FRY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-05-09 published
NEWELL, Marion Louise (née CORVEC)
Passed away at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound, on Saturday, May 7th, 2005. The former Marion Louise CORVEC, of Durham, in her 67th year. Beloved wife of Stewart NEWELL. Loving mother of Kimberly and her husband, Ken FRY, of Durham, Kevin and his wife, Laine, of Victoria, British Columbia, Brian and his wife, Kim, of Halifax, Nova Scotia and Heather and her husband, Donald MARSHALL, of Durham. Fondly remembered by her five grandchildren. Sister of Barbara RAYNES, Joan BOLDOCK, Ann PAUL, Ronald CORVEC, Sandra CORVEC, Carol CORVEC, Cathy ARMSTRONG, Deborah ROBICHAUD, Brenda ELLSWORTH, George CORVEC, John CORVEC and Robert CORVEC. Predeceased by her sister, Betty BYARS. Friends may call at the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham, on Wednesday from 2: 00 to 4: 00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. A Celebration of Life for Marion NEWELL will be held at the Hanover Missionary Church, on Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment, Durham Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.
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FRY o@ca.on.kent_county.wallaceburg.wallaceburg_courier_press 2005-04-20 published
PENNER, Jane Shirley (née FRY)
Jane Shirley (née FRY) PENNER passed away peacefully at Meadow Park Retirement Home, London, on Sunday, April 17, 2005, in her 87th year. Beloved wife of Henry for 64 years. Dear mother of Sharon STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and her husband Jim and Michael PENNER and his wife Colleen. Loving grandmother of Chris STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and his wife Tamara, Olivia, Laura, Emily and Brady PENNER and great-grandmother to Jeremy STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Jane's gentle spirit and kind-hearted manner will be forever missed by those who filled her life. Always more concerned for others and encouraging, Jane was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother. There is no greater calling in life than to be a mom. At Jane's request, there will be no funeral service. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations would be appreciated to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, 617 Wellington Street, London, Ontario N6A 3R6. A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London, Ontario (1-877-246-7186), in care of arrangements. On line condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca "So these are ours, faith, hope and love, but the greatest of these is love"

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FRY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-23 published
FRY, Mervelle
In loving memory of a dear husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather Mervelle, who passed away February 23, 2003.
The rolling stream of life goes on,
But still the empty chair,
Reminds us of the face, the smile,
Of one who once sat there.
We think of him in silence,
No one can see us weep,
But still within our aching hearts
His memory we keep.
Sadly missed and always loved by wife Margaret, children Gloria, Harold, Cathy and Dolores, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

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FRY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-19 published
PENNER, Jane Shirley (née FRY)
Peacefully at Meadow Park Retirement Home, London, on Sunday April 17 2005, Jane PENNER of London in her 87th year. Beloved wife of Henry for 64 years. Dear mother of Sharon STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and her husband Jim and Michael PENNER and his wife Colleen. Loving grandmother of Chris STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and his wife Tamara, Olivia, Laura, Emily and Brady PENNER and greatgrandmother to Jeremy STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Jane's gentle spirit and kind-hearted manner will be forever missed by those who filled her life. Always more concerned for others and encouraging, Jane was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother. There is no greater calling in life than to be a mom. At Jane's request, there will be no funeral service. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations would be appreciated to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, 617 Wellington Street, London N6A 3R6. A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London (433-5184), in care of arrangements. On line condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca "So these are ours, faith, home and love, but the greatest of these is love"

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FRY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-22 published
KRAGTEN, Alegonda (GONDA)
Peacefully at Kensington Village, London, on Thursday, April 21, 2005, Mrs. Alegonda (GONDA) passed away in her 93rd year. Dear mother of Anne VOSKAMP (Pete), Willy FRY and Beppy STEVENS (John). Loving grandmother of Rob (Lisa) and Kristen (Corby). Great Oma to Grayson, Garret, Kyle, Sarah, and the late Daxton. Sister of Leo DENISEGER (Joanne). Aunt of John KLOOT (Nancy), Tante Gon VAN RUUD and Hen KRAGTEN en Annie v.v. STEEN in Holland. Visitation will be held at Memorial Funeral Home, 1559 Fanshawe Park Road, East of Highbury on Sunday from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. A private family service will be held on Monday. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Kensington Village will be gratefully acknowledged.

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FRY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-29 published
CARTER, John E. " Jack"
At Seaforth Community Hospital on Thursday, April 28, 2005, John E. (Jack) CARTER of Seaforth, in his 88th year. Beloved husband of Christina "Florence" Elsie (WHITMORE) CARTER for 62 years. Loving father of Carol and Bruce HOELSCHER and Jim and Ruth Anne CARTER, all of Seaforth, Elizabeth VARLEY, Exeter, Allan and Karen CARTER, Seaforth, Elaine and Don SHROPSHALL, Clinton and Christine and Doug FRY, R.R.#2, Dublin. Special grandpa to 15 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren. Dear brother-inlaw of Warren WHITMORE, Carman WHITMORE, Evelyn CARTER, Kathleen WHITMORE and Elva WHITMORE. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents James and Mary (JARMAN) CARTER, his brother Lorne CARTER, sisters-in-law Ruth WHITMORE, Irene WHITMORE, and Sarah ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, brothers-in-law Erlin WHITMORE, Gordon ELLIOT/ELLIOTT and Fletcher WHITMORE, a nephew Ralph WHITMORE and a niece Karen

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FRY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-04 published
FERGUSON, W. Clarke
W. Clarke FERGUSON, beloved husband of Brenda FERGUSON (CHAMBERLAIN) of Point Clark, R.R.#1 Kincardine, age 66, suddenly as a result of an accident, Sunday, May 1st, 2005. Dearly loved father of Sandra FERGUSON and (friend Andrew FRY) of Owen Sound and Andrew FERGUSON and (friend Julie CHIPPA) of Point Clark. Also survived by two brothers, Lynn FERGUSON of Mississauga and Murray (Susan) FERGUSON, of Huron Township, several nieces and nephews, one great-niece and three great-nephews. Predeceased by parents Myrtle and John FERGUSON and brother David. Visitation at MacKenzie & McCreath Funeral Home, Ripley (519-395-2969, Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service from Pine River United Church, Hwy 21, Thursday, May 5th, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment Lurgan Cemetery. Donations appreciated to Kincardine Hospital, Pine River United Church or Saugeen Conservation.

