DIEBEL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-01-07 published
ASHLEY, Fred
Peacefully, with his family at his side on Tuesday, January 4th, 2005 at the Temiskaming Hospital. Fred ASHLEY of Owen Sound in his 61st year. Beloved father of Lisa and her husband Mike SMITH and granddaughter Hannah SMITH of Cobalt and Paul ASHLEY of Kitchener. son of Val ASHLEY- DIEBEL of Owen Sound and the late James ASHLEY. Also survived by two brothers Dwayne and his wife Mary of Owen Sound and Stephen and his wife Heather of Chatsworth. Sadly missed by his nieces and nephews. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home, for visiting on Saturday from 12 Noon until service time. The funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Pastor Charla CHILVER officiating. Interment, Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Memorial donations to the Kidney Foundation would be appreciated.
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DIEBEL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-04-22 published
ASHLEY- DIEBEL, Valera Pearl
Peacefully, with her family at her side at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Wednesday, April 20, 2005. Val ASHLEY- DIEBEL of Owen Sound and formerly of Tara in her 85th year. Wife of the late Nelson DIEBEL and the late James ASHLEY. Dear mother of Dwayne ASHLEY and his wife Mary of Owen Sound and Stephen ASHLEY and his wife Heather of Chatsworth and step-mother of Paul DIEBEL and his wife Leone, Dale DIEBEL and his wife Donna, Wanita and her husband Russel HALLIDAY and Wanda and her husband Alvin McCURDY. Sadly missed by eight grandchildren Paul, Lisa, Sarah, Kyle, Natasha, Vanessa, Drew and Trent, eight step-grandchildren, one great grandchild Hanna and three step great grandchildren. Also survived by a brother Ray GALBRAITH and three sisters Grace, Mae and Norma Jean. Predeceased by a son Fred ASHLEY (2005,) one sister and seven brothers. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home for visiting on Friday evening from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday morning at 11 o'clock. Interment, Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Memorial donations to the G.B.R.H.C. Foundation M.R.I. Campaign or the Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated. Messages of condolence are welcome at www.tannahill.com
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DIEBEL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-12-08 published
DIEBEL, Donna Isabel (PALMER)
Peacefully at the Lion's head Hospital on Tuesday December 6th, 2005. Donna (PALMER) DIEBEL of Barrow Bay in her 66th year. Beloved wife of Dale DIEBEL. Dear mother of Allan and his wife Lise of Caledonia and David of Owen Sound. Special grandmother of Alec and Owen. Sister of Lois (Grant) McRAE of Rockwood, Phyllis (Jim) MOSS of Red Bay, Bill (Linda) of Elmira and Gail (Wayne) MORRISON of Allenford. Sister-in-law of Paul (Leone) DIEBEL of Dresden, Wanita (Russell) HALLIDAY of Chesley and Wanda (Alvin) McCURDY of Kitchener. The family will receive Friends at the Davidson Chapel, 71 Main Street, Lion's head on Friday from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted from the Bethel Missionary Church, 18 Ferndale Road, Lion's head on Saturday December 10th at 2: 00 p.m. with Reverend Audrey BROWN officiating. Spring interment, Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Donations to the Lion's head Hospital Building Fund or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

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DIEBEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-27 published
Two versions of a murder victim
DARING 'a wonderful, wonderful guy'
Not 'completely upstanding,' police say
By Linda DIEBEL and Isabel TEOTONIO, Staff Reporters, With files from Vanessa LU, Page A1
There are two versions of Delroy George DARING, the father of 10 shot dead in the courtyard of a Scarborough housing complex Thursday night, and one is not so pretty.
The first, from people who knew him, is that he was a good man who pulled a troubled life together to organize "No drugs, No violence" summer barbecues for low-income kids. The group called itself the "out-of-pocket club" because nobody would help them raise money.
There are variations on this version, including the rumour that DARING was a paid police informant in the last months of his life.
Toronto police detectives, while denying the informant story, have a different take on the unemployed furniture mover who emigrated from Kingston, Jamaica, 20 years ago and had convictions for drug possession and trafficking dating back to 1986.
"I have reason to believe that the idea he was, say, a completely upstanding person promoting non-violence, non-drugs and non-guns is not fair," said Det. John BIGGERSTAFF, at the crime scene yesterday. "The activities which brought him to this courtyard are inconsistent with someone promoting (such ideals)."
Added his partner, Det. Greg GROVES: "I have no doubt that this man was the target of this murder."
Whichever version turns out to be true, there is one indisputable fact: he was gunned down in front of 20 to 30 people, many of them children, who later couldn't sleep through the night and are more terrified than ever of living in an increasingly violent part of the city.
"A little girl said to me today, 'Did you see what happened? I did. I saw it,'" said one woman yesterday. "Now that's not right. No child should have that memory."
Residents at 3181 Eglinton, where DARING was shot, didn't want to give their names. People are angry about more than the murder. They say their complaints about their living conditions and violence are ignored.
Yesterday, the building's stairways were littered with burnt newspapers and garbage. They smelled of urine and, in the hallways, light fixtures dangled and carpets were stained with cigarette butts. Locks on the building's doors were broken and mice and roaches scurried about.
Out front, young men milled about the entrance, smoking, listening to music and watching passersby.
"Look, nobody cares until somebody is shot dead, not the police, not the media," said one man, 22. "We never talk to them and it's not about people being scared to talk. It's that when they do, nothing ever happens so why open your mouth."
Before walking away, another man muttered, "Nobody interviewed Delroy when he was trying to do something. Not even the other ghettos cared a f -- -."
