COHEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-17 published
TYLER, Cynthia M. (née FRYER)
Cynthia M. (FRYER) of Valleyview, Saint Thomas, on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 at her late residence, in her 79th year. Beloved wife of the late Colin G. TYLER (April 1, 1994) and dearly loved mother of Bernice E. MIEDZINSKI of Saint Thomas, Laurence E.M. TYLER and his wife Brenda of Richmond, Beverley A. TYLER and her husband Chen COHEN of Toronto and Derek A. and his wife Jill of Saint Thomas. Loved grandmother of Bryan and his wife Andrea, Adam, Jonathon and Fiona. Dear sister of R. Elizabeth SHARRATT, Desmond M. FRYER and Denise L. PEEL, all of England. Sister-in-law of Margaret SANDON. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews. Cynthia was born in Yarmouth, Isle of Wight on December 12, 1926, the daughter of the late Harold M. and Elizabeth (GRIFFITHS) FRYER. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Friday at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Visitation Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the Parkinson Foundation.

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COHEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-05 published
McLEAN, Corrie (née BRAK)
Corrie (née BRAK,) 69. Dearly loved wife of Hugh McLEAN. Corrie came from Loosduinen, Holland. She is survived by step-daughters Cheryl McLEAN of Dorchester, Debbie KOEVEL of Hanover and their families. Also survived by all her many McLEAN in-laws, Angus, Elva of Mississauga, Arnold, Lorrie of Windsor, Roy and Pearl, Rod and Pat, Ken and Pam, all of Kingsville, Joan and Rob of Leamington. Corrie passed away last Thursday, June 30, 2005 at London Health Sciences Centre, London. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial celebration of Corrie's life will take place on a date to be set soon. Corrie is also survived by her brother Jaap BRAK of Loosduinen, The Netherlands and by several extended family in the Hague and Nijmegen, Holland. Special thanks to Dr. Irene COHEN for her compassionate care and concern. Thanks also to Dr. SCHULTZ of London Health Sciences Centre, Palliative Care who helped Corrie to be free of pain in her last days and whose words were so very consoling to visiting Friends and relatives. Special thanks also to our dear Friends, Collette PYPERS and Nelly BYLE who were there for us.

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COHEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-28 published
Revered doctor known for personal touch
By April KEMICK, Free Press Reporter
A prominent and well-loved London doctor, who saved countless lives in a 35-year career at St. Joseph's Health Care, died Thursday.
Dr. David MELTZER, credited by colleagues as a pioneer in oncology in London, died of heart problems at age 86.
"So many people owe their lives to David," MELTZER's cousin, Alan COHEN, said of the quick-witted doctor.
"He was an incredible man and an incredible doctor."
MELTZER, the youngest of eight children born in Manitoba, planted roots in London in the mid-1940s, when he met and married his wife, Zivia, during his military training in Clinton.
After serving in the air force overseas during the war, he enrolled in medical school at University of Western Ontario in 1946.
His long and distinguished career at St. Joseph's began in 1955, when he was hired on in hematology, a branch of medicine dealing with the blood.
For more than three decades, he worked at the hospital in both hematology and oncology, earning a reputation not only for medical skill, but also for personal touches that made him a favourite with patients.
"He had this really wonderful and unique ability to bridge the science of oncology and the art of caring for patients," said Dr. Don TAVES, a former student and colleague of the revered London doctor.
"He had a remarkable wit and a wonderful sense of humour and he was loved by many of his patients," Taves said.
MELTZER, a "master joke-teller" whose jokes numbered in the thousands, was also well liked by the nuns who worked at the hospital.
"I think he's the only person who could tell an off-colour joke to a nun and get away with it," said cousin Phyllis COHEN. "He had them coming back for more."
Even with his dedication to medicine in London, the avid cyclist and golfer always made time for family, said his two grown children, Sari and Alan.
As he helped with the city's first chemotherapy treatment and localized successful medical treatments used elsewhere, MELTZER fostered a wonderful family life.
"He was very, very involved with raising us," his son said. "He was a father who took a lot of pride in his children."
MELTZER, who had an oncology ward at St. Joseph's and a University of Western Ontario scholarship named in his honour, held his family as one of his greatest achievements, said his daughter.
"He said at my wedding, 'Of all the titles I've been given over the years, the most important one was Dad,' " she said.

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COHEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-15 published
COHEN, Rose Esther (née SHERMAN)
Peacefully, at Longworth Long Term Care Centre, on Sunday November 13, 2005. Rose Esther COHEN (née SHERMAN) in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Elliott COHEN (1980.) Loving mother and mother-in-law of the late Harris (2000) and his wife Donna, Dr. Nathan and his wife Nancy, Jerome and his wife Edie, and Rachelle and her husband Blake. "Fabulous Bubby" to Eric, Jonathan, Sarah, Jennifer, Leigh, Michael, Richard, Reese and Jeffrey. Funeral service will be held at the Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas Street, London (between Colborne and Waterloo St.), on Wednesday November 16, 2005, at 11: 00 a.m with Rabbi Joel WITTSTEIN officiating. Interment in Or Shalom Cemetery. Donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences can be expressed at www.loganfh.ca. Special Thanks to the staff in the Iris Wing at Longworth Long Term Care Centre for giving such wonderful care to Rose. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Rose COHEN.

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COHEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-20 published
COWAN, May
Peacefully in her 99th year on Monday December 19th. Predeceased by husband Harry (1994.) Dear mother of Valerie COHEN (England,) Sheila (Jim) ARMSTRONG, and Malcolm (Lynda) COWAN. Also survived by 5 grand_sons and 2 great-grandchildren. Private funeral arrangements in accordance with her wishes.

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COHEN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.barrie.the_barrie_examiner 2005-12-10 published
Grisly murder
Barrie woman stabbed more than 30 times in Ottawa home
By Tobi COHEN, Special to the Examiner, Saturday, December 10, Ottawa Stabbed more than 30 times in the face, neck, chest and back, Barrie native Kleigh CUNDALL had little chance for survival but that didnt stop neighbours, police and paramedics from trying.
One neighbour who lives across the road from the brown brick house on Queen Victoria St. where the former Eastview Secondary School student has lived for the last two years was returning home Thursday evening when he saw the tenants from the upper apartment pounding on the door to the 21-year-olds basement apartment.
I ran right over. They called for help. They were frantic, he said reluctantly, unwilling to give his name. I was there before the cops. We just couldnt get in to help her.
Police said one of the neighbours had managed to get inside the home and saw a man stabbing CUNDALL before fleeing the apartment to dial 911 around 5: 31 p.m.
When he returned, the door was locked and it wasnt until police arrived five minutes later and bashed down the cedar door with their own body weight that anyone could get inside.
The wooden door frame was still lying on the ground covered in snow yesterday. The jagged broken upper window of the door was left untouched for the forensic team to examine despite the landlords request to board it up. A blue Hyundai Accent remained parked in the driveway of the taped off New Edinburgh bungalow.
Ottawa police Sgt. Ron BOS said the woman had been on the phone with her boyfriend when a knife-wielding man arrived at her home.
She'd put down the phone to answer the door when, moments later, her piecing screams prompted her boyfriend to hang up and dial A police officer and paramedics attempted cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, but CUNDALL had lost enormous amounts of blood and was pronounced dead upon arriving at the Ottawa Hospitals Civic campus.
The man was arrested at gunpoint without incident and led to the front of the house.
They had him up against a car, said another neighbour, noting she couldnt make out his features.
The upstairs tenants were seen leaving their home late Thursday with packed bags.
Taken to the Elgin St. cell block, police said the man was later rushed to the Ottawa Hospitals General campus shortly after 1 a.m. after overdosing on pills. Its believed he took the pills prior to the incident.
Initially in the Intensive Care Unit in critical condition, the suspect is now expected to live and be released within three to five days.
Charges will likely be laid against 21-year-old Anthony ROACH, also of Barrie, once hes released from hospital.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-22 published
MARSHALL, Douglas
Peacefully, at St. Michael's Hospital, in his 67th year. He leaves his wife, Sarah MURDOCH; his sons Barnaby and Benjamin; his sister, Sally; his dear friend and first wife, Deborah; his daughter-in-law, Carmen DUNJKO; his granddaughter, Emma, and her mother, Colleen DECOURCY; his belatedly discovered British son, Hugh THOMAS, his wife, Natalie, and son, Oliver; the staff of the Duke of York; his many Friends; and his affectionate but demanding cat, Nora. Douglas was a true original -- demanding, difficult, smart, funny, loyal and irascible -- who more than anything enjoyed red wine, good writing and socializing, probably in that order. He grew up in Colborne, Ontario, and attended Highgate School in London and the University of Toronto, where he was the editor of the Varsity in the 58-59 school year. He worked at the London bureau of Canadian Press; Maclean's; as a television Guide columnist at Books in Canada, which he co-founded with Val CLERY; and the Toronto Star, where he remains the longest-surviving Entertainment Editor since Nathan COHEN. He was a founding member of the Crime Writers of Canada and the author of A Very Palpable Hit. A service for Doug will be held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, January 25, at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West. Donations to the Canadian Liver Foundation.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-27 published
LOEB, Norman A.
Peacefully in his 91st year, on Tuesday, January 25, 2005. Norman LOEB, loving husband of the late Amelia BROWNSTEIN, and the late Dorothy WOLFE. Devoted father and father-in-law of Judith and Mickey COHEN, and Donald and Lorraine LOEB. Beloved grandfather of Richard and Elise COHEN, Jessica COHEN and Mark RUAN, Jill and Danny MORRIS, Jennifer and Ken TANENBAUM, Amanda COHEN and Grady HENDRIX; Jordana, Jonathan, Alexandra, and Jacqueline LOEB, and 11 great-grandchildren. Cherished brother and brother-in-law of Bertram, Jules and Fay, David and Adele, and Dr. Lazarus and Jackie. Heartfelt gratitude to Tomasa COSI, Gemma MONDELLA, and Maria Loreto RAMOS. There will be an evening service at 5 p.m., Thursday only, at 60 Pond Street, Ottawa. Shiva 48 Rosedale Heights Dr. Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. Evening Services at 8: 00 p.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Boys and Girls Club of Ottawa, 412 Nepean Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1R 5G7, (613) 232-0925 Ext. 24.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-29 published
MENDELSOHN, Helen
On Wednesday, January 26, 2005 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Helen MENDELSOHN beloved wife of Nathan. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Eric and Lillian MENDELSOHN, and Alan and Carla WITTES. Dear sister of Ruth SIGGNER, Evelyn SHER, and Gloria COHEN. Devoted grandmother of Aurora and Louis, Liviya, Alex, Sasha, Gabriel, and Dov. Devoted great grandmother of Kohava. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave W., (2 lights west of Dufferin), (416) 663-9060 for service on Friday, January 28, 2005. Please call for service time. Interment Darchei Noam Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva at 201 Major St. If desired, memorial donations may be made to any Jewish Education Fund of your choice.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-31 published
Sylvia Finifter COHEN
By Lainie COHEN, Monday, January 31, 2005 - Page A14
Mother, grandmother, cook. Born June 22, 1918, in Montreal. Died November 9, 2004, in Toronto, from a stroke, aged 86.
Comfort food is what I associate with Sylvia -- a hearty bowl of split pea soup with potatoes, onions, carrots, and the surprise addition of dill for extra flavouring. This soup epitomizes her old-fashioned and traditional ways blended with a modern dash.
Whenever we visited, Sylvia's predictable welcome was, "You must be hungry. What can I get you?"
Sylvia's warmth and hospitality were fostered in her parents' home in Montreal. Her father was a tailor, their home modest yet infused with love. Aunts, uncles and cousins congregated at weekly gatherings where the table would be heaped with bagels and cream cheese, pickled herring and smoked fish -- a spread similar to the one served after Sylvia's funeral.
Several of her lifelong Friends were there: "the girls" who were Sylvia's Bridge partners, companions for outings to art galleries or concerts, and fellow members of the monthly Book Club and Cancer Research Society meetings. As teenagers, the girls liked to stroll down "the Main" in Montreal, stopping to share a smoked meat sandwich at Schwartz's deli, or hosting afternoon tea parties in each other's homes. They recalled shy Sylvia (Tzivia) spoke Yiddish when she entered Grade 1; how she flared up only if someone dared to criticize her younger sister Ruth.
Sylvia and her future husband Max courted for several years before marrying in 1940. Naturally enough for the time, he moved in with her family while he studied to complete his pharmacy degree. Then came years of Max working long hours in a drug store. With the arrival of son Joel followed by David, Sylvia became the consummate housewife and stay-at-home mother, proud to be there to serve her boys lunch and to check their homework. When family finances dictated the need for extra funds, she reluctantly returned to work as a bookkeeper.
Long before the current craze for slow cooking, Sylvia prided herself on preparing food from scratch. Her trademark dessert was roly poly: a delightful concoction of raisins, jam, nuts, cinnamon and Turkish delight, all rolled up in pastry dough and sliced. Her grand_sons loved it and no gift from Bubby was appreciated more than a roly poly. Eager to learn her technique, I watched her, but she never quite followed the recipe she wrote out for me. "You can just feel when it's right," she assured me, pinching the dough and adjusting the flour.
Sylvia was a devoted daughter, taking three buses to visit her aging mother. She'd time her visits so she could help with feeding, but I think it pained her being unable to bring her diabetic mother any baked goods, the same despair she felt of ever fattening up her skinny son, Joel.
Perhaps it was her interest in food that made her claim that every joy was delicious. Sylvia relished dips in the lake, a good book, and especially visits with her five grandchildren. Her biggest regret was not living in the same city as her sons.
In later years, she and Max were able to enjoy his semi-retirement by spending winters in Florida. After his sudden death in 1993, Sylvia became even closer to her sister Ruth. Although nearly inseparable, they bickered like girls. Ruth criticized Sylvia's parking (dents in the car her proof of the allegations) and Sylvia retorted about Ruth's lack of culinary interest (Ruth was happiest with a salami sandwich).
In a twist of fate, Sylvia's wish to be in Toronto with "her boys" came true after Ruth's death. However, by then she suffered from dementia, and could no longer recall our names. She'd just pat our hands and say she loved us, offering to share her meal. To Sylvia, food was comfort; food was love.
Lainie is Sylvia's daughter-in-law.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-04 published
COHEN, Myrna
Peacefully on her 51st wedding anniversary, on Thursday, February 3, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Myrna COHEN, beloved wife of Gerald. Loving mother of Jay and Carolyn, Ellen, and Stephen and Susan. Devoted grandmother of Jessica, David, Carly, Jordan, and Ryan. Dear sister of Allan and Norine ROSE. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W. (2 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Friday, February 4th at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva at 3 Rosemary Lane. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care at 416-586-4800.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-05 published
SHAMAI, Isaac
Died peacefully in his sleep on March 1 2005, in Southfield, Michigan. He looked forward to his 83rd birthday in May, and the visits of his children and grandchildren, but he left too soon. Complications of diabetes left him a double amputee in 1998, but he never lost his ability to share a laugh, and never complained about the battles he faced with his declining health. His great heart finally failed him, but he never lost his wit.