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FRY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-24 published
STEVENS, Margaret Bertina (née McGUIRE)
Margaret Bertina (McGUIRE) STEVENS, age 75, of Oil Springs, passed away Sunday, May 22, 2005 at Bluewater Health, C.E.E. Campus, Petrolia. Beloved wife of Glen STEVENS of Oil Springs. Loving mother of Jeffery and his wife Kim STEVENS of Tupperville. Dear grandmother of J.R. STEVENS, Crystal STEVENS, Jacob and Nicole WHITE/WHYTE. Survived by brothers Morley and Gerald, and sisters Leonore and Linda. Predeceased by her parents John and Jessie (FRY) McGUIRE. Friends will be received at Steadman Brothers Funeral Home, Brigden on Tuesday, May 24, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be conducted on Wednesday, May 25th at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Mark PERRY officiating. Interment Oil Springs Cemetery. Sympathy may be expressed through donations to the Canadian Cancer Society. Steadman Brothers 864-1193.

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FRY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-16 published
NEEDHAM, T. Willard " Bill"
Born July 4, 1923 in London, Ontario, passed away peacefully surrounded by his loving family on June 14, 2005 at University Hospital. Loved and missed by wife, Dorothy (FLEMING/FLEMMING,) children Jackie and Gord DEL DEGAN; David and Joan FLEMING/FLEMMING; Cindy and Andrew NASHED; Pamela and Gerry HUNTER; Debbie and Rudy PARACHONIAK Jim and Elsa FAGAN; David and Allison FAGAN. Grandchildren: Adam, Emma and Kate DEL DEGAN; Shane, Nikki, Carly and Michael FLEMING/FLEMMING Andrea, Duncan, and Erin HUNTER; Sandi, Jody, Rudy and Andy PARACHONIAK Jesse, Alicia, Jeffrey, Kayla and Jeremy FAGAN; David and Matthew FAGAN. Best friend to his brother-in-law, Gordon FRY. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by wife Evelyn, 1972, siblings Lewis, Margaret, Jean and Carmen, and parents Gordon and Emma NEEDHAM.
Bill worked as a proud sheet metal worker, supervising and building numerous construction projects including the Ford Motor Company, Wellington Mall, U.W.O. and the Cami plant. He was well respected and liked by all the men who worked under him and those he worked with. Bill saw front-line action with the Irish Regiment, 5th Division, 1942-1946. He played football for the London Lords, Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen and Regina Roughriders. His favourite past-times were watching all sports, especially football with his favourite dog, Rosie, and his frequent daily trips to Tim Hortons. Visitation will be held on Friday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7: 00-9:00 p.m. as well as 1 hour prior to the funeral service being conducted at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North (2 blocks north of Oxford) on Saturday, June 18t h, 2005 at 10: 30 a.m. Reverend Peter LEONARD of All Saints Anglican Church officiating. Interment, Grove Cemetery. Special thanks to the Doctors and nurses in Intensive Care Unit at University Hospital for their excellent care of Bill and for their dedication and support. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-26 published
Tribute: Harry J. BOYLE
'A wonderful, creative individual who... produced some of the best programs the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ever did'
By Pierre JUNEAU, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, January 27, 2005 - Page S7
Montreal -- Harry J. BOYLE will be remembered as a creative broadcaster and executive. But I think many people who crossed his path will just think of Harry as a sensitive, genuine person with a great sense of humour, a sharp mind, a flair to perceive talent in people or to detect bluff. While I was vice-chairman of the Board of Broadcast Governors, its chairman, Andrew STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, supported the idea of assembling a small and informal group that would try to come up with new ideas to stimulate and evaluate "Canadian content" in radio and television. While I was searching for names, I happened to meet a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation researcher, Rodrigue CHIASSON, who worked in Toronto. He mentioned Harry's name to me. Coming from Montreal, I had never heard of him.
"I can't think of a better person for what you have in mind," said Rod. "He's just a wonderful, creative individual who has produced some of the best programs the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ever did."
That is how Harry and I came to meet. The group was formed and, besides Harry and Rod, included Patrick WATSON and two or three others.
Later, in 1968, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission was created and Harry was appointed vice-chairman. He remained in that post until I left in 1975, when he then became chairman. We worked closely together for seven challenging, but exciting, years. The Board of Broadcast Governors had been in existence from 1958 to 1968, but a completely new act had been passed by Parliament and new policies were expected: An important increase of Canadian programs on radio and television, more Canadian music on radio, the Canadianization of all radio, television and cable companies. Almost all cable companies were American or British. It took about two years to arrange for the transfers to Canadian owners, and involved investments of about $150-million. We had support from some people in the industry -- mainly those who were acquiring some of those previously foreign properties. But the proposed increase in Canadian programming met with some pretty dramatic opposition.
Besides Harry, the commission included some journalists such as Pat Pearce from Montreal, literary critic and professor Northrop FRY, an engineer, top business people from every province, and a physician from a Newfoundland outport. Five of the 15 commissioners were full-time members. Despite lively controversies, decisions were unanimous.
Harry and I had an entirely informal relationship. We had the commission meetings, of course, but if something important suddenly came up, there were no appointments arranged through secretaries. There would be a sharp knock on my door, from Harry's big brass ring. He would come in and sit down. I enjoyed the interruption and dropped whatever I was doing. Very often, the discussion would reorient our thinking and open a new perspective in our deliberations.
Harry was a wonderful storyteller, and his collection of stories was inexhaustible. I have met few people with such an extraordinary memory. He remembered people, conversations, scenery, happenings, even odours in the general store that, if I remember well, his family owned in Wingham, Ontario Harry could hardly speak a word of French, but I was constantly amazed by the number of Friends he had in Quebec and how familiar he was with Quebec culture. Although he was not bilingual, he was bicultural.
Harry's career had been mostly in public broadcasting, while the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission dealt more often with private broadcasters throughout the country. But he seemed to have as many Friends in private radio and television as he had at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. There were few public broadcasters and hundreds of private broadcasters and cable companies. He had been so long and so creative in that field, and they respected his competence and his sense of humour. He seemed to enjoy himself despite the endless hours we had to spend in public hearings listening to applications for an increase in cable rates in northern Newfoundland or the Beauce region of Quebec or whether a Texas cable company owner in Trois-Rivières ought to be allowed to retain his company despite recent Canadian legislation.
I liked having Harry beside me during these hearings. We could share comments, and I enjoyed his very personal way of questioning applicants. I hope I may be permitted, now, to mention something I never brought up with him during all those years of companionship. Hearings would often go from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., sometimes for four or five days. Harry would smoke a pipe filled with very strong tobacco almost continuously. But our Friendship endured. Eventually, he moved back to Toronto. We met now and then but not often enough.
Pierre JUNEAU is a former broadcasting and National Film Board executive who served as chairman of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission from 1968 to 1975.
An obituary of Harry J. BOYLE appeared on January 24.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-02 published
MIZBAH, Dr. Geoffrey
On Thursday, June 30, 2005, at his home at the age of 83. He took his undergraduate medical training at University of Liverpool, Faculty of Medicine and his surgical training at the same university and in London, obtaining his F.R.C.S. (Eng.). He saw active service in Britain's Royal Army Medical Corps as surgeon, I/C field surgical team and I/C surgical division of British Military Hospital in Malaya. He immigrated to Canada in late 1953 to Saskatchewan and in 1956 moved to northern Ontario. He obtained his F.R.C.S. (Canada) and F.I.C.S. During his years in northern Ontario he took leave to do charity work for Canadian Executive Services Association as a surgeon to St. Kitts and Nevis and for British Methodist church in Nigeria as surgeon in Ilisha for his medical school compatriot Dr. Andrew Pearson. He is survived by his loving wife Hélène who has ably assisted him for 52 years. In addition to his wife, he is survived by his nephew Frank WIRTZ and family, his sister Elizabeth HILLIER- FRY and husband Norman of England. Interment has taken place in Oakville, Ontario.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-05 published
FRY, William
(Veteran of World War 2) Passed away peacefully on February 3, 2005 at the Aurora Resthaven Nursing Home at the age of 85. Longtime resident of Rexdale, he will be sadly missed by Beryl and their children Patricia (Ray) HAINES, Bob (Maureen) FRY, and Nancy BOURDON (Nigel.) Grandfather to Derek HAINES, Darren (Tammy) HAINES, Kristi (Chris) CHANG, Carrie (Jamie) INNES, and Beth BOURDON. Great-grandfather to Ella HAINES. A retired Canadian Pacific Railway sales representative, Bill's main passions were sports and officiating. After being a longtime official administrator in the Toronto Hockey League, he turned to football. Bill joined the Canadian Football League in 1957 to man the yardsticks and by 1977 was named the league's director of officiating, which post he held until 1985. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston, on Monday, February 7 from 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday, February 8 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A private family service will be held in the Field of Honour, Montreal at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated. Condolences to the family may be sent to william.fry@wardfh.com "We will miss you Buddy"