These men said DARING was trying to make a difference, especially for the kids. He organized barbecues, which began four years ago and which offered kids a day of bliss with "bouncey-houses" for them to play, along with raffles, soccer and dance contests.
"He was living proof that someone could turn their life around, that somebody could make a change and be a role model," said one man.
A few weeks ago, on August 7, the late-night good mood of a barbecue was shattered when a man was shot in the neck near the Hasty Market across the street. The man survived and nobody has been charged.
Police couldn't confirm reports he was found with 10 bags of marijuana
BIGGERSTAFF said he believes there may have been a connection between DARING's murder and the Hasty Market shooting.
"I'm a believer that things aren't a mere coincidence," he said.
While the autopsy won't be conducted until today, police said that DARING was shot "at least once" in the chest and was pronounced dead an hour later at Sunnybrook hospital.
BIGGERSTAFF said police canvassed the apartment buildings Thursday night after the murder, which occurred around 7 p.m., but were unable to secure eyewitness accounts from anyone in the courtyard.
BIGGERSTAFF said there was concern yesterday at police headquarters, beginning with Chief Bill Blair, about initial reports of the murder describing DARING in glowing terms as a community organizer who was an innocent victim of crime.
"Whether I like it or not, (that version) has gotten some attention," he said, adding that his worry is that Torontonians feel unsafe because they think "a person promoted as a fine, upstanding citizen is killed in broad daylight."
That version, he said, may not be true.
It could be, he explained, that "he was a bad person in a bad position and it had nothing to do with safety in any public area."
Asked if DARING was a drug dealer, the detective said he didn't know.
One young man who worked with DARING to organize the barbecues for children said he was frustrated with the insinuation that DARING was still involved in illegal activities. "They'll say the typical thing, it's what you say in every 'hood: 'He was a drug dealer, he was moving into someone's 'hood.' There's no (hard) drug activity here. If you were a drug dealer selling crack cocaine you'd go broke here."
Rumours are swirling about DARING's murder. Last night Global television reported he was found with 10 dime-sized bags of marijuana, but police couldn't confirm the report.
But at 3181 Eglinton, people didn't want to talk about that. They just wanted to remember the George DARING they knew. For years he lived in their building before moving out about a decade ago.
"He was a wonderful, wonderful guy and he was like a brother to me," said one young man.
In the courtyard where DARING died, a woman looked at the bloodstain on the ground and said: "He didn't represent 'hood life, but he died representing the worst part of it."
He had 10 children with at least three different mothers and apparently looked after all his kids. At the time of his death he lived with his two youngest and his mother in Pickering.
"He was a ladies' man," said one woman. "He liked to take care of business."
Last night, after police removed the yellow tape from the crime scene, two little teddy bears marked the spot where DARING died in the courtyard. And a single bunch of artificial red roses.
How 2 letter Surnames like LU work in OGSPI

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DIECHERT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-29 published
CALDWELL, Gordon
Peacefully surrounded by his family at London Health Sciences Centre-University Campus, on Friday, August 26, 2005 Mr. Gordon CALDWELL of London in his 59th year. Loving father of Chris and Adam WILSON, and Craig and Corinn CALDWELL, all of Clinton. Grandfather of Paige, Ali and Garrett WILSON and Kennedy CALDWELL. Dear brother of Alice and Fred DIECHERT and Ken and Marg CALDWELL of Clinton. Brother-in-law of Joan CALDWELL of Bayfield. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his brother Robert CALDWELL, and by his parents William and Margaret CALDWELL. Friends will be received at the Falconer Funeral Homes, 153 High Street, Clinton, on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 from 1 p.m. until time of the funeral service at 2 p.m. Interment Bairds Cemetery, Stanley Township. As expressions of sympathy memorial donations to the London Regional Cancer Centre would be greatly appreciated.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-08 published
ATS founder WOERNER dies at 65
By Simon AVERY, Technology Reporter, Tuesday, February 8, 2005 - Page B7
Klaus WOERNER, the founder, chief executive officer and president of ATS Automation Tooling Systems Inc., has died of cancer at age 65, the company said.
Mr. WOERNER was one of the country's most successful immigrant entrepreneurs. He trained as a clock maker and tool maker in Germany before moving to Canada in 1960. Initially, he intended to work on the Avro Arrow. Then prime minister John DIEFENBAKER cancelled the fighter plane project before the 20-year-old could get his hands on it.
Instead, Mr. WOERNER took jobs in Montreal, while he worked to complete his Canadian high-school diploma and as he began evening engineering courses. After several years, he moved to Toronto.
He founded ATS in 1978 as a tool and die manufacturer, taking out a second mortgage on his home and investing $70,000. After the company landed several large contracts, Mr. WOERNER steered it into the then-nascent area of robotics. Today, ATS designs and produces automated manufacturing and test systems for big companies in the automotive, electronics, medical and consumer products industries. The Cambridge, Ontario, firm employs about 4,000 people and posted annual sales of $665-million in 2004.
Shares of ATA fell 27 cents to close at $12.15 yesterday on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-11 published
O'SULLIVAN, Reverend Sean, 1989 -- Died This Day
Friday, March 11, 2005 Page S7
Politician, priest, writer and publisher born in Hamilton, Ontario, in 1952.