He arrived in Montreal from Lithuania as a child with his mother. He was raised by her, and for some years of his youth lived at the Montefiore Orphans Home, where his mother taught Hebrew. Isaac graduated MacDonald College at McGill University after serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War Two. Newly wed to Ethel April COHEN in 1948, he and April were pioneers in Israel, living on the Givot Brenner Kibbutz. He became the proud father of four daughters, Rebecca, Ruth, Sally and Lisa, once he and April returned to Toronto. In later years, following divorce, he moved to Detroit, where he was happily married to Kathleen until her death in 2002. He will be remembered with great fondness by his Friends and business associates in Detroit, and by family in Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa and Vancouver. He is survived by his daughters and their husbands and partners, and his grandchildren, Zoey (and Trevor), Marc, Sam, Ariel, Zachary, and Ethan.
At his request, he will be cremated in Detroit, and shiva will be observed in Toronto. A memorial service is planned in Detroit, time and place to be announced. Donations in his memory may be directed to the Jewish Family and Child Service of Toronto (416-638-7800).

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-11 published
SADAVOY, Esther Pearl (née PLEET)
Passed away peacefully at North York General Hospital on Wednesday, March 9, 2005, at the age of 88. Esther SADAVOY, loving wife of the late Bob (Robert) SADAVOY. Treasured mother and mother-in-law of Corinne and Don (SKLAR,) Judy and Marvin (COHEN,) Lyle and Carolee, David, and Benjamin. Beloved Bubby Esther of Michelle, Rachel and the late Robert, Michael and Deb COHEN, Deborah and Cory FRIEBERG, Neil and Alyssa COHEN, Robin, Michael, Jacob and Sarah, Vanessa and Daniel. Proud great-grandmother of Zachary, Beth, and London. Survived by brothers, Michael and Pinchas and his wife, Barbara. Predeceased by her parents, Clara and Harry PLEET, step-mother Bertha PLEET and brother Jack. Esther will be sadly missed by family and Friends, especially in Ottawa and Toronto. Esther had an active, enquiring mind, a wonderful memory and a life long love of learning. Ever loved and missed, Esther will always be in our hearts. Funeral Services will be held on Friday, March 11, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m. at Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Avenue West, Thornhill, Ontario. Shiva will be observed at 111 Rockford Road, Toronto, Ontario. If desired, donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-14 published
Annie (COHEN) FLEISHER
By Helen LAMPERT, Monday, March 14, 2005 Page A14
Homemaker, wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother. Born February 9, 1926, in Toronto. Died December 30, 2004, in Toronto of multiple system atrophy, aged 78.
Born in 1926, Annie's Yiddish name was Alta Hannah, "Alta" meaning old, in the hope she would live a longer life than the two sisters who preceded her, both of whom died in childhood. The youngest child of Harry and Jenny COHEN, Annie and her two brothers, Max and Louie, grew up on Toronto's College Street, above the family bakery. The aroma of sticky Chelsea buns, cinnamon rugelach and fruit-filled pastries filled the air and forged her lifelong passion for dessert. She would gladly trade a sumptuous entree for a freshly baked cheese Danish.
Hers is a life best told in three parts. The first is the story that brought together Annie COHEN and her one great love, Eddie FLEISHER. The second centres on the happiest years of her life as a vivacious wife and devoted mother. The last is a portrait of courage, a tribute to her strength and pride in the face of a disabling disease.
The love story began in Poland long before she and Eddie were born. Annie's mother and Eddie's father lived in the same village, and though very much in love, circumstances prevented them from marrying. After the First World War, each emigrated to Canada and they lost touch. Eddie's father, with his wife and children, settled in Montreal. Annie's family landed in Toronto. When word spread that they were "neighbours," Eddie's father travelled to Toronto to rekindle a Friendship with Annie's mother. Once reunited, they discovered that their youngest children were a son and a daughter respectively, just 11 days apart in age. Together they hatched a plan for their two young children to meet and perhaps fall in love. With a few bumps, their plan worked. In 1943, at the tender age of 17, Annie and Eddie married and they enjoyed 61 wonderful years together.
As a wife and mother, Annie flourished. She supported and cared for Eddie and saw to it that her most cherished possessions, her three children, had the best possible education and opportunities. Her brisk walk matched the pace at which she embraced life, and her children scrambled to keep up. Annie was a wonderful hostess and amazing cook. She was a real balabusta (homemaker): spooning out cod-liver oil, knitting skating sweaters, concocting blistering mustard plasters, making sour pickles or sweet gefilte fish, and changing the bed linens from cotton to flannel with the arrival of each winter's chill. Sharp, smart, and fast: Annie was affectionately nicknamed "The Whip."
In 1980, Annie's energetic personality came into conflict with her body's decreased ability to respond. Diagnosed at first with multiple sclerosis, and then Parkinson's, it would be years until her symptoms were identified as multiple system atrophy, a neurodegenerative disease. Her prognosis was poor and the typical survival rate of seven years was daunting. Annie faced her disease with the same strength she brought to life. She sought treatments of every kind, and she never once complained or turned bitter. She was a true role model for courage. Eddie took early retirement to return the love and care she had always given him. His devotion and commitment helped Annie beat the odds for 25 years. She got the chance to see her children become successful, her grandchildren launch careers and families, and to hold a great-grand_son in her arms.
Her last year was tragically painful. As she was laid to rest, I was comforted by a wonderful memory of her driving her black Buick Skylark, top down, head scarf blowing in the wind, radio blaring, pedal to the metal, whipping past us all.
Helen is Annie FLEISHER's daughter.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-02 published
HERMAN, Dr. Bernard George
Born January 11, 1919, in Toronto, the second and fair-haired of the six sons of Eli and Bella HERMAN. After serving with the Canadian Medical Corps during World War 2, Bernie interned at a Los Angeles Hospital and found Bette COHEN and a rewarding surgical practice sufficient reasons to adopt California's graces for the rest of his life. His family's testament follows: Bernard G. HERMAN, M.D., well respected surgeon who loved his patients and excelled at caring for them, passed away on March 29, 2005 at age 86 surrounded by his loving family. His wife Bette, his son Mark, his two daughters Bonnie and Terry, and his five grandchildren Brian, Melissa, Alex, Alana and Jillian survive him. He also leaves his 4 surviving brothers of Toronto, Canada, Sydney, Victor, Reginald and Irving (the oldest, Norman having predeceased him in 2001). After 40 years, he retired from his surgery practice at age 70 and dedicated himself to his hobbies. He had loved sailing in his younger days and enjoyed taking family and Friends for sailing trips off the Southern California Coast. However his passion was golf. He was a member of Riviera Country Club for many years and took great pleasure in continuously striving to improve his golf swing and game. He played golf daily until 3 months before his final illness. He will be greatly missed by all who loved him. Funeral services (were) held Friday, April 1 at Hillside Memorial Park. (800) 576-1994. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made to Cedars-Sinai Hospice. We wish to add that when he retired, Bernie worked as an advisor for an Insurance Co., and it was O.K. for a few years, but Bernie prided himself on his ethics, and he resigned over a moral disagreement. And, in addition to golfing and sailing, he loved intellectual challenges and when he and Bette travelled, Bernie insisted on destinations that provided intellectual stimulations. So long, good friend.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-12 published
SNOW, Lillian
Passed away peacefully on April 10, 2005. Beloved wife of the late Joseph. Dear mother of Rosalie GELLER and Margie and her husband Marvin KESHEN. Proud Bubie of Debi, Gail, Fern, and Mayer, and the late David KESHEN. Great grandmother of Joshua, Justin, Jory, Adam, Daniel, Stefanie and Katie. Survived by sister Sylvia COHEN and brother Sam GOLDHAR. Predeceased by sisters Helen, Annie and Gerry. Funeral Service will be held Tuesday, April 12, 2005 from Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. W. (between Bathurst and Yonge) at 11: 30 a.m. Interment to follow at Mount Sinai Cemetery, Sunnyside Association Section. Shiva 5444 Yonge Street, #407. Memorial donations may be made to Alzheimers Society of Canada, 416-488-8772, or charity of your choice.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-15 published
KRAVITZ, Clara
On Wednesday, April 13, 2005 at Baycrest Hospital. Clara KRAVITZ, beloved wife of the late Joseph KRAVITZ. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Marsha and Jim McWHINNIE, and Lou and the late Elaine WINER. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Hilda and the late Ben ROSE, Fred and Marion REISMAN, Al and Sheila REISMAN, Ruth and the late George REISMAN, and the late Minnie and Morris COHEN, and Lou REISMAN. Devoted grandmother of Elly WINER and Jane HARGRAFT, Aviva and Matthew GOTTLIEB, Michael WINER, Annie, Paul, and Diane McWHINNIE, and the late Jeannie McWHINNIE, and great-grandmother of Jessie, Allie, Rachel, and Eleanor. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, April 15, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 41 Bauer Crescent, Unionville, concluding Sunday evening, April 17th. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Foundation 416- 946-6560 The Baycrest Centre Foundation, 416-785-2875.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-16 published
MILLER, Bessie (née GILMAN)
With great sadness we announce that Bessie Miller passed away unexpectedly on Saturday, May 14, 2005 at the age of 82. She will be sadly missed by her loving husband of 54 years Allan, her children Sam, Lianne, Willie and Julie, Murray and Susy, Rivi and Steven ROGUL. Special Bubbie to Issy, Max, Genny, Allison, Amy, Adam and Jacob. Loving sister to Dina and Mark FRANKEL, Charna and Jack GILMAN, Ronnie GILMAN, and Harry GILMAN. Predeceased by her parents Samuel and Molly GILMAN, brothers Abie and Issie, and sister Ida COHEN. Devoted aunt to numerous nieces and nephews.
Bessie was a wonderful mother, friend and a devoted wife. She married Al in 1950 and began an extraordinary life together. They were inseparable throughout the rest of her life. She had an immense amount of energy, going non-stop from morning till night. When mom travelled to visit her children, her suitcase was filled with baked goods that only she could create. Bessie took immense pride in the achievements of her children and grandchildren. She travelled frequently to see them and was always there to kvell over their achievements in academics, athletics and arts. Mom's highest priority was family. She revelled in family occasions, always looking forward to everyone coming together for celebrations. Her childrens' extended families became as her own. There was nothing that Bessie wouldn't do for her husband and family. She will be sadly missed by all of us. Above all else, she leaves us with the gift of a close and loving family.
Funeral services will be held in Winnipeg on May 16, 2005 at 9: 30 a.m. at the Shaarey Zedek Synagogue. Shiva will be held at apartment 701, 141 Wellington Crescent. Donations may be made to the Jewish Foundation of Manitoba, or a charity of your choice.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-01 published
SHEFF, Sally " Sarah" (née KAPUSTIN)
Peacefully in her sleep in Montreal, on Tuesday, May 31st, 2005, in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late Louis. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Gerald and Shanitha, Anna and Harvey FELSHER, Allan and Amy, Esther and the late Jack SKLOFSKY. Proud Bubbie of Rhonda and Gary KAPLAN, Laurie and Jonny COLE, Jonathan, Rachel, Jordan, Marisa, Laurie, Jason and Rebecca. Cherished great grandmother of Lindsey, Daniel, Sascha, Matthew, Thomas, Ezra. Sister and sister-in-law of Ida and the late Harry COHEN, the late Annie and the late Morris GREENBERG, the late Rose and the late Abe BOOKMAN, the late Hymie KAPUSTIN. Sister-in-law of Sarah and the late Moe WEISER, the late Abe and the late Mildred SHEFF. She will be greatly missed by Julian and Luca. Special thanks to her caregiver Prissy. Funeral Service from Paperman and Sons, Montreal on Thursday, June 2nd at 2: 30 p.m. Burial in Montreal. Shiva at 117 Laporte, D.D.O. In lieu of gifts or flowers, donations in her memory may be made to the "Sally and Louis Sheff Memorial Fund" c/o Federation C.J.A., (514) 735-3541 Ext: 3295.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-13 published
FISHAUF, Nathan
On Sunday, June 12, 2005, at Baycrest Hospital. Nathan FISHAUF, beloved husband of Brenda. Loving father and father-in-law of Ann SARGENT, and Louis FISHAUF and Nancy. Dear brother of Eta COHEN, and the late Yoel FISHAUF, and Leah GILBOA. Devoted grandfather of Miriam, and Jackson. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (one light west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, June 15, 2005 at 2 p.m. Interment Stashover Young Mens section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Nathan Fishauf Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C3, (416) 780-0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-14 published
LOWY, Mitzi
In her 99th year, in Montreal, on Sunday, June 12th, 2005. Devoted wife of the late Eugen LOWY. Beloved mother and mother-in-law of Dr. Fred and Mary Kay LOWY, Henny KING and the late Edmund CASWELL of Scotland. Cherished Omama of David LOWY and Christine BOWDEN, Eric LOWY and Connie WANSBROUGH, Adam LOWY and Lindsey JEFFRIES, Sarah LOWY and Stuart HENDERSON; Dean and Diane LEVY, Heidi KING, John and Sarah KING, Alex KING. Loving great-grandmother of Tsiporah LOWY; Melissa and Kaitlin LOWY, Hannah LOWY; Brandon and Andrea LEVY; Harrison and Thomas KING. Predeceased by her five siblings. Sadly mourned by her nieces and nephews Alice LATZER, Renee LATZER, Jacquie and Leonel JUAREZ, Renee RUIZ, Monique LACKENBACHER, Henny and David COHEN, Gaby BESTHOFF and their families. Special friend of May POLSKY. She will be fondly remembered as a mentor and role model to all those whose lives she touched. Heartfelt thanks to the staff at Manoir Westmount. Funeral service from Paperman and Sons, 3888 Jean Talon West, Montreal, on Thursday, June 16th at 10: 00 a.m. Graveside service on Friday, June 17th at 11: 00 a.m. at the Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Vaughan (Toronto), Ontario. Shiva private. Contributions in her memory may be made to the Lowy Scholarship Fund c/o Concordia University (514) 848-2424 ext. 5270.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-06 published
OBORNE, Elizabeth Marguerite (née BOYDE) (1920-2005)
It is with profound sadness that the family of Elizabeth (Bette) Marguerite OBORNE announces the passing of its matriarch on Tuesday, August 2, 2005 at Rideau Place on-the-River, Ottawa, after a, thankfully, short term illness. Bette, predeceased by her parents Winnifred (WOOD) and Stanley BOYDE, her sister Shirley LONEY, and an infant son, John, was born in Toronto, October 2, 1920 where she lived until moving to Montreal in 1960, and Ottawa in 1978. With extensive travel, and winters in Florida since 1980, for 57 years she spent her summers at the beloved cottage at Skootamatta Lake, the gathering point for her extended family. Left to mourn are Ross, her beloved husband of 64 years, her children and their partners: Jim-Winnipeg-(Bryan, Jennifer, Jimmy and Elizabeth); David-Toronto-(John and Tracy) and Lynn-Lennoxville (Michael, Stephen, Jennifer and Carolyn) and 9 great-grandchildren. Mum was strong, independent, organized and hard working. She was a baseball fan and active participant in swimming, curling and particularly gardening. She loved flowers almost as much as sunsets at the lake and was able to enjoy several sunsets in the beautiful garden at Rideau Place shortly before her passing. A life-long supporter of her husband's and immediate family's activities, she was proud of their achievements and concerned during their trials. The connections to her extended family were very important to her and the family was her occupation in life - a job from which she never retired - and she remained more concerned for their interests than her own, right to the end of her days. A sincere appreciation is expressed by the family to Mum's caregivers: Ottawa Civic Hospital (4B), particularly intern Jennifer SOUCIE, St. Elizabeth Health Care, the staff and Friends at Rideau Place, and, most importantly, to her family physician, Dr. Howard COHEN, for his attention in the last 3 days of her life making her passing as comfortable as possible. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made at the Canadian Cancer Society or to the charity of choice. In accordance with her instructions, the remains will be cremated and deposited at Skootamatta Lake at a later date at a family memorial celebration.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-12 published
KIRSHENBAUM, Betty (a.k.a. Batia, Batja) - Estate of
Notice To Creditors
In the Estate Of Betty KIRSHENBAUM (also known as Batia KIRSHENBAUM and Batja KIRSHENBAUM,) late of Richmond Hill, Ontario, Property Manager.