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-22 published
O'BRIEN, John Steen
Peacefully at South Muskoka Memorial Hospital, Bracebridge on Sunday, February 20, 2005 in his 77th year. Beloved husband of Marette of Raymond. Survived by Delia of St. Catharines and granddaughter Marie HAMMOND (Chris) of Bracebridge. Brother of Margaret JACKSON, Nancy KEY, Elizabeth RIEL and the late Jean KIVELL, James and Edward O'BRIEN. Brother-in-law of Pam and Gerald FRY. Special uncle of Paul FRY (Marie) and Michael FRY (Tanya) and great uncle of Nathan and Avery FRY and the late Connor and Caleb FRY. Friends will be received at the Reynolds Funeral Home "Turner Chapel", Bracebridge on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral will be held on Thursday, February 24, 2005 at Utterson United Church at 1: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the South Muskoka Hospital Foundation. Interment at Ullswater Township Cemetery in the Spring.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-28 published
ERSKINE, Lionel Robert
Peacefully at Northumberland Hills Hospital, Cobourg on Sunday, February 27th, 2005 in his 75th year. Retired member of Canada Post. Lionel ERSKINE loving husband of Shirley (née SAINT.) Beloved stepfather of Don FRY and his wife Liz. Dear brother-in-law of Roy SAINT and his wife Glady. Friends are invited to call at the Ross Funeral Chapel, 135 Walton Street, Port Hope, Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, March 3rd at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Port Hope Union Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Northumberland Hills Hospital Palliative Care Unit would be appreciated.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-20 published
FRY, Audrey M. (née McINTOSH)
Suddenly, on Friday, June 17, 2005, in hospital, Audrey FRY (nee McINTOSH) of R.R.#4, Fergus, in her 87th year. Beloved wife of Howard FRY. Loving mother Margaret and her husband Carl BAKER of R.R.#4, Fergus. Loved grandmother of Matthew and his fiancée Robin of Guelph, Robin and Paul, both at home. Dear sister of Jean H. CASSELMAN of Williamsburg, Ron McINTOSH and his wife Leona of Iroquois and sister-in-law Betty McINTOSH of Chesterville and Donna and her husband Don SMITH of Tillsonburg. Predeceased by her son Doug, one sister Olive MALLORY and one brother Bert McINTOSH. A Memorial Service will be held at the Sharon Hope United Church in Sharon on Monday, June 27, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Remembrances to the Groves Memorial Community Hospital or the Church of your choice would be appreciated by the family (cards available at the funeral home, 519-843-3100). www.grahamgiddyfh.com

