CHU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-30 published
WORTHY, Victor Ross
Beloved husband, father, Poppa, brother and friend, died at Lions Gate Hospital on July 25, 2005. He will be sorely missed by his wife of 44 years Margaret; daughters Kate (Paul CHU) and Chrissie (David WYSOTSKI,) grandchildren Adria, Jade and Julia WYSOTSKI & his sister Dawn McKENDRY and family. Vic was a wonderful, intelligent, generous and caring family man and friend. He was born in Toronto in 1937 and graduated from Ontario Agricultural College and the University of Toronto as an Agricultural and Mechanical Engineer. Vic also attended the Banff School of Advanced Management and the Harvard Advanced Management Program. He worked for MacMillan Bloedel for over 35 years, retiring as Senior Vice President of Engineered Wood Products in 1996. Vic was an avid tennis player, skier, dancer, golfer, gardener, gadget fancier, car buff, woodworker and all round handyman. Words are too little to cover the 68 years of his life, but our memories of him and his influence will continue to enrich our lives. Special thanks to G.P. Dr. Robert Scott. No funeral or flowers by request. The family would appreciate memorial donations to the Lions Gate Hospital Palliative or Emergency Ward or to the charity of your choice.

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CHU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-26 published
HILL, David Winston
Passed away peacefully at home with his wife Beverly and family members at his side on Wednesday, March 23, 2005, after a courageous battle against cancer. Forever loved and remembered by Beverly, his wife and soulmate of over 38 years, his beloved mother Eileen, sisters Violet STEELE, Betty WALKER, Anne DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, Ruth SHULTZ, Patricia TODD and Lan CHU. Fondly remembered by his sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews, extended family and Friends. David was born in Unionville, Ontario on April 21, 1941. He was a founding member of the Military Re-enactment Society of Canada and was continuously active in teaching Canadian history across North America through living history for the last 28 years. He was also very passionate about everything historical particularly from the 1812 period as well as travel, reading and lively debate and discussion. He will be sadly missed by his countless Friends, colleagues and family. Special thanks to the Community Care Access Centre Stouffville Office, Carol MILES, Homecare workers, nurses and Evergreen Hospice of Markham who made it possible for him and Beverly to be at home. Friends may pay their respects at Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main St. N. (Markham Rd.), Markham on Sunday, March 27, 2005 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held in the chapel of Dixon-Garland Funeral Home on Monday, March 28, 2005 at 11 a.m. Donations may be made to the Evergreen Hospice of Markham.

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CHU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-30 published
MAH, Eileen (née CHU)
Peacefully at the Scarborough Hospital, General Division on Sunday, June 26, 2005. Wife of the late Henry MAH. Dear mother of Diane, Edith, Eric, Joanne, Robert, and Elizabeth. Sister of Alberta, Dorothy, William, Phyllis, Nelson, Lorna, and Sandra. Proud grandmother of Tessa, Mathias, Michael, Kiera, Sarah, Alice, Jennifer, Erica, Angela, Jeremy, Alicia, and Melinda. Family will receive Friends on Friday from 2-5 p.m. A complete funeral service will be held at the Ogden Chapel on Saturday 11 a.m. If desired, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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CHU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-01 published
MAH, Eileen (née CHU)
Peacefully at the Scarborough Hospital, General Division on Sunday, June 26, 2005. Wife of the late Henry MAH. Dear mother of Diane, Edith, Eric, Joanne, Robert, and Elizabeth. Sister of Alberta, Dorothy, William, Phyllis, Nelson, Lorna, and Sandra. Proud grandmother of Tessa, Mathias, Michael, Kiera, Sarah, Alice, Jennifer, Erica, Angela, Jeremy, Alicia, and Melinda. The family will receive Friends at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Ave. East, Agincourt (east of Kennedy Rd.) on Friday from 2-5 p.m. A complete funeral service will be held at the Ogden Chapel on Saturday 11 a.m. If desired, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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CHUA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-14 published
POTTER, William Wakely (1921-2005)
After a valiant battle with heart disease, William W. POTTER died January 13, 2005. He is survived by his wife of 58 years Ruby L. POTTER, son William J. POTTER and wife Linda, daughter Susan GRANT and husband the late Jim, five grandchildren, Lisa, Meredith and Andrew POTTER, Alexandra and Veronica GRANT and two great grandchildren, Kiera and Emma GRANT- SEDORE. A native of Toronto, a product of Lawrence Park, Bill was a King Scout in his youth. Bill served with distinction as a flight lieutenant during World War 2 and flew with both the Royal Air Force (201 Squadron) and Royal Canadian Air Force (423 Squadron) completing over one hundred operational flights. In 1946 he joined Beneficial Finance Company of Canada and over the next twenty-seven years he assumed greater managerial authority and resided in Toronto, Ontario, Syracuse, New York and Short Hills, New Jersey. Bill retired as President and Director of Beneficial Management Corporation, a New York Stock Exchange corporation. Moving back to Canada, he came out of retirement to become President of The Trust Companies Association of Canada from 1973 to 1987, followed by directorships on a number of corporate and bank boards in the U.S.A. and Canada. Many thanks to all those who, over recent months, have shown great compassion and skill, especially the physicians and nursing staff at York Central Hospital, Richmond Hill, 3rd Floor North Cardiac Wing. A special note of gratitude is extended to Dr. Grace CHUA and staff of the Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit. Donations in his memory may be made to: York Central Hospital: by mail to 10 Trench Street, Richmond Hill, L4C 4Z3, memo Cardiac Unit or access the web at www.yorkcentral.on.ca; or the Heart and Stroke Association of Ontario, accessing the web for information at www.heartandstroke.ca; or a charity of your choice.

