FRIENDLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-17 published
FRIENDLY, Mynne
Suddenly on Saturday, January 15, 2005 at her home. Mynne FRIENDLY beloved wife of the late Max FRIENDLY. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Sharon FRIENDLY, Pamela FRIENDLY and Ron SMITH, and Lynda FRIENDLY. dear sister and sister-in-law of Max SHERMAN, and Ida and Morry CLARFIELD and the late Paul and Sam SHERMAN. Devoted grandmother of Jordan and Veronica UNGERMAN, Lezli and Massimo CASINI of Italy, Alexzander SMITH, and great grandmother of Kyle and Shelby UNGERMAN, and Emily and Elia Max CASINI. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W., (2 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Tuesday, January, 18 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment Beth Sholom section at Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva at 55 Prince Arthur Ave. #1102, from 1: 00 p.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Mynne Friendly Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst St. Toronto, M6A 2C3 (416)780-0324.

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FRIENDLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-17 published
FRIENDLY, Mynne
Suddenly on Saturday, January 15, 2005 at her home. Mynne Friendly beloved wife of the late Max FRIENDLY. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Sharon FRIENDLY, Pamela FRIENDLY and Ron SMITH, and Lynda FRIENDLY. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Max SHERMAN, and Ida and Morry CLARFIELD and the late Paul and Sam SHERMAN. Devoted grandmother of Jordan and Veronica UNGERMAN, Lezli and Massimo CASINI of Italy, Alexzander SMITH, and great-grandmother of Kyle and Shelby UNGERMAN, and Emily and Elia Max CASINI. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W., (2 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Tuesday, January 18 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment Beth Sholom section at Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva at 55 Prince Arthur Ave. No. 1102, from 1: 00 p.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Mynne Friendly Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3 (416) 780-0324.

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FRIENDLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-18 published
Nol YOUNG had vision for daycare
He wanted a seamless day for schoolchildren
'Incurable' optimist devoted life to youngsters
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
A playful, joyful giant of a man, Nol YOUNG dedicated his life to children, their care and their welfare -- even though it was all theoretical until the birth of his own daughter just six years ago.
Mieke was an amazing gift, he used to say, and this wasn't theory, nor just the words of the smitten father he was. Four years before she was born, he was diagnosed with a brain tumour and given a few months to live. Perhaps it was his sunny, optimistic nature, perhaps it was something else, but YOUNG married his partner, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation writer Ann JANSEN, after his diagnosis and New Year's Eve surgery, and lived another 10 years. He died March 8 at age 51.
"When he was first sick, we never thought (having children) was a possibility," JANSEN said. "But he stayed well and the desire to have children is a very strong one. "
And he was someone who had a very strong sense of possibility.
"Cancer wasn't the only thing Nol had that was incurable. His optimism was," said Geoff WILLIAMS, a friend from their high school days in Scarborough. "Until close to his death he rarely expressed frustration or spoke of being upset with having cancer."
What did concern him -- greatly -- was establishing a child-care program for school-aged children within a federally funded universal child-care system. His vision was a seamless school day for children, in which they could go to one place for school and daycare. He was a founding member of the School Age Care Association of Ontario and the author of a 1994 book Caring for Play: The School and Child Care Connection.
He was the sparkplug behind a conference in Toronto six years ago and the driving force behind the association newsletter "Exploring Environments".
"He was very involved in things for children, advocacy for children, not-for-profit children's care," said Martha FRIENDLY, who saw him the day after the federal budget was announced in February. He had been staying in the palliative care unit at Toronto Grace hospital since the beginning of the year and by then was having some trouble speaking, but he wanted to know if the budget included finally -- funding for child care.
FRIENDLY is chair of the University of Toronto Childcare Resource and Research Unit, but she was one of a group of parents starting up the Alternative Primary School in about 1982 when she hired YOUNG to help with its faltering daycare. "He was tall -- about 6-foot-4 -- with a big, bushy head of red hair and I thought he was just the cutest guy. I tend to make snap judgments. I thought 'Okay, here's the guy (we need).'"
YOUNG told the hiring committee he wasn't strong on administration and that became a running joke. He was a creative, compassionate, imaginative and inspirational child-care worker: he started an outdoor education program in which the daycare kids experienced overnight outdoor camping, he designed a school-aged child-care program that focused on what the kids were interested in, including Friday afternoon swim lessons, but he never could pull together a budget.
It was the same when he arrived in the early childhood education program at George Brown College in 1987, ready to shake things up at a school known for its focus on the infant and toddler stages. He envisioned school boards and child-care centres working together to provide the seamless day, and it now exists at the early childhood education program funded by the province and run by George Brown at Ryerson public school.
YOUNG also initiated an innovative Canadian social history project, collecting archival photographs and organizing them into stories of child care, health, women's work, poverty and racism he often shared with classes at the college.
"He was trying to engage students in a more meaningful way of learning about history, and for early childhood education students to understand why we have the health care we have," said Pam DOYLE, his friend and colleague at George Brown.
She worked on the project with YOUNG in 1998. "He once affectionately referred to me as 'his staff,'" she recalled. "It was a faux pas he didn't make again."
But it was also typical of YOUNG, who could talk his, mainly female, colleagues into helping out and usually into doing the majority of the detail work on the many projects, conferences and causes he believed in. He got away with it because of his infectious idealism, youthfulness and exuberance. Still his Peter Pan-like ability to have the women in his life look after all its practicalities had a female friend at George Brown threatening to make up T-shirts proclaiming "I'm not Wendy."
He grew up in a family of women. "When he was born, everybody was thrilled," said his sister Betty VEITCH. He was the youngest child and only boy, and his three sisters fought over who was going to take him to school on his first day.
His father was an Anglican Church minister, idealistic and often away administering to the needs of his parishioners, something that wasn't lost on his son. When YOUNG was about five, he disappeared one day. The family finally found him having milk and cookies at the home of the church organist who lived with her elderly sister. He told his frantic mother he was "doing visiting just like Dad does."
YOUNG began working with children at the former Bolton Camp for underprivileged children and at the Eastview drop-in centre in downtown Toronto while attending the University of Toronto. He graduated -- eventually. "This was typical of how he approached academia: he liked it in theory better than practice," said WILLIAMS.
YOUNG started up and lived in a number of communal houses in the city: "From the first house on Follis to the apartment above the shawarma shop on College, in the house that shook in high winds on Clinton, and during brief diversions to the foreign lands east of the Don Valley Parkway, Nol managed to bring groups of people together in various degrees of harmony," WILLIAMS noted.
YOUNG and JANSEN made their home in a co-op near University of Toronto and a Starbucks, where YOUNG used to take his plastic travel mug every morning for a fill-up. He got to know the staff there so well, one of them started babysitting Mieke and another signed up in George Brown's youth services program. "He was a natural mentor," his wife said.
When he moved into the palliative care unit, the Starbucks staff arranged delivery of coffee to him.
His surgery last fall wasn't successful, but it might have given him an extra month or so of life, which he put to use. His was a family devastated by cancer: both his twin sisters died of it (Gwen had breast cancer and Lorraine ovarian cancer). His father had died of pancreatic cancer and his mother died of leukemia. Only Betty VEITCH survived kidney cancer.
Trinity Hospice organized a care team for YOUNG that was soon overflowing with Friends.
Pam DOYLE was a team member. "He still had ideas to the end. He still wanted to get people to work on committees. He said the team was life-giving; we were in awe of him."
When he still could, he did paddling exercises in his bed because he was hoping he might be able to go on one more canoe trip to Killarney. With DOYLE, he worked out the details of the Noel Young Award, which will be awarded to a student in George Brown's early childhood education program who has shown a commitment to advocacy and action.
About 450 people attended his memorial celebration at Trinity St. Paul's Church last month. There were cards and condolences. One was from Martha FRIENDLY's daughter Abigail, now 25 and studying in London, England. She was one of the kids at that daycare in 1982 where YOUNG first worked. She used to pretend she wasn't feeling well at school so she could sit with YOUNG in the daycare. "I always thought you were a giant," she wrote.

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FRIENDLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-04 published
SMITH, Isobel (ne CAMERON)
On Sunday, May 1, 2005 at King Gardens Nursing Home, in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late George Burns SMITH. Loving mother of Ronald and his wife Pamela FRIENDLY, and Glen and his wife Ann. Dear grandma of Alexzander and Lydia. Survived by her sister Margaret NOBLE. Predeceased by her brother Jack. Lovingly remembered by niece Alison and nephews Graham and John Jr. Bravery passed on, to Freedom and God.

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FRIES o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2005-12-07 published
SWEIGER, Iris (ROLLINSON)
Iris (ROLLINSON) SWEIGER passed away at Grey Gables, Markdale, Wednesday, November 23, 2005 in Markdale in her 87th year. She was the beloved wife of the late Grant SWEIGER and dear mother of Lynda BROADWORTH of Port Perry, David (Sue) of Markdale, Douglas (Scarlett JANUSAS) of Tobermory, Robert of Walkerton and Barbara Welch (Hugh) of Dundalk. Also, loving grandmother of Mark, Danna and Joe BROADWORTH, Chris and Leah SWEIGER, Amelia and Virginia SWEIGER, Michael and Andrew SWEIGER, Douglas, Eric, Julie and Ryan WELCH. She was the great-grandmother of Josh and Alexander. She will be sadly missed by sister Lorna GRIFFITHS (Wilf) of Toronto, and brother Roy ROLLINSON (Eleanor) of Owen Sound. She was predeceased by sister Thelma McKIE, and son-in-law Bill BROADWORTH.
Friends called at the May Funeral Home, Markdale, Friday evening, November 25. Reverend Mark WAUGH officiated at a funeral service held at Annesley United Church, Markdale, Saturday, November 26 at 2: 30 p.m.
A eulogy and remembrances were shared by grandchildren Danna, Douglas and Eric. Music included the congregational hymns "The Lord's My Shepherd, I'll Not Want" and "What a Friend We Have In Jesus," accompanied by organist David FRIES. Special music "Somebody's Hero" was played at the conclusion of the service.