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-02 published
KEERE, Lucille (CURRAN)
Passed away at Northumberland Hills Hospital, Cobourg on Friday, July 1, 2005. Lucille CURRAN, beloved wife of Patrick KEERE. Loving mother of Coleen STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Danny FRY) and Dan KEERE (Peggy). Also survived by her grandchildren Ryan STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Laura and Eric KEERE. Friends will be received at the Allison Funeral Home, 103 Mill Street North, Port Hope, Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service Tuesday 1 p.m. Interment Veteran Plot, Port Hope Union Cemetery. If desired, memorial contributions may be made by cheque to the Canadian Cancer Society or Northumberland Hills Hospital Foundation. www.allisonfuneralhome.com

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-31 published
BRADSHAW, Lawrence " Larry"
At the Norfolk General Hospital, on Friday, October 28, 2005, in his 73rd year. Beloved husband of Jackie BRADSHAW. Dearest father of Tom, Paul (Sharon,) Matthew (Karen,) Beth JONES (Kevin,) Mary TELTZ (Richard), Theresa GOUVEIA (Harry), and Lorraine BRADSHAW (Rob WEST.) Will be sadly missed by his brother Tim FRY (Kathy,) mother-in-law Betty OWEN, and sister-in-law Audrey FRY. Cherished grandfather of Christopher, Lynn, Jon, Rachelle, Rebecca, Shawn, Jacob, Dale, Sean, Stephanie and Emily. Predeceased by his parents Lorraine and Tom FRY and his son Lawrence BRADSHAW. Larry was dedicated to the St. Vincent De Paul Society, a member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, and the Simcoe Seniors Club. The family will receive Friends to share their memories of Larry at The Baldock Funeral Home, 96 Norfolk St. N., Simcoe, on Monday (today) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Parish Prayers will be said at the funeral home on Monday evening at 7: 00 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated from Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church (corner of Queen and Union Sts.), on Tuesday, November 1, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m., Father Dikran ISLEMECI Celebrant. Interment to follow at Saint Mary's Cemetery. Donations in memory of Larry, can be made to the St. Vincent De Paul Society and would be gratefully acknowledged by the family. Baldock's, 519-426-0291.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-15 published
HARRIS, Lillian (née FRY)
Peacefully at the Kingston General Hospital on Monday, November 14, 2005, in her 76th year. Lillian (née FRY,) beloved wife of the late Bertram HARRIS. Dear mother of Janet CUMMINGS and her husband Pat of Kingston, Julie D'AMBROSIO and her husband Michael of Sutton, and Gordon HARRIS and his wife Linda of Oshawa. Lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Kelly TAILOR/TAYLOR, Sandra TAILOR/TAYLOR, Kevin CUMMINGS, Meagan CUMMINGS, Jeremy PROMM, Julian D'AMBROSIO, Adam D'AMBROSIO, Alexander HARRIS and Connor HARRIS. Sister of Wilfred FRY and his wife May of California. Resting at the Giffen-Mack "Danforth" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2570 Danforth Avenue (atMain St. subway), on Wednesday evening from 7-9 p.m. Funeral service in the chapel on Thursday, November 17, at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Resthaven Memorial Gardens. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to The Heart and Stroke Foundation in Mrs. HARRIS' memory.

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FRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-19 published
WARD, Bernice Edna (née MOUNT)
Peacefully, at Aurora Resthaven, on Thursday, November 15, 2005. Bernice (née MOUNT,) beloved wife of the late Clifford WARD, and dear mother of Brian (Leah,) Donna (Gary KADONOFF,) Keith (Arlene), David (Sheree), and the late Kevin. She will be lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Kevin, Christopher, Matthew, Michael, and Daniel. Dear sister of Vernon MOUNT, Alma POTTAGE, Harry and Douglas MOUNT, and the late Kenneth MOUNT, Florence FRY, Viola BROOKFIELD, Allan MOUNT, and Shirley FORFAR. Friends may call at the Roadhouse and Rose Funeral Home, 157 Main St. South, Newmarket, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Monday at 1: 30 p.m., followed by interment at Newmarket Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society of the Christian Baptist Church Restoration Fund would be appreciated.

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FRYDAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-14 published
FRYDAY, Edna May
In Groves Park Lodge, Renfrew, Ontario on Sunday, September 11, 2005. Edna Jones age 84 years. Loving mother of Linda (Peter) NAISH of Renfrew. Loved grandmother of Scott (Meghan) and Chuck (Kalyn.) Dear sister of Marion HESTER and Evelyn GORDON. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Mount Pleasant Cemetery Chapel, London, Ontario on Saturday, September 17, 2005 from 10-11 a.m., where a Funeral Service will take place at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery. For those desiring donations to the Groves Park Lodge Residence Fund, 470 Raglan St. N., Renfrew, Ontario, K7V 1P6 would be appreciated. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the care of the Anderson Funeral Home Renfrew, Ontario 613-432-3651.

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FRYDENBURG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-22 published
POLSON, Estelle (née WASSERMAN)
September 24, 1913 in Edmonton to February 20, 2005 in Toronto. She is survived by her son Richard SILVER and his partner Benoit LAFLECHE and her son Phillip SILVER, his wife Brenda and their children Elliot, Joel and Deborah. Estelle had special affection for her "second family" Marsha (née AARON) and Ben FRYDENBURG, David AARON, Ron and Naomi WOLCH, Doug WOLCH and Gary WOLCH and his wife Mor BARZEL. Donations in her memory can be made to The Baycrest Centre Foundation, 3560 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M6A 2E1.