Creditors and others having claims against the above estate are required to send full particulars of such claims to the undersigned on or before the 12th day of September, 2005, after which date the estate's assets will be distributed having regard only to claims that have then been received.
Zahava LAMBERT, Toronto, Ontario, Naomi E. KIRSHENBAUM- COHEN, North York, Ontario And Howard J. KIRSHENBAUM, Toronto, Ontario, Estate Trustees,
by Lerners LLP, Solicitors, 80 Dufferin Avenue, P.O. Box 2335, London, Ontario,
N6A 4G4.
Page B15

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-19 published
KIRSHENBAUM, Betty (a.k.a. Batia, Batja) - Estate of
Notice To Creditors
In the Estate Of Betty KIRSHENBAUM (also known as Batia KIRSHENBAUM and Batja KIRSHENBAUM,) late of Richmond Hill, Ontario, Property Manager.
Creditors and others having claims against the above estate are required to send full particulars of such claims to the undersigned on or before the 12th day of September, 2005, after which date the estate's assets will be distributed having regard only to claims that have then been received.
Zahava LAMBERT, Toronto, Ontario, Naomi E. KIRSHENBAUM- COHEN, North York, Ontario and Howard J. KIRSHENBAUM, Toronto, Ontario, Estate Trustees,
by Lerners LLP, Solicitors, 80 Dufferin Avenue, P.O. Box 2335, London, Ontario,
N6A 4G4.
Page B7

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-26 published
KIRSHENBAUM, Betty (a.k.a. Batia, Batja) - Estate of
Notice To Creditors
In the Estate Of Betty KIRSHENBAUM (also known as Batia KIRSHENBAUM and Batja KIRSHENBAUM,) late of Richmond Hill, Ontario, Property Manager.
Creditors and others having claims against the above estate are required to send full particulars of such claims to the undersigned on or before the 12th day of September, 2005, after which date the estate's assets will be distributed having regard only to claims that have then been received.
Zahava LAMBERT, Toronto, Ontario, Naomi E. KIRSHENBAUM- COHEN, North York, Ontario and Howard J. KIRSHENBAUM, Toronto, Ontario, Estate Trustees,
by Lerners LLP, Solicitors, 80 Dufferin Avenue, P.O. Box 2335, London, Ontario,
N6A 4G4.
Page B7

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-17 published
MENDELSON, Jeannette (formerly CRYSTAL)
On Friday, September 16, 2005, at Kensington Place. Jeannette MENDELSON, beloved wife of Bert, and the late Max CRYSTAL. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Nita and Mark COHEN, and Larry CRYSTAL. Loving sister and sister-in-law of Norma and Bernie KATZ, and Ruth and the late Jerry KAIMAN. Devoted grandmother of Matthew and Talia, Julie, Stephanie and Blair, and Jason and Michelle. Devoted great-grandmother of Mack, Zoey, Jack, and Sophie. Please call Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel (416) 663-9060 after 9 p.m. Saturday evening or see www.benjamins.ca for details. Interment the Adath Israel Synagogue section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Jeannette Mendelson Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C3, (416) 780-0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-28 published
ZIPURSKY, Freda
On Monday, September 26, 2005 at her home. Freda ZIPURSKY, beloved wife of Alvin. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Larry and Susan of Los Angeles, Bob and Debbie of Toronto, and Ben and Antonia of New York. Dear sister of Shirley COHEN. Devoted grandmother of Liza, Rachel, Jonathan, Amy, Emma, Rebecca, and Gillian. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Thursday, September 29, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Holy Blossom Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva following the service at 403 Richview Avenue then continuing after 7: 00 p.m. at 278 Bloor Street East #1203. If desired, donations may be made to the Freda Zipursky Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-15 published
COHEN, Rose Esther (née SHERMAN)
Peacefully, at Longworth Long Term Care Centre, on Sunday November 13, 2005. Rose Esther COHEN (née SHERMAN) in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Elliott COHEN (1980.) Loving mother and mother-in-law of the late Harris (2000) and his wife Donna, Dr. Nathan and his wife Nancy, Jerome and his wife Edie, and Rachelle and her husband Blake. 'Fabulous Bubby' to Eric, Jonathan, Sarah, Jennifer, Leigh, Michael, Richard, Reese and Jeffrey. Funeral service will be held at the Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas Street, London (between Colborne and Waterloo St.), on Wednesday November 16, 2005, at 11: 00 a.m. with Rabbi Joel WITTSTEIN officiating. Interment in Or Shalom Cemetery. Donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences can be expressed at www.loganfh.ca. Special Thanks to the staff in the Iris wing at Longworth Long Term Care Centre for giving such wonderful care to Rose.
A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Rose COHEN.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-07 published
COHEN, Edward Ezra
(Former Co-owner of Colonial Furniture)
Peacefully on Monday, December 5, 2005 at the age of 81. Beloved husband of 43 years to Fern COHEN. Loving father of Robin HARRIS (Robin SEARS), John (Deb) HARRIS, Wendy HARRIS (Neil McGILLIVRAY) and Michael (Minda LATOWSKY) COHEN. Cherished Zaidie to Mathew, Rachel, Alanna, Amelia, Noah, Kate, Ethan and Hannah. Dear brother of Erica CHERNEY and Ben (Rhona) CARNIOL. Devoted brother and business partner for 60 years of Sid (Barbara) COHEN. son of the late Max and Greta COHEN. Uncle Eddie will be sadly missed by his many nieces and nephews. A Funeral Service was held at the Jewish Memorial Chapel, 1771 Cuba Avenue on Tuesday, December 6, 2005 at 2 p.m. Interment Jewish Community Cemetery, Bank Street, Ottawa. Shiva to be observed 1201-40 Boteler Street, Ottawa. In lieu of flowers donations to the Ottawa Jewish Community Foundation (798-4696 #274) would be appreciated. Arrangements in care of the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry. (613-233-1143).

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-10 published
ROGERS, Ida
On Thursday December 8, 2005 at Baycrest. Ida ROGERS, beloved wife of the late Ben ROGERS. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Harvey and Sharon, and Rose and Perry COHEN. Dear sister of the late Sam STRAUSS, Nathan STRAUSS, and Harry STRAUSS. Devoted grandmother of Jonathan and Rebecca, Deborah, Ellie and Nathan FIGHEL, and great-grandmother of Brooke. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday December 11, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Workmen's Circle Section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 56 Ridgevale Drive. If desired, donations may be made to the Ida Rogers Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-15 published
COHEN, Shaughnessy, 1988 -- Died This Day
Thursday, December 15, 2005, Page S9
Lawyer and politician born in London, Ontario, on February 11, After a brief teaching career, she decided to study law. In 1979, she graduated from the University of Windsor and served as federal prosecutor for Essex County from 1985 to 1989. Long involved in Liberal politics as an organizer, she decided to run in the 1988 federal election but she was not successful until 1993, when she defeated New Democratic Party incumbent Howard McCURDY. She collapsed in the House of Commons just seconds after standing to address the House. She had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-31 published
COHEN, Bert Meyer (November 14th, 1919-December 29th, 2005)
Bert "Butch" COHEN has gone to join his cronies in that Monday Night Bridge game in the sky. He was devoted to his bride of 63 years Muriel "Mickey" COHEN. He was a loving father to Peter, Paul (Janeen), and Mark 'Cole' (Ellen). He was the respected and irreverent grandfather to Peter, Jesse, Samantha, Roxanne, and Zachary. He was pre-deceased by his granddaughter Alexandra and his 'daughter' Wendy BICKERSTAFF. Bert also leaves a legion of good Friends and loved ones - all of whom will miss and remember his outrageous sense of humour and sharp wit. Bert was a successful family man, a businessman who actually loved going to work each and every day (which he did right up until a week ago). A tribute to his practical, down-to-earth approach and incisive judgement was his 60+ years of business success and his win-win long-time association with the Lipson family. He was a terrific hockey player in his prime, a graduate of the University of Toronto (Master of Commerce), a lifelong donor and community volunteer serving with distinction at the Toronto Jewish Free Loan Cassa, the United Way and the Terrace at Baycrest. Bert was a World War 2 veteran, a patron of the arts, a penultimate entertainer and a true and loyal friend. Bert will be missed by all. Friends and strangers alike were 'taken' with his special sense of humour and his intuitive spark in conversation - an optimism conveyed - a genuine article - that was Bert. At Holy Blossom Temple, 1950 Bathurst Street for service on Sunday, January 1, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Holy Blossom Memorial Park. Evening shiva services at 400 Walmer Road, East Tower, Suite 529.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-03 published
SOLOWAY, Louis
On Friday, December 31, 2004 at Baycrest Hospital. Louis SOLOWAY, beloved husband of the late Esther. Loving father and father-in-law of Bev and Harold HUTNER, Linda and Arne LEAN, and Bryan SOLOWAY. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Anne and Joe LICHTIG, Edith and the late Joe PACILLA, the late Bessie COHEN, Ben SOLOWAY, and Ruth SHAPIRO. Devoted grandfather of Jennifer and Jamey, Marc, Karen and Margaret, and Melanie, and great-grandfather of Shoshana. Services were held at Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W., on Sunday, January 2 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Temple Sinai section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 104 Mullen Drive, Thornhill. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Louis and Esther Soloway Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto 416-780- 0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-22 published
HANDELMAN, Bertha
On January 20, 2005. Bertha, beloved wife of the late Murray. Dear friend of Saul SHUGAR. Dear mother of Arnold and Elkie, Elaine and Allan DAVIS, and Temi and Stan DULBERG. Grandmother of Kevin and Nancy, Jill and John, Kenny and Cheryl, Richie and Eva, Judi, David and Tamara, and Warren and Jason. Sister of Faye and Moishe GRAFSTEIN, and Dave and the late Laura COHEN. Great-grandmother of Keleila, Martine, Brandon, Aaron, Simone and Mason. A Funeral Service will be held on Sunday, January 23, 2005 at 12: 00 noon from Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. W. (between Yonge and Bathurst). Shiva Private. Memorial donations may be made to the Soldiers of Israel, 416-783-3053.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-22 published
MARSHALL, Douglas
Peacefully, at St. Michael's Hospital, in his 67th year. He leaves his wife Sarah MURDOCH; his sons Barnaby and Benjamin; his sister Sally; his dear friend and first wife Deborah; his daughter-in-law Carmen DUNJKO; his granddaughter Emma, and her mother Colleen DECOURCY; his belatedly discovered British son Hugh THOMAS, his wife Natalie, and son Oliver; the staff of the Duke of York his many Friends; and his affectionate but demanding cat Nora. Douglas was a true original - demanding, difficult, smart, funny, loyal and irascible - who more than anything enjoyed red wine, good writing and socializing, probably in that order. He grew up in Colbourne, Ontario, and attended Highgate School in London and the University of Toronto, where he was the editor of the Varsity in the '58-59 school year. He worked at the London bureau of Canadian Press; Maclean's; as a television Guide columnist at Books in Canada, which he co-founded with Val CLERY; and the Toronto Star, where he remains the longest-surviving Entertainment Editor since Nathan COHEN. He was a founding member of the Crime Writers of Canada and the author of A Very Palpable Hit. A Service for Doug will be held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, January 25th at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. Donations to the Canadian Liver Foundation.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-01 published
BADER, Morris Philip
On Monday, January 31, 2005 at The Scarborough Hospital - Grace Division. Morris BADER, beloved husband of the late Sue BADER (née COHEN.) Devoted partner of Jean COOPER. Loving father and father-in-law of Judi and William DRAIMIN, and Marvin and the late Nancy BADER (née LAND.) Beloved grandfather of Lisa and Brad KALK, and Robbyn DRAIMIN. Loving great-grandfather of Jordan Daniel, Samantha Paige, and Joshua Aaron KALK. Dedicated brother and brother-in-law of Arnold, Ethel LAMSTER, Saundra and Henry SHERMAN, and the late Ruth and Louis GOLDMAN. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (2 lights west of Dutferin) for service on Wednesday, February 2, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Stopnitzer Young Mens section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva 67 Mossgrove Trail. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, 416-486-2500, or The Scarborough Hospital - Grace Division for Palliative Care Unit, 416-495-2505.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-05 published
PAMENTER, Margaret Frances Ferrier
Passed away on February 3, 2005, in her 85th year, at Trillium Health Centre - Mississauga Site. Beloved wife of Walter Douglas PAMENTER. Cherished mother of Judith (David COHEN,) Nancy (John POTVIN,) and Heather (Ian WALLACE.) Dear grandmother of Philip POTVIN, Alex WALLACE, Shelley WALLACE, Valerie COHEN, and Laura COHEN. Dear sister of Bill FERRIER. Lovingly remembered by many nieces and nephews and other family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West (between Islington and Kipling Aves.) between 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at the Chapel on Tuesday, February 8, 2005 at 3 p.m.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-06 published
PAMENTER, Margaret Frances Ferrier
Passed away on February 3, 2005, in her 85th year, at Trillium Health Centre - Mississauga Site. Beloved wife of Walter Douglas PAMENTER. Cherished mother of Judith (David COHEN,) Nancy (John POTVIN,) and Heather (Ian WALLACE.) Dear grandmother of Philip POTVIN, Alex WALLACE, Shelley WALLACE, Valerie COHEN, and Laura COHEN. Dear sister of Bill FERRIER. Lovingly remembered by many nieces and nephews and other family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West (between Islington and Kipling Aves.) between 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at the Chapel on Tuesday, February 8, 2005 at 3 p.m.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-09 published
ROSE, Miriam (née COHEN)
On Tuesday, February 8, 2005 at Baycrest Hospital. Miriam ROSE, beloved wife of the late Marvin. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Leslie, and Brian and Verone. Miriam was the youngest of nine children of the late Annie and Harris COHEN. Devoted grandmother of Laura. A graveside service will be held at Pardes Shalom Cemetery, New Fraternal section, on Thursday, February 10th at 2: 00 p.m. Friends are invited to visit the family at 2 Neptune Drive, Suite 315 for Thursday only. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Baycrest Centre Foundation (416) 785-2875.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-05 published
COHEN, Sheldon