The grand_sons of Iris served as pallbearers and honourary pallbearers, and her granddaughters carried floral tributes. Interment was in Markdale Cemetery.
Memorial donations were directed to the Centre Grey Hospital Health Services Foundation - Building Fund and the charity of choice. Following the service the Friends and relatives joined the family for refreshments and fellowship in Annesley United Church Fellowship Hall.
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FRIES o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.markdale.the_markdale_standard 2005-03-30 published
SUTCLIFFE, Wilbert
Peacefully, at Grey Gables, Markdale, Sunday March 20, 2005. Wilbert 'Wib' SUTCLIFFE of Markdale in his 100th year. Beloved husband of the late Edna and the late Ruth. Survived by sisters-in-law Grace WHEILDON of Markdale, Shirley DICKSON/DIXON of Mitchell and brother-in-law Maurice QUINTON of Owen Sound, and the family of the late Ruth SUTCLIFFE (HOLLEY.) Sadly missed by his extended family and Friends. Friends called at the May Funeral Home, Markdale, Tuesday evening and Wednesday afternoon and evening, where Reverend Neil PARKER officiated a funeral service held Thursday March 24, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Chaplain Kathryn HAINES gave a eulogy. Music included the congregational hymns 'Amazing Grace' and 'What A Friend We Have In Jesus', accompanied by pianist David FRIES. Arnold ROSENBURG, Will MOORE, Howard GREIG, Hob PRINGLE, Terry McKAY and Cornelius VLIELANDER served as pall bearers. Honorary bearers were George HALL, Bob HALL, Terry BUCKLEY, Ken FERGUSON, John HALVERSON and Dyson SEABROOK. A recessional honour guard was formed by the past and present members of the Councils of the Township of Chatsworth, and the County of Grey. lnterment in Markdale Cemetery. Donations were directed to Grey Gables Residents' Fund, or the charity of choice.
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FRIES o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.markdale.the_markdale_standard 2005-05-18 published
LUCAS, Reverend Dr. C. Glenn
Passed away at Grey Gables, Markdale, Monday May 9 2005, Rev. Dr. C. Glenn LUCAS of Markdale in his 76th year. Beloved husband of Phyllis NAPIER. Loving father of Shaun (Tara) of Berkeley. Dear brother of Rhea ALDERSON of Toronto and Sheila MURRAY (Robert) of Ottawa. Grandfather of Jessie, Brittney and Cheyanne. Predeceased by parents Robert and Jessie LUCAS and brother Graham. The family received Friends at the May Funeral Home, Markdale on Wednesday afternoon and evening. A Funeral service was held at Annesley United Church, Markdale, Thursday May 12, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. Rev Judith SPRINGETT officiated at the service, Reverend Dr. Bob GUILIANO gave the sermon and Reverend Robert BUCHANAN provided words of remembrance. David FRIES, Organist and Choir Director of Annesley United Church and the members of the combined choirs of Christ Church Anglican and Annesley United Church led the congregation in the hymns "Rejoice The Lord is King "The Lord Is My Shepherd" and "O God Our Help in Ages Past". Phillip ALDERSON, Andrew MURRAY, Peter CADE, George EMERY, Peter LUCAS, and David EVAN served as pall bearers. Reverend Anne MILLS recited a poem at the committal service held in Markdale Cemetery. Friends and relatives joined Phyllis and her family at a luncheon served by the Annesley United Church Women in the Annesley United Church Fellowship Hall. Memorial donations were directed to the Centre Grey Health Services Foundation Building Fund.
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FRIES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-05 published
CHESNEY- SCOTT, Barbara Ann
On Tuesday, May 3, 2005 at her residence in Byron, Barbara Ann CHESNEY- SCOTT, formerly of Seaforth. Beloved wife of Brad SCOTT. Dearly loved daughter of Marilyn (KLING) and Glenn CHESNEY of Seaforth. Lovingly remembered by her brother Rob CHESNEY and his wife Patti, and their children Paige and Brooke, all of Cincinnati. Dear sister-in-law of Barb FERREIRA of London. Loved by nieces Brittney and Alexis FERREIRA. Also survived by her grandmother-in-law Ruby FRIES of Elmira and aunts and uncles. Welcomed into rest by her grandparents and parents-in-law Wally and Betty SCOTT. There will be no funeral home visitation. A private family service will be held on Saturday, May 7 at the Whitney-Ribey Funeral Home, 87 Goderich Street West, Seaforth, at 2: 00 p.m. Pastor Stephen HILDEBRAND will officiate. Interment Maitlandbank Cemetery, Seaforth. Memorial donations to London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, N6C 6B5 would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Condolences at www.whitneyribeyfuneralhome.com

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FRIES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-27 published
KERR, Charlotte Marie (KELLEY)
Peacefully at Bluewater Health Mitton St. Site, Sarnia on December 24, 2005, Charlotte Marie (KELLEY) KERR, age 82 of Sarnia. Beloved wife of Robert KERR. Loving mother of Cathy and her husband Ken DAVIDSON, Sarnia, Bob KERR and his wife Lyn, Sarnia, Patrick KERR and his wife Bev, Pembrooke, Mark KERR and his wife Lou Anne, Powell River, B.C. and Pauline and her husband Tom SNADEN, Windsor. Much loved grandmother of 11 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Survived by her niece Penny ANDERSON of Ottawa and nephew Clyde FRIES of British Columbia. She will be missed by her cat Barney. Predeceased by a sister Margaret "Jean" FRIES of British Columbia. The funeral service will be held on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia. Interment in Resurrection Cemetery. Friends and family will be received at Smith Funeral Home on Wednesday from 12 noon until service time at 1: 00 p.m. Sympathy donations may be made to the Charity of your Choice. Memories and condolences may be sent online to www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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FRIES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-21 published
OSTRANDER, Howard " Howie"
Peacefully, after a brief illness, went home to be with his Lord and Friend Jesus Christ, on Sunday, March 20, 2005, at the age of 76. Howard was born in Craighurst, Ontario in 1929. He moved to Toronto in 1943 and from there to Elmira in 1994. Beloved husband of Ena (ne NEILL,) loving father of JoAnne (David) FRIES of Greenville, Wisconsin, and Neil (Yvonne) OSTRANDER of Elmira, and cherished grandfather of Brian, Jonathan, Michael, Brett, and Jennifer. Howard will also be remembered by his sister Kathleen (John) ROSS. Howard was predeceased by his parents Harvey and Annie OSTRANDER, sister Irene CONNELLY, and brother Ray OSTRANDER. Friends are invited to share their memories of Howard with his family during visitation at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 from 1-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A celebration of Howard's life and faith will be held at Waterloo Mennonite Brethren Church, 245 Lexington Road, Waterloo, on Wednesday, March 23 at 2: 00 p.m., with Pastor Paul McLLWRAITH officiating. A reception will follow in the lower auditorium of the church. Cremation and private interment will follow at a later date. As expressions of sympathy, donations can be made in Howard's memory to International Teams of Canada and may be arranged by calling the Edward R. Good Funeral Home. Condolences/Donations/Flowers www.edwardrgood.com 519-745-8445

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-01-18 published
VANSTONE, Helen Jean
The family announces with great sorrow the gentle passing of our Mom, Helen Jean VANSTONE, on Friday, January 14th, 2005, at the age of eighty years. Predeceased by Dad, her lifelong partner and husband of fifty-two years, Reverend R. Bruce VANSTONE, there remain behind to cherish her memory five daughters and their husbands /partners: Kathryn (Larry), Barbara (Tim), Sheila (Blair), Heather (Victor), Susan (Rod) and ten grandchildren. She is also survived by her brother, Bev DUNSMORE and his family. Mom will be forever remembered for her devotion to her family and home, her love of babies and her gentle, steadfast belief in the miracles of life. Slow to chide, swift to bless, Mom raised us by her loving example. We are very thankful for the compassionate care given to Mom by Dr. Hans FRIESEN and the nursing staff on Unit 61 at Rockyview General Hospital. A Memorial Service will be held at Knox United Church, 506 - 4th Street S.W., Calgary, Alberta on Wednesday, January 19th, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. If Friends so desire, memorial tributes may be made directly to the Mission and Service Fund at Knox United Church, 506 - 4th Street S.W., Calgary, Alberta T2P 1S7. Expressions of sympathy may be forwarded to the family at www.mem.com.
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FRIESEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-29 published
NORDEMANN, Harmpje Maria "Hannie" (VAN REIJENDAM)
After a lengthy illness, Harmpje Maria (Hannie) passed away at Craigwiel Gardens, Ailsa Craig on January 27, 2005. Harmpje Maria ((HannieVAN) REIJENDAM) NORDEMANN in her 77th year. Loving wife of J. Gerhard (Gerald) NORDEMANN of Nairn. Loving mother of Gerald and wife Brenda NORDEMANN of Komoka, Joan NORDEMANN- KELLER and husband Robert KELLER of Brampton, Shirley and husband Don WATSON of Nairn, Helen NORDEMANN and husband Tony DA SILVA of London, Keith and wife Ramona NORDEMANN of Medicine Hat, Alberta and Dorothy and husband Larry FETTERLY of Brampton. Predeceased by daughter Yvonne (NORDEMANN) MacGREGOR (1987.) Beloved Oma of Beth and Craig NORDEMANN, Marc and Matthew NORDEMANN- KELLER, Jacki and Jason WATSON, Andrea and Daniel NORDEMANN-DA SILVA and Andrew and Emily NORDEMANN. Dear sister of Dini DE ROOI of the Netherlands, sister-in-law of Corry NORDEMANN of Strathroy, D.W. (Wim) NORDEMANN of the Netherlands, D.J.J. (Dick) and Map NORDEMANN of the Netherlands, J.F. (Fred) and Edna NORDEMANN of Nightville, New Brunswick, brother-in-law J. DRENTH of the Netherlands and C.J. (Carel) and Rudi NORDEMANN of the Netherlands. Will also be missed by many nieces and nephews both in Canada and the Netherlands. The family will be at the Nairn Mennonite Church (26459 Bear Creek Sideroad - just off Petty Street) on Friday, February 4, from 7-9 pm and on Saturday, February 5, from 1-2: 30 pm with memorial service at 2:30 pm officiated by Rev. David FRIESEN- WALDNER. There will be a private family service of interment at another time. T. Stephenson and son Funeral Home (Ailsa Craig) entrusted with arrangements. Cremation has taken place. Those wishing to make donations in memory of Hannie NORDEMANN are asked to consider Craigwiel Gardens. A tree will be planted in memory of Mrs. Harmpje NORDEMANN.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-19 published
PENNER, Henry K.