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CHUA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-14 published
POTTER, William Wakely (1921-2005)
After a valiant battle with heart disease, William W. POTTER died January 13, 2005. He is survived by his wife of 58 years Ruby L. POTTER, son William J. POTTER and wife Linda, daughter Susan GRANT and husband the late Jim, five grandchildren, Lisa, MEREDITH and Andrew POTTER, Alexandra and Veronica GRANT and two great-grandchildren, Kiera and Emma GRANT- SEDORE. A native of Toronto, a product of Lawrence Park, Bill was a King Scout in his youth. Bill served with distinction as a flight lieutenant during World War 2 and flew with both the Royal Air Force (201 Squadron) and Royal Canadian Air Force (423 Squadron) completing over one hundred operational flights. In 1946 he joined Beneficial Finance Company of Canada and over the next twenty-seven years he assumed greater managerial authority and resided in Toronto, Ontario, Syracuse, New York and Short Hills, New Jersey. Bill retired as President and Director of Beneficial Management Corporation, a New York Stock Exchange corporation. Moving back to Canada, he came out of retirement to become President of The Trust Companies Association of Canada from 1973 to 1987, followed by directorships on a number of corporate and bank boards in the U.S.A. and Canada. Many thanks to all those who, over recent months, have shown great compassion and skill, especially the physicians and nursing staff at York Central Hospital, Richmond Hill, 3rd Floor North Cardiac Wing. A special note of gratitude is extended to Dr. Grace CHUA and staff of the Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit. Donations in his memory may be made to: York Central Hospital: by mail to 10 Trench Street, Richmond Hill, L4C 4Z3, memo Cardiac Unit or access the web at www.yorkcentral.on.ca; or the Heart and Stroke Association of Ontario, accessingthe web for information at www.heartandstroke.ca; or a charity of your choice.

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CHUANG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-29 published
TRUDEAU, Daniel R.
It is with great sadness that our family announces the passing of Daniel at age 72 years, on Sunday, March 27, 2005 at Credit Valley Hospital. His family and wife Shirley of 50 years were by his side through his brave struggle with cancer to the end. He will be forever missed by his daughter Peggy CHUANG and her husband Denny and his son Dan TRUDEAU and his wife Carol, Ottawa. He will be forever remembered in the hearts of his 4 grandchildren Nichole and Kaitlyn TRUDEAU and Tyler and Bailey CHUANG. Dear brother-in-law to Marlene and Jim MAHONEY (their travel companions,) Lorraine and Bill PORTER, Jerry LAMORE, and the late Clara and Jake REMPEL. Loved by nieces and nephews Debbie, Patty, J.J., Jason, Jeff, Blake and Brian. The family would like to thank the many Friends who offered love and support to us through this difficult journey. Especially the doctors and nurses on 2C at the Credit Valley Hospital. Extra thanks to Dr. Sam REMTULLA for always being there for us. The family will receive Friends at the Lynett Funeral Home, 3299 Dundas St. West (east of Runnymede Rd.) on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held on Thursday, March 31, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. from St. Francis Xavier Church, 5650 Mavis Rd. Interment Assumption Cemetery. Family dog Potter will keep your rocking chair warm.

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CHUANG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-30 published
TRUDEAU, Daniel R.
It is with great sadness that our family announces the passing of Daniel at age 72 years, on Sunday, March 27, 2005 at Credit Valley Hospital. His family and wife Shirley of 50 years were by his side through his brave struggle with cancer to the end. He will be forever missed by his daughter Peggy CHUANG and her husband Denny and his son Dan TRUDEAU and his wife Carol, Ottawa. He will be forever remembered in the hearts of his 4 grandchildren Nichole and Kaitlyn TRUDEAU and Tyler and Bailey CHUANG. Dear brother-in-law to Marlene and Jim MAHONEY (their travel companions,) Lorraine and Bill PORTER, Jerry LAMORE, and the late Clara and Jake REMPEL. Loved by nieces and nephews Billy, Debbie, Patty, J.J., Jason, Jeff, Blake and Brian. The family would like to thank the many Friends who offered love and support to us through this difficult journey. Especially the doctors and nurses on 2C at the Credit Valley Hospital. Extra thanks to Dr. Sam REMTULLA for always being there for us. The family will receive Friends at the Lynett Funeral Home, 3299 Dundas St. West (east of Runnymede Rd.) on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held on Thursday, March 31, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. from St. Francis Xavier Church, 5650 Mavis Rd. Interment Assumption Cemetery. Family dog Potter will keep your rocking chair warm.

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CHUBAK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-09 published
SEMENIUK, Lillian (CHUBAK)
In loving memory of a dear wife and mother, Lillian (CHUBAK) who passed away December 9, 1985. Always in our hearts! Husband Wasyl, daughter Rose and son-in-law Paul.

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CHUBB o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-04 published
CHOROSTECKYJ, Osyp " Joe"
At Chateau Gardens Nursing Home on Saturday, July 2, 2005, Osyp "Joe" CHOROSTECKYJ in his 84th year. Beloved husband of the late Ewdokia (CHUBB) CHOROSTECKYJ (1994.) Dear father of Maria BECKBERGER (John) of Sauble Beach, Emilia TAILOR/TAYLOR of London and Lila CARTER (Gary) of Ipperwash. Loving grandfather of Myron, Natalia, Paula, Matthew and Nina. Visitors will be received on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. in the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William Street. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated in Christ the King Ukrainian Catholic Church, 707 Nelson Street, on Tuesday at 10 a.m. Interment St. Peter's Cemetery. Panachyda (Prayers) Monday evening at 7: 30.

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CHUBB o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-12 published
CHUBB, Dorothy Isabeau (née FOSTER)
Quietly on Monday, March 7, 2005 at age 97. Predeceased by her husband Sidney G. CHUBB. Devoted mother of Pat KEATING and Linda EDWARDS. Lovingly remembered by her sons-in-law Armand and Tom and her grandchildren, Geoffrey and Stephanie KEATING, and Colin, Johanna, Nicholas and Michael EDWARDS. A Memorial Service will be held at St. Clement's Anglican Church, 59 Briarhill Avenue (at Duplex Avenue), Toronto on Saturday, March 26, 2005 at 2 p.m. with reception following. Spring interment in Pine Grove Cemetery near Port Perry, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, a remembrance may be made to a charity of your choice.

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CHUBB o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-12 published
CHUBB, Dorothy Isabeau (née FOSTER)
Quietly on Monday, March 7, 2005 at age 97. Predeceased by her husband Sidney G. CHUBB. Devoted mother of Pat KEATING and Linda EDWARDS. Lovingly remembered by sons-in-law Armand and Tom; and her grandchildren Geoffrey and Stephanie KEATING and Colin, Johanna, Nicholas and Michael EDWARDS. A Memorial Service will be held at St. Clement's Anglican Church, 59 Briarhill Ave. (at Duplex Ave.), Toronto on Saturday, March 26, 2005 at 2 p.m. with reception following. Spring interment in Pine Grove Cemetery, near Port Perry, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, a remembrance may be made to a charity of your choice.