On Wednesday, March 2, 2005, at Toronto East General Hospital. Sheldon COHEN, loving father of Cynthia, Michael, Joseph, and Eva-Marie. Dear brother of Marv. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (2 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday, March 7, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva will be held at 3 Sunfield Rd., North York, Monday only. If desired, donations may be made to the Sheldon Cohen Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-14 published
WOLFMAN, Max
On Sunday, March 13, 2005 surrounded by his devoted family. Loving husband of Betty. Beloved father of Marnie COHEN, Michael and Wendy, Brian, Eric and Adrienne. Devoted brother and brother-in-law of Lily and Saul STEINFELD, Morrie and Pauline, Jean and the late Irving Wolfman, Yetta Berman, and the late Abe BERMAN, and the late Rae and Joe FREEDMAN. Adored grandfather of Tara, Mandy, Asia, Alexandra, and Jacob. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue W. (2 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday, March 15 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment The Adath Israel Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva visits will be held from 1: 00 p.m. daily and evening services at 6:15 p.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to The Baycrest Foundation 416-785-2875 or The Herbie Fund c/o Hospital for Sick Children, 416-813-7234.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-16 published
FAWCETT- SCHWENDAU, Phyllis Eileen
At Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, March 14, 2005, age 91, previously of Scarborough and recently of Keswick. A vibrant and courageous heart came to rest in the loving company of her son, Eric SCHWENDAU and his wife Sharon COHEN of Keswick, granddaughter Theresa THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Baltimore, Ontario, and devoted sister, Norma GROVES. She was predeceased by her husband Frederick "Alph" SCHWENDAU, March 20, 1982 and Lloyd FAWCETT in January 2005. Deeply missed, never to be forgotten. Funeral Service from M.W. Becker Funeral Home, 490 The Queensway South, Keswick 1-888-884-4486 on Friday, March 18, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m. Family will receive Friends from 10: 30 a.m. until time of service. Interment Westminster Memorial Park Cemetery, Willowdale. If desired, a donation made to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-02 published
HERMAN, Dr. Bernard George
Born January 11, 1919, in Toronto, the second and fair-haired of the six sons of Eli and Bella HERMAN. After serving with the Canadian Medical Corps during World War 2, Bernie interned at a Los Angeles Hospital and found Bette COHEN and a rewarding surgical practice, sufficient reasons to adopt California's graces for the rest of his life. His family's testament follows: Bernard G. HERMAN, M.D., well respected surgeon who loved his patients and excelled at caring for them, passed away on March 29, 2005 at age 86, surrounded by his loving family. His wife Bette, his son Mark, his two daughters Bonnie and Terry, and his five grandchildren Brian, Melissa, Alex, Alana and Jillian survive him. He also leaves his four surviving brothers of Toronto, Canada: Sydney, Victor, Reginald and Irving (the oldest, Norman having predeceased him in 2001). After 40 years, he retired from his surgery pracice at age 70 and dedicated himself to his hobbies. He had loved sailing in his younger days and enjoyed taking family and Friends for sailing trips off the Southern California Coast. However his passion was golf. He was a member of Riviera Country Club for many years and took great pleasure in continuously striving to improve his golf swing and game. He played golf daily until 3 months before his final illness. He will be greatly missed by all who loved him. Funeral services were held Friday, April 1 at Hillside Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made to Cedars-Sinai Hospice. We wish to add that when he retired, Bernie worked as an advisor for an insurance company, and it was O.K. for a few years, but Bernie prided himself on his ethics, and he resigned over a moral disagreement. And, in addition to golfing and sailing, he loved intellectual challenges, and when he and Bette travelled, Bernie insisted on destinations that provided intellectual stimulations. So long, good friend.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-12 published
CZECH, Walter George
Passed away at Villa Care Centre, Midland, on Monday, April 11, 2005. Water CZECH of Midland, formerly of Oshawa, in his 84th year. Loving father of Roma CZECH (Ray OVERMAN) of Wyevale and step-father of Janina BOGUSZ (the late Ed WOJNAR) of Ajax. Loving grandfather of Rowan Walter CZECH- MAURICE, Noelle, Ryan (Robin) and Jeremy WOJNAR. Walter was born in Krakow, Poland on January 15, 1922. He spent time in a prisoner of war camp in Siberia, and was in the Service under General Anders in World War 2 in the British Allied Forces. As an Artillery Sergeant, Walter was stationed in Palestine, Iran and Egypt and finally fought in the Great Battle of Monte Cassino. He loved music with a passion (especially the tango) and played many instruments for the troops during the war. After the war, Walter spent time in Italy before immigrating to Canada. Some broken hearts and smiling faces were left behind. The family would like to thank Dr. GRIEVES and Dr. COHEN, as well as all the wonderful caregivers at the Villa Care Centre. The family will receive Friends at Lynn-Carson Funeral Home, 290 First Street, Midland, 705-526-6551 on Friday, April 15th from 7-9 p.m. Cremation has taken place. Walter requested that there be no flowers ("Can't Eat Them!") and no services held. Instead, spend time with your family and just love them in his memory. Walter's Words to Live By: "It doesn't cost to listen." "Smart people listen more than they talk." "Easy to spend, hard to save." "Doesn't matter how much you make, matters how much you save." "Just spend time with your family and enjoy life." And finally... "Let's go to Horny Tim's Doughnuts for coffee!" To sign our online guest book, please visit: www.carsonfuneralhomes.comA Memorial Tree will be planted by the Lynn-Carson Funeral Home.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-12 published
SNOW, Lillian
Passed away peacefully on April 10, 2005. Beloved wife of the late Joseph. Dear mother of Rosalie GELLER and Margie and her husband Marvin KESHEN. Proud Bubie of Debi, Gail, Fern and Mayer, and the late David KESHEN. Great-grandmother of Joshua, Justin, Jory, Adam, Daniel, Stefanie and Katie. Survived by sister Sylvia COHEN and brother Sam GOLDHAR. Predeceased by sisters Helen, Annie and Gerry. Funeral service will be held Tuesday, April 12, 2005 from Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. W. (between Bathurst and Yonge) at 11: 30 a.m. Interment to follow at Mount Sinai Cemetery, Sunnyside Association section. Shiva 5444 Yonge Street, No. 407. Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Canada, 416-488-8772, or charity of your choice.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-14 published
GALIAUSKAS, Dr. Elena
With family by her side, passed away April 13, 2005. Predeceased by husband Kazys. Beloved mother of Dalia DAINORA and Rymantas GALIAUSKAS (GALIUS.) Loving grandmother of Paul DAINORA (wife Ramune,) Audra DAINORA (husband Randolph COHEN,) Tomas DAINORA, Aleksandra DAINORA, Kristopher GALIUS (wife Susan) and Monika GALIUS. Dear great-grandmother of Marius and Vilius DAINORA and Dalia Dainora COHEN. Born in Vilnius (1911,) she earned the degree of Doctor of Dentistry at the University of Kaunas. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere on Friday, April 15th from 6-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held at the Lithuanian Martyr's Church, 2185 Stavebank Rd., Mississauga, on Saturday, April 16, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Saint John's Lithuanian Cemetery.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-15 published
KRAVITZ, Clara
On Wednesday, April 13, 2005 at Baycrest Hospital. Clara KRAVITZ, beloved wife of the late Joseph KRAVITZ. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Marsha and Jim McWHINNIE, and Lou and the late Elaine WINER. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Hilda and the late Ben ROSE, Fred and Marion REISMAN, Al and Sheila REISMAN, Ruth and the late George REISMAN, and the late Minnie and Morris COHEN, and Lou REISMAN. Devoted grandmother of Elly WINER and Jane HARGRAFT, Aviva and Matthew GOTTLIEB, Michael WINER, Annie, Paul, and Diane McWHINNIE, and the late Jeannie McWHINNIE, and great-grandmother of Jessie, Allie, Rachel, and Eleanor. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, April 15, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 41 Bauer Crescent, Unionville, concluding Sunday evening, April 17th. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Foundation 416-946-6560 or The Baycrest Centre Foundation, 416-785-2875.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-25 published
SHIDLOWSKI, Harry " Chaim"
It is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of our dear Chamel on Shabbat/Erev Pesach April 23, 2005 at Sunnybrook and Women's College Hospital. Beloved husband of Molly, loving father to Ida (Stan COHEN), Lilian, and Alvin (Lori ISENBAUM). Devoted grandfather of David and Vanessa, Dana, Daniel, Brandon and Justin. Brother to Henna and the late Aron STAWICKI of Israel, brother-in-law to Gitel and the late Leibish GOTLIEB, uncle and great-uncle. Born Stopnitz, Poland. Holocaust survivor. His absolute courage will remain a guiding light to our family for all generations to come. Funeral Services will be held on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 at Steeles College Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Avenue West. Please contact Chapel at 416-733-2000 for time of funeral. Interment at Bathurst Lawn Cemetery, Stopnitzer Section. Shiva at 88 Alexis Blvd. (evening prayers). Memorial donations, if desired, to Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-06 published
Charged, tried, acquitted, killed
Nate Dawg 'lived by gun, died by gun'
Had threatened a key Crown witness
By Dale Anne FREED and Nick PRON, Staff Reporters
Nathanial " Nate Dawg" LESLIE may have dodged a murder rap two months ago, but he couldn't duck the bullets that snuffed out his life outside a west-end strip club early yesterday morning.
Homicide detectives are looking at revenge as a possible motive in the slaying of the 23-year-old wannabe gangsta rapper, who died in a hail of bullets after narrowly avoiding two other recent murder attempts.
Three weeks ago, a gunman peppered a bus shelter at King St. W. and Dufferin St. with shots but missed LESLIE.
It's believed LESLIE had armed himself and did some shooting of his own at those hunting him, a police source said.
His death came in the midst of a city-wide spasm that saw three homicides in less than 24 hours. A woman was stabbed to death on Wednesday night in a home near Finch Ave. E. and Brimley Rd., while a man was killed yesterday afternoon near Jane St. and Finch Ave. W.
LESLIE had been warned by his lawyer, Friends and police to get out of town after he was acquitted of second-degree murder in the February 2003, killing of Bruce PANCHO at a Yorkville nightclub, Friends said.
"He knew he was going to die," one said. "He knew he was targeted for death from the moment he was acquitted."
LESLIE had at least two close calls in the 60 days of freedom following his release from custody after the trial. But his luck ran out on Wednesday at about 2: 30 a.m. in front of the House of Lancaster, on Bloor St. W. near Lansdowne Ave. He was shot "numerous times" in the stomach by an unknown gunman, who then disappeared into the night, police said.
The police officers who patrolled the west-end area weren't surprised by his slaying.
"You live by the gun, you die by the gun. It's street justice," one officer said.
During his trial, jurors were never told that LESLIE had threatened a key Crown witness, a lifelong acquaintance of his who was standing just a few metres away when PANCHO, a stranger, was shot in the chest after he accidentally bumped into LESLIE on the dance floor.
Even the judge at his trial seemed to think LESLIE was guilty, saying while jurors were out of the courtroom that the key witness had "compelling evidence" LESLIE was the shooter.
LESLIE was also a suspect in two other murders, sources told the Toronto Star. He was also suspected of assaulting several inmates at the Toronto (Don) Jail.
Jail spokesperson Chris CROISIER said LESLIE had been carrying a switchblade at the jail but eventually handed it over when confronted by guards.
LESLIE's death has brought a "strange kind of relief" to the mother of the man he was acquitted of slaying, she said in an interview last night.
"I lost my child and it hurt me from the bottom of my heart," Georgia DUFFUS said. "My justice comes from God. I don't want to say this is justice because I feel really awful. I don't want to seem as if I'm rejoicing.
"When I walked from that courthouse without getting any justice (after LESLIE's acquittal,) I felt crushed, like I was let down by the system," she said.
"I feel sorry for his family members, his grandmother and his father, who were there throughout court."
The lawyer who represented LESLIE at his trial, Laurence COHEN, was visibly shaken by the slaying, saying he was aware of the threats against his client. COHEN told jurors that the case against LESLIE was one of mistaken identity.
"This is just another senseless act of violence," COHEN said yesterday. "My condolences to his family. He had a lot of people who cared for him."
Despite his apparent penchant for violence, LESLIE died without a criminal record, although he had been in some minor trouble as a juvenile. The murder rap had been the first criminal charge against him.
Acquaintances said he could be kind and considerate, with a lively sense of humour. But on the street, LESLIE was known as a violent man with a "short fuse" who usually carried a gun. He also had a penchant for writing violent rap lyrics -- once singing on a Toronto radio show.
One song he penned -- found in his pocket when he was arrested read in part:
They say I'm armed and dangerous
And known to kill strangers.
So do not approach
Cause you'll probably get smoked.
The Crown attorney's office had discussed appealing LESLIE's acquittal on the murder charge but decided against it, said prosecutor Kerry Hughes.
"It's very rare that a jury acquittal is appealed," she said.
LESLIE dropped out of high school and, although he never had a job, he always had money, buying a $150 bottle of champagne on the night PANCHO was slain, his trial heard.
Friends say he fathered two children, with two different women, living with one or the other while he was selling drugs.
He had a "Day One" tattoo on his right forearm and "Gangsta" tattooed on his left forearm. He had been known to carry a 9-mm Walther P38 semi-automatic handgun tucked into his waistband.
Friends describe LESLIE as being blasé about the threats against him during the last two months of his life. One recalled him saying: "I'm trying to get my computer back from the cops. Oh, by the way, someone just took a shot at me."
Although he knew he was a marked man, LESLIE told Friends he didn't want to leave the Parkdale area, where he had lived all of his life.
When he was the target of a massive manhunt in the PANCHO slaying, complete with wanted posters on newspaper boxes, LESLIE remained in Parkdale, sleeping in different places almost every night, a friend said.