After a courageous battle with cancer, Henry K. PENNER of St. Thomas, Ontario, passed away peacefully at Elgin General Hospital on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 at the age of 81. Born in Steinbach, Manitoba, son of Cornelius and Katherine, stepmother, Margaret. Beloved husband of Thelma (COWAN.) Dear father of Keith (Marcia COOPER) PENNER of Toronto. Brother of Norman and Tina PENNER, Winnipeg; Wilma and Dick PENNER, Steinbach; Alvin and Margaret PENNER, Winnipeg; Ruth PENNER, Winnipeg; Gladys and Kevin RUCKER, Tampa, Florida; Dorothy and Dennis REIMER, Steinbach; Ruth KLASSEN, Winnipeg; and Roy and Emelyn PENNER, Calgary. Predeceased by Adelaine PENNER, Betty HANNIGAN, Gordon PENNER and Lottie FRIESEN. Sadly missed by nieces, nephews, cousins, Friends, and the congregation of First Yarmouth Plains Baptist Church. A veteran of World War 2 with the Royal Regiment of Canada. Visitation Thursday, May 19, 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m., Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas. Funeral Service Friday, May 20 at 2 p.m., First Yarmouth Plains Baptist Church, 6071 Fairview Road, R.R.#4, Saint Thomas, internment to follow at Elmdale Memorial Park Cemetary. Memorial contributions made to First Yarmouth Plains Baptist Church or the charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-13 published
KEMP, Mary Audrey (DICKSON/DIXON)
After a lengthy battle with cancer, Mary Audrey (DICKSON/DIXON) of Craigwell Gardens, Ailsa Craig; passed away on Monday July 11, 2005 in her 84th year. Beloved wife of the late Gordon KEMP (July 9, 2004.) Dear mother and mother-in-law Lynda (Brian) YOUNG, Barrie Shirley (Alan) LALIBERTE, Mitchell; Ron MORLEY, Ailsa Craig Nancy ROBINSON, Parkhill; Larry (Mary Jane) KEMP, Bryanston Predeceased by daughter Marilyn MORLEY (1993.) Dearly loved grandmother of Joel and Stephen YOUNG, Shannon (Brian) STRIK, Aaron and Brandon MORLEY, Kelly Jo, Christopher, Scott and Katelyn ROBINSON, Jason, Kyle and Justin KEMP. Great-grandma to Cole STRIK. Predeceased by family members Zelda (Jim) GEORGE; Orville (Madeline) DICKSON/DIXON, Rheola (Ted) HOTSON, Marjorie (Dean) WHITE/WHYTE, Les (Eleanor) DICKSON/DIXON, Wilmore (Myrtle) DICKSON/DIXON; sister-in-law to Doris (Del) GOUGH, Byron and Lloyd (Ceal) KEMP, London. Funeral service will be held at Ailsa Craig Community Centre, Wednesday July 13, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. Visitation 2 hours prior to the service. Reverend David FRIESEN- WALDNER officiating. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. T. Stephenson and son Funeral Home, Ailsa Craig entrusted with arrangements 519-293-3331. A tree will be planted in memory of Mrs. Audrey KEMP

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-10 published
PHILLIPS, Roger
Unexpectedly but peacefully at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital on Thursday September 8, 2005, Roger PHILLIPS of Ailsa Craig, formerly of London. Much loved husband of Margaret (BUCK) PHILLIPS. Wonderful father of Emma (E.J.) PHILLIPS and Mark and Gwen PHILLIPS of London. Loving grandfather (Bampy) to Connor and Paige. Dear brother of Patricia OSBORNE of Waterdown. Dear uncle of Mark, Paul and Nigel OSBORNE and their families. Resting at the T. Stephenson and son Funeral Home, Ailsa Craig where the funeral service will be held on Monday September 12 at 2 p.m. with Reverend David FRIESEN- WALDNER officiating. Visitation 2 hours prior to the service. Cremation to follow. Those who wish may donate to the charity of their choice. He will be missed by many. A tree will be planted in memory of Mr. Roger PHILLIPS.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-26 published
Family mourns crash victim
By Joe BELANGER, Free Press Reporter, Mon., December 26, 2005
Willy KLASSEN was the kind of young man who could put a smile on anyone's face.
Loved by all who knew him, the 20-year-old's passions in life included snowboarding, soccer, cars, Friends and family -- the simple pleasures learned growing up in a close-knit, hard-working family of 10 children.
Those people whose lives Klassen brightened celebrated Christmas with only his memory.
The East Elgin secondary school graduate was killed instantly Friday when the car he was in went out of control on Elgin Road just north of Aylmer and slammed into a tree after sideswiping another car it was trying to pass.
"You couldn't ask for a better friend," said Reuben WIEBE, who suffered a broken thumb and a concussion in the crash, of which he has no memory.
"He'd give you just about anything you'd ask for."
The driver of the 1997 BMW, KLASSEN's pal Dan FRIESEN, 24, suffered a broken collarbone and leg.
Police say speed was a factor.
The three were on their way to visit KLASSEN's brother, Henry, 22, a volunteer with the Malahide fire department.
When the alarm sounded, Henry was among the rescue workers who raced to the scene only to discover the victim was his brother.
"I found out when I got there," said Henry in an interview Christmas Eve.
As other firefighters worked to free his brother, Henry helped load WIEBE and FRIESEN into ambulances.
"You just do what you've gotta do," said Henry. "It doesn't really hit you until you sit down later and think about it."
Henry said yesterday his family is coping with the tragedy, surrounded by Friends.
Henry, whose parents, Frank and Susan, have 10 children between the ages of 13 and 30, lost not only a brother, but a buddy.
"He was a very happy guy and everybody just loved him," Henry said of his truck-driver brother, who lived in Malahide Township.
The youngest KLASSEN child, 13-year-old David, mourned the older brother he adored by writing a poem, Someone Always Has to Fall, its poignant words showing his struggle to understand the loss:
"It doesn't matter what the size
Whether it be large, small, or none at all
Always someone has to fall
You'll cry and cry but the pain is still there.
You'll have agony that no one can compare.
But yet it's true
That someone always has to fall
No matter who it is at all."
Today, Friends and family are to gather at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home on Talbot Street East in Aylmer for visitation from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
The funeral is at 2 p.m. tomorrow at EMMC Church in Summers Corners. Interment is at Aylmer Cemetery.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-15 published
Ex-boyfriend sought in slaying of woman
By Joe FRIESEN, Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - Page A14
Police are still searching for a man in connection with the shooting death of his ex-girlfriend in a parking garage on Friday.
A warrant has been issued for the arrest of John KOVACS, 52, of Toronto. Mr. KOVACS was out on bail at the time of the attack.
Szilvia VERES, 35, was shot several times in the head at close range. Her husband, Miklos KEMENCZY, 46, survived despite being shot in the head and torso.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-16 published
Suspect in fatal shooting dead of apparent suicide
By Joe FRIESEN, Wednesday, February 16, 2005 - Page A10
John KOVACS was found dead in a Quebec hotel room on Valentine's Day, three days after his former girlfriend was fatally shot and her new husband wounded during a parking garage ambush.
He died of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound, Toronto Police said. His body was discovered around 4 p.m. Monday and was identified by fingerprint records.
"He was found by cleaning staff who were checking on his well-being," said Toronto police homicide detective Terry BROWNE.
Mr. KOVACS, 52, checked in to the hotel, believed to be about 20 kilometres from Rivire-du-Loup, east of Quebec City, on Sunday night and had been on the run since Friday's shooting.
Szilvia VERES died after she was shot several times while sitting in a car in the parking garage of a North York apartment building. Police said she had been in a relationship with Mr. KOVACS, but broke it off last year. Since then, he was charged with four counts of criminal harassment and was forbidden by a court order from seeing her.
Ms. VERES's husband, Miklos KEMENCZY, survived the attack despite being shot in the head and torso. He identified Mr. KOVACS as the shooter.
Mr. KEMENCZY is still recovering at a Toronto hospital. His father Nick said he was able to stand and move around yesterday but was still in a state of denial.
A social worker will try to help the family break the news of Ms. VERES's death tomorrow, his father said.
"He's doing very well but he's still in denial, that's why you cannot say nothing now," Nick KEMENCZY said.
"He's walking a little bit but his head is not clear."
Ms. VERES and Mr. KEMENCZY met in March of last year and, to his parents' surprise, soon announced their intention to marry. They wed in November.
Quebec's provincial police force has taken over the investigation of Mr. KOVACS's death, but are refusing to comment because it is an apparent suicide.
A firearm was recovered from the hotel room but police do not know whether it is the same one used in Friday's shooting.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-17 published
Man shot to death after visiting ailing mother
By Joe FRIESEN, Thursday, February 17, 2005 - Page A22
A 27-year-old man who police say was a kind, generous person with no criminal background was killed in an apartment stairwell after visiting his ailing mother.
Selvakumar SELLAIAH was shot to death late Tuesday night on the 17th floor of 275 Bleecker Street, an apartment building in the Sherbourne Avenue and Wellesley Street area.
"He's an innocent man," Detective Joel KULMATYCKI said.
Mr. SELLAIAH lived in the area and worked at a nearby restaurant.
Police believe robbery may have been the motive.
