MacGillivray White Funeral Homes, 222 Autoroute 20, Cartier - Exit 49 in Pointe-Claire. Funeral service Wednesday, November 9 at St. Michael's Parish, 105 St. Viateur Street, at 10: 00 a.m. Interment at Lakeview Memorial Gardens, Pointe-Claire. Visitation Monday 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Montreal Children's Hospital or the Children's Make A Wish Foundation.

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GUTMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-14 published
O'CONNELL, Alice Jane " Jean" (née MUIRHEAD)
Born January 29, 1929. Died peacefully at St. Joseph's Health Centre on January 12, 2005. Beloved wife of Michael (married July 3, 1954, St. Anthony's Church, Toronto). Dear mother of Mary-Anne LEE and her husband Geoffrey and Michael. Devoted grandmother of Veronica and Edward. Youngest daughter of the late John MUIRHEAD and Alice CARTER. Dear sister of Edna LAWRENCE and twin sister of Ted. Predeceased by Jim, Mary WORBOYS, Anne and John. She will be sadly missed by many other relatives and Friends. Alice was a parishioner for 50 years at St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic Church and was a longtime member of the C.W.L. The family would like to thank the 3E staff, Intensive Care Unit staff, chaplaincy, Dr. GUTMAN and Dr. BUDDEN of St. Joseph's Health Centre for their excellent care and support. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston, on Saturday from 6 to 9 p.m. and Sunday 2 to 4 and 6 to 9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic Church (2100 Jane St.) on Monday, January 17, 2005 at 10 a.m. Interment to follow at Mount Hope Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made in memory of Alice to St. Joseph's Health Centre or to St. Francis Table. Condolences may be sent to the family at alice.oconnell@wardfh.com

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GUTMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-25 published
SALMON, Marie Gertrude " Louise" (née FEEHELEY)
Passed away peacefully at St. Joseph's Health Centre on Sunday, January 23, 2005, at the age of 83. Beloved wife of Thomas. Dear sister of the late Charles FEEHELEY. Loving aunt of Anne and her husband Renato DA COSTA, Michael and his wife Maria FEEHELEY, great-aunt of John and Réjeanne, Michael, Mary, Christopher, Patrick, Matthew, Andrew, Julie, Emily and great-great-aunt of Matthew. Our special thanks to Dr. GUTMAN and the nursing staff at St. Joseph's Health Centre for their loving care and kindness. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane subway on Wednesday from 4-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at St. James Church, on Thursday, January 27, 2005 at 9: 30 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, donations made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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GUTMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-24 published
BLACKHALL, Doris Marion Stewart
One of God's most beautiful and courageous angels found her way back home on Monday, August 22nd, 2005. She is now reunited with her devoted husband, Bertram Chester BLACKHALL. Cherished mother to Bonnie Margaret, Jane Elizabeth (Carmen DECOSTE,) Jennifer Ann (Gary WALTERS) and Jon Barnett (Dana.) Proud "Nanoo" to Trevor and Ryan; Brandon and Rowan; Hannah; Blake, and the late Shane DECOSTE. She is also survived by her loving sisters, Margaret REIMER and Elsie AVERY. Special thanks to the staff at both St. Joseph's Health Centre and St. Michael's Palliative Care Unit. Eternal gratitude to Dr. Ed GUTMAN and José San Pedro (S.J.H.C.) for their wonderful compassion and support. There truly are living angels among us. Visitation to be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 lights west of Yonge St.) on Friday, August 26th, 12: 30-1:30 p.m. Service in the chapel 1: 30 p.m. to be followed by interment (Mt. Pleasant Cemetery) and a reception in the Park Room of the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation may be made to Sleeping Children Around the World (scaw.org) or the Alzheimer Society of Canada.