After growing up in East Hamilton and then attending Brock University, he decided to try his hand at politics. At 20, he became Canada's youngest member of Parliament and was made a special assistant to prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, his boyhood hero. A right-wing Tory, he helped assemble a group of ultra-conservative zealots known as "The Shysters." In Contenders, a 1983 bestselling book by Patrick Martin, Allan Gregg and George Perlin, The Shysters were said to favour rituals that "included an oath-burning ceremony and the kissing of a sacred ring. Lacking any suitable Canadian political heroes, they admired the work of Richard Nixon, and the ideas of Barry Goldwater." In 1977, after representing Hamilton-Wentworth for five years, he decided to become a priest and was ordained in 1981. Two years later, he was diagnosed with leukemia but pressed ahead with a controversial priest recruitment campaign. He later became publisher of the Catholic Register and wrote a book titled Both My Houses.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-26 published
Royce FRITH, Lawyer, Politician, Diplomat 1923-2005
As canny as he was charming, he never seriously ran for office and instead horse-traded his way into the Senate before being sent to London as High Commissioner, writes Sandra MARTIN. An enthusiastic amateur thespian, he above all relished the drama of the 1995 turbot wars against Spanish fishermen
Saturday, March 26, 2005, Page S9
Tall, patrician, and impeccably dressed, Royce FRITH was a natural communicator who moved through life with charm and grace. A lawyer by training, a Liberal by avocation, and a performer by instinct, he had the potential to be either chief justice of the Supreme Court or prime minister. That he was neither was a mystery to many, but the most likely explanation was fourfold: He was intensely private; his many talents, which included acting and singing, tempted him to enjoy life in the broadest sense; he needed to make a living; and, although he relished influence, he wasn't hungry enough to seek real power.
Mr. FRITH suffered two great tragedies in his life -- the breakdown of his marriage followed by his estranged wife's premature death in 1976, and the death four years later of his son Greg from malignant melanoma at age 25 -- but he kept his anguish to himself and never really spoke about these losses even with his closest Friends. He maintained the same strict privacy in the last few years about his own struggle with cancer. Even many of his closest Friends did not know the extent of his illness.
He served his country as a member of the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism, as a Senator during the Trudeau and Mulroney eras, and perhaps most famously as the High Commissioner to England and Northern Ireland who saved Canada House and who rallied British fishermen to the Canadian cause during the "turbot war" with the Spanish in the mid-1990s.
Earlier this week, senators from all sides of the Upper Chamber rose to pay tribute to Mr. FRITH. Liberal Joyce FAIRBURN noted that he had "cut a swath through this place with a potent mix of intellect, talent, humour, stubbornness, skill and commitment that challenged the rest of us to think and act well beyond the boundaries of this chamber." Conservative Lowell MURRAY, who had often "crossed swords" with Mr. FRITH, especially during the 1990 G.S.T. filibuster, praised him as "a model of bilingualism," and an "enjoyable, engaging and interesting companion and a great raconteur." Long-time political strategist Dorothy DAVEY, speaking on behalf of herself and her husband, former Senator Keith DAVEY, said, "he brought intelligence and élan to every position he held and joy and warmth to every Friendship he graced and every room he entered,"
Royce Herbert FRITH was born in Lachine, Quebec, the only son of George Harry FIRTH and Annie Beatrice ROYCE. He was educated at Lachine High School and transferred to Parkdale Collegiate after the family moved to Toronto in the mid-1930s. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1946 and Osgoode Hall in 1949 and then did a Diplôme d' études supérieures (droit) at the University of Ottawa. By then, he had married Elizabeth DAVISON, a professional singer whom he had met through The Toronto Mendelssohn Choir.
Back in Toronto, the FRITHs lived in Leaside and Mr. FRITH practised law on his own for nearly two years before joining two colleagues to form the firm of Magwood, Frith and Pocock. He made his political affiliation to the Liberal party early, serving as national treasurer of the Young Liberal Association in 1949. He got involved in local politics by sitting on Leaside town council in 1951 and 1952 and serving as reeve in 1953. He won the nomination as the provincial Liberal candidate for York East in 1955, but lost by more than 7,000 votes to Hollis BECKETT, the Conservative candidate.
He never ran for public office again. Former Senator John NICHOL thinks of Mr. FRITH as a Renaissance man. He speculates that he didn't actively pursue a career in elected politics because "his interests were so broad, in the arts and music, that I don't think he wanted to limit himself to the treadmill existence of an member of Parliament, or worse, a cabinet minister."
Instead he became a strategist and an organizer, becoming president of the Ontario Liberal Association in 1960, a position he held until 1962. By then, he was one of the key members of Cell 13, a group organized by Keith DAVEY, then national director of the Liberal Party, to build up electoral support for Lester PEARSON and his brand of reform liberalism throughout the country after the party's disastrous showings in the 1957 and 1958 federal elections. One of Cell 13's key activities, as described by Christina McCall-Newman in her book Grits, was "travelling show-and tell demonstrations of canvassing, speaking, and advertising methods" for novice candidates, collected under the rubric of the School of Practical Politics. Mr. FRITH, was a key trainer in these "campaign colleges."
Before the 1963 election that gave Mr. PEARSON his first minority government, the perfectly bilingual Mr. FRITH was a practising lawyer, the host of a television program called Telepoll on the newly formed CTV network, and an applicant before the Board of Broadcast Governors for a licence to establish a private radio station in Windsor, close to the border with the United States.
He got the licence, much to the annoyance of Windsor member of Parliament Paul MARTIN, who thought it should go to a local, and four months later relinquished it in favour of his silent partner, media czar Geoffrey STIRLING.