He is the city's ninth homicide victim of 2005.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-19 published
Transit death leads police to second body
Detectives speculate store proprietor and companion died in murder-suicide
By Joe FRIESEN, Saturday, February 19, 2005 - Page A16
A man and woman are dead after an apparent murder-suicide that spanned the city's east and west ends.
The police investigation began shortly after 2 a.m. yesterday, when a man was killed by a subway train at Donlands station. Police said they traced the man to a corner store on Mimico Avenue in Etobicoke where, two hours later, they discovered the body of a female acquaintance of the man. They would not identify the two people.
Police are trying to establish the nature of the relationship, but residents of the quiet, working-class neighbourhood by the lake say the store was run by Tanvir Ashraf KHAN, known to his customers as Tan.
Mr. KHAN's long-time companion was known as Shah.
Jill REED, who lives across the street from the store, said the two were in their 40s and had been a couple for some time. There was trouble in the relationship recently, however, and Shah left Mr. KHAN for about a month around Christmas, Ms. REED said.
"They were just nice, friendly people," Ms. REED said. Like many people, she shopped at the New Jersey Variety and Discount Store for such things as cigarettes and milk. Mr. KHAN always greeted his customers with a smile, she said.
However, another neighbour, Gary David BROWN, said he spoke to Shah on the streetcar last week, and she told him that Mr. KHAN was "a little unstable."
At the time, Mr. BROWN was explaining how he had had a falling out with Mr. KHAN nine months earlier.
Mr. BROWN had taken a special interest in the goings-on at his local corner shop two years ago and had been advising Mr. KHAN on the business. He recommended that Mr. KHAN branch out by establishing a Western Union money-transfer service, as well as providing fax and photocopy services and installing a pay telephone -- all of which turned out well for his store, Mr. BROWN said.
But one day, when Mr. BROWN wanted to send a fax, Mr. KHAN reacted angrily toward him, telling him not to wave the papers in front of him. Mr. BROWN was baffled, and left the store vowing not to return. The two had barely spoken since.
"He was very reserved, but as soon as something went wrong, like when he was having Internet problems with Western Union, it really got his blood pressure up," Mr. BROWN said. "He was easy-going until something got on his nerves."
Mr. BROWN said Mr. KHAN worked all hours of the day, from around 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., and was often spotted stepping outside the shop for a cigarette. Shah, who Mr. BROWN described as "the nicest person you would ever want to meet," would often join Mr. KHAN at work.
The only problem Mr. BROWN had been aware of at the store related to the penny candy.
Children from the local school were stealing too much of it, Mr. BROWN said, so Mr. KHAN decided to get rid of it and sell only chocolate bars.
Manvinder KAUR, who lives next door to the small residence -- attached to the store -- where Mr. KHAN lived, said she saw him late Thursday night.
He was putting out the garbage as usual, and said hello with a big smile. The two often chatted because they shared a language, she said.
Mr. KHAN was born in Pakistan. He took up the corner-shop business in December, 2001. He rented the store for $725 a month, and the attached residence for $325 a month.
The property owners described Mr. KHAN as likable and said he always paid his rent on time.
"It's very sad news. We'd never believe that," said the owner, who asked to remain anonymous.
"I don't know why he did this."
Postmortems will be performed today. The homicide squad has taken over the investigation.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-04 published
Special Investigations Unit investigating death of man, 37, in custody
By Joe FRIESEN, Friday, March 4, 2005 - Page A11
The Special Investigations Unit is still investigating the death of Adeyeri ROBINSON, a 37-year-old man who died after being arrested and restrained by police on February 21.
Two officers have been designated as the subjects of the investigation, and one has been designated a witness.
Mr. Adeyeri died as he was being transferred from the care of Toronto emergency services to staff at the William Osler Health Centre in Etobicoke.
He was detained by police under the provisions of the Mental Health Act.
A postmortem concluded there was no "anatomical cause of death." Toxicology and pathology tests are still being conducted.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-14 published
Bill CAMERON, Journalist And Teacher 1943-2005
'Thinking-man's anchor' who was one of public broadcasting's true believers seemed destined for greatness until 1999 when he was among Canadian Broadcasting Corporation staffers cut by corporation number crunching, writes Joe FRIESEN
By Joe FRIESEN, Monday, March 14, 2005 Page S9
On the day he had brain surgery, Bill CAMERON, ever the consummate newsman, roused himself from the anesthetic to set the record straight. He had already started an argument with the nurses for taking his books away, and wasn't supposed to be reading or doing anything strenuous. But as he lay there, his head bandaged, listening to his neurosurgeon discuss the day's news, he couldn't help but interject to fill in the missing details.
"They were discussing something that had happened that day, and Bill seemed to know all about it," his wife Cheryl HAWKES said yesterday. "I said, you've been under anesthetic all day. How did you do that? How do you keep up like that?
"Somehow, he must have read the paper."
Originally from British Columbia, Mr. CAMERON spent his high-school years in Ottawa. His father was a prominent oceanographer and his mother died of cancer when he was a teenager. He attended the University of Toronto from 1962 to 1965, and spent much of his energy as a young man trying to forge a career as an actor and writer.
He got his start in journalism doing freelance work for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio, and at 25 was on the editorial board of the Toronto Star. In 1970, he was part of a breakaway group that wrote the Real Poverty Report in response to what they felt was a misreading of the situation by the Senate Committee on Poverty.
He moved to Maclean's magazine before eventually being hired by Global television in Toronto. Bill CUNNINGHAM, who was vice-president of television and current affairs at Global, said Mr. CAMERON came highly recommended. "I've often wondered if by taking him into television I didn't do him a bit of a disservice."
"It's not the kind of thing you win Pulitzer prizes for, turning out copy for an anchor, but he sure did it better than almost anyone I've ever seen," he said. "He could really turn a phrase."
By the mid-1970s, Mr. CAMERON had established himself in television, becoming a reporter and anchor for Global at a time of ambitious expansion at the station.
In 1978, Moses ZNAIMER at the upstart CityTV was looking to add some intellectual weight to his newscast. He leapt at the chance to hire Mr. CAMERON, who brought a natural gravitas with his Walter Cronkite-like delivery.
"Because we had the only 10 o'clock newscast [in Toronto], I wanted to make it more dignified, and Bill was perfect," Mr. ZNAIMER said. "Bill was a guy who believed that ideas matter and who believed that wrapping up the day's events in a pithy and elegant way was worthwhile."
It was not long after that Mr. CAMERON met Ms. HAWKES, a freelance journalist. It was August 15, 1980. She had been assigned to write a profile of the handsome, broad-shouldered anchor.
They met at the Blue Angel restaurant, and as she left at the end of the interview, Mr. CAMERON chased after her and said "I don't need a profile written about me. I need to marry you."
Later, he told her that he knew from the moment they first spoke on the telephone that he would ask her to marry him.
A few days after the interview, she watched him on television, looking for material for her story. She remembers seeing one of the short editorials he used to do at the end of the newscast. That night, he talked about his experiences at summer camp.
"I thought he was handsome, smart and really weird," she said. "I was just intrigued, I guess. He represented everything I thought I wanted in a partner."
It was a whirlwind romance. They were married four months later in December, 1980. The profile Ms. HAWKES submitted was published in Star Week the day of their wedding.
Mr. CAMERON left CityTV in 1983, after station executives decided his formal style was no longer a good fit for the hip urban market they coveted.
He was snapped up almost immediately by Mark STAROWICZ, executive producer of The Journal, and worked there during the heady days when the show was at the forefront of international current-affairs reporting.
He travelled to war zones in Mozambique, Croatia and the Persian Gulf with The Journal, producing work that colleagues said ranked with the best ever done at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Robin BENGER was a producer at The Journal who worked with Mr. CAMERON on a report on the civil war in the former Yugoslavia. He said Mr. CAMERON exuded a sense of calm even-handedness that allowed him to connect with people from all sides.
"He could interview a peasant in a potato field with the same equanimity and fairness as the president of a country," Mr. BENGER said. At one point, as shelling broke out around them while Mr. CAMERON was taping a direct-to-camera piece, he calmly worked his way into an ad lib, describing the shell bursts as the sound of giants dropping sandbags.
Away from the camera, Mr. CAMERON was a shy and private person who didn't covet the spotlight. He was a voracious reader who constantly had three or four books on the go. His wife said he would often roll out of bed clutching a book, ready to start the day.
"We have a picture of him floating on the Dead Sea, when he was on assignment with The Journal, reading. He could read in the most extraordinary circumstances," she said. "I think he had a great fear of getting caught somewhere without a book in his hand."
She said Mr. CAMERON felt he always had to be prepared for any kind of assignment, and so tried to know as much about everything as he possibly could. "It was like being married to my own Google search engine," she said.
And even with all the travelling his job required, he was always very close to his family. Mr. BENGER remembers his colleague, in the middle of a war zone, being anxious to get back to the hotel to hear how his son had fared on a math test that day.
Mr. CAMERON once described a 1983 documentary he did on the civil war in Mozambique as his best work. But it also raised doubts for him, which he expressed in an essay for the book The Newsmakers: Behind the Cameras with Canada's Top television Journalists.
He wrote about feeling the dreadful suspicion "that we dip into the surface of deep events, paddle with our feet, guard our comforts, patronize our contacts, exploit great tragedies for the good of our careers, and get the story wrong.... Maybe the real reporter is not necessarily the most talented but the one who can survive all this guilt, doubt, shame and suspicion, and get at least some part of the story home."
Mr. CAMERON was also one of the alternate anchors of The Journal who shared time with the late Barbara FRUM. But while Ms. FRUM was given glamorous interviews with the likes of Margaret Thatcher, Mr. CAMERON would be relegated to grilling Alan MacEachen in the show's second half.
Mr. STAROWICZ described him as the "thinking-man's anchor." And he was even given the chance to share his sense of humour in the Journal Diary segments, which Mr. STAROWICZ describes as "a cynical tour d'horizon, or Michael Moore before there was a Michael Moore."