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FRYDMANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-17 published
Canadian composer FREEDMAN dies at 83
By Peter GODDARD, Visual Arts Critic, Page A18
Harry FREEDMAN, one of Canada's most prolific composers with nearly 200 works to his credit, died yesterday from cancer. He was 83.
FREEDMAN's scores included three symphonies and nine ballets.
Tireless and passionate, he leaves behind two new works.
His family immigrated to Medicine Hat, Alberta., from Poland when FREEDMAN, born Henryk FRYDMANN, was 3.
He served four years with the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War 2 and in 1946 was hired as the Toronto Symphony Orchestra's English horn player.
He left in 1970 to compose full-time.
FREEDMAN wed classical soprano Mary MORRISON in 1951 and the pair became Canadian classical music's glamour couple.
He is survived by his wife and three daughters (Lori FREEDMAN is a professional bass clarinet player), five grandchildren and a great-granddaughter.

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FRYDRYCHOWICZ o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-17 published
FRYDRYCHOWICZ, Danuta Maria
Peacefully at Dearness Home on Friday, October 14, 2005. Danuta Maria FRYDRYCHOWICZ in her 85th year. Wife of the late Jan Piotz FRYDRYCHOWICZ. Dear mother of Peter FRYDRYCHOWICZ (Joanne) and Eva GERMAN (Terry) all of London. Loving grandmother of J.P. and Matthew. Sister of Alina CZARCZYLISKI. She will be remembered by all of her relatives in Poland. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at Mount Pleasant Cemetery Chapel, 303 Riverside Drive, London on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 at 2 p.m. Expressions of sympathy and donations (Heart and Stroke Foundation) may be made through London Cremation Services 672-0459 or on-line at www.londoncremation.com

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FRYDRYSZCZYK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-28 published
FRYDRYSZCZYK, Antoni
In loving memory of a wonderful father, grandfather and greatgrandfather, Antoni, who passed away 27 years ago today, May 28, 1978.
He lived for those he loved
And those he loved remember.
Always loved and remembered by all your family.

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FRYDRYSZCZYK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-26 published
FRYDRYSZCZYK, Nellie
In loving memory of a dear mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, Nellie, who passed away 16 years ago today November 26, 1989. Secret thoughts, a silent tear, Always wishing your were here. Always loved and never forgotten by all your family.