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CHUBB o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-23 published
CHUBB, Robin Seymour Clifford
Robin Seymour Clifford CHUBB, B.A. Arch., age 73, at home surrounded by family. Husband of Kit, father of Lynette, Robert (Ottawa), Andrew, Nigel (Toronto area), David, Lindsay (Kingston area). Proud grandfather of James, Harlyn; Awstin, Rhys, Blake, Bryn James, Kyle, Briana; Jordan, Genny; Zaakirah, Ayesha; Samuel. Memorial service to be held in Kingston, City Christian Church, 1287 Woodbine at Collins Bay Road, Monday, July 25, 2005, 2-4 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Avian Care and Research Foundation, Box 182, Verona, Ontario, K0H 2W0, would be greatly appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Simpler Times Cremation Service. On-line condolences www.kingstoncremation.com

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CHUCHMUCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-03 published
DZWONYK, Lillian
70. Died at home in Winnipeg on Thursday, September 29, 2005 after a courageous fight with cancer. Lillian, a compassionate and gentle woman of deep faith, will be greatly missed by her children Danylo DZWONYK (Cheryl PALMER) of Toronto, Pazia Dzwonyk (Glen) CHARLEBOIS of Kenora, Zenon DZWONYK of Winnipeg and Taisa Dzwonyk (Brent) HORNING of Winnipeg; grandchildren Matthew, Maia, Emma and Alex HORNING, Nicholas and Eve CHARLEBOIS. Also left to mourn are her sisters Rose CHUCHMUCH, Vera RODECK, Caroline ANTONIW and Helen (Paul) SIDORYK and many more relatives and Friends in Canada and Ukraine. Predeceased by her husband Ewstachij in 1997.
Lillian was a fine artist and in retirement, after years as an elementary school teacher in Kenora, painting became her passion. Known in the Ukrainian community for her watercolours and acrylics, Lillian exhibited in Manitoba, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario. Parastas was sung Sunday, October 2 at 7: 00 p.m. at St. Joseph's Ukrainian Catholic Church, Winnipeg with Divine Liturgy and Panahyda to be celebrated Monday, October 3 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment to follow in Holy Family Cemetery.

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CHUD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-26 published
SHANKMAN, Dr. Leonard V.
Suddenly at University Hospital on Friday, November 25th, 2005, Dr. Leonard V. SHANKMAN of London in his 90th year. His devoted and loving wife for 64 years, Nettie, was by his side. Beloved father of Phyllis STEIDMAN and her husband Maxwell and Linda CHUD and predeceased by son Dr. Lorne SHANKMAN. Devoted grandfather of Jason and his wife Genevieve, Jennifer, Joshua and Michael and proud great-grandfather of Samantha. Dear brother of Gladys ZALDIN and brother-in-law to Hilda GREENBLATT and Jean and Bob LISS. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Dr. SHANKMAN was for years a pillar of the London Jewish Community and a respected member of the London dental profession. He served as Captain in the Royal Canadian Dental Corp during World War 2. Leonard's legacy of generosity and love will live on in those he leaves behind. The funeral will be conducted at Or Shalom Synagogue, 534 Huron St. on Sunday, November 27, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. with Rabbi Larry LANDER officiating. Shiva will be held at 1647 Stoneybrook Cres. N. on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas Street in charge of arrangements (433-6181). Online condolences www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Dr. SHANKMAN.

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CHUD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-26 published
SHANKMAN, Dr. Leonard V.
Suddenly at University Hospital on Friday, November 25th, 2005, Dr. Leonard V. SHANKMAN of London in his 90th year. His devoted and loving wife for 64 years, Nettie, was by his side. Beloved father of Phyllis STEIDMAN and her husband Maxwell and Linda CHUD and predeceased by a son Dr. Lorne SHANKMAN. Devoted grandfather of Jason and his wife Genevieve, Jennifer, Joshua and Michael and proud great grandfather of Samantha. Dear brother of Gladys ZALDIN and brother-in-law to Hilda GREENBLATT and Jean and Bob LISS. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Dr. SHANKMAN was for years a pillar of the London Jewish Community and a respected member of the London dental profession. He served as Captain in the Royal Canadian Dental Corp during World War 2. Leonard's legacy of generosity and love will live on in those he leaves behind. The funeral will be conducted at Or Shalom Synagogue, London, on Sunday, November 27, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. with Rabbi Larry LANDER officiating. Shiva will be held at 1647 Stoneybrook Cres. N., London on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. Logan Funeral Home, London, in charge of arrangements (519-433-6191). Online condolences www.loganfh.ca
A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Dr. SHANKMAN.

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CHUDLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-05 published
WHEELER, George Stanley
Peacefully, after a brief illness, at Sunnybrook Hospital, in Toronto, on Thursday March 3, 2005. George WHEELER of Hillsburgh in his 71st year. Loving father of Terry WHEELER of Hillsburgh, Larry WHEELER and his wife Lyndal of New Zealand, and Joy JONES and her husband Mike of Hillsburgh. Cherished poppa of Michelle and Bradley JONES, and Danaka and Geordie WHEELER. Dear brother of Bert and Myrna WHEELER of Erin, Marjorie and Murray HILLIS of Arthur, and Julie Ann and Gary BRYANT of Elora. George will be sadly missed by his nieces, nephews, and Friends. The family will receive Friends for visitation at the Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main St. S., Erin on Sunday evening from 7-9 p.m., and on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday March 8th at 2: 00 p.m. at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church in Hillsburgh, with Reverend Reid CHUDLEY officiating. Spring interment, Huxley Cemetery, Hillsburgh. If desired donations to the Hillsburgh Fire Department would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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CHUDLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-05 published
MacMURCHY, Mary Louise
Peacefully at Freeport Hospital in Kitchener, on Wednesday, May 4, 2005. Mary MacMURCHY of Hillsburgh, in her 67th year. Beloved daughter of the late Donald and Mae MacMURCHY. Loving sister of Robert MacMURCHY and his wife Carol of Bramalea, and Charlie MacMURCHY and his wife Marlene of Oakville. Long time special friend of Maria SIPAK of Hillsburgh. Dear aunt of Douglas, Raymond, Vassa, Brian, Sarah, Kelly, and Neil. Great-aunt of Jason, Michael, Melanie, Rachel, and Isabelle. The family will receive Friends for visitation at the Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main St. South, Erin on Friday, May 6th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held at Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Main Street in Hillsburgh on Saturday, May 7th at 2: 30 p.m. with Rev. Reid CHUDLEY officiating. Interment, Huxley Cemetery. If desired, donations to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Canadian Cancer Society, or the Freeport Health Centre in Kitchener would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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CHUDOBIAK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-03 published
NELSON, Rose (née CHUDOBIAK)
Peacefully on Sunday, February 27, 2005 at St. Joseph's Health Centre. Beloved mother of Lynne Marie. Adored Grannie of Trevor and Michael. Dear sister of Stella and Olga. Rose will be lovingly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service to be held from St. Joan of Arc Church, 1701 Bloor St. W. (1 block east of Keele St.) on Friday, March 4, 2005 at 1 p.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery.