Mr. CAMERON had been chosen to succeed Ms. FRUM as host after her death in 1992, Mr. STAROWICZ said, but the show was cancelled as a result of a power struggle at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Mr. STAROWICZ remembers the Journal staff gathering at a pool hall in Queen Street in Toronto and crowding around the television to hear Mr. CAMERON utter the show's final words: "Thank you for letting us serve you."
Mr. CAMERON considered himself one of public broadcasting's true believers, and was bitterly disappointed when he was eventually pushed out of the network in 1999 by a take-it-or-leave-it contract offer that promised a massive pay cut.
After having accepted assignments to host Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's local news in Toronto, where he won a Gemini award, and for a spell as Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Newsworld's morning anchor, he left the corporation for a short-lived public-relations job with American Gem Corp.
Friends say it's a shame that Mr. CAMERON never got the recognition, or the high-profile anchor job, that he deserved. "If he had a problem, it was that he was very bright, and appeared that way on camera," one former Journal staffer said.
In 2003, Mr. CAMERON became the media ethics chair at Ryerson University in Toronto. It was a good fit, Friends said, for he always took seriously his responsibility to his subjects.
Mr. HENDERSON remembers that Mr. CAMERON, before every televised interview, carefully warned his subjects that the tape was rolling and whatever they said could now be used against them. "He was a guy who was always in search of fairness. He was inquisitive, as every good journalist should be. But if he thought somebody was treated unfairly, it really hurt him."
His latter years were spent mainly on his writing, including a column in the National Post.
He was known as the best documentary writer in the country, and was called in to rescue scripts on some of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's highest-profile successes.
"His writing was just superb. It lifted up anything you were working on," Mr. HENDERSON, a senior producer for Canada: A People's History, said. In 2002, Mr. CAMERON directed his own documentary The Season, chronicling the harvest in Biggar, Saskatchewan.
He also published a novel, Cat's Crossing, a dark, literary portrait of Toronto, and before he died had finished a draft of his second novel, which centres around a freelance travel writer.
Mr. CAMERON, 62, died at his home in Toronto on Saturday, March 12, of esophageal cancer. He was surrounded by his family.
Bill CAMERON was born in Vancouver on January 23, 1943. He died of esophageal cancer at his home in Toronto in the early hours of Saturday morning. He was 62. He is survived by his wife, Cheryl HAWKES, and their children Patrick, 22, Rachel, 21, and Nick A Teacher Full Of Insight And Curiosity
When I walked into Bill CAMERON's class at Ryersen for the first time in the fall of 2003, I was shocked to see that my ethics teacher wasn't just the Mr. B. CAMERON listed on the timetable, but a genuine star of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. More astonishing, was that he lacked the celebrity attitude we've all come to expect from a star. Instead, what we got was a teacher full of insight and curiosity.
He didn't seek the spotlight; he was respectful; and he cared about what his students had to say. And when his class discussed the media business, he was never condescending, despite his wealth of experience. For someone who had been around the world and covered many of the great conflicts of the late 20th century, he was surprisingly interested in what a group of aspirants thought.
Of course, there was plenty of his own wisdom as well. In a discussion of the ethical implications of journalists carrying weapons in war zones, he casually mentioned that he had never thought it was a good idea. In Africa, it had once came up as an option but he dismissed it. He thought that any interview conducted by someone holding a lethal weapon was probably compromised.
I once approached him to ask about the ethics of going undercover to expose a professional essay-writing service used by university students. Bill discussed how it could be done in the most honest, straightforward way. He was adamant that the owners of the service could be persuaded to tell their side of the story, and eventually they did.
On the morning the story was published, Bill had already carefully read the student paper by the time I arrived. He said he thought we had got the ethics just right.
It was a compliment I will always treasure. -- Joe FRIESEN

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-14 published
White supremacist DROEGE shot to death in Toronto
By Joe FRIESEN, Thursday, April 14, 2005, Page A1
Toronto -- Wolfgang DROEGE, a white supremacist, Nazi sympathizer and former leader of the Heritage Front, was shot to death in the hallway of a Toronto apartment building yesterday.
Mr. DROEGE, 55, who had a lengthy criminal history including drug charges, was found dead in a second-floor hallway on North Dr. in the Upper Beaches.
Officers from the Toronto Police Emergency Task Force responded to a report of gunshots in the building just before 3 p.m. and discovered that a man, believed to be the assailant, had barricaded himself in an apartment.
Superintendent Bob CLARKE of 41 Division said crisis negotiators took over at that point and spoke to the man over the telephone.
"I understand there was telephone communication between the suspect and the Emergency Task Force officers. After a brief period of time it was resolved and we took the person into custody."
Another man, whom Supt. CLARKE identified as the suspect's brother, arrived at the scene and spoke with the man over the telephone, but it is not known whether that intervention played a role in the eventual surrender.
Mr. DROEGE, born in Germany in 1949, came to prominence as a leading figure on the extreme right in the 1970s. In 1975 he painted the words "white power" along the planned parade route for an African Liberation Day march and was arrested for damaging property.
Soon after, he joined the Ku Klux Klan under then-leader David Duke and tried to start a branch in Canada.
In 1981, in perhaps his most spectacular political foray, he was one of 10 men convicted of plotting to overthrow the government of Dominica.
They planned to use the Caribbean island as a base for drug smuggling, thereby generating funds for white supremacist activities elsewhere in the world. He served two years in U.S. prison for the conspiracy.
Mr. DROEGE returned to Canada in 1989 after serving more time in U.S. prisons for drugs and weapons offences. He quickly set about establishing a network to unite far-right groups in Canada under the auspices of the Heritage Front.
Bernie FARBER of the Canadian Jewish Congress, who campaigned against the Heritage Front in the 1990s, said that for a time under Mr. DROEGE's leadership there was increased interest in the group's brand of extremism.
"They were getting 200 to 300 people at rallies," Mr. FARBER said. "During his leadership the Heritage Front was one of the most deplored racist organizations of its day."
Mr. FARBER said Mr. DROEGE has been out of the spotlight for more than seven years, since the Heritage Front collapsed and white supremacists in Canada fell into political disarray.
"We knew that he maintained some kind of connection to the racist right, but he was never the public face again," Mr. FARBER said.
"This man's criminal history is quite lengthy so I don't think it was any great surprise that he lived on the dark side and was taken by the dark side."
Kimberly GORMAN, who lived in the same building as Mr. DROEGE, said she thought he had been trying to change his ways over the past several years.
He travelled to Europe frequently, she said, but certainly didn't have a typical 9-to-5 job. He slept during the day and did most of his living at night. About six months ago he complained that someone had tried to break down his door, and he showed Ms. GORMAN the damage.
She said his apartment was usually messy, but there was never any sign of the white supremacist politics he espoused publicly over many years.
"He was a very nice man," she said. "I think for the past five years of his life he was trying not to be the guy that he once was."
She also said he was extremely health conscious, always watching what he ate and taking many vitamins.
During yesterday's standoff, which lasted about an hour, dozens of heavily armed Emergency Task Force officers swarmed the apartment building on the quiet suburban street. Several pensioners were caught in the building, but many were taken out by the Emergency Task Force. A local school was placed on lockdown for a short time, police said.
Jason TANZOLA, who has lived three doors down from Mr. DROEGE for two years, was shocked to find his neighbourhood transformed into a heavily guarded armed camp.
He described Mr. DROEGE, whom he knew simply as Wolf, as one of the nicest guys in the world.
"I used to walk by him in the hallway and we'd say hello. If it is what people are saying it is, I'd be quite shocked, because I wouldn't peg him as somebody who'd be a racist."
Toronto Police did not release the name of the man being held in connection with Mr. DROEGE's death.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-20 published
One dead, one badly injured in shootings
witnesses: describe gangland-style killing of victim riding bicycle
By Joe FRIESEN, Wednesday, April 20, 2005, Page A10
An 18-year-old man was killed riding his bike in Parkdale in a shooting that sent bystanders scrambling for cover and a 17-year-old was in critical condition after being shot while in an area of the Annex that residents say is plagued by a 24-hour crack den.
Just before 9 p.m. on Monday, Joseph JONES was riding his bike on Jameson Avenue south of Queen Street, right next to Parkdale Collegiate.
A 41-year-old woman said Mr. JONES, 18, had been in an argument a few hours earlier that escalated to yelling. As he rode past her balcony, the woman saw one man open fire on Mr. JONES, the flame from the black handgun lighting up like a firecracker, she said.
The man fired twice, she said, the bullets whizzing below her and shattering the glass of her apartment lobby. Inside the lobby, a woman named Janice was playing with her two-year-old daughter, tickling her with a feather duster.
The first bullet came through the front door, Janice said. She instinctively leapt on top of her daughter, pushing her to the ground and covering her with her own body. The next bullet flew past her head. She could hear it, she said, and then felt the hot sting as broken glass landed on top of her back and a shard stuck in her earlobe.
"It felt so hot, I thought I was shot," said Janice, who declined to give her last name. "I was just kissing the concrete."
Ursula HARRIS, who was standing nearby, watched as seconds later a man strode into the middle of Jameson Avenue and fired four more shots at Mr. JONES.
"I saw his arm moving with the gun and it went bang, bang, bang, bang," she said. "I said 'Oh my God, they're killing him.' "
Mr. JONES stopped, got off his bike and stumbled about 30 metres before collapsing face down in the gutter, blood pouring from his wounds. He died shortly after.
Two men fled the area on foot, running through the grounds of Parkdale Collegiate, an area that residents say is known to be frequented by drug dealers.
Mr. JONES, who lived with his aunt and was unemployed, was known to police but his killing is not believed to be gang-related. Homicide detectives are asking community members to come forward with any information.
A few hours after Mr. JONES was killed, a 17-year-old man was shot while in the area of Bathurst Street and Follis Avenue, close to the Grapefruit Moon diner.
The man was seen crawling into the middle of Bathurst Street around 12: 45 a.m. before he collapsed and ambulance workers arrived on the scene. Julie GALLUPE, who watched the aftermath of the incident from her window, said he was panicking, kicking his legs and shouting that he couldn't breathe.