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FRYE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-01 published
Richard OUTRAM, Poet 1930-2005
Writer who was a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation stagehand by day viewed the world in a grain of sand. A private and intensely emotional man, his devotion to his art was nourished by a lifelong love of his wife, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Tuesday, February 1, 2005 - Page S7
On the coldest night of the winter, poet, stagehand and widower Richard OUTRAM, having consumed a quantity of pills and drink, sat on the enclosed side porch of his house in Port Hope, Ontario, and, in a grand Blakean gesture, contemplated the universe and quietly allowed himself to die.
Everything that made his life joyful emanated from his love for his wife and collaborator, the artist Barbara HOWARD. She died in 2002 during an operation to fix a broken hip. "Devotion is not too strong a word," said writer Barry CALLAGHAN. " The two of them fed each other beautifully and with enormous intensity. They were the closing of the couplet. So, what are you going to do with a one-line couplet? He really was his work and his love for her."
Mr. OUTRAM was not the only poet to have a day job that required entirely different skills from his literary vocation. The poet Raymond SOUSTER, for example, spent his working life at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. It was Mr. OUTRAM's conscious decision to spend his days at physical labour so his mind would be free in the evenings to devote to his poetry. But unlike other working poets, such as Mr. SOUSTER, Mr. OUTRAM won very little popular or critical acclaim.
Although he published steadily for more than 40 years, he won only one major prize -- the City of Toronto Book Award in 1999 for his volume Benedict Abroad. There is only one book-length critical study of his work, Peter Sanger's "Her kindled shadow..." An Introduction to the Work of Richard OUTRAM, which was published in limited numbers by The Antigonish Review in 2001.
Instead of a popular audience, he had a series of passionate champions, such as Mr. Sanger, a retired academic. "Richard has both a physical and a metaphysical orientation that isn't compromised at either level," explained Mr. Sanger. "When Richard writes well there is absolutely no distinction between those two levels." Although Mr. Sanger agrees some poems are better than others, he says what makes Mr. OUTRAM's work stand out is its "magnificence coherence." Every poem is ultimately linked to the rest of his body of work.
Richard Daley OUTRAM was born in Oshawa, Ontario, the son of Mary Muriel DALEY, a teacher, and Alfred Allan OUTRAM, an engineer who served in the artillery in The First World War and was wounded at Ypres in Belgium. His mother's father was a Methodist minister who was deeply involved in the negotiations to form the United Church of Canada in 1925. His paternal grandfather ran the hardware store in Port Hope, the town east of Oshawa where Mr. OUTRAM and his wife moved in 2000.
Shortly after young Richard's birth, his parents moved to the Leaside area of Toronto. As a teenager, Mr. OUTRAM was already interested in music and botany, two areas that remained central to his poetry for the rest of his life. Graduating from Leaside Secondary School in 1949, he went that autumn to Victorian College at the University of Toronto to begin an honours degree in English and Philosophy. There he encountered two professors, philosopher Emil FACKENHEIM and literary critic Northrop FRYE, both of whom had a huge impact on the way he thought about the world. He also enlisted as an officer cadet in the reserve system of the Royal Canadian Navy, spending the summers of 1950 and 1951 aboard frigates in the Bay of Fundy and at H. M. C. S. Stadacona in Halifax.
After he graduated from the University of Toronto in 1953, he worked for a year at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto as a stagehand and then moved to England where he found a job in the same capacity for the British Broadcasting Corporation. It was in London that he first began to write poetry and where, in 1954, he met visual artist Barbara HOWARD. From that meeting their lives were entwined until her death in 2002.
"You can't speak of them apart," said Louise DENNYS, executive vice-president of Random House Canada. "They were so completely connected and so beloved of each other, and that is what proved in the end to be impossible for him to live without."
Four years older than Mr. OUTRAM, Ms. HOWARD was born in Toronto in 1926, began drawing as a child, graduated with honours and a silver medal from the Ontario College of Art in 1951 and then taught school to earn enough money to continue her studies in the major art centres of Europe.
They returned to Canada in 1956 and Mr. OUTRAM went back to working as a stage hand and then crew leader at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, a job he would hold until he retired at 60 in June, 1990. The late typographical designer Allan FLEMING/FLEMMING (of the Canadian National logo among other work) was the best man at their wedding in April, 1957, and also the designer and publisher of Mr. OUTRAM's first collection, Eight Poems, a chapbook with a print run of 190 copies that appeared in 1959 under the Tortoise Press imprint.
The next year, Mr. OUTRAM and Ms. HOWARD founded The Gauntlet Press, producing an elegant series of hand-printed volumes of Mr. OUTRAM's poetry over the years decorated with Ms. HOWARD's beautifully coloured wood engravings.
Early in their marriage, the OUTRAMs had a daughter who lived for only a day. His grief is encased in several poems including Sarah, which appeared in his first major collection, Exsultate, Jubilate (1966,) an elegant volume designed by Mr. FLEMING/FLEMMING and published by Macmillan Co. of Canada.
Toronto writer Barry CALLAGHAN, who was one of the hosts on Weekend, a local Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television show, met Mr. OUTRAM on the set in the late 1960s. "I became aware of this intense man standing beside the camera, dressed like a guy working on the floor but staring at me like a hawk," Mr. CALLAGHAN said in a telephone conversation. After the two men struck up a conversation, "I discovered this very isolated and intensely intellectual man who was interested in poetry and ideas."
In the middle 1970s, Mr. OUTRAM took the manuscript for Turns and Other Poems to the now defunct Clarke Irwin publishing house. Two young editors, Susan KEENE and Louise DENNYS pushed the collection, but Clarke Irwin was already in its demise and was doing very little original publishing.
"He had a shining, sharp, sense of the natural world and he was able to give it a sense of form, a sense of greatness larger than and one moment," said Ms. DENNYS. "He saw the world in a grain of sand and he did that in a way that was very beautiful and very particular to his work and to him."
Ms. DENNYS wanted to find a way to publish the book and Mr. OUTRAM suggested she meet his friend bookseller Hugh ANSON- CARTWRIGHT. Bookseller and poet had met years before, the way such people usually do, over a volume of Mr. OUTRAM's poetry that Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT was trying to sell in his bookstore. Then it turned out that they were neighbours and a lifelong Friendship ensured.
The Christmas of 1974, Ms. DENNYS took the manuscript on a visit home to her parents in England and cold-visited the Hogarth Press, a division of Chatto and Windus. She met poetry editor D. J. Enright, who eventually offered to publish Mr. OUTRAM's poems. She came back to Canada and was able to tell Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT that if he wanted to form a little publishing company, here was a British partner. That is how Turns and Other Poems was published by Chatto and Windus with the Hogarth Press in London in 1975 and by Anson-Cartwright Editions in Toronto the following year. "That moment, when I elided happily in his life back then, was a moment of great pride for Hugh and for me too," she said. "It was the first time that I was involved directly in a book's publication."
Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT published another volume of OUTRAM poems, The Promise of Light in 1979 and Mr. Callaghan's Exile Editions did a Selected Poems in 1984. "He had a fantastic sense of form and a musical ear for what he was doing that was almost perfect, but often his poems were the prisoner of his skill," said Mr. CALLAGHAN, adding that "you can't be first rate every time out and there are times when the form traps what he is trying to do."
Shortly after writer Alberto MANGUEL arrived in Canada in 1983, he met Mr. OUTRAM. "I was awed at first by the strange combination of intelligence and devastating humour," said Mr. MANGUEL. " For all the seriousness of his poetry, he was a very funny man."
After reading Mr. OUTRAM's poetry, Mr. MANGUEL says he was surprised, as he has been so many times in Canada, that "a poet of Richard's magnitude" was not celebrated around the world. "Richard's poems were very serious and complex, and in many cases they required a lot of time and patience from readers," said Mr. MANGUEL. " You had to disentangle the references and look up the words, but it was always worthwhile. When you discovered what he meant, the poem built to a different level."
The next person to publish Mr. OUTRAM was Tim INKSTER of The Porcupine's Quill, who released Man in Love (1985), Hiram and Jenny (1989) Mogul Recollected (1993) and Dove Legend (2001). "It is incredibly elegant and sophisticated and passionate and demanding and even, to a lot of people, off-putting, because verbally it is immensely clever and full of allusions and references," said writer and poetry editor John METCALF. "It is probably some of the most rewarding stuff that has been written in Canada."
Writing poetry, even life itself, lost its purpose for Mr. OUTRAM after his wife died. "Richard was always sending me poems that he loved by other people," said Mr. MANGUEL, mentioning the poem Winter Remembered by John Crowe Ransom about an "... Absence, in the heart, /" that was too great to bear and how the only way to soothe it was to "...walk forth in the frozen air/."
"He must have been thinking of that poem," concluded Mr. MANGUEL sadly.
Funambulist by Richard OUTRAM, 1975
I work on a slender strand
Slung between two poles
Braced fifteen feet apart.
My patient father coached me
From childhood to fall unhurt,
Then set me again and again
On a crude slack-rope he rigged
Out back of our caravan,
Raising the rope by inches:
Now, I'm the only acrobat
In the world to include in his act,
As finale, a one-hand-stand
Thirty feet from the ground
With no net. I married
A delicate, lithe girl
From another circus family.
We are very happy. She stands
On the circular platform top
Of one pole, to steady me
As I reach the steep, last,
Incredibly difficult slope
Near the pole: when I turn about
To retrace my steps, no matter
How quickly I spin, she is there
At the top of the opposite pole,
Waiting, her arms outstretched.
From Turns and Other Poems, published by ANSON- CARTWRIGHT Editions.
Richard Daley OUTRAM was born in Oshawa, Ontario on April 9, 1930. He died of willful hypothermia in Port Hope, Ontario, on Friday, January 21, 2005. He was 74. He was predeceased by his wife Barbara. A celebration of their lives is being planned for a later date.