Mr. DAVEY was not pleased at these public rufflings of Liberal party solidarity, which provided John DIEFENBAKER with fuel for his scathing wit. In his 1986 book, The Rainmaker, he wrote: "Though never quite a dilettante, Royce was not prepared to commit totally to anything, least of all a political career." He went on to say that he regarded Mr. FRITH as "a squandered political resource" who might even have been prime minister. "Too often, however, he slid by on his remarkable personality."
Mr. PEARSON did not share that view. One of his first acts as Prime Minister was to establish the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism, with Mr. FRITH as one of ten commissioners. He served the Commission faithfully and well, saying at one point in the hearings that: "If one section of the country sees it as consisting of a majority and a minority while the other sees it as an equal partnership, this does not provide a fertile ground for the exchange of culture. Until we can find ways to change these attitudes, the present conflict will continue."
Earlier this week, Keith SPICER, who was appointed Canada's first Commissioner of Official Languages by Pierre TRUDEAU in 1970, paid tribute to Mr. FRITH who served as his legal adviser. "Royce's advice, in those days when language was still a minefield of anger, misunderstanding and prejudice, was fundamental to the success of the Official Languages Act."
As canny as he was charming, Mr. FRITH struck himself an advantageous deal when the Liberals wanted him to be Ontario campaign manager in the late 1970s. Perhaps Mr. FRITH knew how hard it would be to deliver Ontario to the Liberals in the wake of Mr. TRUDEAU's imposition of the War Measures Act and wage and price controls. He was willing to give up his lucrative law practice to serve the party but he asked for, and received, an appointment to the Senate in 1977. He then took on running the Ontario campaign in the 1979 election, the election that saw Mr. TRUDEAU trounced by Joe CLARK's Progressive Conservatives.
In the Senate, Mr. FRITH was an active and gifted debater and served as deputy leader of the government from 1980 to 1984, deputy leader of the Opposition from 1984 to 1991 and leader of the Opposition from 1991. Working in Ottawa gave him the opportunity to spend more time in nearby Perth, his mother's ancestral home in the Ottawa Valley, and to indulge his passion for amateur theatricals, including playing Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady. "Quite frankly," said Senator David SMITH, "he was better looking than Rex Harrison and he had a real polish and flair."
He resigned his Senate seat in 1994, five years before mandatory retirement at age 75, to become High Commissioner to London, his final and most triumphant period of public life. He waged two major campaigns. Under his predecessor Fredrik EATON, appointed by Brian MULRONEY, there was a serious danger that the lease on Canada House in its flagship location in Trafalgar Square in London, was going to be allowed to lapse. Mr. FRITH was appalled and did his utmost to point out that losing Canada House was going to be a blow to Canadian tradition and prestige. He also discovered that under the terms of the lease, Canada had to restore the building to its original condition before handing it back to the Crown. Instead of saving money, giving up Canada House was going to cost a great deal. That proved a winning argument in those cost-conscious days.
Former Liberal Cabinet minister Brian Tobin, now a lawyer in the private sector, had trained as a young candidate with Mr. FRITH in one of the many campaign colleges. He appreciated Mr. FRITH's brand of Liberalism. "He understood the private sector very well, but he also had a huge heart and understood that not only did you have to produce wealth in this society, you have to be fair to those who have fewer advantages."
But what really endeared Mr. FRITH to him was the role he played in the turbot wars when Mr. Tobin was federal minister of fisheries. Members of the fishing community in Cornwall started flying Canadian flags because they were upset by the over-fishing that they themselves were seeing by the Spanish and the Portuguese and they sympathized with Canada's position. Mr. FRITH went to visit them to say thank you. "He did a marvellous job," said Mr. Tobin. "He was such an articulate, persuasive personality that he could walk into a community he had never been in before in his life at a time like that and really embody Canada in the most positive sense of the word."
When asked if he had a favourite memory of Mr. FRITH, he said, "I see this big tall guy in a bow tie with chiselled features, big grin, flashing eyes looking for the next big cause, bare knuckles and all, to embrace. And that's Royce."
If Mr. FRITH was disappointed when he was recalled in 1996 to make way for former Cabinet minister Roy MacLaren to succeed him in London, he kept it to himself.
The Vancouver law firm now called Borden Ladner Gervais invited him to join them as a consultant on British and European affairs. The climate was better than in Ottawa and he had Friends there, especially former Senators John Nichol and George Van Roggen. He quickly became the centre of a social circle that revolved around the Vancouver Symphony, the board of Pearson College and the Vancouver Club. "Royce would walk in every day," said David Smith, "looking like he had just come off Jermyn Street, tailored by Savile Row. I never needed to book anything [when I went to Vancouver], all I had to do was go to the Vancouver Club and there he would be looking like a million dollars."
Mr. FRITH's daughter Valerie also moved to Vancouver where she taught for a number of years in the publishing program at Simon Fraser University. He never remarried, although he had many close women Friends, most notably Hillary Haggan in recent years.
Royce Herbert FRITH was born in Lachine, Quebec, on November 12, 1923. He died of pneumonia as a complication of malignant myeloma at home in Vancouver on March 17, 2005. He was 81. He is survived by his daughter Valerie and her family.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-27 published
B. Marion AXFORD
By Grant SMITH, Wednesday, April 27, 2005, Page A22
Teacher, guidance counsellor, honorary mother. Born December 20, 1917, near Delhi, Ontario Died February 21, in Toronto, of natural causes, aged 87.
Marion AXFORD was born on a farm south of Delhi and from her earliest years, she dreamed of becoming a teacher. She spent hours in the woodshed behind the house playing with a blackboard and chalk to teach spelling and arithmetic to imaginary kids. She would admit years later, however, that as a child, she ran low on self-esteem. The desire to teach and the search for self-esteem in herself and others would consume her for the rest of her life.