He was in critical condition yesterday.
A man was arrested nearby in connection with the shooting but police did not release his name or the charges against him.
Greg MacKIE, a PhD student at the University of Toronto, said he saw the victim moments before he was hit.
"I saw this sketchy guy who seemed to be lurking in the alleyway," Mr. MacKIE said. "A car zoomed by, a late model hatchback, and that's when I heard the shot."
Mr. MacKIE said the area, which is surrounded by half-million-dollar homes and professional families, is plagued by suspicious behaviour.
Several residents said there is a crack house operating in the alley near where the shooting took place.
They said they have brought their complaints to the police but they have been unable to do anything to stop it.
"They asked me if they could use my deck to stake it out," said one woman, who asked that her name be withheld for safety reasons.
Two years ago, 17 shots were fired from an automatic weapon at the same corner. No one was hurt, but bullets ended up in the front room of at least one home.
"We all know that there is criminal activity going in and out of that alley all the time," the woman said. "The community is upset about it and we're not going to stand by and watch it happen."

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-13 published
Man shot dead defending boy
By Joe FRIESEN, Monday, June 13, 2005, Page A8
Her eyes brimming with tears, Brenda DONNELLY whispered a word of thanks to the man who died defending her son.
Standing near the spot where 33-year-old Duane (Trini) DAVID was shot to death early yesterday morning, she hugged the many Friends who came together last night to mourn him.
"He saved my son. It could have been him lying there," Ms. DONNELLY said. "The gun was in his face. He said, 'Mom, I saw the fire come out.'"
The shooting occurred in a laneway just off Danforth Avenue near Dawes Road around 1: 45 a.m. after Ms. DONNELLY's 16-year-old son ran to Mr. DAVID asking for help. He told Mr. DAVID he was being chased by two teens on bicycles who were threatening to rob him.
Mr. DAVID was a friend of Ms. DONNELLY's and a regular at the local bar who had a reputation for looking after the neighbourhood children. He approached the two teens and asked them to leave the area, speaking calmly and respectfully, witnesses: said.
The teens were angry, and asked Mr. DAVID why he was intervening on the boy's behalf, but they left soon after. Mr. DAVID then retreated into the alley to ask Ms. DONNELLY's son why he was being chased. Seconds later, the teens came riding down the alley toward them. One was holding a gun.
"It was like a ride-by shooting," said Sherry MURPHY, who was standing barely 10 metres away when the shots were fired.
She listened in disbelief at the sound of the first shot, and stood frozen as all those around her scattered at the sound of the second, third and fourth. She watched as the two teens rode past her into the night. She turned to Mr. DAVID as he extended an arm beneath him, trying to ease himself onto the pavement. He was wearing a white shirt, she said, and his blood was starting to seep through.
She rushed over to where he lay and cradled his head in her arms, wiping the sweat from his face as he slipped in and out of consciousness.
He had taken her to dinner that night, she said, and then to a movie. He had bought lunch for her children.
"I didn't even believe what was happening," she said. "He took two bullets, one in the chest, one in the stomach."
He was still responding to her when paramedics arrived, Ms. MURPHY said, but was pronounced dead on arrival at St. Michael's Hospital.
Police are looking for two people, one a shooter, the other a witness. The shooter is described as 19 years old, 5-foot-6, with short dark hair, and wearing a baseball cap, dark baggy jeans and a black satin jacket.
Ms. DONNELLY said that her son has been in bed all day, racked with fear. "He's a basket case today because he thinks that bullet was meant for him," she said. "He knew he could always rely on Trini."
"He went down the way he has always been his entire life, helping people."
Mr. DAVID was born in Trinidad and lived in Canada for 20 years. He had recently started a photography course at Ryerson University, and was hoping it would turn into a career. He talked of having children, but in the meantime he was a guardian for the many women who spent most evenings sitting with him at the wooden picnic bench in the corner outside Pataya Cafe and Restaurant.
Last night three red roses were placed near the spot where he drank and held court most every evenming.
Friends said he was a man who always tried to avoid violence, and who insisted on seeing a smile on everyone's face.
"He was the best man in East York," Nadine NARREA said. "He's going to be really missed by a lot of people. It just doesn't make any sense."
Ms. DONNELLY said she hopes teens in the neighbourhood will learn from this incident. That way, she said, Mr. DAVID will not have died in vain.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-14 published
Swim tragedy claims second child victim
Seven-year-old boy dies in hospital a day after his brother drowned
By Joe FRIESEN and Eric VANDEN BUSSCHE, Tuesday, June 14, 2005, Page A15
With reports from Jen GERSON and Ken KILPATRICK in Hamilton
Fergus -- Already reeling from the drowning of their nine-year-old boy, a Toronto family was faced with a mounting tragedy last night as their seven-year-old son died in a Toronto hospital.
Calvin LE had been in critical care at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto after a swimming accident that killed his brother Larry on Sunday.
The LE family spent the day shuttling between the Hospital for Sick Children and the McMaster Medical Centre in Hamilton, where a third son, eight-year-old Anthony, is being treated. Anthony's condition was upgraded to fair from serious yesterday.
The three children were involved in a horrifying incident at a beach in the Belwood Lake Conservation Area near Fergus on Sunday afternoon. The boys were swimming in the shallow water when someone noticed that Anthony was in trouble. He was pulled from the water and bystander Eddie RIVERA began to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The boy's mother was apparently in such shock that she momentarily forgot about her two other sons who had also slipped under the water.
After a frantic 10-minute search, the two boys were pulled from the bottom by Mr. RIVERA of Kitchener, who had just finished reviving Anthony using cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
Mr. RIVERA, 28, told the Guelph Mercury that he dove deep into the water and scooped the two boys from the lake bottom, carrying them to the surface.
"It was just cold and dark," he said yesterday. "I knew I was going to run into a face. I guess I was more or less scared."
The boys were swimming at a former quarry site that has been transformed into a bathing area. The designated swimming zone, which is about one metre deep, is roped off with a floating line of white buoys. Beyond that line, the bottom drops off sharply, reaching a depth of five metres in the centre.
There are no lifeguards on duty, nor is there any supervision. Large signs near the beach warn parents that the beach patrol service, which operated until 1996, has been discontinued and that the safety of their children is their responsibility.
Yesterday, the Grand River Conservation Authority, which is responsible for the area, said it would examine safety procedures at all of its beaches in the wake of this incident and another recent drowning near Cambridge, Ontario
Dave SCHULTZ, spokesman for the conservation authority, said the review would likely examine issues such as signage and emergency procedures and might consider the question of staffing.
He said the beach patrol was discontinued partly for financial reasons and partly because it was thought to provide parents with a false sense of security. Members of the beach patrol were not trained lifeguards but watched swimmers.
Mr. SCHULTZ said budget cuts that were accelerated under the government of Mike Harris reduced the conservation authority's funding by several million dollars. A 1996 report to the authority's planning committee recommended cutting the beach patrol service because it was being phased out in other areas of the province and because it would save about $50,000 a year.
At Sick Kids hospital yesterday, more than half a dozen family members, many fighting tears, crowded into a corner of the waiting room of the critical-care unit.
In Hamilton, Le LINH, an uncle from Guelph, was with the boys' parents as they sat at Anthony's bedside.
He said their mother is very upset, but added that he didn't know much more.
"They don't talk too much, so I don't know exactly what happened. I just know they've [the children] been drowned in the water," he said.
He added that he thinks Anthony's condition is improving.
"He's a little bit awake and then they are going to take the tube out," he said. "Once in a while, he is moving and trying to wake up, but he can hear."
At the boys' elementary school, St. Jane Frances Catholic School on Jane Street in North York, principal Maria CIOPPA said the community was shocked and saddened by the news.
Larry's Grade 4 teacher, Maria LA REGINA, said he was a creative child with a mischievous smile. He was so small he would often be confused for a Grade 1 pupil and was known for his funny dances.
Mary Jo DEIGHAN, a spokeswoman for the Catholic School Board, said counselling services will be provided at the school for the next several days.
"This shows how important it is to look after children," Ms. DEIGHAN said. "Never let them out of your sight, not even for a second."
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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-25 published
Boy found dead near Wasaga Beach
Suspected drowning victim believed by police to be missing six-year-old
By Joe FRIESEN, Monday, July 25, 2005, Page A11
Police discovered a body in the Nottawasaga River yesterday, a few hundred metres from the crowded beach where a six-year-old boy went missing Saturday during a family outing.
Constable Mark KINNEY of the Ontario Provincial Police said the body is believed to be that of Terry THANHTAIK of Toronto. The boy's parents were expected to formally identify the body last night before a postmortem is conducted.
The boy is believed to have drowned.
"There's nothing that we've found so far that would lead us to believe there's foul play, but we don't rule out anything until we're 100-per-cent sure," Constable KINNEY said.
Terry and his parents arrived at Wasaga Beach Provincial Park with a number of Friends and family for a day of sun and sand, as they often did in the summer. The beach was crowded, and Terry, who was an only child, was in and out of the water all day. His parents said they last saw him on the beach at about 3: 45 p.m. At 4 p.m., they called police to report him missing.
"He was on the beach, and the next thing, he was gone," Constable KINNEY said. "It wasn't like he was way out in the water."
There was an onshore breeze that day, and the waves were less than a metre high. Terry had taken some swimming lessons, Constable KINNEY said.
"The information we got was that he was taking swimming lessons, but I don't know to what extent."
There were no lifeguards on duty at the beach, which is about two hours north of Toronto and often filled with hundreds of people on summer weekends.
The body was found around 2: 30 p.m. yesterday by a searcher from the Ministry of Natural Resources, one of several agencies called in to assist with the search.
Constable KINNEY also said that 200 people dressed as soldiers for a battle re-enactment joined the search on Saturday, combing the town for clues. A water search went on through the night, with searchers feeling their way along the lake bottom in the dark.
This is the latest in a series of child drowning deaths in Ontario this summer.