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FRYE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-28 published
Award-winning political writer McCALL, 70, dies
Author published two volumes on Trudeau
By Oliver MOORE and Sandra MARTIN, Thursday, April 28, 2005, Page A8
Christina McCALL, the political writer who helped coin the phrase "he haunts us still" about Pierre Trudeau, died yesterday morning after a long illness. She was 70.
Ms. McCALL combined a journalism career with literary non-fiction writing, winning several awards for her work and, at one point, challenging her then-former-husband Peter C. NEWMAN in a duel played out at the top of the bestseller lists.
It was with her second husband, University of Toronto political economist Stephen CLARKSON, that she published two volumes on Mr. Trudeau, establishing the oft-used phrase about the former prime minister's ability to haunt Canadians.
Last night Mr. CLARKSON said Ms. McCALL had been seriously ill for more than a year with three progressive, incurable illnesses. She had found out about them one after the other, he said.
"But I don't want to concentrate on the illnesses," he said. "She was the premier political analyst of her generation.
"She was a perfectionist," he said. "What she loved was getting a letter from a carpenter who said she got it right. She was writing for her fellows, and by that I mean her fellow Canadians."
She died in the Providence Healthcare centre in Toronto. Her funeral is tomorrow.
In addition to her books, Ms. McCALL wrote about Canadian politics for years in senior positions at the magazines Saturday Night and Maclean's and at The Globe and Mail. She also held a position as assistant editor at Chatelaine magazine.
It was at Maclean's that she met Mr. NEWMAN, who at the time was married, but admitted recently in print to being "bowled over" by the editorial assistant. He suggested separation to his first wife and then, finding she was pregnant, said that he would remain until the birth, but could promise no more.
Mr. NEWMAN and Ms. McCALL were married in the autumn of 1959. Theirs was a literary as well as a marital partnership, with Ms. McCALL helping shepherd his 1963 book on Diefenbaker through the editing process.
Mr. NEWMAN once said she was his best editor.
The Diefenbaker book sent Mr. NEWMAN's reputation soaring, in a period during which Ms. McCALL continued writing. She received several Press Club Awards for magazine writing
She produced her own book nearly two decades later, several years after she and Mr. NEWMAN had parted company in 1977. The next year she married Mr. CLARKSON.
The 1982 publication of Grits: An Intimate Portrait of the Liberal Party peeled back layers of the governing party, offering Canadians telling glimpses of their leaders.
In one anecdote, she described Mr. TRUDEAU hearing over the phone that a hockey game was in progress.
There was an "awkward pause at the other end of the line and then Trudeau said, 'Oh, I see. What inning are they in?' "
Critics loved the book, which beat out a work from Ms. McCALL's former university professor, Northrop FRYE, for the 1983 non-fiction prize from the Canadian Authors Association. It was also nominated for a Governor-General's Award.
Grits -- praised as "one of the most important Canadian books of the 1980s" -- was locked in an end-of-year battle in 1982 with Mr. NEWMAN's biography of Conrad Black, The Establishment Manitoba
Nearly a decade later Ms. McCALL published the first volume of her two-volume work on Mr. Trudeau, collaborating with Mr. CLARKSON. The first volume won the Governor-General's Award in 1990.
Other works include The Man From Oxbow (1967) and The Unlikely Gladiators: Pearson and Diefenbaker Remembered (1999).
Ms. McCALL leaves her husband and three children, Ashley McCALL, Kyra CLARKSON and Blaise CLARKSON.