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CHUDY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-05 published
KUPOLSKI
At his residence, on June 20, 2005, Stanislaw KUPOLSKI in his 83rd year. Friends are invited to attend a graveside service on Tuesday at 2 p.m. at St. Peter's Cemetery, Reverend Waclaw CHUDY officiating. O'Neil Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.

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CHUDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-22 published
MacDONALD, Alastair Kennedy
Born Glasgow, Scotland, June 23, 1912. Passed away peacefully on Monday, June 20, 2005, in Toronto, three days shy of his 93rd birthday. A loyal Scot as well as a proud Canadian, a student of Burns and a great storyteller himself, a generous soul, and a loving father.
Alec MacDONALD is lovingly remembered by his daughter Jan CHUDY (and husband Loren) of Toronto, and by his son Alastair (Margaret DUFF, deceased 1996,) also of Toronto. He is also survived by four grandchildren, Carrie (Rick PRINE,) Alastair, Jennifer, and Alice (Keith JACKSON,) and his six great-grandchildren, Louis and Campbell JACKSON of London, England, Chloe MacDONALD of Toronto, and Jose, Daniel and Destiny of Florida.
Alec was predeceased by his mother Marion (Jack) in 1912 and his father Peter Stuart MacDONALD in 1921 in South Africa, and also by his infant son Robert in 1937, his son Peter Stuart MacDONALD (Louisa, deceased 2000) in 1998, and his wife of 67 years Gordon (April 23, 2002).
Alec was a veteran of World War 2, serving with the Royal Air Force (City of Glasgow Squadron), working with No. 9 Squadron, Bardney, Lincolnshire, and serving in Gibraltar and North Africa.
At Alec's request, he will be cremated and at a later date his ashes will be scattered on his beloved Croftamie Burn, near Loch Lomond. A memorial service will be held at Kew Beach United Church, 140 Wineva (at Queen Street), at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 16.
The family thanks the staff of H-7 at Toronto East General Hospital for their kindness to Alec during his final week, and also the staff at Versa-Care on Main Street, where he resided for the last six years.
Tattie-bogle, Daddy.

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CHUDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-22 published
MacDONALD, Alastair Kennedy
Born Glasgow, Scotland, June 23, 1912. Passed away peacefully on Monday, June 20, 2005, in Toronto, three days shy of his 93rd birthday. A loyal Scot as well as a proud Canadian, a student of Burns and a great storyteller himself, a generous soul, and a loving father. Alec MacDONALD is lovingly remembered by his daughter Jan CHUDY (and husband Loren) of Toronto, and by his son Alastair (Margaret DUFF, deceased 1996,) also of Toronto. He is also survived by four grandchildren, Carrie (Rick PRINE,) Alastair, Jennifer, and Alice (Keith JACKSON,) and his six great-grandchildren, Louis and Campbell JACKSON of London, England, Chloe MacDONALD of Toronto, and Jose, Daniel and Destiny of Florida. Alec was predeceased by his mother Marion (Jack) in 1912 and his father Peter Stuart MacDONALD in 1921 in South Africa, and also by his infant son Robert in 1937, his son Peter Stuart MacDONALD (Louisa, deceased 2000) in 1998, and his wife of 67 years Gordon (April 23, 2002). Alec was a Veteran of World War 2, serving with the Royal Air Force (City of Glasgow Squadron), working with No. 9 Squadron, Bardney, Lincolnshire, and serving in Gibraltar and North Africa. At Alec's request, he will be cremated and at a later date his ashes will be scattered on his beloved Croftamie Burn, near Loch Lomond. A memorial service will be held at Kew Beach United Church, 140 Wineva (at Queen Street), at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 16. The family thanks the staff of H-7 at Toronto East General Hospital for their kindness to Alec during his final week, and also the staff at Versa-Care on Main Street, where he resided for the last six years. "Tattie-bogle, Daddy."