"He knew if he was seen on the streets, he would be dead. He went the way he wanted to go."
A second man, described by police as an associate of LESLIE's, was wounded in the shooting, and found nearby, on the west sidewalk of Margueretta St. He was taken to St. Michael's Hospital, where he underwent surgery and is expected to recover, police said.
One neighbour said she heard a woman screaming just before the shooting. Bullets were sprayed everywhere. One hit the porch roof of a house part way down Margueretta St.
Police were on the scene within minutes, the resident of the house said.
"I saw two guys lying on the ground. I heard people screaming. I saw the cops, the firefighters."
Police sources said beer bottles from inside the House of Lancaster were collected yesterday to obtain fingerprints.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-19 published
COHEN, Evelyn R.
Peacefully, at home on Wednesday, May 18, 2005. Evelyn, beloved wife of the late Bernard (Butch) COHEN. Loving mother of Sheldon (Ruth), Mark (Cindy), and Mitchell (Elissa). Cherished grandmother of Noah, Zachary, Haley, and Adam, J.P. and Matt, and Sasha. Predeceased by her brother Leo BORNSTEIN and brother-in-law Paul BOGART. Evelyn will be sadly missed by her dear sister Mildred (Mickey) BOGART, and sisters-in-law Rochelle BORNSTEIN, and Miriam ANTMAN. She will be fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Evelyn devoted her life to family, Friends, customers and community. Her presence touched all who met her. The family gives special thanks to Christine SANMARTIN, Dr. MAZURKA, Betty Ann, Edith, and Magdalin for exceptional care and compassion. The funeral service will be held on Thursday, May 19, 2005 at 1 p.m. at Adas Israel Synagogue, 125 Cline Avenue South, Hamilton. In memory of Evelyn, donations to the Reena Foundation, 905-763-8254 would be appreciated by the family.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-07 published
COHEN, Paul " Pesach"
Born 1948 in Detroit, he died in Toronto on Sunday, June 5, 2005. Predeceased by his parents, Harry and Florence, he is survived by his sons Michael and Justin of Dayton, Ohio, his brother and sister-in-law, Gary and Linda of Florida, and his aunt and uncle, Marvin and Sara HOFFMAN of West Bloomfield, Michigan. He will be buried in the Machpela Cemetery in Ferndale, Michigan. Paul is also survived by countless Friends in Toronto, including the entire Anshei Minsk Congregation in Kensington Market, where he has played a significant role for the past 10 years. Memorial donations may be made to Anshei Minsk Congregation (416) 595-5723.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-13 published
Dorothy THOMAS stormed city hall
One of reformer group elected to council in 1972
She started poop and scoop program in Toronto
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
Once upon a time, when Toronto was younger and believed in itself much, much more, a group of urban idealists stormed city hall. They called themselves reformers and they got into the council chamber by getting themselves elected. David CROMBIE was their leader, a man dubbed Toronto's "tiny perfect mayor" by the media of the day, and great things were expected and sometimes even delivered.
Now, these reformers were feisty and forward-thinking -- they were people like the late Colin VAUGHAN, an architect turned activist, lawyers Dale MARTIN and Karl JAFFARY, renegade thinker John SEWELL. And three of the newly minted aldermen -- for that was the job title of councillor in those days -- were women.
But only two -- Anne JOHNSTON and Dorothy THOMAS -- made it through the first term of office. JOHNSTON, who retired from municipal politics at the time of the last election, says that was only because they learned to be tough and because they had each other.
"I met her December 4, 1972, the night we were all elected. There was a spontaneous gathering of all the reformers at city hall and I remember Dorothy was wearing a hat and she came up to me and said: 'You and I are going to be Friends,'" she said.
They were a gang of citizen politicians who believed they were going to create a livable, even lovable city, but THOMAS was right about at least one thing that night: she and JOHNSTON were Friends until May 9 this year, when THOMAS died of cancer at Dorothy MIKOS was the proud daughter of very proud Hungarians. Her father, a tailor, and her mother, a talented seamstress, came to Canada in the 1930s. Theirs was the classic immigrant story, according to THOMAS's only child, Nye THOMAS, a lawyer and policy director of the Ipperwash provincial inquiry. His grandparents worked hard in Spadina Ave. sweatshops so their children would never have to and were thrilled when their daughter went to the University of Toronto.
THOMAS discovered journalism there -- it was the heyday of the varsity press -- as well as Ralph THOMAS, another journalist who would become a well-known Canadian filmmaker. Now living in California, he is best known here for Ticket To Heaven and The Terry Fox Story. Dorothy THOMAS left university before she graduated to work at the Toronto Star, where she was an arts reporter under the watch of the legendary entertainment editor Nathan COHEN.
She was a stay-at-home mom living in a fourplex on Wineva Ave. in the Beach when she joined up with a group of residents to successfully fight the construction of the Scarborough Expressway, which would have cut right through her neighbourhood.
THOMAS served two terms on Toronto council, from 1972 to 1976 and from 1981 to 1985, representing the old Ward 9 until ousted by a tag team of Paul CHRISTIE and Tom JAKOBEK. She had been one of the founders of the City of Toronto's Person's Day Award and had headed the Mayor's Task Force on the Status of Women.
"She was an excellent politician," said Barbara CAPLAN, a former Toronto city clerk. "She could build consensus across political ties."
JOHNSTON said her friend initiated Toronto's poop and scoop program, an achievement not among those noted on the condolence motion passed by council 10 days after THOMAS died, but not without its significance.
"She owned the public works committee," said JOHNSTON. " She was always the chair. She liked it because it was working on neighbour stuff."
Attractive and articulate, THOMAS was also blunt. "There was no filter with her, ever," her son said.
She made headlines when she and Alderman Dale MARTIN visited Calgary in 1985 for the 48th annual convention of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. "The whole of downtown Calgary shows an amazing lack of planning," she said. Ralph KLEIN was the mayor then and he summoned photographers to record him standing in front of Calgary City Hall wearing boxing gloves and dissing the smug politicians from the East.
THOMAS didn't back down. "It's very ugly in Calgary," she told the Star. "It even makes (Metro planners) look good."
By then a single mom working punishing hours, THOMAS still made a point of being home every night to have dinner with her son. When she quit politics the first time, it was to spend time with Nye. When she left municipal politics for good, she moved to Euclid Ave. and got a job heading and helping clean up the Metro Licensing Commission, serving on the subsequent Toronto Licensing Tribunal until 2003.
A spectacular cook and a stylish hostess, she was often asked to donate her talents to fundraising events. A dinner party for four catered by Dorothy THOMAS was always a hot ticket at silent and not-so-silent auctions for the New Democratic Party. She was generous with her money as well as time, donating to 60 charities, including the Canadian Marmot Foundation (because she thought no one else would, her son said).
Her dinner table was a natural gathering place for Friends and their families. For 10 years she met one Wednesday night every other month with a group of powerful women such as June CALLWOOD, Doris ANDERSON and Sylvia OSTRY, and for twice as long as that, she was part of a poker player gang of Friends that included fellow activist Ethel TEITELBAUM, who often travelled with THOMAS.
"She was a complicated woman who attacked a lot of people who loved her. But we hung in there because she was loyal and wonderful company -- witty, generous. I always thought she was beautiful," said TEITELBAUM.
Last fall they had travelled to Sicily, one of THOMAS's must-see destinations. "We had a ball," said TEITELBAUM.
But THOMAS, who disliked doctors, was in pain and in fact had been suffering for some time. When she was finally diagnosed with cancer at Christmas, it was too late. THOMAS was admitted to Princess Margaret Hospital, where she had hundreds of visitors. "They said they had never seen anything like it," said CAPLAN, who was soon sending out regular emails about THOMAS to 125 recipients.
In recent years, THOMAS had moved to Port Hope and had been immersed in developing the Port Hope Ecology Garden.
THOMAS never got home again: she spent 17 weeks in hospital, latterly at the Toronto Grace where she celebrated her 67th birthday with Friends. She wasn't in pain, but she was unable to read or watch much television, and every morning she would wake up and be angry that she was still around. "She wanted to leave the arena," CAPLAN said.
She insisted both Nye and his wife, Karen, go to China on a long-awaited trip to bring home Mei Leigh, their adopted daughter and her first grandchild. She died two days after they left Canada.
Her many Friends are gathering tonight at 7 p.m. at the Gladstone Hotel for her memorial. There will be good food, wine, Friends reuniting, laughter and only four speeches. Her son says it is where and how she would have wanted it.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-14 published
FISHAUF, Nathan
On Sunday, June 12, 2005, at Baycrest Hospital. Nathan FISHAUF, beloved husband of Brenda. Loving father and father in-law of Ann SARGENT, and Louis FISHAUF and Nancy. Dear brother of Eta COHEN, and the late Yoel FISHAUF, and Leah GILBOA. Devoted grandfather of Miriam, and Jackson. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, June 15, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Stashover Young Mens section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Nathan Fishauf Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-02 published
COHEN, Anna (née MENDELSON)
In Montreal on Sunday, June 26, 2005. Wife of late Hyman COHEN. Beloved mother of Naomi, Getzel and Avi. Grandmother of 9. Great-grandmother of 11.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-03 published
HOPKIN, Thomas William Randal " Randy"
Peacefully at home with his family on Monday, August 1, 2005 in his 48th year. Thomas William Randal HOPKIN, dear son of Helen and predeceased by his father Thomas and step-mother Hugie. Dear loving husband to Margaret and cherished father to Jason (Stephanie) of Acton, Michelle HOPKIN- MILES (Jeff) of Toronto and Randy (Dawn) of Brampton. Loved brother of Debbie, Cheryl, Alan, Larry, Chris, Kim and Cindy. Randy will be sadly missed by his in-laws William and Margaret HANN, sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews, cousins and many other family and Friends. The family would also like to express their sincere appreciation to Kevin, Dr. COHEN, Dr. BURKES, Dr. SWARTZ and all the homecare workers who helped with their care and compassion. It is truly appreciated. Randy will also be missed by his "companions" Cody and Domi. Friends will be received at the Ridley Funeral Home, 3080 Lakeshore Blvd. W. (between Islington and Kipling Aves., at 14th Street, 416-259-3705) on Wednesday and Thursday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Mass Friday 11 a.m. at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 782 Brown's Line. Interment Assumption Cemetery, Mississauga. Messages of Condolence may be placed at www. RidleyFuneralHome.com.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-08 published
John GOVEDAS, 55: A force of nature with 88 keys
John GOVEDAS brightened up choir rehearsals
Pianist also brilliant composer and arranger
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
They are an unheralded lot, these accompanists in school gyms or drafty church basements hunched in balled sweaters over pianos that may or may not be in tune, playing for bored and/or restless choristers who may or may not be in time or on the same note.
Then there was John GOVEDAS.
A big man, a nutty professor of a guy, he would burst into rehearsals, streaming sheet music behind him -- and everything, including the choir he was about to accompany, was brighter.
"Behind your back he would be winding the kids up," said Margaret STANFIELD, the renowned and recently retired music director at Howard Jr. Public School. "He would make faces behind the conductor's back. He could be a distraction."
Before every school practice, the kids would crowd around GOVEDAS at the piano, giggling at the buck teeth and horns he added to the pictures he'd taken of them with his new digital camera. Then there was the fake hand that appeared at Halloween.
Indeed the clown who could break into The Simpsons theme song to crack up a choir hid the artist, the lyrical pianist, the composer, the arranger with the uncompromising standards and the need to hone musical expression to those same standards, to an always higher level.
"Either you could work with John or you couldn't. He was intimidating. He could wreak havoc at a rehearsal if he sensed you weren't strong or confident," said Shelagh COHEN, who could and did work with GOVEDAS for years, even after she left conducting in schools to work in administration for the Toronto public board's music department.
GOVEDAS went on to do all the accompanying work for the board.
"(His) piano was never relegated to a supporting role but was an integral part of the song," STANFIELD said in her eulogy to GOVEDAS, who died May 11. He was 55.
She was another music teacher/choir director who faced down GOVEDAS and won his Friendship. "I inherited him," she said when she went to Glen Ames school to teach. "I was told I should keep him, that he was brilliant. And that's what he was: brilliant."
The two worked together for 20 years, 16 of them at Howard school, talking over repertoire and interpretation and producing a long run of award-winning choirs from there.
GOVEDAS used to attack the piano, STANFIELD said. "He grunted, he groaned and sweated, as his page turners knew. He was a force of nature at the piano."
GOVEDAS accompanied school choirs all over town; among them those at John Wanless, Glen Ames, John Ross Robertson, Maurice Cody, Earl Haig and Gledhill schools. He accompanied adult singers as well in the High Park community choir, the Riverdale Youth Singers and the Milton Choristers. For a time he led a girls' choir in Hamilton and for 35 years he was choir director at his own church.
In his music-strewn apartment in High Park, he arranged and composed music on his electric piano. He wrote "I am the Song," a favourite with many of his school choirs. His 1996 version of "I'se the B'y" has been performed by choirs in Iceland and Australia as well as Newfoundland.
COHEN said she had to fight with GOVEDAS to show her that arrangement he insisted he'd written it for the high school voice, not that of an elementary school-aged child. And it was true that GOVEDAS, whose music degree from the University of Toronto was in choral composition, had a gift: he knew how to write for a child's voice, knew its range, understood that it is tricky for youngsters to hit a high G on an E or I vowel sound, although somewhat easier for them to manage it with the more open A, Ah, O or OOO vowel sounds. He knew how to make the rhythm fit the text, often frightening the conductors who knew there would be lots of meter and rhythm changes.
"The children found his music easy to learn, yet it was not easy music," said COHEN. " His music sat so well with the children's voice. And they adored his songs."
There were always accolades for his compositions at the annual Kiwanis music festivals. So COHEN persevered until her friend finally brought in a scratchy, scribbled manuscript of "I'se the B'y." It was the Maurice Cody school choir, under COHEN, who first performed the piece.
GOVEDAS had many commissions, writing music for families of all faiths to mark special occasions, and for both Howard and Northlea schools, long-time rivals at the Kiwanis festivals.
While music director at one Catholic church -- the Lithuanian Martyrs in Mississauga -- he was commissioned to write music for another, the Church of the Holy Resurrection. He once proudly showed STANFIELD the medal he received from the Lithuanian government for his contribution to his cultural heritage, and it was at church, the centre of community life for many Lithuanians, where he discovered his love of music.
When Lithuanian Martyrs was still located on College Street, it had a magnificent pipe organ that entranced a 6-year-old GOVEDAS waiting while his mother attended choir practice. When he was 10, his parents bought a piano; when he was 12, he was playing the organ at church; at 16, he got his first paid gig, playing for a wedding.