Last month brothers Larry LE, 9, and Calvin LE, 7, drowned at Belwood Lake near Fergus, Ontario, in an incident that left a third brother in serious condition.
Also this summer, a 15-year-old drowned at a lake near Cambridge, Ontario; a 12-year-old died in a pool in Mississauga; and a six-year-old drowned at a beach in Huron County.
Figures released last week by the Canadian Institute for Health Information indicate that almost 500 Canadians drown every year, almost half of them young children. It is the second-leading cause of accidental death in children under the age of 5, behind automobile accidents.
On an average summer day in Ontario, seven people are treated in an emergency room for a water-related injury, the Canadian Institute for Health Information study said.
"For every child that drowned in 2002-2003, there were six to 10 more who almost drowned and required hospitalization," Margaret KERESTECI, manager of clinical registries at Canadian Institute for Health Information, said in a release last week.
"When you take into account that one in four children in Ontario who experience near drowning sustains permanent brain damage, you start to get an idea of how vital it is to make water safety a priority."
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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-29 published
son charged in death of mother
By Joe FRIESEN, Friday, July 29, 2005, Page A12
A man has been charged with manslaughter after his mother died in what police describe as a shocking case of abuse and neglect.
Mary NOSEWORTHY, 78, was found dead two weeks ago by her 54-year-old son, Donald, at the home they shared in Scarborough. There were obvious signs of abuse on her body, Detective Joel KULMATYCKI said.
"There were bruises on her body as a result of assaults," he said yesterday. "She hadn't bathed in, I would hazard a guess, a number of weeks.... Her bedroom and the area where she lived in that house weren't fit for anyone to live in."
Det. KULMATYCKI said it was the accused who asked for police to be called in.
An autopsy showed that Ms. NOSEWORTHY died of congestive heart failure.
"The primary cause of death was heart failure, and the secondary cause of death, which contributed directly to the primary, was elder abuse and neglect," Det. KULMATYCKI said. "She wasn't properly cared for.
He added that Mr. NOSEWORTHY told police his mother suffered from dementia, although she hadn't seen a doctor.
"It's almost like child abuse where the baby is crying and the parent gets so frustrated that they strike out," he said.
Rod MacDONALD, who lives next door to the NOSEWORTHY home on Westcroft Drive, said he hadn't seen Ms. NOSEWORTHY for the two months before she died. Normally she liked to walk to the local store every day to buy groceries, he said, but his wife had noticed her condition deteriorating over the winter.
Mr. MacDONALD said it was difficult to talk to his elderly neighbour. She was almost completely deaf, he said, and would often repeat stories.
"You kind of didn't like to walk away from her, but then she'd come up and start repeating these stories, things from way back in the past," Mr. MacDONALD said.
"Her husband was an elevator installer and he used to go all over Canada, and she used to talk about being alone a lot of the time and bringing up Donald.
"She'd talk about bringing Donald along on trips to Newfoundland or British Columbia to see his father because he'd been away for four or five weeks installing elevators. And the next week she'd have the same story again."
Mr. MacDONALD said Mr. NOSEWORTHY took his mother to see her husband's grave in Pickering every Sunday, but otherwise wasn't around much.
He, too, worked in the elevator business, starting his day at 5: 30 a.m. and staying out late.
Unlike his father, however, Mr. NOSEWORTHY made no effort to cut the lawn or clear the driveway, the neighbour said. Even though he owned a snow blower, he allowed his mother to shovel the driveway all winter.
Mr. MacDONALD said he could tell that Ms. NOSEWORTHY was sometimes afraid of her son, and recalled an incident two years ago when she locked herself out of the house and walked next door for help.
"She was saying Donald's going to be mad," he said.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-20 published
Body found near diner identified, police say
By Joe FRIESEN, Saturday, August 20, 2005, Page A14
Police have identified Sri Showbi PARAN, 36, as the city's latest homicide victim.
Mr. PARAN's body was found just before 6 a.m. Thursday by a man walking near a diner at 1570 Midland Ave. in Scarborough. Mr. PARAN is believed to have eaten at the diner before his death. A cause of death has not yet been determined but there were obvious signs of trauma on the body when it was discovered.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-17 published
Oakville man dies at race finish line
By Joe FRIESEN, Monday, October 17, 2005, Page A10
A 36-year-old Oakville man died after running a half-marathon yesterday.
The man collapsed after crossing the Toronto Marathon finish line at Queen's Park. He was treated by paramedics and taken to Mount Sinai Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.
"He made it right to the end, crossed the finish line and collapsed," police Staff Sergeant John BOYCE said.
The man's family requested that his name not be made public.
Marathon organizers said the man collapsed between 10: 30 a.m. and 11 a.m. after completing the course. Race director Jay GLASSMAN said medical staff were on the scene and treated the man immediately.
"They basically caught him as he collapsed," Mr. GLASSMAN said. "We responded within seconds, and the team did what they could." Mr. GLASSMAN said the man arrived at Mount Sinai within 20 minutes.
It is the second time in as many years that a man has died during the race. Last year, Scott LABRON, 42, of Guelph, Ontario, died while running the half-marathon.
"When stuff like this happens, it's hard." Mr. GLASSMAN said. "It's still statistically very rare that someone will die at an event like this, but it's happened at every major marathon.... There's really nothing you can do about it."
He added that organizers trust that participants are fit and have been training in preparation for the race.
More than 1,600 people completed the full marathon yesterday and 3,758 finished the half-marathon.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-18 published
Pair's death in car deepens distress at school
Students already split over sex-assault, harassment charges against 16 youths
By Unnati GANDHI and Joe FRIESEN, Friday, November 18, 2005, Page A13
A school stunned by the arrest of 16 young people on charges of sexual assault and harassment was rocked again yesterday by the death of one of its students.
Police found the bodies of 17-year-old Anna ZARNOCH, a Grade 12 student at James Cardinal McGuigan Catholic High School, and William RODRIGUEZ, 22, just after 6 a.m., yesterday in Mr. RODRIGUEZ's garage in the city's west end.
Police called the deaths accidental, saying the two probably died of carbon-monoxide inhalation after the old Cadillac they were sitting in had been running for hours overnight with the heater on and the garage door closed.
A police spokeswoman said Ms. ZARNOCH's death is not related to the criminal investigation at the school.
"She went to the school, but she was in no way connected to the sexual-harassment case," Constable Wendy DRUMMOND said, adding that Ms. ZARNOCH was not a witness in the case. "At this point, we're ruling it an accidental death from carbon-monoxide poisoning,"
The teen's death plunged a divided school further into disarray. Many senior students, some of them facing charges, are waiting for the court case to begin as well as mourning a classmate's death. For a school with slightly more than 600 students from Grades 9 through 12, the effect will likely be significant.
On Monday, 14 students were taken from their classes, arrested and handcuffed. They joined two others accused in a case that has sent shockwaves throughout the city. Police allege that a 16-year-old student was sexually assaulted and harassed both inside and outside the high school for more than a year. In one incident, police say, the girl was dragged from a school hallway and assaulted in a stairwell before being taken to a bathroom and assaulted again.
Staff convened an emergency meeting with students, parents and police Wednesday night to discuss the impact of the alleged assaults and the arrests of the 16 students. The event apparently did little to calm frayed nerves.
Some parents said they were considering removing their children from the school, while others said their children were afraid to return. A few students said they were ashamed to wear their school uniforms in public.
Many students are upset with the way the case was handled.
They say their classmates shouldn't have been arrested at school.
They have accused police and school officials of racism and of being heavy-handed in dealing with the accused, all of whom are black. Some have stayed away from school since they attended a bail hearing for their jailed Friends on Tuesday.
Ms. ZARNOCH lived in a high-rise building just south of the school near Keele and Finch Avenues.
Mr. RODRIGUEZ, who was her boyfriend, according to family members, lived in the Lansdowne house near St. Clair Avenue with his mother, sister and brother-in-law.
The brother-in-law, Al BARBOZA, said at the home yesterday that the pair had gone into the garage about 7: 30 p.m. on Wednesday. Mr. RODRIGUEZ's mother checked on them at about 1 a.m. and thought they were asleep.
"They stayed in the car the whole night," Mr. BARBOZA said. "I can't believe they were out there sleeping, it's so cold."
When the mother found them without any vital signs at about 6 a.m., she called police.
Mr. BARBOZA said he didn't know Ms. ZARNOCH very well, but knew that she had been reported missing by her family on Wednesday.
"Whenever he gets a girlfriend, I don't know what he does. He brings them over here all the time."
While Mr. BARBOZA said that the Cadillac parked in the garage rarely gets driven, upstairs tenant Anabela ALMEIDA said that she had seen Ms. ZARNOCH several times before and knew that Mr. RODRIGUEZ often went to listen to the radio in the car.
"The girl stays at the house sometimes," said Ms. ALMEIDA, who had been living on the second floor of the two-storey home for the past seven months.
The bodies have been taken to the coroner's office for autopsies scheduled for today.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-28 published
Charles Clarence "Clare" LAKING, Veteran (1899-2005)
Canadian veteran of First World War learned hard work on the front lines
By Joe FRIESEN and David PYETTE, Monday, November 28, 2005, Page S11
Clare LAKING, a farm boy from Campbellville, Ontario, who never finished high school, volunteered for the Great War to spite his father and narrowly avoided being killed on his first trip to the front.
The first shell he saw landed 45 metres away. He started wondering what he had gotten himself into. A second shell came so close that he dropped to the ground in terror. Before he could get up, a third shell landed right in his trench, showering him with dirt and debris.
Mr. LAKING survived his first brush with death, and lived through many more in his two years as a signalman who repaired communication lines at the front.
Mr. LAKING died Saturday at the age of 106. There are now only four Canadian veterans of the First World War still living.
Charles Clarence LAKING, named for his father Charles, but known as Clare, was born on February 21, 1899, on a farm in Southern Ontario. He attended a one-room school five kilometres from his home, and grew up playing hockey on the flooded, frozen fields near the school.