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CHUKWU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-14 published
Desola Juliana ONUOHA
By Gloria CHUKWU and Chinwe MGBEMENA, Wednesday, September 14, 2005, Page A22
Wife, mother, friend, registered nurse. Born July 25, 1972, in Nigeria. Died May 23 in Brampton, Ontario, of colon cancer, aged Desola was a very vibrant person whose personality and beauty charmed everyone who came in contact with her in her short life.
Desola was born and raised in Nigeria, where she obtained the equivalent of a bachelors degree in science laboratory technology. During her graduate internship, she met and married her best friend Obioma ONUOHA in 1999. They had a daughter, Kechinyere.
Desola's family emigrated to Canada in May, 2001, whereupon she faced the reality of being a new immigrant and the need to update her education with a Canadian education. She quickly enrolled at the school of nursing at Humber College. It was in November, 2001, while in nursing school and pregnant with her second child, that the colon cancer was diagnosed. The disease led to the death of her unborn child in 2002 and ultimately claimed her own life in 2005.
I met Desola through my friend Chinwe less than two months after Desola's arrival in Canada. It was during Chinwe's son's christening and, at the end of the day, it felt like I had known Desola for ages.
She was charming, witty and down-to-earth. She had a positive attitude toward life and never believed that anything was impossible. Her courage and attitude carried her through her nursing program even after her diagnosis.
Desola had the option to quit the program and concentrate on her treatment, but she chose to do both. Her diagnosis did not dampen her spirit and, even with series of chemotherapy and surgeries, she continued with her nursing program and graduated with honours in May, 2003, an accomplishment that has not ceased to amaze many people.
Desola loved people and loved company. She had a passion for cooking and entertaining. Anyone who knew her would not pass up an opportunity to visit with her since it always meant good food and positive conversation. During the vigil night kept in her honour, some people declined to eat. A friend of hers remarked that Desola would be upset that people did not eat at her house, which was very true of Desola. Needless to say, that the remark brought back memories and energized the room even amidst the grief.
At the vigil night, several people testified to how she positively affected their lives. One of these testimonies truly summed her up: "Desola had a forgiving soul and was always ready to make excuses for other people's inadequacies." She did not like to talk about the wrongdoings of others and would divert conversations away from any opportunity of doing that. Her belief was that people's behaviours are influenced by what they go through and so it is unfair to judge a person by one single action.
She was full of love and held her marriage as sacred.
She taught us a lot of things, especially to face whatever comes our way with strength and courage. Throughout the four years of fighting cancer, Desola held onto God, fervently praying and never losing her faith.
She continued to show strength and be a source of courage to her Friends. Even during her last days in the hospital, Desola comforted Friends who visited her, instead of them comforting her.
Desola's life confirms that life is not measured by how long we live but by our productivity. Desola was very hardworking and positively touched a lot of lives. As her funeral brochure stated: "Far and near, up and down, her beautiful face we will never see again, but the footprints she left in the hearts of her loved ones will forever be there."
Gloria and Chinwe are Desola's Friends.

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CHUM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-03 published
Advocate hailed for 'massive spirit'
Greenpeace co-founder Bob HUNTER is remembered for his tenacity and humour.
By John McKAY, Canadian Press
Toronto -- Bob HUNTER, who co-founded Greenpeace and was also a broadcaster, journalist, prolific author and political hopeful, died yesterday after a lengthy battle with prostate cancer. He was 63.
In his most recent public role, the Manitoba-born HUNTER was the ecology news specialist for CHUM's Citytv and CP24 television channels.
He was perhaps best known to Toronto viewers for Paper Cuts, a morning television segment in which he wore a bathrobe and commented on stories in the day's newspapers.
"This was a man with a great loving heart, a brilliant mind and a massive spirit," said Stephen HURLBUT, vice-president of news programming for Citytv. "It is a sadder world today, but a better world because of him."
HUNTER died surrounded by Bobbi, his wife of 31 years, and his children Will, Emily, Conan and Justine. Funeral arrangements were yet to be decided.
"Bob was an inspirational storyteller, an audacious fighter and an unpretentious mystic," said John DOHERTY, chair of Greenpeace Canada in a statement. "He was serious about saving the world while always maintaining a sense of humour."
HUNTER first came to prominence in Vancouver in 1971 when he was invited to join a group taking a charter vessel to Alaska to protest nuclear testing the U.S. began on Amchitka Island in the Aleutians in 1965.
"I thought I was going to be a reporter, taking notes," the one-time newspaper reporter remarked at the time.
"In reality, I wound up on first watch."
He stayed for the 45-day duration of the voyage and subsequently helped shape the beginning of the Greenpeace Foundation in '72.
Today, the organization has more than 2.5 million members with a presence in 40 countries.
He left Greenpeace's employ in '81 and turned to writing and broadcasting to transmit his green message. He was once named one of Time magazine's top eco-heroes of the 20th century.
In 2001, he ran unsuccessfully for the Ontario Liberal party for a by-election seat.

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CHUM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-04 published
WATERS was founder of CHUM
By Canadian Press, Sun., December 4, 2005
Toronto -- The broadcast pioneer who brought Top 40 music to Canadian airwaves and changed the industry has died at the age of 84.
Allan WATERS, the founder of CHUM Ltd., died peacefully in his sleep yesterday in hospital, surrounded by family, including his wife of more than 50 years, Marjorie.
WATERS stepped down from the CHUM board of directors in October after half a century in the broadcasting industry. He served as chairperson and president of CHUM until 2002.
WATERS began his broadcasting career in 1954 when he bought 1050 CHUM in Toronto, which went on to become Canada's first Top 40 radio station.
He took chances, defied conventional wisdom and became a legend in broadcasting, said his son Jim, who is now chairperson of CHUM.
"Everyone criticized him when he (went with the Top 40 format). They said, 'Allan, you must be crazy, you're not going to really play that loud music are you?' Even my mother criticized him," Jim WATERS said yesterday.
"But he stood by it as he always has. He's never given up on anything. He certainly didn't give up on that and look what happened. I guess history was made from that day forward as far as CHUM is concerned and I think as far as broadcasting in Canada is concerned," he said.
"Putting Top 40 radio on in 1957 was certainly a ground-breaking move, no question about that."
He probably never dreamed about how big his network would grow, Jim WATERS added.
"I don't know that he ever thought it was going to get this big... when he bought 1050 CHUM," he said. "I don't know that he ever imagined that at all."
The CHUM empire grew to include radio and television stations from coast to coast. CHUM owns 33 radio stations, 12 television stations and 21 specialty channels, including MuchMusic, Bravo and Space.
The move to television was another risky move that paid off, Jim WATERS said.
"I think a very significant move that Dad made was buying Citytv in Toronto."