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GUTMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-25 published
BLACKHALL, Doris Marion Stewart
One of God's most beautiful and courageous angels found her way back home on Monday, August 22nd, 2005. She is now reunited with her devoted husband, Bertram Chester BLACKHALL. Cherished mother to Bonnie Margaret, Jane Elizabeth (Carmen DECOSTE,) Jennifer Ann (Gary WALTERS) and Jon Barnett (Dana.) Proud Nanoo to Trevor and Ryan; Brandon and Rowan; Hannah; Blake, and the late Shane DECOSTE. She is also survived by her loving sisters, Margaret REIMER and Elsie AVERY. Special thanks to the staff at both St. Joseph's Health Centre and St. Michael's Palliative Care Unit. Eternal gratitude to Dr. Ed GUTMAN and José SAN PEDRO (St. Joseph's Health Centre) for their wonderful compassion and support. There truly are living angels among us. Visitation to be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 lights west of Yonge St.) on Friday, August 26th, 12: 30-1:30 p.m. Service in the chapel 1: 30 p.m. to be followed by interment (Mt. Pleasant Cemetery) and a reception in the Park Room of the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation may be made to Sleeping Children Around the World (scaw.org) or the Alzheimer Society of Canada.

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GUTMANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-07 published
KESSLER, Anna Eada
With great sorrow the family announces the loss of Anna Eada KESSLER on March 15th, 2005 in her 28th year, in Edmonton, Alberta. Dearly loved daughter of John and Stephanie. She will be deeply missed by her sister Andrea and brothers Michael and Jeremy. Much loved granddaughter of June ENGEL and the late Daisy and Maury KESSLER. Greatniece of James and Joyce GUTMANN, of Phyllis and Ken ANDREWS, John and Pat DYKE, Colin and Rita DYKE. Anna will be sadly missed by her cousins Kathryn and Earl and Michelle, Ayella, Zahara, Keely GROSSMAN, Gail and Bob and Chris, Olivia DUCK, Jeff DYKE, and Judy, Colin, Susan (DYKE) and Seven, Cedar and Dylan WELSH, and her extended family in Europe. A private funeral was held in Toronto. Anna finished high school in Toronto, graduated with Honours in Philosophy from University of Toronto, went on to post graduate studies on a scholarship at Cornell University, and was currently finishing her Ph.D. in Philosophy at University of Alberta in Edmonton. She will be granted a posthumous Doctorate this year from the University of Alberta. Anna was a highly sensitive, gifted, courageous and caring person. She loved dogs, horses and hockey. Anna will be remembered with great affection by her many Friends and colleagues around the world. Donations can be made to the 'Anna Kessler Memorial Fund' at University of Alberta, Philosophy Dept., 6-33 Humanities Centre, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E5 (tel: 780-492-8060) or @ anm3@ualberta.ca or also to the Clarke Institute, 9th Floor Women's Unit, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2S1 (tel: 416-535-8501 ext. 4093)

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GUTOSKI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-01 published
KOEHLER, Elmina Catherine (TRAUTMAN)
(February 19, 1915-October 31, 2005)
Peacefully, on Monday, October 31, 2005 at Trinity Village Care Centre, amidst the love of her family, in her 91st year. Predeceased by Lorne (2000), her loving husband of 57 years. Sadly missed and always remembered by her children; Anne Maria McKERRAL (Cal,) Rosemary GUERREIRO (Michael,) Virginia ANDERSON (Robert) and Mary Jane GUTOSKI (Donald) and her grandchildren, Steven, Angela, Andrew, Amy, Jocelyn and Graham. Also remembered by her sisters, Sister Leona TRAUTMAN, Rita HASTINGS and Kathleen MAYNARD, her brother Howard TRAUTMAN and many nieces and nephews. Raised in Formosa, Ontario, Elmina lived in Kitchener for over seventy years. She was first employed at Tony Day Knitters and later at Terry Williams Sweater Company for more than twenty years when she retired in 1981 to care for her grand_son. A 43 year breast cancer survivor, Elmina devoted much of her life to caring for others. She was a longtime member of St. Francis of Assisi Roman Catholic Church and the Catholic Women's League. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Schreiter-Sandrock Funeral Home and Chapel (519-742-4481) 51 Benton Street, Kitchener on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Parish prayers will be at 8: 45 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at St. Francis of Assisi Roman Catholic Church (Blueridge Avenue) on Thursday, November 3, 2005 at 10 a.m. with Father Joseph DE VIVEIROS, C.R. officiating. Cremation to follow. A reception will be held in the church hall. Donations may be made as expressions of sympathy to Trinity Village Care Centre (Pinewoods) or Saint Mary's Hospital in Elmina's memory. For more information or online condolences visit www.schreitersandrockfuneralhome.com. A special thank-you to all the wonderful staff at Trinity Village for the compassion, care and love shown to our mother and to us over the last three years.