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FRYE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-30 published
Christina McCALL, Journalist, Biographer: 1935-2005
She combined powerful analysis with insightful writing to produce a groundbreaking examination of the Liberals, writes Sandra MARTIN, and then topped that by collaborating on the definitive study of Pierre Trudeau
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, April 30, 2005, Page S9
My, how she could write. Her sentences were as sensuous as they were illuminating. Every word, every comma, was sculpted and buffed as though she were working on marble not paper. Married twice, first to writer Peter NEWMAN and then to political economist Stephen CLARKSON, Christina McCALL moved in powerful political, journalistic and academic circles, but in the past dozen years she was plagued with illnesses, from diabetes to cancer to Parkinson's, and suffered from chronic pain.
Mr. NEWMAN, who flew from London to attend her funeral yesterday in Toronto, compared her to a singer with perfect pitch. "It is not something you learn, You have it or you don't, and she had it." Assessing her importance as a writer, he said: "On the negative side, the quantity wasn't there and I have no explanation for that because she could have done anything and everything. On the positive side, she brought a whole new way of looking at the political world."
Prof. CLARKSON, with whom she collaborated on Trudeau and Our Times, a two-volume study of the late prime minister, said she "had a novelist's intuition," which she applied to political actors instead of imagined characters in a fictional plot. "She could understand their motivation, their psychology and where they came from," he said, explaining that when they did joint interviews, "she would come out understanding the person and I would come out knowing the issues."
Christina McCALL was the daughter of civil servant Christopher Warnock McCALL and Orlie Alma (FREEMAN,) a registered nurse he had married after the death of his first wife. Christina grew up with an older half-brother, Sam, an older sister, Orlie and a younger brother, Brian. She graduated from Jarvis Collegiate in Toronto at 17 and spent that summer working at Maclean's magazine to help earn her tuition at Victoria College in the University of Toronto.
Northrop FRYE was a tremendous influence and she "always talked about his lectures as the intellectual highlight of her life," according to Mr. NEWMAN. She wanted to go on to do graduate work, according to Prof. CLARKSON, but money was scarce. So, after graduating with an honours degree in 1956, she returned as an editorial assistant to Maclean's, which was then under the editorship of Ralph Allan.
He became the second major influence in her life as a writer. "He wasn't religious, but he had all the advantages of believing in goodness and practising it, which is rare for editors," said Mr. NEWMAN. "He was our role model and we became his Disciples and tried to emulate his qualities." Ms. McCALL's first book, Ralph Allan: The Man from Oxbow (1967), was an anthology she edited as a tribute to the legendary magazine editor.
It was at Maclean's that she met Mr. NEWMAN. " She was very junior," he said, "but I was blown away by her ability," not to mention her allure. "Beauty and intelligence are a potent combination and she had both in spades." They fell in love, but he was already married.
She shifted to Chatelaine magazine. "She came to me in the late 1950s," said Doris ANDERSON, then editor of Chatelaine. "She was wonderful," said Ms. ANDERSON. " She was a great writer, very insightful with an original eye and she used the language with great skill and grace." Ms. McCALL had two other qualities that appealed to Ms. ANDERSON: She generated lots of ideas for the magazine and underneath her demure appearance she was a dedicated feminist.
She was also a woman in love. After Mr. NEWMAN divorced, they married in October of 1959. Shortly afterward, they moved to Ottawa, where Mr. NEWMAN became Ottawa editor of Maclean's. These were the years when he was writing his book Renegade in Power: The Diefenbaker Years with her help and she was beginning her study of Lester Pearson and the Liberal Party.
Asked if she chose the Liberals because he was already working on the Progressive Conservatives, Mr. NEWMAN said no. "Any good journalist in this country knows the Liberals are a natural subject because they are such a force in this country. What gives them such continuity and strength? Analyzing that is the prime ambition of every political journalist." Besides, "the people who ran that party were our Friends and contacts."
The NEWMAN / McCALL marriage collapsed in the early 1970s. They divorced in 1977. By that time, they had long since returned to Toronto. Ms. McCALL had worked as a freelance writer and as a contributing editor and writer to Saturday Night and Maclean's.
She had also become friendly with Prof. CLARKSON. He knew her first through her writing, which he admired for its depth, insights and authority. "You believed what she wrote," he said, "because you knew she had thought about it and often her perceptions were novel."
Prof. CLARKSON and his broadcaster wife, Adrienne CLARKSON, now the Governor-General, split up in 1973. Some time later, he invited Ms. McCALL, who was then working as a national reporter for The Globe and Mail, to have lunch to discuss the federal election of 1974. He asked her to dinner a year later and they gradually began a relationship.
They were married in 1978, bought a new home "to start afresh" with the respective children from their first marriages. "We were the operative parents," Prof. CLARKSON said simply. Later, he and Ms. McCALL adopted each other's daughters. "It was the symbolism of being one family rather than a split family," he said. That tight arrangement led to painful estrangements from the other biological parents -- Mr. NEWMAN and Ms. CLARKSON -- that were only resolved after the passage of time and the birth of grandchildren.
Grits: An Intimate Portrait of the Liberal Party was finally published in 1982. It was dedicated "with love and admiration" to Stephen Hugh Elliott CLARKSON. The book, which caused a sensation, was unlike most political writing at the time. It was a biography of a party, not a person, but it was written as a series of profiles of key figures (Keith Davey, Pierre Trudeau, Jim Coutts, Michael Pitfield, John Turner and Marc Lalonde) from the Pearson years through the Trudeau era.
"Grits is not only a brilliant portrait of how an arthritic party, drenched in scandal, suddenly learned to dance again, but also a textbook on how easily a bunch of young political junkies could take over a party," said historian John ENGLISH. "It endures as one of the finest analyses of Canadian politics ever written." Journalist Robert FULFORD, who picked up Grits again after he heard about Ms. McCALL's death, said: "It is still fresh and full of terrific insights into the politics of the 1960s and 1970s."
Besides forging a tight family unit, Ms. McCALL and Prof. CLARKSON decided to collaborate as authors, she bringing her writing talent and political insights and he contributing his organizational skills and policy analysis to their study of Trudeau, which won the Governor-General's award for volume one, The Magnificent Obsession in 1990. Prof. CLARKSON said the process was agonizing because her method was to start with the introduction and polish it before moving on, an approach he thought akin to "building the front door before you've got the basement foundations in."
They wrote every sentence sitting side by side at the same keyboard. Every few pages, they would "print out" and "haggle" over the punctuation and the wording. "It was very, very slow," he said. Even he can't remember who actually wrote of Mr. Trudeau, "He haunts us still," saying that their editor Doug GIBSON at McClelland & Stewart also had a role in shaping the iconic sentence. Mr. GIBSON recalls that they had written, "He still haunts us," and he shifted the emphasis by moving the second word to the end of the sentence.
Writing wasn't the only agony that Ms. McCALL and Prof. CLARKSON shared. For most of their marriage, she was in severe physical pain and he was the gentle and loving caregiver. "In the mid-1970s, she had back pain and then arthritis, but the serious illnesses began in 1993," he said, "when she was diagnosed with diabetes, followed by breast cancer four years later." It wasn't so much the malignancy, but the treatment that caused many of her subsequent health problems.
The surgeon cut her brachial nerve during an operation to remove the tumour in her breast, leaving her left shoulder, arm and hand in chronic pain. "She was a very classy, elegant woman and writer," said broadcaster Eleanor WACHTEL, who became a friend in the late 1990s, "but she was also very private."
Ms. McCALL didn't want anybody to know that she had breast cancer, and didn't want to be seen looking frail and ill. Ms. McCALL's world shrank and she saw fewer and fewer people as her illnesses progressed. Managing her pain grew harder, although she continued to help her friend Rosemary SPEIRS strategize for the Equal Voice website (a movement to increase the number of women in elected office in Canada). The real downhill journey began about a year ago when she could no longer be cared for at home. Until almost the end, though, say the few Friends who visited her, she was a very astute, very witty and very engaging conversationalist.
It was a rough and frustrating passage for the woman many considered the best political writer and analyst of her generation.
Christina McCALL was born in Toronto on January 29, 1935. She died in Toronto of cancer on Wednesday. She was 70. She is survived by her husband, Stephen CLARKSON, three children and their families.

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