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CHUM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-07 published
JARRETT, Merrick (1924-2005)
Following a lifetime filled with music and joy, Merrick died peacefully in Peterborough, Ontario, December 6, 2005, a year after the death of his dear Mary. He will always be loved by his sister, Sheila, and his three children, Linda (David WHITFIELD,) Stephen (Theresa MORRISSEY,) and Kate (John HART.) " Muk" was very proud of his eight grandchildren, Lindsay and Andrew WHITFIELD Adam, Michael and Peter JARRETT; and Terry, Martha and Rachel HART. He will also be missed by his nieces and nephews, Brian, Robin, Kim, Andrew and Rob. Merrick JARRETT was a singer of folk songs, piper and yodeller extraordinaire. His mother, Sassa, instilled in him a love of folk music at an early age. He began performing on radio station VORG in Newfoundland, and continued with programs on CKEY, CHUM and CFRB in Toronto, as well as a number of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio series. He made a number of recordings, and performed at various folk clubs and festivals, including Mariposa. Thousands of children were introduced to folk music through his concerts in schools and libraries across Canada. For 17 years he taught folk music at Conrad Grebel College, University of Waterloo. Merrick was the recipient of the 2002 Kitchener-Waterloo Arts Award (Music). Family and Friends are invited to share memories of Merrick's life on Friday, December 9, 2005 at the Sunshine Centre, 141 Father David Bauer Drive, Waterloo, Ontario, from 3: 00-6:00 p.m. To honour both Mary and Merrick, a donation to Lisaard House, 990 Speedsville Rd., Cambridge, Ontario N3H 4R6, would be appreciated. "It sounds an echo in my soul, How can I keep from singing?"

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-09 published
Bob McADOREY, Broadcaster: 1935-2005
Deejay who helped determine what Toronto's youth listened to in the sixties went on to enjoy a 27-year run as a popular and irreverent figure on Global television
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, February 9, 2005 - Page S9
Toronto -- If you knew Peggy Sue, you knew Bob McADOREY. That's because, with his pile of curly hair and horn-rimmed glasses, the Toronto disc jockey was a ringer for Buddy Holly, the songwriter and singer from Texas whose song was a hit in 1959. The two men were born 10 months apart -- McADOREY in 1935, Holly in 1936 and actually met in the mid-1950s when Mr. McADOREY was a disc jockey in Guelph, Ontario, and the singer was on a tour of Canada.
"His job was to introduce Buddy Holly at a concert at Kitchener. When he went on stage, the crowd went wild, and Bob though 'Gee, I didn't know I was this popular,' " remembered his sister Pat RUSSELL. "Of course, they thought he was Buddy Holly."
For decades, Mr. McADOREY was the entertainment commentator on Global Television; he retired less than five years ago. But in an earlier era, he was a household name in Southern Ontario. In 1960, just a few months after Buddy Holly died in a plane crash in 1959, his look-alike joined Toronto's CHUM. Almost overnight, Bob McADOREY became the top disc jockey at CHUM, the No. 1 rock station in the country. He was astonished when the station paid him what he was asking for -- $7,200 a year (about $50,000 in today's money, according to the Bank of Canada's inflation calculator).
"Bob McADOREY, whose face is as well known in Toronto as Mayor Givens, has the most power to dictate what pop music Ontario teens listen to," wrote the Toronto Telegram in 1966.
Not only was he the on-air man in the key 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. slot, he was also the music director. He chose the records the other six disc jockeys played. He and the other disc jockeys decided on CHUM's Top 10, which sent kids to record stores to buy records with a big hole in the middle and a song on each side. They spun at 45 revolutions a minute and were called 45s.
"He alone commands what goes on the hit parade in Canada," wrote The Globe's Blake KIRBY in 1968. "Middle-aged squares who run record stores use the CHUM chart, the weekly list of what McADOREY is playing and plugging as a buying guide."
Along the way, he shared the footlights with such big-name visitors as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.
The CHUM hit parade made records such as The Unicorn by the Irish Rovers. Mr. McADOREY, a sentimental Irish-Canadian, pushed the record, which sold 140,000 copies in Canada and a million in the United States. But he didn't like everything on the CHUM chart. It was a business, after all.
"We're playing records here which I just can't bear to listen to, but I wouldn't let that influence what goes on the air," Mr. McADOREY once told The Globe and Mail. His sister said that when he went home after work, he was so sick of rock 'n' roll that he put earphones on and listened to classical music.
Like many successful big-city disc jockeys, Mr. McADOREY also ran dances on the weekends -- events with such names as Bob McAdorey's Canadian Bandstand or Canadian Hopville. He and a couple of other disc jockeys owned a company called Teen Scene Ltd., which put on dances in towns all over Southern Ontario.
After a long spell on CHUM, Bob McADOREY either was too old -- he was well into his 30s -- or too tired, and so he suddenly found himself fired. Unlike the regular corporate world, where people resign, in radio they are just plain sacked. Disc jockeys almost wear it as a badge of honour.
"There are no hard feelings," he told an entertainment writer in 1972 after he had been sacked from CFTR following a stint at CFGM. "I was told that it was either the station's new music-and-contests format or me." Within days, he had rejoined radio station CFGM.
A few years later, he morphed into television. No one told him that radio types, from the hot side of the Marshall McLuhan equation, are not supposed to be able to make the switch to the cool world of television. He perched on his stool in 1973 and performed for about 27 years.
Bob McADOREY was born within earshot of the Niagara Falls. His father worked as a machinist on the railway and the whole family lived near both the tracks and the roundhouse at Niagara Falls, Ontario For the rest of his life, Mr. McADOREY maintained a love affair with trains and rode them at every opportunity.
He went to high school at Stamford Collegiate. An Irish Catholic, he was one of two non-Protestants in the class. The other was Barbara FRUM, later the host of The Journal and As It Happens on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The two would spend the religious class in another room, enjoying their time off.
In Grade 12, Mr. McADOREY started work at the local radio station, doing a program in the early morning before class. "One day, the station manager told me to go on air and do the play-by-play of a local baseball game," he told the Toronto Star in 2000. "I didn't know the players' names and I didn't know much about baseball, so I sat in the bleachers and interviewed the spectators and it seemed to work."
After that, he was hooked. For a time, he worked all over -- including radio station CJDC in remote Dawson's Creek, British Columbia Even then, he was fairly outrageous. " CJDC had access to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation feeds," he said in 2000. "But nobody monitored us, so we sold everything -- the one o'clock time signal to a jewellery store, the Queen's Christmas Message brought to you by Sammy's Bar and Grill."
But it was soon after he had moved to Guelph, Ontario, that things really began to happen and he hit the big time at the age of 24 by working for CHUM.
Though he may have been at the top of the pop game in the Toronto of the sixties, he also became a national figure at Global as it expanded from a base in Southern Ontario to become the country's third network. He never applied for a job in television, it was just chance.
Bill CUNNINGHAM, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation foreign correspondent brought in to run Global News, hired him after he saw him speak during a tour of the new television station. At the time, Mr. McADOREY was working for Alan SLAIGHT, a prescient broadcaster who had run CHUM, bought CFGM and was one of the early owners of Global. Mr. CUNNINGHAM's plan was to lighten up the newscast and hire a kind of humourist-commentator. Thus, Mr. McADOREY covered entertainment and did light pieces for the newscast, heading out with a cameraman to find what he could. Once, during an Air Canada strike, he drifted out to Toronto's Pearson International Airport and happened to find Terminal 2 entirely deserted. The scene made irresistible camera fodder. The pair had time to erect an impromptu bowling alley and roll a few balls before the party was broken up by patrolling policemen.
The show was an enduring success. It helped that Mr. McADOREY was good-looking, possessed a great voice and was totally unaffected and unpretentious. Behind the scenes, though, Global was in turmoil and not just financially.
The network kept trying to reinvent itself. One idea was to bring in an untried newsreader, Suzanne PERRY, who was one of Pierre TRUDEAU's press aides and whose son, Matthew PERRY, went on to fame in the sitcom Friends. Sadly, Ms. PERRY was put on air before she was ready and that experiment failed.
A short while afterward, the network tried something called News at Noon, with Bob McADOREY doing entertainment, Mike ANSCOMBE the sports, and John DAWE, business. The three of them joked, made fun of each other, and did and said things you weren't supposed to see on television. All of a sudden, they had a huge audience, unheard of at that time of day.
"We broke new ground with 300,000 viewers at noon," said business reporter John DAWE. " Then it expanded and we did the 5: 30 news as well. We worked together for 14 years."
As he matured, Mr. McADOREY lost his Buddy Holly looks. Instead, he was often mistaken for another famous person with glasses and a mass of curly hair -- Ken TAILOR/TAYLOR, the Canadian ambassador to Iran who sheltered American colleagues during the 1979-80 hostage crisis.
At Global, the news department kept trying new things and new people, though the on-air staff remained pretty much the same. One producer didn't like the jocular format. And Mr. McADOREY didn't like him. He rebelled by being provocative on air.
"It's Friday, and I didn't really feel much like working today. The boss is out of town so I took it easy this afternoon, stretching out in my office, reading and daydreaming," he began his part of the 6 p.m. newscast on April 8, 1983. It got him fired.
"Unprofessional and insulting to the viewers," read the note from his pompous producer. The viewers thought otherwise. Phone lines buzzed and letters landed on all the right desks. Two weeks later, the producer was fired and Bob McADOREY was rehired.
As host of Entertainment Desk from 1991 to 1997, he guided it through many lively segments. Among the most memorable was the appearance of comedienne Judy Tenuta. "[She] pretty well took over the show, which bothered some viewers but not me," he once said. "Her wild style made for bizarre television. Most of the interview was done with Judy sitting on my lap making semi-lewd comments."
For all that, he never did like producers. At the time of his retirement in July, 2000, Andrew RYAN of The Globe and Mail asked him what advice he would give to aspiring young entertainment journalists. "Producers are dorks, actors are jerks," Mr. McADOREY answered. "The only ones worth talking to are directors."
Having been asked to retire, he said he had no expectations of a gold watch. Rather, "how about a gold boot up the butt? Retirement was not my idea. I always thought I had a few more good years left."
Instead, he chose to retire quietly at his home in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario His main hobby was reading and he was something of an authority on James Joyce. An Irish nationalist, he had a lifelong obsession with the great Dublin writer.
Robert Joseph McADOREY was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on July 24, 1935. He died on February 5 at St. Catharines, Ontario He was 70 and had suffered prolonged illness. He is survived by daughter Colleen, sister Pat and brother Terry. He was predeceased by his wife and by two of three children.