In an interview a few years before his death, Mr. LAKING, who was always a keen joker despite his strict Methodist upbringing, remembered walking to school with his older brother Bob in a particularly harsh snowstorm. When they arrived, they were the only ones there.
"The storm was too severe for everybody else. We had our lunch with us, we were cold and hungry and we didn't want to start back home right away. So we filed the padlock off the door, went out to the woodshed, and got the fire going. We spent most of the day catching mice and putting them in the girls' pencil boxes. Most of the mice smothered before the next morning, but it was still quite a surprise for the girls."
After he finished elementary school, Mr. LAKING commuted by train to a business college in Hamilton for six months. At 16, he took a job in Campbellville with the Bank of Nova Scotia that paid $300 a year.
Two years later, in 1917, he hitched a ride to Guelph and joined the army.
"I went against my father's wishes. He was dead against war, and he was getting under my skin," Mr. LAKING said. "And it was in order -- as much as anything -- to shut him up that I enlisted.
"He as much as told me at the time that, 'If you enlist I'm through with you.' It was a hard decision. Nevertheless, I carried through and enlisted. And when I came back, everything was fine. Everything was forgiven."
Mr. LAKING was sent to England, where he trained as a Morse code operator before being sent to the front.
"In fact I could have had a nice soft job in England for the balance of the war, because they knew I had worked for a bank, and I was in the orderly room for a couple of months there. But I thought: 'I have come this far, let's go on.' "
The next two years were filled with adventure and sorrow, as many of the young Canadians he served with died in battle. But the best feeling came at war's end, as he travelled through liberated villages, and people lined the roads to wave and cheer.
He came home to Canada intending to move to Alberta, but ended up working in lumber yards. It was in the late 1920s that he began courting a legal secretary named Helen PATTERSON.
One night he was on his way to Helen's parents' house for a Saturday supper. He was wearing his best fedora, navy blue overcoat and white silk scarf.
"In those days they had iced toboggan slides in Riverdale Park. I met some boys there who persuaded me to come for a ride on the toboggan. At the bottom of the toboggan slide the light standards were surrounded by manure piles to guard against any accident.
"The toboggan headed right for the manure pile. I was lying on the bottom of the toboggan with the rest of the guys on top of me, so I couldn't get off. I rolled into the manure pile wearing my Sunday best. Then I had to visit Helen's parents."
Nevertheless, they were married in 1929, just before the stock market crash, and a year later their son Keith was born, followed by their daughter Sheila six years later.
In 1941, Mr. LAKING bought his own business, Danforth Wallboard, in Toronto's East End, and kept it for close to 25 years before selling in 1965.
Throughout his life he was an avid fan of the Toronto Maple Leafs and held season tickets until the age of 100. He was to have been honoured at a ceremony at the Air Canada Centre this month, but couldn't attend due to his failing health.
He was also an avid curler, who once scored an rare eight-ender, a feat of perfection when all eight of the team's rocks are closer to the centre circle than any of the opposition's.
"It's a once-in-a-lifetime feat, if you're lucky," he once said.
After retirement, he and Helen travelled the world together and spent time with their grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Helen died in 1993, and Mr. LAKING moved into the veterans residence at Sunnybrook hospital in 2003. He was in good health until a few weeks before his death, and kept a driver's licence until the age of 102.
The four remaining Canadian veterans of the First World War are Lloyd CLEMETT, 105, who is also at Sunnybrook; John BABCOCK, 105, who lives in Spokane, Washington.; William PROCTOR, 106, now residing in Salmon Arm, British Columbia; and Dwight WILSON, 104, a resident of Oshawa, Ontario

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-22 published
WARKENTIN, Dr. David E. (1930-2005)
Born Hepburn, Saskatchewan, October, 17, 1930 and passed away at Bracebridge on January 14, 2005. Beloved husband for 54 years of Eunice. Dear father of Sandra and her husband Paul WHITE/WHYTE, David and his wife Elizabeth, Brent and his wife Rebecca, Brian and his wife Sharlene. Predeceased by son Bruce. Loving grandfather of Christopher, Calvin and Sarah, Kristin, David, Melissa and Christina. Dear brother of Bill and Carol, Viola (Toots) and Alfred (Lou) FRIESEN, Don and Irene, Bob and Erna, Bert and Helen, Ed and Irene. He will be remembered by many patients from his 40 years of medical practice at Agincourt Clinic, Agincourt, Ontario. A memorial service was held Monday, January 17, 2005 at Faith Baptist Church, Huntsville, Ontario with Pastor Darrell BAKER officiating.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-23 published
LUNDY, Joseph Richard
(Retired Bell Canada)
It is with deep sorrow we announce the passing of our dearly loved Joe. Peacefully in faith and surrounded by his loving family at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie, on Monday, February 21, 2005. Joe LUNDY of Barrie was the beloved husband of 45 years to Jeannette. Dearest father to Lisa (Joe) CARTAGINESE, Deanna (Bruce) MARTIN, and Christopher LUNDY (friend Pamela HENDERSON) all of Barrie. He was the perfect Papa to his dearly loved grandchildren Amanda and Natalie CARTAGINESE, Justin and Jordan MARTIN, Taylor and Kailyn LUNDY and step-grand_son Kyle MARTIN. Predeceased by his infant daughters Maria, Theresa and Josephine, and his parents Richard and Madeline LUNDY. He will be deeply missed by his brothers Michael (Carol) LUNDY of Ottawa, Jim (Jane) LUNDY of Markham, and his sister Mary (William) WALKER of Markham and their families. Remembered with love by his mother-in-law Mary SOKIL (late Harry SOKIL,) brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law Mike and Dianne and nephew Shane McBRIDE, Betty EATON and family, and Lorraine LUNDY. Also survived by his extended family Margaret TAILOR/TAYLOR and family of Patna, Scotland, as well as many close and dear Friends. Joe was born in Toronto, Ontario, on April 11th, 1936. He joined Bell Canada in 1954 and worked in Northern Ontario for many years before he and his family moved to Orangeville and then Barrie in 1967. He was a member of the Bell Canada Pioneers and the Barrie Historical Society. After retiring in 1990, he and Jeannette travelled extensively, something they enjoyed very much. He also enjoyed hunting, fishing and working at his small engine repair business, and foremost spending time with the apples of his eye his grandchildren. Friends may call at the Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Home (201 Minet's Point Road at Yonge Street), Barrie, on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held from Saint Mary's Church, Barrie, on Friday, February 25th, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. with Father Frank McDEVITT celebrating. Cremation. Inurnment to follow with his parents in Mount Hope Cemetery, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations to the R.V.H. Regional Cancer Care Centre would be appreciated by the family. We would like to express our gratitude for the wonderful care from the Nurses at R.V.H. 3 North B. Palliative Care and Doctors KHONSARI, PRESNELL, D. PATTERSON, and Rick IRVIN as well as Dr. A. LOBLAW, and his assistant Grace CHAN of Sunnybrook Cancer Clinic. A special thanks to our family Dr. N. FRIESEN, whose care, understanding, and support to Joe and family will always be remembered.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-11 published
FRIESEN, Emily (ne TRUSZINSKI)
Peacefully on Tuesday, August 9, 2005 at the age of 84. Beloved former wife and friend of Henry FRIESEN. Loving sister to Alma BARTELS of Germany. Cherished aunt of Stefanie (Brad) ORAMA and Hans KRUEGER. Emily will be greatly missed by many other family members and Friends who are too numerous to mention. Friends may visit at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Ave. East, Agincourt (east of Kennedy Rd.), Thursday from 6-8 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel Friday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Erskine Cemetery. In memoriam donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated by her family.

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FRIESEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-26 published
SMITH, John Wesley " Rusty"
With deep sadness the family announces the death of John Wesley "Rusty" SMITH. Born in Noranda, Quebec on April 20, 1930, Rusty grew up in Kirkland Lake and Haileybury, Ontario. A graduate of the Haileybury School of Mines, he was initially employed by the Ontario Department of Mines. He subsequently found his niche in the metallurgical field where he worked as Mill Manager with New Jason Mines (Ont.), Mackeno Mines (Yukon), and Jardun Mines (Ont.). Rusty then accepted a position with New York and Honduras Rosario Mining Co., leaving Canada to spend the following eight years in the Republic of Honduras followed by three years in New York City. Yearning for his homeland, Rusty returned to Canada in 1968, accepting a position as Mill Manager with Bethlehem Copper Mine. He resided with his family in Ashcroft, British Columbia During the spring of that year, Rusty bought a property on beautiful Horsefly Lake, British Columbia. Clearing the land, erecting a cottage, and enthusiastically embracing the attributes of life in the country he was able to pursue his love of working with wood, building and "fixing". Always innovative and hard-working, he could keep almost anything "running". Rusty continued as Mill Manager at Bethlehem Copper which was eventually taken over by Cominco and subsequently amalgamated by Lornex Mines to become Highland Valley Copper. In 1986 he retired and moved into into his newly built log home on the lake. Here, he was finally able to slow down to leisurely pursue hobbies and to enjoy the fruits of his labour and the company of his beloved pets. Rusty bore his illness with courage. The long journey ended on October 10, 2005 at the Cariboo Memorial Hospital in Williams Lake, British Columbia. His body rests at Mountain View Cemetery in Horsefly, British Columbia. A beloved husband and father, he is survived by his wife of 53 years, Diana (CREEDON,) daughters Maggie (PIGGIN,) Erin (Kevin FRIESEN) and grand_son Noah, and by son Sean and grandchildren Kiara, Joshua and James, by sisters Jean (ARMSTRONG,) Mary (Manuell) and Betty (Soth). He was predeceased by brothers Burney and Roy and by his parents Muriel Reany and John Wesley SMITH. Rusty will be remembered for his easygoing nature, quick sense of humour, breadth and depth of knowledge on a wide variety of subjects, uncanny skill at problem solving and willingness to help others. The family wish to extend their heartfelt gratitude to the relatives and Friends who helped and supported them in so many ways.

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