She attended McMaster University in Hamilton, obtaining her B.A. in 1939 with a major in mathematics. These were difficult times for women to make their way in the world. She applied to teach mathematics at Elmira High School in 1941. When the board reviewed her application, one member opined, "Women can't teach math," to which the director replied, "This one can." And she did for the next five years. Marion followed this by becoming the first woman to serve as registrar and dean of women at Waterloo College.
In 1952, she returned to her hometown to teach mathematics at Delhi Secondary School where she met an inspector from the provincial Department of Education named Olive PALMER. Olive married John DIEFENBAKER, the future Prime Minster of Canada. She provided Marion with the first nuance of a vision that would turn into a lifetime mission to develop guidance programs for students. In the process, the two became the greatest of Friends.
In 1955, she accepted a job in Agincourt followed by a moved to the Scarborough Board of Education as a supervisor of guidance, working at the elementary level to help students select courses for high school. This involved ground-breaking work to develop a guidance course, on-the-job-training in elementary schools, and teaching other teachers how to deliver the program.
Everything in her life, however, was interrupted in late November, 1969. Marion suffered a stroke and in a display of courage and perseverance she made it through the night despite predictions to the contrary. She spent 11 weeks recovering in hospital and would be back to work in August of 1970. She admitted later that she had to get better because the children needed her. A year later she was chief supervisor of Guidance in the Scarborough Board of Education; she retired in 1979.
Ten years after retiring she sat down to write a book about enhancing self-esteem in children. The book was called Me 'n' You, and it finally exposed her for what she was; the Queen of Self-Esteem, the Hug Lady and a creator of the "warm fuzzies."
In recognition of her outstanding service and dedication to teaching and guidance, in 1975 she was honoured with a "Woman of the Year Award" presented by the Ontario Government for outstanding contribution to education in the province. In 1992, the Ontario School Counsellors Association created The Marion Axford Award to be presented in recognition of an outstanding contribution to guidance.
Marion never married, instead choosing to adopt all the children she met along the way. One very special child, Lynda FORGET, lived next door to her in Agincourt. At age 5, Lynda adopted Marion. Reflecting on Marion's life and influence, she said: "When I think of Marion I always think of love; her love of children, her unconditional love of family and Friends and her love of life." This was the heart that drove the spirit. For Marion, reaching out to help children was not a job. It was a love affair. The world will be a better place because she touched the lives of thousands of children and everyone who met her.
Grant SMITH is Marion's cousin.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-17 published
Evelyn HORNE, Civil Servant and Volunteer: 1907-2005
Ottawa secretary worked for Mackenzie KING and was acquainted with a succession of prime ministers. From her vantage point at the centre of power, she saw everything and knew everyone
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Tuesday, May 17, 2005 Page S9
Ottawa -- Everyone came to see Evelyn HORNE to pick her brains on people and policy, including Jean CHRÉTIEN. She spent 30 years at the centre of political power. Starting with Mackenzie KING, Miss HORNE knew five prime ministers in a row, including Louis SSAINTURENT, John DIEFENBAKER, Lester PEARSON and Pierre TRUDEAU.
From 1941 to 1973, Miss HORNE perched just off centre stage as a perceptive spectator of some of the most tumultuous events in recent Canadian history -- from the anxious years of the Second World War to the new welfare state that came later. Surrounded by statesmen, politicians, governors-general and civil servants, Miss HORNE knew practically all of them, many on a first-name basis.
"She told me that she knew CHRÉTIEN when he was a young pup who came and sat on the corner of her desk and talked politics," said her nephew, Robert PIKE of Ottawa.
Other Ottawa mandarins who valued Miss HORNE for her administrative skills during the '40s and '50s included Prime Minister Paul MARTIN's father, Paul MARTIN Sr., Jack PICKERSGILL and C.D. HOWE.
For all that, Miss HORNE never forgot the years she spent working for Mackenzie KING. Getting that job was a "case of being in the right place at the right time and knowing the right people though I would be selling myself short if I didn't admit that I had some native intelligence and was willing to go the second mile into overtime when it was necessary," she said in 1997.
Miss HORNE first attracted Mr. King's attention when, as a provincial civil servant, she was secretary of the committee organizing the Nova Scotia segment of the 1939 visit to Canada of King George Virgin Islands and Queen Elizabeth.
"When Mr. KING asked to meet me during his tour of East Coast defences in the fall of 1940, I knew I was to be interviewed for a job. And what an interview! Presumably, someone had told him that I could write a fairly good letter; he asked me nothing about my work capabilities," said Miss HORNE.
Instead, Mr. KING quizzed her about the architectural features of the room they were sitting in at Nova Scotia's Province House, Canada's oldest seat of government. "[It was] the most perfect example of Adam architecture in North America. He asked me to explain the symbolism of the bas-relief around the fireplace and recount the history behind the life-size portraits of kings and queens that adorned the walls," she said.
Fortunately, Miss HORNE knew all the answers and found herself in Ottawa in January of 1941. "My first reaction was disappointment. I found the city dull and boring -- after Halifax. There was no immediate awareness that there was a war on. And I was very disappointed in [my new] job. I was assigned to do the 'routine correspondence.' "
It was so simple and repetitive, she was "bored to tears. When I could stand it no longer, I complained to the boss -- not Mr. KING, of course, but [to his] principal secretary. I said I wanted to go back home. The work was too easy -- there was no challenge I didn't have enough to do. As a result, I was given the responsibility for the whole of the Prime Minister's correspondence."