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-26 published
PRITCHARD, David -- Dispatch
By Jordan PRESS, Saturday, March 26, 2005, Page M4
Radio listeners never knew what they were going to hear when David PRITCHARD took to the Disk Jockey booth. One night he piped up in the middle of a pop song and told listeners, "later we'll chop some chives with Charles Ives." Some nights he would look at whoever was at the station with him and begin one of his 10-minute esoteric conversations. "Uh... uh... John," he would start, according to fellow disc-jockey John DONABIE, who met Mr. PRITCHARD in the 1970s when the two were at CHUM-FM. 'I notice you have a staple in your arm. Are you for sale?'
"He would go so deep into somewhere, and it would all make sense," says Mr. DONABIE, now the weekend morning man at CFRB.
Mr. PRITCHARD was a musician and an artist, but is best remembered as an influential local radio host from the end of the era when Disk Jockeys -- not corporate programmers -- picked the play lists. He died of cancer on February 27 at age 60.
"Everyone believed that no one could be that creative... without doing something," Mr. DONABIE says, referring to the drugs that fuelled the period. But "David didn't even smoke cigarettes."
Mr. PRITCHARD was born on October 18, 1944, in London, England, and moved with his family to North York in 1952. As a teenager, he started his own pirate radio station he called CBIG by rigging up a microphone and an antenna to broadcast across his Willowdale neighbourhood.
He rose to prominence in 1968 when he became the late-night man at CHUM, where it wasn't unheard of him to broadcast classical, jazz and electronic records simultaneously on the station's three turntables, Mr. DONABIE says.
He would also play his own experimental electronic compositions. "But he would always say a listener named Fred had sent in some new music," says Jim BAUER, who worked with Mr. PRITCHARD at CHUM. " People listening on the air had no idea it was David."
In 1969, he married Libby GRAHAM and they had two children, Christian, now 32, and Fraser, now 29.
Shortly after Fraser was born, Mr. PRITCHARD became the first program director for then-fledgling CFNY in 1977. He continued to make music, becoming the first North American to be signed by Island Records, the same label as U2 and Bob Marley. He was also a visual artist, creating many collages and paintings that now hang on the walls of his Friends' homes.
While he had opportunities to take more lucrative jobs, he was always more interested in art than money, his son Christian says.