His brother Denis can't remember a time when John was not playing the piano at their home. That focus stayed with him for the rest of his life. "He was always so busy with his music, always running," said Denis.
But when John came to his home for Christmas in 2003, Denis knew something was wrong when his normally ebullient brother was subdued. And it was obvious he was in pain when he visited three months later.
"He kept procrastinating seeing a doctor," said Denis. "For John there was no other world than music."
By 2004, STANFIELD too was worried about her friend, especially as the February date for the annual Kiwanis festival neared. "He wouldn't let go," she said. "We were torn between saying to him that he must stop, but the feeling was that he would have given up sooner on life if he had been shut out."
Gaunt and grey-skinned, he was at the piano when Howard's primary choir, the Grade 3s, sang "Piping Down the Valleys Wild" and "The Brown Bird Singing," the latter a favourite of GOVEDAS.
"At the end they had to hold a high F note and they held it beautifully and I remember thinking I am going to hang onto this a little longer. It was an exquisite moment and John knew it too," said STANFIELD. " When they sang that last perfect note he smiled at them and nodded."
The choir won the award as best of its class, and GOVEDAS was determined to accompany his singers, as well as the choir from Earl Haig school, at the upcoming Spring Festival, the annual city-wide concert of school choirs that takes place each May at Massey Hall.
COHEN had also hired GOVEDAS for that concert to accompany the mass choir singing his piece "I am the Song," although by March she realized he wasn't going to be able to play. Still she sent the program to the printers with his name on it: "I thought I can't remove him now since it may dash his hopes and his determination."
But 10 days before the concert, GOVEDAS was moved into the palliative care unit at St. Michael's Hospital and COHEN and STANFIELD began talking about having him attend Spring Fest 2005 in a wheelchair. But when it was time for the concert, May 4, GOVEDAS was in a coma and unable to witness COHEN conduct the choir as they sang the piece he had written 11 years earlier for that same event.
It was performed just before the intermission and COHEN had arranged for the sound engineer to record and make a Compact Disk of the piece then and there.
"I went beating down Queen St. in all my finery and ran up to the 4th floor (at St. Mike's) and handed the Compact Disk to Denis," COHEN recalled. I spoke to John and told him it was a great show and that he had a lot of applause."
As Denis played the piece, COHEN said she saw "a little movement" of John's head, a "little wrinkle" of the brow. "I think he heard it," Denis said.
STANFIELD has put together a tribute Compact Disk "of all the songs I could find that were previously recorded and arranged or written by him." It is called A Tribute to John GOVEDAS and Howard school is selling it to raise money for an award in his name to be presented at future Kiwanis festivals.
And come spring, she will organize a concert to honour the man for whom the music never stopped.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-12 published
LENECK, Jack
On Wednesday, August 10, 2005 at North York General Hospital. Jack LENECK, beloved husband of the late Helen LENECK. Loving father and father-in-law of Sharon and Joel COHEN, and Brian and RoAnne LENECK of California. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Lil and the late Morris SALTZMAN. Devoted grandfather of Stuart and Mahsa, Stacey and Amy, and Danielle. Devoted great-grandfather of Hannah Ryan. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, August 12, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Pride of Israel section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 110 Babcombe Drive, Thornhill. If desired, donations may be made to the Jack Leneck Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780- 0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-22 published
'Nobody's daughter' spoke up
Ann SZEDLECKI's Holocaust tale
Survivor told her story until the end
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
Ann SZEDLECKI was a powerful and popular speaker for Toronto's Holocaust Centre.
"I think you are brave for standing up in front of a bunch of students to tell your story; it must have been hard to tell us some of those awful memories from your past," wrote one student from King City Secondary School.
"I don't think I would last as long as you did. Unlike me, you never gave up," wrote another.
"It opened my eyes and informed me about something I knew little about," a third student commented.
And a fourth wrote: "I believe that people like yourself, who struggled during the war, should speak out and share their stories."
But SZEDLECKI, who died of cancer May 7 at 79 and was buried on Mother's Day, had to be talked into telling her story. At 14 she was alone in Siberia, sentenced to six months of hard labour, her brother imprisoned for supposed political crimes, but she always said she was never in a concentration camp and therefore really wasn't a Holocaust survivor.
"At first she was a bit reluctant to talk, especially with an Auschwitz survivor like me," recalled Judy COHEN, who as co-chair of the Holocaust Centre's speaker bureau interviewed all potential speakers four or five years ago when SZEDLECKI was approached to tell her story.
"I said 'Ann, you lost your family. The end result is you are a Holocaust survivor of a different sort. It's good for people to know there are varied experiences.'"
That accomplished, COHEN had to then talk SZEDLECKI out of telling her story the way she was accustomed to: as an adventure story of a spirited young girl.
"I think she missed the point of her own suffering," said COHEN. "I told her to tell them the absolute truth and put it in an historical context, otherwise it is just a sad story. As I said to her 'You didn't enjoy the adventure.'"
SZEDLECKI listened and became a fine speaker, someone who understood that this kind of storytelling is more educational than cathartic.
"Her story became what it should be," said COHEN.
But first she wrote it down over the 10 years in which she attended Toronto author Sylvia WARSH's creative writing classes at the Bernard Betel Centre for Creative Living.
"My mother became a whole other person once she muttered the words 'I am a writer,'" said her daughter, Lynda KRAAR.
"She was a natural storyteller," said WARSH, who helped SZEDLECKI produce a 200-page autobiographical manuscript. "Look at page three, starting 'I am nobody's daughter.' It is great stuff."
Her manuscript begins as Ann FRAJLICH is leaving the Soviet Union after six years, leaving behind the unmarked grave of her brother Shoel -- dead at 23 from tuberculosis contracted as a result of being arrested for cooked-up political crimes, tortured and imprisoned -- and leaving with only a bag of dried bread, a jar of melted butter, a few clothes and size 12 shoes on her feet.
She is returning to her hometown of Lodz, Poland, even though her entire family had died in the Warsaw Ghetto.
"I am nobody's daughter, nobody's sister, nobody's granddaughter, daughter-in-law, sister-in-law, aunt or cousin," she wrote. "My past is all gone, it disappeared."
In 1940, her worried parents had sent her off with her brother to the Soviet Union where they would work for one year to "wait out, hopefully, the short war," as she wrote. They were transported to Ridder (later renamed Leninogorsk) in western Kazakhstan, in Siberia, about 500 kilometres from the Chinese border.
And it was true, she was a bit giddy over what she considered to be a great adventure, excited to be going to a new place and to be out on her own. She didn't even mind when she was put to work painting bathhouses and enrolled in school. But after her brother was arrested, she was thrown out of the school and ended up hauling bricks, then later peeling potatoes and washing dishes in a mining cafeteria.
When she took three days off work without permission to bury her brother in the frozen spring of 1943, she was sentenced to six months of hard labour in appalling conditions at a labour camp. She lugged railway ties to build a new line, shovelled snow to clear roads, cut down trees and freed logs from a frozen river, but she was also carrying the grief of her brother's death and her guilt that she wasn't with him when he died.
After being released she volunteered to work underground in the mines, loading the ore into wagons. She hated it but, typically, wrote instead about "the miracle of my survival" in which she left the pile of ore she was sitting on to boldly ask the foreman for a cigarette -- and just as he handed her a smoke, the pile collapsed. "I could've been buried under tons of ore," she cheerfully concluded.
"I can even go so far as claiming that smoking saved my life."
(The children and students to whom she later told that story just loved it.)
"Since she was 14, my mother has been invincible," said KRAAR.
She married soon after the war, a man who was 11 years her senior, a concentration camp survivor with the numbers forever burned into his forearm. Abraham SZEDLECKI was "a wounded, traumatized and sad guy," according to his daughter and the marriage was never a happy one, although it lasted until her death.
The couple moved to Canada in 1953 after three years living in Israel and both went to work in the garment district. He pressed coats, she sewed on buttons. But it wasn't long before the boss promoted her to bookkeeping duties in the office and even though she'd had no experience doing books, she learned fast.
Although Abraham stayed in the factory, she left her job in 1965 when a store out on Albion Rd. became available.
"She took out a loan for $5,000 -- this little Holocaust lady with Grade 7 education -- when all her Friends were saying don't do it," her daughter recalled.
For years, her women's clothing store was the most successful business in the Shoppers World Mall on Albion Rd. KRAAR -- SZEDLECKI's only child and travel companion on holidays -- had married and moved to New Jersey by the time SZEDLECKI retired in 1990.
"They were close, closer than I could imagine," said Masha AMI, KRAAR's best friend since they met at camp when they were 11.
"I could see they were not only mother and daughter but Friends."
The Friendship was always volatile, however, as both were strong, talented and stubborn women who liked to do things their way.
As SZEDLECKI and her husband had long been leading separate lives although continuing to share their Bathurst Manor area bungalow, she threw herself into volunteer work.
She had always been involved with her Masada chapter of Hadassah-Women's International Zionist Organization, but she began driving for the Kosher Meals on Wheels program and serving on a committee managing funds provided to survivors through the Jewish Material Claims Against Germany Inc.
She kept up her writing and her talks until the last year of her life.
Her husband, suffering from Alzheimer's, moved into a care facility, but she stayed where she was determined to be, in her own home. KRAAR said she kicked into overdrive, often staying for weeks to care for her weakening mother in her home.
SZEDLECKI died in her home listening to show tunes and singer Theodore Bikel.
And as far as KRAAR is concerned, her mother's story isn't over. She's writing a show about her mother's life. One song is finished, which KRAAR, an amateur musician and publicist, performed in a small club in New York City recently. It was part of Mamapalooza, a celebration of mothers.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-04 published
CRANDALL, Florence
On Friday, September 2, 2005 at Baycrest Hospital. Florence CRANDALL beloved wife of the late Maurice CRANDALL. Loving mother and mother-in-law of John and Anne, and Allen and Cherylanne. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Aaron and Marci FROMSTEIN, Elsie ABLESER, Selma TAILOR/TAYLOR- JOSEPH and Lionel JOSEPH, and Sylvia and the late Hyman FROMSTEIN. Devoted grandmother of Tim and Tammy, Matthew, Melissa and Sean LONG, Joey, Lacey, Lisa and Eli COHEN, Jason, Scott, Mark, and Brandon, and great-grandmother of 5. She will be missed by her many nieces and nephews. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, September 4, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Kiever Podolnier Section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva 454 Coldstream Ave. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society 1-888-939-3333 and Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, 416- 922-6065.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-05 published
ROSENSTRAUCH, Rosa
On September 4, 2005, Rosa, beloved wife of the late Leon. Dear mother and mother-in-law of Eve ROSENSTRAUCH, Phyllis FEGELMAN, Annette and Yosi COHEN. Loving Bubbie of Rachel ZELUNKA (Mark) and Michael FEGELMAN, Orly and Aaron COHEN. Loving sister of Helen JENKALA (Benny.) A graveside service will be held on Monday, September 5, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. at the Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park, Stopnitzer section. Shiva will be observed with Eve and Annette at 116 Bentwood Cres., Thornhill, and Phyllis at 15 Shallmar Blvd., Apt. 702, Toronto. Memorial donations may be made to the Association for the Soldiers of Israel at 416-783-3053.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-18 published
MENDELSON, Jeannette (formerly CRYSTAL)
Peacefully on Friday, September 16, 2005. Wife of Bert MENDELSON and the late Max CRYSTAL. Beloved mother and mother-in-law of Nita and Mark COHEN and Larry CRYSTAL. Beloved Nana to Stephanie and Blair, Jason and Michelle, Matthew and Talia and Julie. Loving great-grandmother to Mack, Zoey, Sophie and Jack. She will be sadly missed by her sisters and brothers-in-law Norma and Bernie KATZ and Ruth KAIMAN, Sam and Shirley CRYSTAL and Harry and Miriam CRYSTAL. Memorial donations may be made to the Jeannette Mendelson/Crystal Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 416-780-0324. Funeral Service to be held on Sunday, September 18, 2005. Call Benjamin's for details at 416-663-9060.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-28 published
VARRIN, Rita (née KAVANAUGH)
Passed away quietly on Tuesday, September 27th, 2005, in her 85th year. Loving and devoted Mother of Lorraine and her husband Graham MARKS and Jacquie and her late husband Dr. Michael JENNINGS. Cherished Grandmother "You Who" to Patricia (Alan) MARTINOVICH, Katie (Jason) RANDELL, Krissie (Dan) VANDERBURG, Nikki MARKS (Sam COHEN,) Maureen, Patricia and Andrew JENNINGS, and Great-Grandmother to Ethan, Joshua, Alexandra and Kieler. Survived by her sister Lorraine (Dave) BALDWIN and predeceased by her sisters Dorothy, Gerry, Helen, Mary, Kay, Peggy and brother Tom. Rita will be missed dearly and fondly remembered by her many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. Rita served her country as a Women's Royal Naval Service during World War 2. She was a life long painter, sculptor and student of the Arts. Friends may call on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of the Annunciation Roman Catholic Church, 97 King Road, Richmond Hill, on Friday, September 30th, 2005 at 10: 30 a.m. Cremation to follow. As an expression of sympathy, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Alzheimer Society. Condolences - www.rskane.ca.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-03 published
COHEN, Dorothy
On Saturday, October 1, 2005 at Baycrest Hospital. Dorothy COHEN, beloved wife of the late Albert COHEN. Loving mother of Sherri COHEN. Devoted daughter of the late Jack and Sadie COHEN. Will be sadly missed by her loving dog Samantha and her cat Sasha. A graveside service will be held in the Blue Star Lodge section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park on Monday, October 3, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 1-888-939-3333.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-04 published
COHEN, Dorothy
On Saturday, October 1, 2005 at Baycrest Hospital. Dorothy COHEN, beloved wife of the late Albert COHEN. Loving mother of Sherri COHEN. Devoted daughter of the late Jack and Sadie WARREN. Will be sadly missed by her loving dog Samantha and her cat Sasha. A graveside service was held in the Blue Star Lodge section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park on Monday, October 3, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 1-888-939-3333.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-08 published
PAMENTER- POTVIN, Nancy Anna Liese (née PAMENTER)
Passed away peacefully, surrounded by her family, on November 5, 2005, 57 years of age, at Toronto Grace Hospital. Nancy survived cancer with courage and grace for over 3 years. She was a caring Nurse, Nursing Instructor, and Lawyer. Sweetheart of husband John Neill Thomas POTVIN. Cherished mother of Philip John POTVIN. Beloved daughter of Walter Douglas PAMENTER and the late Margaret PAMENTER. Dear sister of Judith (David COHEN) and Heather (Ian WALLACE.) Lovingly remembered by aunts and uncles, nieces and nephews, cousins, and many supportive lifetime Friends. Thanks to: High School, Neighbourhood, Church, and University Friends health care staff at Princess Margaret, Toronto Grace, St. Michael's Hospitals, and Etobicoke Community Care Access Centre, who helped, encouraged, and cared for Nancy. Donations welcomed to the National Ovarian Cancer Association. Reception at Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West (West of Islington) on Wednesday between 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at Humber Valley United Church, 76 Anglesey (East of Islington) on Thursday, November 10, 2005 at 1 p.m.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-09 published
He made his mark on city and nation
By WARREN Gerard, Special To The Star
Beland HONDERICH rose from plain beginnings to become one of the most influential Canadians of his day, using his power as publisher of Canada's largest newspaper to influence the agenda in politics and business at every level.