That task was not without its lighter moments, Miss HORNE told her niece, Frances PIKE. " One day, she reached an envelope addressed 'To the Biggest Prick in Canada.' There was nothing inside except an unused condom. 'Mr. PICKERSGILL,' she said, 'what do I do with this'? He said, 'Miss HORNE, I'll take care of it. As far as the contents are concerned, you may do with it what you will.'"
Although Miss HORNE rarely saw Mr. KING during the war, the Prime Minister's Office "was an exciting place to be, right at the heart of government, during those increasingly intense years of war. There were so many pressing concerns, and all kinds of people wrote to the Prime Minister about all kinds of problems. I had to find the answers, or find the people who could.
"I learned so much, not only about government, but also about the people of this country, who showed so much courage, stoicism, and forbearance in the face of all the tragedy and the hardships that affected us all during those terrible years."
In 1946, Miss HORNE moved from the East Block to Laurier House, Mr. KING's home, where she handled his personal correspondence and did some speechwriting. "I became acquainted with [him] as a person, and I liked him."
In 1950, Miss HORNE struck an early blow for women's rights after she went to work for the assistant private secretary to Robert WINTERS, then minister of reconstruction and supply. Despite all her experience, Mr. WINTERS "wouldn't take her on trips because he thought that was unseemly. So he hired a man, whom she had to train. He was hopeless, but making more money than her," said Mr. PIKE, the nephew.
When Miss HORNE complained to her boss that she should be earning as much as the new man, he retorted that he saw no reason for a raise -- she was making excellent money "for a woman."
"So she packed up and went home," said Mr. PIKE. " Then she called Jack PICKERSGILL, who told her to sit tight for a few days and he'd see what he could do. Very soon after, she went to work for Ellen FAIRCLOUGH at the Department of Citizenship and Immigration."
Miss HORNE finished her career with the federal government in 1973 when she retired from the National Film Board. Awarded the Coronation Medal in 1953 and the Centennial Medal in 1967, she received a Governor-General's Caring Canadian Award in 2004 for her years spent as a volunteer.
Miss HORNE first started volunteering during the First World War, when she knitted scarves for the troops. "I distinctly remember the outbreak of the war in 1914, and I recall many occasions when I went to the train station in Truro with my mother to meet the troop trains to present gifts of food and cigarettes and warm knitted items."
When the Second World War broke out in 1939, Miss HORNE's volunteering became a "way of life. I worked as a check-girl for the weekly dances at the famous North End Services Canteen, and playing the odd game of snooker with the boys who didn't feel like dancing. Many times, I would best serve by lending a sympathetic ear or looking at pictures of sweethearts or wives and children back home."
Life in Halifax during the war was grim, she recounted. "The most vulnerable spot in all of Canada, the city was actually at war and everyone pitched in to help. I can laughingly say that my war work was entertaining and being entertained by the officers of the great battleships that anchored in Halifax harbour. We had a lively social life.
"But the shadow of war was always close at hand; and more than once, men I had danced with one night were brought back two days later, burned beyond recognition when their ship was torpedoed by German U-boats just beyond the harbour headlands. Volunteer visits to Camp Hill, the [military] hospital, were a high priority for me at that time."
Evelyn Annie Ethel HORNE was born on February 23, 1907, in Truro, Nova Scotia She died of heart failure on March 21, 2005, in Ottawa. She was 98. She leaves her niece, Frances; nephews Robert, David, Peter and Donald; 16 great-nieces; and 11 great-great-nieces and nephews.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-02 published
Jack COYNE, Lawyer: 1919-2005
A specialist in international trade and administrative law, he served on a panel that resolved disputes in the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement, writes Sandra MARTIN. As an Royal Canadian Air Force pilot, he won the Distinguished Flying Cross
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, July 2, 2005, Page S9
Rhodes Scholar, decorated veteran and distinguished tax lawyer, Jack COYNE loved the law, history and his family. Although intensely private, his life merged with the public interest because of his own achievements and the controversies that flared around his brother James when he was governor of the Bank of Canada and his daughter Deborah when she was romantically involved with Pierre TRUDEAU.
He was the youngest of three children of James Bowes COYNE, a prominent Winnipeg judge, and Edna Margaret ELLIOT/ELLIOTT. Jack was nine years younger than his brother James, and four years younger than his sister Sally (now GOUIN.) "I was very fortunate," she said this week, "because I grew up with my older brother Jim, and my younger brother Jack grew up with me."
Remembering her brother as a very charming young man who was extremely good looking and intelligent, she said he was always popular because he played the piano. "And you know how it is when you're young and there's a gathering and there's a piano and somebody knows you play and you spend the rest of the time there." Years later, it became a family tradition for Mr. COYNE's five children, all of whom took piano lessons, to give their father recordings of their playing on his birthday.
Although not a natural athlete, he delighted in winter sports, especially hockey, which he learned to play on frozen ponds in Manitoba, and skiing, which he did with his own family every weekend in Ottawa. He was tall, about 6 feet, and slim with a short trunk and long legs and arms -- a bit like a daddy-long-legs. "He had a long stride which he used to full effect, partly because he had been taught to march during the war," says his son John.
An able student, he finished high school at 16, earned an honours degree in history and economics from the University of Manitoba four years later and won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford in 1940 as his older brother Jim had done before him in 1932. "It was a little diminishing," said Mrs. GOUIN. "I graduated from university without any great distinction, but I was very proud of my brothers."