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GUTOWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-20 published
CLAPP, Donald Ross
Passed away, October 18, 2005, in hospital, at 77 years of age. Our hearts are broken. Beloved husband of Donna Mae. Loving father of Wendy DUNCAN and Laurie HENRY. He will be sadly missed by Bruce DUNCAN and Tim HENRY, and his dear grandchildren Brody and Benton DUNCAN and Cameron and Kaitlyn HENRY. He will be lovingly remembered by his brother Doug, Peggy and Peter GUTOWSKI and their families. Don's gentle, kind, and loving spirit will live on in the hearts of his family and Friends forever. Family and Friends will be received at Pine Hills Cemetery, Visitation, Chapel and Reception, 625 Birchmount Road (north of St. Clair Ave. East), 416-267-8229, on Friday, October 21, 2005 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A Service will be held on Saturday, October 22, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. Reception to follow. Memorial donations may be made to the Autism Society.

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GUTSCHER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-08 published
GUTSCHER, Herbert Joseph
Of Walkerton, passed away at south Bruce Grey Health Centre, Walkerton, on Monday, November 7, 2005, in his 53rd year. Beloved husband of Mary. Dear brother of Betty KROEPLIN of Chepstow, Ron, Mervin, Gerry and Joan of Brant Township, Clayton and Florence and Joe and Linda of Walkerton, Mike and Helen, Glen and Terri, and Leona of Mildmay. Cherished godfather of Joel GUTSCHER, Randall KROEPLIN and Joanne TWINING. Herb was predeceased by his brother-in-law Norbert KROEPLIN and parents Leo and Magdalena (KREITZ) GUTSCHER. Vistations will be held at the Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton, on Wednesday 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. with parish prayers at 8: 45 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Thursday, November 10, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. at Sacred Heart Church, Walkerton. Interment in Calvary Cemetery, Walkerton. Memorial donations to the Kidney Foundation, Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.
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GUTSCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-25 published
SCOTT, James Alexander
(Formerly of Toronto) Peacefully, at his home after a courageous battle with cancer on Monday, October 24, 2005, surrounded by his loving wife and family, in his 79th year. Survived by his wife Babe (formerly CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER) and daughters Gail HUDSON (Jim) of Kitchener, Nancy MacINTOSH (Howard) of Waterloo, Susan BARRAN (Chris) of Elmira; grandchildren Chyanne GUTSCHER (Brad) of Kitchener, Colin MacINTOSH (Jessica) of Kitchener, Annie MacINTOSH of Waterloo great-grandchildren Natasha and Nolan GUTSCHER. Predeceased by his parents Joseph and Mary SCOTT, brother Joseph SCOTT, sister Mary YATES and first wife, Grace. Jim retired from McDonnell Douglas Aircraft in Toronto in 1992 after serving as an electrician for more than 30 years. Friends will be received at the Westmount Funeral Chapel, 1001 Ottawa Street South (at Westmount Rd.), Kitchener, today (Tuesday) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel of the funeral home on Wednesday, October 26, 2005 at 1 p.m. Cremation to follow. Donations to the Grand River Cancer Centre and the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada may be made by calling the funeral home at 519-743-8900. Memorial Tributes may be made on line at www.mem.com

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GUTSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-10 published
HELARY, Audrey Elizabeth (née GUTSELL)
On Friday, September 9, 2005, after a lengthy battle with Alzheimer's. Beloved wife of the late Paul HELARY. Loving mother of Garth, Richard and Elizabeth. Dear grandmother of Danielle. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas St. W. (between Islington and Kipling Aves.) on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will take place at St. Matthew's Anglican Church, 3962 Bloor St. W. on Monday, September 12, 2005 at 11 a.m. Interment St. George's On-The-Hill Churchyard Cemetery. If desired, remembrances may be directed to Alzheimer Society of Toronto.

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GUT surnames continued to 05gut002.htm