At the same time he set new standards for informed, in-depth, responsible reporting.
HONDERICH, publisher of the Toronto Star for 22 of his 52 years at the paper, died in Vancouver at 86 yesterday following a stroke.
HONDERICH was a fiercely private man, almost reclusive, but that didn't keep him from being an impatient perfectionist, a leader whose principal ethic was work.
The Star was his life, his passion.
Among his many honours, and one he treasured, was his election in 1986 to the News Hall of Fame by journalists across Canada for leading "Canadian newspapers into a new direction, taking readers backstage to explore and explain the current events that shaped their lives."
HONDERICH left the publisher's office in 1988, going on to become board chairman of the newspaper and its parent company, Torstar Corp. He retired from that position in 1994, but maintained an office across from the newsroom on the fifth floor at One Yonge St. until 1999.
Beland Hugh HONDERICH was born in Kitchener on November 25, 1918, and grew up in the nearby village of Baden. He was proud of his pioneer roots -- Mennonites from Germany who found religious freedom in Waterloo County in the early 1800s.
"My father was a man who stood for religious freedom, and I am proud to follow in his footsteps," HONDERICH once said.
His father, John HONDERICH, was ostracized in the staunchly traditional Mennonite community because he and young Beland went to hear a speaker from another Amish sect. The shunning, as it was called, meant that other Reform Mennonites were forbidden to sit down to eat with them or to shake their hands.
Nor did his father quite fit in with his thrifty, hard-working neighbours in other ways. A sometime beekeeper, homespun village philosopher, printer and pamphleteer for liberal causes, he was "not a very good provider" in a community where work was next to godliness.
His mother, Rae, was the family's main breadwinner. She was the local telephone operator, a job that included the use of a train station in Baden which served as a home for the HONDERICHs and their six children. HONDERICH recalled that the family never went hungry, but there was little money for anything but food.
He gathered coal along the railway tracks to heat their home and carried water in summer to gangs of workers repairing the roads. In the mornings, he worked around the Canadian National Railway station, sweeping and cleaning up for 40 cents a day.
Despite winning a regional debating championship with his sister Ruth -- they defended the proposition that the Soviet way of life was superior to the American way -- he struggled to pass high school entrance examinations.
HONDERICH didn't do well in high school. And it didn't help that he had to hitchhike 16 kilometres to and from school in Kitchener. As a result, his attendance was spotty and his marks were poor. He was demoted in his second year to a commercial course "where at least I learned to type."
Discouraged, he dropped out of school and got a job as a farmhand at the beginning of the Great Depression, much to his mother's displeasure. "You can do better than that," he recalled her saying on more than one occasion.
The farm job didn't last. His introduction to reporting came about because his father was hard of hearing and took his son to public meetings and political rallies to take notes. It taught the young HONDERICH, who was later to battle deafness himself, to write quickly and accurately.
He inherited a Kitchener-Waterloo Record paper route from one of his brothers, which led him to become the paper's correspondent for Baden at 10 cents a column inch. He created news by organizing a softball team and covering its games for the paper.
When he was 17, fires on successive nights destroyed two barns owned by a prominent Baden farmer. Arson was suspected and the young HONDERICH's coverage so impressed his editors that they offered him a tryout as a cub reporter in Kitchener at $15 a week.
He showed up for work in a mismatched jacket and pants and with his two front teeth missing from a tough hockey game the night before. He didn't shine as a reporter.
The publisher, W.J. MOTZ, concluded after a week that HONDERICH was in the wrong line of work and told city editor Art LOW/LOWE/LOUGH to fire him. But LOW/LOWE/LOUGH saw something in the youngster and persuaded MOTZ to give him a second chance.
LOW/LOWE/LOUGH worked HONDERICH hard. He gave him an assignment each evening to go along with his day job. Ed HAYES, who worked at the Record in those days, recalled in an interview that HONDERICH (or "Bee" as he was nicknamed) was determined to succeed.
"Each reporter was supposed to turn in a story every afternoon at the end of his shift. Bee wasn't satisfied with that. He'd turn in two, three or more.
"He was the darling of the city desk."
As time went by, he improved, becoming more and more confident. He was also developing into a perfectionist. So much so, in fact, that he'd bet an ice cream with an assistant city editor that he would find nothing that needed to be changed in a HONDERICH story.
At first, he recalled, it cost him a lot of ice cream cones, but later he rarely had to pay off.
In those early days at the Record, HONDERICH knew he had a country bumpkin image. So when he had saved enough money, he went to a quality menswear store and asked the manager to show him how to dress. He bought a dark pin-striped suit, complete with vest, and that look became his uniform in life.
A fellow staffer at the Record recalled HONDERICH borrowing a bike from a delivery boy and speeding off to an assignment in his pin-striped suit.
And co-workers described him as a loner who rarely headed for the beer parlour with the boys after work, though he was known to sip a scotch on special occasions. Mostly, he went to Norm Jones' restaurant for a milkshake.
Though he spent most of his time working, he taught Sunday school at a Presbyterian church, and served as secretary for a minor hockey league.
This involvement brought him into contact with Milt DUNNELL, the legendary Star sports columnist, who had made a name for himself at the Stratford Beacon Herald before heading for Toronto. He told HONDERICH that the Star was looking for reporters to replace those who had enlisted to serve in World War 2. HONDERICH, who had been rejected by the Royal Canadian Air Force and merchant marine because of poor eyesight and hearing, applied to the Star in 1943 and was hired as a reporter for $35 a week.
He was proud that the Kitchener city council gave him a vote of thanks for his fair reporting. And MOTZ, the publisher who thought he would never make it in the newspaper business, begged him not to go.
Stepping into the grandly marbled lobby of the Star's building at 80 King St. W., HONDERICH recalled that he was "scared as hell." But he was in the right place. This was the world of Joe ATKINSON.
As publisher, Joseph E. ATKINSON had guided the paper through most of the first half-century and was seen by friend and foe alike as one of the country's leading reformers. It turned out that the publisher and his new employee had some things in common.
Both had come from large, impoverished, God-fearing families in small-town Ontario, and quit school early to put food on the table. "One thing I had in common with Joe ATKINSON," HONDERICH recalled, "is that I knew need."
There was a major difference, however. ATKINSON was a star of Canadian journalism in 1899 when the new owners of the Toronto Evening Star hired him at 34 to run the paper. HONDERICH was 24 when he arrived at the paper, an unproven asset at the time.
But he didn't take long to prove himself. His work was soon noticed by Harry C. HINDMARSH, ATKINSON's son-in-law and the man who ran the newsroom.
HINDMARSH sent HONDERICH to Saskatchewan for the election that brought Tommy Douglas and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (later to become the New Democratic Party) to power in 1944.
The next year he was sent back to do a progress report on North America's first socialist government. His stories were so enthusiastically some thought naively -- positive that the Saskatchewan government asked permission to reprint them.
They also caught the eye of Joe ATKINSON, whose reform ideas were at home with the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation's, although he never endorsed the party at election time. HONDERICH was marked as someone worth watching. He was asked to fill in as an editorial writer, the newspaper job he enjoyed most of all.
Some critics said HONDERICH's writing lacked flair or style. But it was clear. He explained complicated matters in simple, accurate terms. His idea was to dive right into a story, delivering the promise of the headline in the first paragraph.
In his reporting career, HONDERICH covered a wide variety of assignments, collecting his share of scoops, enough to impress HINDMARSH. In 1946, he called in HONDERICH, congratulated him on a story, then remarked, "Oh, by the way, the financial editor left today. I'd like you to start as financial editor on Monday."
"But I don't know the difference between a stock and a bond," HONDERICH replied.
"You'll learn," HINDMARSH said.
HONDERICH told HINDMARSH he would take the job on the condition that he be allowed to go back to feature writing if it didn't work out.
"If you don't make a go of it, you'll go out the door," HINDMARSH said in a menacing way.
It goes without saying that HONDERICH made a go of it.
One of the first things he noticed from his new desk was a tailor at work in a building across King St. He decided his business section would write for that tailor, for the ordinary person.
His News Hall of Fame citation noted: "He led in turning the writing and presentation of financial news into a readable subject in terms that interest the average reader." He criticized the stock exchange, questioned banking methods, recommended profit sharing, and supported credit unions and other co-operatives.
But when there were major stories to be covered, HINDMARSH often took HONDERICH out of his financial department and sent him all over the globe -- to Newfoundland on the eve of its joining Canada, to Argentina where press freedom was under attack, to Asia with Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent for the first round-the-world trip taken by a Canadian prime minister, and to Britain for the funeral of George VI.
In 1948, HONDERICH, along with 12 other employees, chartered the first Canadian local of the American Newspaper Guild. As president of the union, he signed the first contract with the Star.
Some members of the union were suspicious, however, thinking that as financial editor he was "a company stooge" trying to make sure the Guild didn't fall into the hands of disgruntled left-wingers.
They weren't aware, however, that he knew all about bad working conditions because he had done both day and night assignments as a young reporter in Kitchener.
He served three terms as Guild president and helped win better pay and working conditions. Later, on the other side of the negotiating table, he continued to believe in the need for an organized newsroom, although that view was severely tested in a bitter strike in HONDERICH had become a major force in the newsroom when ATKINSON died in 1948 after nearly 50 years as publisher of a racy paper with principles.
His death, however, created a crisis at the paper. ATKINSON's will had left the Star to a charitable foundation to be administered by his trustees. However, the Ontario Conservative government passed the Charitable Gifts Act, which said no charity could own more than 10 per cent of a business.
The government may have viewed the will as an attempt to escape death duties, but more likely the legislation was an attempt to muzzle the Star, a liberal thorn in the Tory side.
Nevertheless, it became a distinct possibility the paper might be sold to outside interests. Bidders, including beer baron E.P. TAILOR/TAYLOR, were lining up for a chance to buy what had become Canada's most profitable daily.
The Star was granted stays of execution however, and HINDMARSH, the founder's son-in-law, succeeded ATKINSON until his own death in 1956. In the HINDMARSH years, the paper seemed to lose direction and much of its fairness, particularly in the reporting of politics. The paper's reputation was going downhill.
Meanwhile, HONDERICH had been appointed editor-in-chief in 1955 and a couple of years later he was appointed to the board, after HINDMARSH's sudden death. It put him in the position of becoming an owner of the paper.
Walter GORDON, an accountant who was to become finance minister in Lester Pearson's Liberal government, worked out a plan for the trustees to buy the Star by putting up $1 million among the six of them, including HONDERICH. The paper was valued at $25.5 million.
At the time, the sale price was the most ever paid in Canada for a newspaper, and it turned out to be a steal. Under HONDERICH's leadership, Torstar, the Star's parent company, would become a more than $1 billion enterprise over the next 30-plus years.
For readers and the staff, the HONDERICH years had begun, although he didn't take over as publisher until 1966. Immediately, however, he went about remaking the paper. Headlines didn't scream any more, and the silly and the sensational disappeared from the paper.
HONDERICH was putting his stamp on the Star. Reporting only the facts wasn't good enough. He demanded thorough backgrounding of stories to make them understandable to the average reader. Or, as he said, for "my barber."
He created a great newsroom that included sports columnist DUNNELL and leading Canadian writers such as Pierre BERTON, Peter NEWMAN, Charles TEMPLETON and Nathan COHEN, as well as award-winning cartoonist Duncan MacPHERSON.
HONDERICH returned the Star to the principles of Joseph E. ATKINSON, including a reform-centred editorial policy. Unemployment, affordable housing, adequate welfare benefits, medicare, pensions, minority rights, the need for an independent Canada -- these became subjects he demanded be dealt with on a daily basis.
In one of his rare public appearances, he told a group of editors in 1961 that "the basic function of a newspaper is to inform, to tell the public what is happening in the community, in the nation and in the world. You will notice I did not use the word, entertain." He felt that television had made entertainment a secondary function for newspapers. "How much better then, to concentrate on what we can do best, and that is to inform the public."
The change was most evident in the Star's treatment of politics and economics. The background feature gradually became commonplace in North American journalism, and a poll of U.S. editors rated the Star one of the world's 10 top foreign papers.
Critics of the HONDERICH way -- many of them highly placed in the paper -- couldn't wait for HONDERICH's grey, humourless Star to fail, but they were doomed to disappointment, just as surely as the Star's competitor -- the unchanging Telegram -- was doomed to extinction.
Not only did the Star's circulation grow, so did its profits.
Honesty and integrity were words that most people associated with HONDERICH. But many on his staff found him a demanding taskmaster, an uncompromising and often difficult man to deal with. There was never any doubt that Beland HONDERICH was the boss. He wasn't one for chit-chat.
Early in his career as publisher, he all but cut himself off from the social whirl of movers and shakers. He admitted to becoming almost reclusive after finding himself challenged at social functions and parties to defend Star policies he felt needed no defence, especially since he had put them into place.
But he never felt that way about the public at large. The so-called Little Guy could get him on the phone more easily than a celebrity could. His home number was in the book. And in the days when the Star was an afternoon paper, it wasn't unusual for an evening editor to get a call from HONDERICH, who in turn had received an irate call at home from a reader whose paper hadn't been delivered.
The paper would be delivered by taxi, and the taxi company was instructed to report to the editor the moment the paper had arrived. Then HONDERICH would phone the reader to make sure he was satisfied.
The first part of his 12-hour working day was spent poring over page proofs, quarrelling about leads of stories, questioning something in the 25th paragraph, asking for more background, and demanding follow-ups.
He was articulate, often painfully so for the person at the other end of his complaints. His editors took great pleasure when he demanded "antidotal" leads. He meant anecdotal leads.
Notes with the heavy-handed BHH signature on them rained from his office.
The difficulty everyone had in pleasing him and the way he prowled the newsroom won him the nickname "The Beast." And he was called "Drac" by some editors who thought he, like the vampire, sucked the staff dry.
When the paper departed from what the reader had come to believe was a Star tradition, he took to the typewriter to explain the reasons himself. In 1972, for example, he put his initials on an editorial that explained why the Star was supporting Progressive Conservative Robert Stanfield over Liberal Pierre Trudeau in the federal election.
In his rare public appearances, the nasal flatness of his voice often disguised the passion he felt for a subject. However, he was an effective spokesman for the causes he championed. In defending the Star's strong stand on economic nationalism, he told the Canadian Club it was based on the need to preserve the differences between Canada and the United States.