Mr. COYNE always played down this achievement. "There weren't a lot of people in Manitoba back then, so your odds of getting one were pretty good." Besides, in 1940, he was much more interested in donning a uniform than an academic gown. He postponed the Rhodes Scholarship and found a job with the Bureau of Statistics (now Statistics Canada) while he figured out how he could get overseas and fight in the war.
In late 1941 (again like his older siblings), he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force. Both COYNE men became pilots, each graduating at the top of his class, while their sister trained recruits and later worked in an administrative capacity at headquarters. When Jack qualified as a pilot, his sister's boss decided it would be "terrific publicity" if she, wearing her air force uniform, pinned the wings on her little brother.
After Mr. COYNE went overseas in 1942, he was stationed in northern Scotland and flew reconnaissance and bombing missions against German shipping off the coast of Norway. On one of these strikes, his squadron leader's plane was destroyed and his own plane, a Bristol Beaufighter, was hit and turned upside down. "He was able to right the plane and led his fellows back safely to home port," said his older brother Jim. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for "skill, courage and resolution."
After the war, he took up his Rhodes Scholarship at Queen's College, where he showed off his skating skills as captain of the university hockey team in the Spengler Cup tournament. He graduated with a first-class bachelor's degree in law in 1947 and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in London. The next year, he qualified to practise in Manitoba and Ontario; he settled in Ottawa, where he became a partner in the firm Herridge, Tolmie, Gray, Coyne & Blair. It later merged with Osler, Hoskin and Harcourt.
Unlike his older brother, who quickly abandoned law for the intricacies of monetary policy at the Bank of Canada (where he served as governor for a tumultuous period when John DIEFENBAKER was prime minister,) Mr. COYNE stuck with the law, but honed his practice to suit his interests in history, business and Canada's place in the world.
He specialized in international trade and administrative law and "very quickly carved out a real niche for himself in the 1960s as the acknowledged expert in Canada on anti-dumping," said his son John, general counsel for Unilever Canada. Another huge early case was his involvement in the trans-Canada pipeline debate. His specialty allowed him more scope than the straightforward practice of corporate law and got him closer to the business world than many of his colleagues.
"He was always interested in the inter-relationship between Canada and the rest of the world, which was probably an outgrowth of his experience during the war and at Oxford," said his son. Mr. COYNE represented some of the largest firms in North America and served on the Canadian roster of panelists for dispute settlement procedures under Chapter 19 of the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement.
Lawyer Ron CHENG, who worked closely with Mr. COYNE at Oslers in the early 1980s, described his mentor as an old-school lawyer who set an example by doing rather than by telling. "He was one of the hardest-working lawyers I have ever come across. He was thorough down to the last detail, exploring every facet of an issue or problem and anticipating arguments from the other side," said Mr. CHENG. "He was a wonderful advocate who spoke compellingly and had the ability to draw an analogy from everyday life to give immediacy to a dry and arcane aspect of the law."
He had an impetuous side, too. "He had a sense of fun and he was a fast driver, a fact that was confirmed by everybody who drove with him," said Mr. CHENG. "He drove his car the way I'm sure he used to fly his Beaufighter."
If the law was Mr. COYNE's profession, his family was his passion. In 1952, he married Margery Joan DANIELS. They had five children Jennifer, Deborah, Barbara, John and Ryland. Jennifer remembers the family codes, such as MIK (more in the kitchen) or FHB (family hold back) that were invariably delivered with a wink at the dinner table. She says her father fostered independent thought and freedom of choice in his children, loved them all unconditionally, and taught them to always be there for each other, as he had been for them.
Two of his children followed him into law. Deborah, now a judge with the Immigration and Refugee Board, figured on the public stage in the 1980s because of her political affiliation with then Newfoundland premier Clyde WELLS in the move to abort the Meech Lake accord and her romantic liaison with Pierre TRUDEAU, which culminated in the birth of their daughter Sarah in 1991.
In his early 70s, Mr. COYNE began showing early signs of Alzheimer's disease, an affliction that gradually erased his prodigious memory and his independence. "It is a terrible disease," said his sister. "Not only does it rob the individual of all of his intelligence, but how devastating it must be to see your father disintegrating before your eyes."
Mr. COYNE's son John divides the progression of his father's Alzheimer's into three stages, beginning in the early 1990s when his mother became alarmed at his father's forgetfulness. Within a couple of years, Mr. COYNE himself knew something was amiss, "but it was one of those things he didn't want to talk about," his son says, explaining that silence is one of the concomitant tragedies of this "terrible affliction." The third stage came when the children realized their father was seriously impaired. He continued to go to his law office every day until the time came when he could no longer remember how to get home. That was when his family made the decision to put him into an institution, in 2000.
"That's a day I won't forget," said John COYNE, "because I was the one who had to take him to the home [Perley Rideau Veterans' Health Centre] and sit chatting with him as all of the kids left the room one by one, and him not really knowing at that point that this was where he was going to be spending the rest of his days."
John (Jack) McCreary COYNE was born in Winnipeg on June 20, 1919. He died of Alzheimer's disease in Ottawa on June 28, 2005. He was 86. His wife, Joan, predeceased him, on July 3, 2002.
He is survived by his five children, their partners, nine grandchildren and his siblings James COYNE and Sally GOUIN.