"I think our society tends to be more compassionate, somewhat less extreme and certainly less violent," he said. "We put more emphasis on basic human needs such as health insurance and pensions."
He warned that increased U.S. ownership of Canadian resources would endanger our ability to maintain those differences.
In a 1989 speech at Carleton University in Ottawa, he caused a stir when he argued that objectivity in newspapers was neither possible nor desirable.
"No self-respecting newspaper deliberately distorts or slants the news to make it conform to its own point of view," he said. "But you cannot publish a newspaper without making value judgments on what news you select to publish and how you present it in the paper.
"And these value judgments reflect a view of society -- a point of view if you will -- that carries as much weight, if not more, than what is said on the editorial page."
Just as ATKINSON used the news pages to popularize reform ideas, HONDERICH used them as a weapon in his own causes.
One example was his reaction to a document leaked to him outlining then-prime minister Brian Mulroney's government strategy on free trade. It said the communications strategy "should rely less on educating the public than getting across the message that the free trade initiative is a good idea -- in other words a selling job."
HONDERICH made sure all aspects of free trade were put under the kind of scrutiny the government wanted to avoid, particularly the possible effects on employment and social benefits.
Simon REISMAN, the bellicose chief trade negotiator, accused HONDERICH of personally waging a vendetta against free trade. He said HONDERICH used the Star "in a manner that contradicts every sense of fairness and decency in the newspaper business."
In reply, the unrepentant publisher said: "The role of a newspaper, as I see it, is to engage in the full and frank dissemination of the news and opinion from the perspective of its values and particular view of society. It should report the news fairly and accurately, reflect all pertinent facts and opinions and not only what the official establishment thinks and says."
As publisher, he demonstrated an impressive business savvy for a man who once said he hardly knew the difference between a stock and a bond. In 1972, he moved the paper to new quarters at One Yonge St.
And later, in his position as chief executive officer of the parent company, Torstar Corp., he acquired Harlequin Enterprises, the world's largest publisher of romance books, and 15 community newspapers to add to the 14 the Star already owned in the Toronto area.
At the same time, HONDERICH still was very much making his mark in journalism. He was the first in Canada to introduce a bureau of accuracy and to appoint an ombudsman to represent the reader in the newsroom. In a wider sense, he was the main force behind the establishment of the Ontario Press Council, where readers can take their complaints to an independent body.
As well as his election to the News Hall of Fame, he was honoured in other ways, receiving doctors of law degrees from Wilfrid Laurier and York universities, and the Order of Canada in 1987.
HONDERICH was married three times, the last time on New Year's Day 2000 to Rina WHELAN of Vancouver, the city where he lived until his death. He had two sons: John, who followed in his father's footsteps to become publisher of the Star, and David, an entrepreneur and one daughter, Mary, a philosophy and English teacher. He also had six grandchildren.
Even into his eighties, HONDERICH exercised daily and loved to play bridge, golf and fish.
Charles E. PASCAL, executive director of the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, recalled golfing with HONDERICH after he had entered his eighties. PASCAL was in his mid-fifties.
"I expected to be slowed down by playing with a couple of guys in their seventies and one in his eighties," PASCAL said. "Bee, as with everything else, played golf with determination, focus and tenacity. I was quite impressed with his golfing. He was very competitive."
After HONDERICH stepped down as publisher in 1988, and as a director of Torstar in 1995, he lost none of his zeal for pursuing causes. He did this through the Atkinson Charitable Foundation and his own personal philanthropy.
"His role on our board was absolutely essential, forceful, radical," PASCAL said.
"I had the sense that the older he got he became more and more impatient. He was impatient, just impatient, about all that is yet to be done by governments and others to reduce the inequities for those who are disadvantaged through no fault of their own."
He was generous in his giving and, as was his character, he had no interest in public recognition or praise.
"He just had no time whatsoever for personal recognition," PASCAL recalled.
"I think he would have liked to have been around forever if for no other reason than to contribute more."
At HONDERICH's request, there will be a cremation, after which the family will hold a small private gathering to celebrate his life.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-26 published
KOVEN, Dr. Neil
It is with profound grief and sorrow that we announce the passing of our beloved Neil, on Friday, November 25, 2005, after a long and courageous battle, with his family by his side, as always. Loving husband of Gail. Proud father of Max and Alexander. Devoted son of Frances and Martin KOVEN. Son-in-law of Jake and Susan GROSSMAN. Caring brother and brother-in-law to Cheryl and Shelly RUDOLPH. Brother-in-law of Stephen and Barbara YACK. Sorely missed by his nephews and niece Adam and Carrie RUDOLPH, Michael and Cindy YACK, Ashley and Helen YACK. Great-uncle to Dylan and Mason, and the late Faith YACK. Especially missed and loved by Amy REGACHO. Most beloved grand_son of the late Phillip and Molly COHEN and Morris and Susan KOVEN.He" was the kindest, sweetest man who touched the hearts of all those who knew him. He was the ultimate mench." A funeral service will be held on Sunday, November 27, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. from Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. W. (between Yonge and Bathurst). Interment Mount Sinai Cemetery, Beth Sholom section. Shiva will be observed at 18 Parsons Court, Thornhill. A special note of gratitude to Dr. Joe MIKHAEL. Donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Foundation for Multiple Myeloma, 416- 946-6560.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-27 published
EISENSTAT, Helen (née LEVY)
Our mother Helen EISENSTAT, daughter of Isaac and Jenny LEVY, and loving wife to our late father Louis EISENSTAT, died on November 26, 2005, at the age of 87. Her death, like her life, brought family and loved ones closer. She leaves a great void in the lives of her children Marilyn (Michael POSLUNS,) Lorraine (Ernie WEINRIB,) Barbara, and Sholom (Rifka.) Her grandchildren Aliza, Sara, Jacob, Yedida, and Ayala benefited from their Bubi Helen's love and attention, as did her nephews and nieces Sheila, Paula, Howie, Steve, Judy, Rhoda, Noah, Ava, John, and their families. Helen's life was intertwined with many other lives: her sister Margaret NASLEN; her sisters-in-law Belle TAFT and Minnie COHEN, her late brothers-in-law Earl (Jake) and Ned; the Feldman, Paul and Bar-Am families; her Friends, especially Yetta MEDNICK and life-long friend Laura EDELL - and to the spouses of all these loved ones, z"l. Helen loved her adopted Kazekevich family, Alex, Klara, Michael and Masha. Helen's family will always be grateful to Lorraine and Ernie who opened their home to Helen during her illness so that she could remain in the circle of her family and Friends. The family thanks Doctors GOLDMAN and STEINBERG and the Palliative Care Team at Mount Sinai's Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care; nurses Liz, Marg and Valerio; Sheila WALKER of the Jewish Hospice; Doctors KEYSTONE and WAERN; and Helen's wonderful caregivers Cora, Zora, Mary, Pat, Carol, Maria, Claudia, Ofelia, Robin and Joyce. Donations in Helen's memory can be made to Ziv Tzedakah Foundation (31 Glen Rush Blvd., Toronto, M5N 2T4) or Mazon Canada (416) 783-7554. Call Benjamin's at (416) 663-9060 for funeral time. Shiva and prayers will be at the home of Lorraine and Ernie, 16 Shorncliffe Avenue (416) 921-8471. There will be a d'var Torah every evening at 8 p.m. May Helen's soul, along with our late father Lou's soul, be bound up in the bond of everlasting life.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-15 published
COHEN MEGHORY, Sarah
On Tuesday, December 13, 2005 at York Central Hospital. Sarah COHEN MEGHORY beloved wife of the late Moshe COHEN MEGHORY. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Avi and Jerry BJMOLT, Yehiel and Maria COHEN MEGHORY, Drora and Julius BATORI, Ophra and Donnie STARKMAN, and Danny and Cindy COHEN MEGHORY. Devoted grandmother of Alan and Adrienne, Larry, Ronnie and Lauren, Dale and Michael, David, Naomi, David and Lindsey, Jodi and Jason, Jordan and Tammy, Elana and Jordie, Michael, Matthew, and Julian, great-grandmother of Jordan, Kaleigh, Ari, Yoni, Nehama, Lauren, Adam, Charlie, Jake, Kylie, Logan, Dara, and Jamie. A special thanks to Ida for her loving dedication. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W. (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday, December 15, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva 20 Alcaine Court, Thornhill. If desired, donations may be made to The Sarah Cohen Meghory Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C3 416-780-0324.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-15 published
FUCILE, Emilio Lorenzo (1917-2005)
Passed away peacefully at Cummer Lodge Nursing Home on Tuesday, December 13, 2005 in his 88th year. He will be greatly missed by his wife Valentina and children Tony (Teresa,) Mary BRUNO (Italo), and Sal (Karen). Also sadly missed by his grandchildren, Sabrina (Mikel), Shawna (Tony), Remo, Kristina, Adrian, and Adam. Visitation will be at Bernardo Funeral Home, 2960 Dufferin Street (two streets south of Lawrence Ave.) on Thursday, December 15 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Charles Borromeo Church (southwest corner of Dufferin St. and Lawrence Ave.) on Friday, December 16 at 9: 30 a.m. Entombment to follow at Westminster Cemetery (5830 Bathurst St. north of Finch Ave.) The family thanks Dr. COHEN and the healthcare givers at Cummer Lodge for assisting Emilio for the past ten years. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation.

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COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-20 published
COHEN, Mary Rose (née MALKIN)
After a long courageous battle, on December 19, 2005. Predeceased by her husband Abe ("the Duke"). Beloved and cherished mother of Naomi and Tom, Melody and Scott, Farley and Debbie, Stephen and Lesley. Wonderful Bubbie to Lindsey, Brittney, Joshua, Dean, Carly, Jennifer, Stephen, Lynn, and Damon. Loving sister of Bertha and the late Marvin ALLEN, and the late Alvin and Edith MALKIN. Auntie to Marlee, Lauryl, Jordan, Kevin, Jeffrey, Michael, Serena and the late Larry MALKIN. Mary will be missed terribly by her many wonderful relatives and Friends - thanks to all of you for your support and Friendship during this difficult time. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Wednesday, December 21, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Shaarei Tefillah Synagogue section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 11 Almington Street. If desired, donations may be made to the Mary Rose Cohen Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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COHN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-22 published
WINNINGER, Ruth (née COHN)
Peacefully, surrounded by her family at Chelsey Park Long-Term Care Home, on November 19, 2005 at 3: 30 p.m., in her 87th year, Ruth WINNINGER, née COHN. Much beloved wife of Fred WINNINGER, loving mother of Lesley HISCOCKS (Barry) of Port Lambton, David WINNINGER (Linda) of London, Sylvia WINNINGER of Toronto, Jeffrey WINNINGER (Brenda) of London, and Peter WINNINGER (Irena) of Toronto. Beloved grandmother of Steven GALBRAITH (Trevor) of Toronto, Jeremy HISCOCKS of Sarnia; and Benjamin, Rebecca and Joshua WINNINGER, of London. Also survived by her twin sister, Evi MORELLI of Torino, Italy, brother-in-law, Otto WINNINGER (Dagmar) of Oshawa; and cousins, Inge HAEKANNSON of Mora, Sweden and Ali GHABN of Cairo, Egypt. Art, along with family and books, was an important part of Ruth's life; she was an accomplished painter and sculptor, studying with some of the best-known London artists, volunteered often as a tour guide at the London Art Gallery, and ran art classes for children. A family burial service will be held on Wednesday, November 23 and a memorial service for and by family and Friends will be conducted Sunday, November 27, 2005 at 3: 30 p.m. at the Unitarian Fellowship of London, 557 Clarke Road, London. In lieu of flowers, any contributions to the charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated. Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas St. in charge of arrangements. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mrs. WINNINGER.

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COHOON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-10 published
TAPP, Addie (COUGHTREY)
Peacefully at her residence in Dorchester on Wednesday, March 9th, 2005 Addie (COUGHTREY) TAPP formerly of London in her 97th year. Beloved wife of the late Arthur Bryce TAPP. Dear mother of Patricia COHOON and her husband Robert of Dorchester. Predeceased by her brother Harry COUGHTREY and her sisters Lorinda, Bailie and Susan HOWARD. Loving grandmother of Christopher Bryce COHOON and his wife Maria CAROLINA of London. Friends will be received by the#2 hours prior to the funeral service which will be conducted in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London on Saturday, March 12th, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. with Reverend Brian McKAY of Church of St. Andrew Memorial officiating. Interment in Dorchester Union Cemetery, Dorchester. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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COHOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-05 published
HAWKINS, Elinor Jean (GREENWOOD)
Graduate of Toronto General Hospital School of Nursing (1952) and Branksome Hall (1949). In her 75th year, Elinor passed away peacefully in her sleep at Scarborough General Hospital on Friday, November 4, 2005 at 3: 55 a.m. Beloved wife of Kenneth. Devoted mother of Sue Ann, Kim and her husband Peter COHOS, Sandra and her husband the late Terry LEMAITRE, and Steven and his wife Kelly. Cherished grandmother of Ben, Kaila, Stephen, and Adam. The family will receive Friends at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Avenue East, Agincourt (east of Kennedy Road), on Sunday from 2-4 p.m. Funeral service to be held in the Ogden Chapel on Monday at 4 p.m. A celebration of life will be held at the Donalda Club, 12 Bushberry Drive, Don Mills (416-447-5575), on Monday at 6 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Meta Centre, 401 Champagne Drive, Toronto M3J 2C6, 416-736-0199, Community Living Toronto, 20 Spadina Road, Toronto M5R 2S7, 416-968-0650, or to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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COHOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-05 published
HAWKINS, Elinor Jean (GREENWOOD)
Graduate of Toronto General Hospital School of Nursing, 1952 and Branksom Hall, 1949. In her 75th year, Elinor passed away peacefully, in her sleep, at the Scarborough General Hospital, on Friday, November 4, 2005 at 3: 55 a.m. Beloved wife of Kenneth, devoted mother of Sue Ann, Kim and husband Peter COHOS, Sandra and husband the late Terry LEMAITRE, Steven and wife Kelly. Cherished grandmother of Ben, Kaila, Stephen, and Adam. The family will receive Friends at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Ave. East, Agincourt (east of Kennedy Rd.), on Sunday, November 6, 2005 from 2-4 p.m. Funeral Service to be held in the Ogden Chapel on Monday, November 7, 2005 at 4 p.m. A Celebration of Life will be held at the Donalda Club, 12 Bushberry Drive, Don Mills, 416-447-5575, on Monday, November 7th at 6 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Meta Centre, 401 Champagne Drive, Toronto M3J 2C6, 416-736-0199, Community Living Toronto, 20 Spadina Road, Toronto M5R 2S7, 416-968-0650, or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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