His life will be celebrated at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church in Ottawa on Tuesday.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-06 published
MICHENER, Roland 1991 -- Died This Day
Saturday, August 6, 2005, Page S9
Politician and viceroy born at Lacombe, Alberta., on April 19, After graduating from the University of Alberta in 1920, he went to Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. In 1924, he set up a law practice law in Toronto and developed an interest in politics. In 1945, he was elected to the Ontario legislature and served until 1948. Five years later, he was elected a Tory Member of Parliament in the riding of Toronto St Paul's. After four years on Parliament Hill, he became Speaker of the House, a job that brought him frequently into conflict with the leader of his party, Prime Minister John DIEFENBAKER. He held the post until his defeat at the polls in 1962. Two years later, Prime Minister Lester B. PEARSON, a close friend from his Oxford days, appointed him High Commissioner to India in 1964 and then Governor-General in 1967.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-20 published
RICHARDSON, Burton Taylor, 1993 -- Died This Day
Saturday, August 20, 2005, Page S11
Journalist and political aide born in Saskatchewan in 1906
After joining the Regina Post (now the Regina Leader-Post), he put in his time as a junior reporter until 1936, when he was sent to Edmonton to report on the recently elected Social Credit government there. In 1943, he was sent to cover the war in the South Pacific and in 1946 he witnessed the founding of the United Nations in San Francisco. After that, he returned to Saskatchewan as editor of the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix and later became editor of the Toronto Telegram. In 1963, he became executive assistant to John DIEFENBAKER while he was prime minister and opposition leader. He later turned his years with Mr. DIEFENBAKER to good account by editing some of the Diefenbaker speeches and publishing them in 1972 under the title These Things We Treasure.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-10 published
BARNES, Ken -- Dispatch:
By Oliver MOORE, Saturday, September 10, 2005, Page M6
Ken BARNES kept his drawings as he worked on the Avro Arrow, and his family is now deciding how best to get these pieces of Canadian history into a museum.
As a colour-blind young drafting student in night school, Mr. BARNES impressed his teacher enough to land a job. Working first for Victory Aircraft and then for the A.V. Roe aircraft company, he had a hand in the building of several legendary planes.
"At the beginning of the war, Ken was redesigning the Lancaster for the [Royal Air Force]," remembers his younger brother Jack, 85. "While he was designing them, I was over there flying them."
The family says that Mr. BARNES worked later on the Jetliner, the first jet-powered passenger aircraft, and on the Arrow as it went through the planning phase. It was his job to put down on paper the ever-evolving vision of the head designers. And many of these drawings made their way to his home in Etobicoke.
When then prime minister John DIEFENBAKER stopped Arrow production and ordered all traces destroyed, Mr. BARNES was one of the workers who couldn't follow the order.
"Officially it was destroyed, everything," Jack says. "Naturally, some of the employees saved some materials... my brother, he kept the originals because he drew them."
These drawings were stored for decades at the home long inhabited by Mr. BARNES and his wife, who predeceased him, but the family is well aware of their historic value.
"We haven't made any decisions yet," said Ken BARNES's son Gord, who now lives in Regina. "It's an important decision to make."
Mr. BARNES spent his entire career in various forms of the aerospace industry. Years after the Arrow project, he worked for a company that used Canadian-designed jet engines to force oil through pipelines. He was also involved in development of the Canadarm, this country's contribution to the U.S. space-shuttle program.
Although struggling with a Parkinson's-like disease, he refused to go into a nursing home. He died last month at the age of 87.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-28 published
SULLIVAN, Dr. Joseph, 1988 -- Died This Day
Wednesday, September 28, 2005, Page S9
Senator and hearing specialist born in Toronto in 1902.
The youngest in a Irish Roman Catholic family of five children, he excelled at school and went on to the University of Toronto. In 1926, he graduated from medical school and two years later opened a practice in otolaryngology. In between, he took time out to play goalie on the University of Toronto Varsity Grads hockey team that won the gold medal at the 1928 Winter Olympics. Settling to his medical practice, he began to develop revolutionary surgical techniques that earned international awards. During the Second World War, he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force where he worked on problems with the hearing of pilots. After the war, his reputation grew and he was named honorary surgeon to the Queen. Patients came to him from all over the world and across Canada. One was Prime Minister John DIEFENBAKER. In 1957, Mr. DIEFENBAKER named him to the Senate.

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DIEFENBAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-09 published
PICKERSGILL, John Whitney, 1997 -- Died This Day
Wednesday, November 9, 2005, Page S9
Politician born in Wyecombe, Ontario, on June 23, 1905.
While he was a boy, his family moved to a homestead in Manitoba where they farmed. He breezed through the University of Manitoba and then went to Oxford to study history. In 1929, he returned to Manitoba to be a college lecturer but fancied a better salary. In 1936, he wrote the civil-service examination. When he arrived in Ottawa in 1937, he expected to join the Department of External Affairs but, instead, was sent to the Prime Minister's Office for what he was told would be a short term. Nobody lasted more than six weeks with Mackenzie KING. He not only survived but rose to become Clerk of the Privy Council. In between, he met Joey SMALLWOOD and came to support the cause of Newfoundland's joining Canada. In 1953, he ran for Parliament in Bonavista-Twillingate and became Newfoundland's representative in the federal cabinet. In 1954, he became minister of citizenship and immigration. During the Diefenbaker years, he was an effective voice in opposition. When the Liberals returned to office in 1963 under Lester PEARSON, he became secretary of state and House leader. In 1964, he accepted the transport portfolio and introduced the National Transportation Act, at the same time creating the job of chairman of the transport commission at a salary of $40,000 a year. He then wrote the job description and arranged for his own appointment. He was a master at turning the wheels of government, a skill that earned him a grudging tribute from Mr. DIEFENBAKER: " Parliament without Pick would be like hell without the devil."

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