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-03 published
Bob HUNTER, Evironmentalist And Writer: 1941-2005
In 1971, he was assigned to cover a story about a nuclear protest. Instead, he joined the group and co-founded Greenpeace
By Terry WEBER, With files from Canadian Press; staff; Globe and Mail archives, Tuesday, May 3, 2005, Page S9
He was a journalist, television personality, writer and political candidate but most of all he was a co-founder of Greenpeace, recognized by Time magazine as one of the 20th century's 10 top eco-heroes.
In 1971, while on assignment for the Vancouver Sun, he was invited to join a group taking a charter vessel to Alaska to protest nuclear testing that the U.S. began on Amchitka Island in the Aleutians in 1965. It had all started when Mr. HUNTER had attended a Sunday night meeting in a church basement, where he and a group of likeminded Friends decided, there and then, to save the environment and set up what he later laughingly called an organization. As he left the podium, having been elected president, he yelled out "Peace!" -- the mantra of the time -- and someone in the audience responded with the word green. "Let's make it a green peace," he yelled.
They scrounged up some money, bought an old broken-down fishing boat, renamed it the Rainbow Warrior and set off to the Aleutian Islands off Alaska to harass the mighty American military. They didn't get there in time, the boat being a very slow boat to anywhere, but the suspense devoured the front pages in British Columbia and eventually the whole country. Having been a reporter since he was 18, the venture was partly inspired by a quixotic desire to file a story datelined "Ground Zero."
"I thought I was going to be a reporter, taking notes," he once remarked. "In reality, I wound up on first watch."
He stayed for the 45-day duration of the voyage and subsequently helped shape the beginning of the Greenpeace Foundation in 1972. With the launch of the pro-environment activist group, he helped bring public attention not only to nuclear testing but to the excesses of whaling and seal hunting, as well as the dumping of toxic waste into the oceans.
His forays into the face of danger were the stuff of high adventure. The photographic record of Greenpeace encounters with Soviet or French ships on the open ocean are often fuzzy and taken at a distance. Apparently, one famous photo of a Russian harpoon parting the hair of a protester as he bobbed through the ocean swell in a flimsy inflatable boat showed the Greenpeace leader himself. "That's HUNTER," Gord PERKS of the Toronto Environmental Alliance told The Globe and Mail last year. Anywhere else, and Mr. HUNTER "would be revered as a national hero," he added.
Personal heroics, however, were not something Bob HUNTER chose to exploit. Only the mission was important. In a Globe and Mail report of the 1977 harpoon incident, he described the scene by telephone but had failed to put himself in it.
The encounter was vintage Greenpeace. Protesters aboard the James Bay, a former Canadian minesweeper, had succeeded in protecting sperm Wales for almost four hours by piloting their dinghies between the Wales and the harpooners. Finally, the Soviet boats had massed together and let loose their harpoons. At least one of the projectiles had passed low over the heads of protesters, whose dinghy was keeping pace with a whale only metres away.
Saving Wales lay at the heart of Mr. HUNTER's early work as an environmentalist. He was once moved to relate an incident that, to him, spoke volumes about the creatures. In July of 1975, lack of funds and an underpowered vessel had caused Greenpeace to abandon a campaign to disrupt whaling off the California coast. It turned out that their old fishing boat, the Phyllis Cormack, owned a top speed of nine knots, while the Russians they pursued were capable of 20 knots.
Even so, the protesters had somehow enjoyed great success -- but only because the Wales had come looking for Greenpeace. Inexplicably, something had caused the animals to turn and seek out the slower vessel.
"The Wales came right at our boat, and the chaser boat we were following had to change course," Mr. HUNTER later told reporters.
Eventually, Mr. HUNTER left to join the Sea Shepherd Society, which was seen as a sort of splinter group, but by then he had charted a definable course for Greenpeace. After all, it was he who adopted the term Rainbow Warriors to portray Greenpeace activists, as well as the phrase Media Mind Bomb to describe the activist impact on the public consciousness.
"I was the right person in the right place," the shaggy-haired, grey-bearded Mr. HUNTER once said of his pivotal role in Greenpeace. "But when it's done, I think you can get into a habit of just clinging to it because you don't know what to do next, whereas I knew all along, I wanted to get back to what I was doing already."
In truth, his contribution was far greater than that. Mr. HUNTER possessed a genius for communication. The language of dramatic imagery and gesture that Greenpeace pioneered grew directly from his analysis of the late communications guru Marshall McLuhan. "Tell me how many people you know who ever had an idea that good and made it happen." Bob HUNTER took the theory, applied it to environmentalism and and so changed the world.
"Bob was an inspirational storyteller, an audacious fighter and an unpretentious mystic," said John DOHERTY, chairman of Greenpeace Canada. "He was serious about saving the world, while always maintaining a sense of humour."
Being an environmentalist, he told an audience at the University of Toronto's Innis College in November, means always having to explain to your children why you're so angry. "We're doomed!" he shouted with gusto, his ponytail flying. "It's obvious that the world is going to hell in a hand basket, as usual."
For all his zeal as a self-described "apocalypticist," he was also capable of self-satire. "Save the three-legged purple salamander from southern Saskatoon!" he gleefully urged his audience, which included such luminaries as David Suzuki and Monte Hummel, president of World Wildlife Fund Canada. "I'm all for it.
"My God, the planet is being destroyed while I lie here on my waterbed; I must do something!"
Today, the organization has more than 2.5 million members with a presence in 40 countries. He left Greenpeace in 1981 and turned to writing and broadcasting to transmit his 'green' message. In 1991, he won the Governor-General's Award for literature for his book Occupied Canada: A Young White Man Discovers His Unsuspected Past. He was the author of more than a dozen books. Earlier, he had also written for the television shows The Beachcombers and Danger Bay.
In his most recent public role, he was the ecology news specialist for CHUM's CITY-TV and CP24 television channels. He was perhaps best known to Toronto viewers for Paper Cuts, a segment on the station's popular Breakfast Television show, in which he wore a bathrobe and commented on stories in the day's newspapers. Viewers also knew him as CITY-TV's environmental reporter and as host of Hunter's Gathers.
In 2001, he ran unsuccessfully for the Liberal Party for a by-election seat in the Ontario legislature and accused the New Democratic Party of employing slanderous techniques against him in the campaign.
In 1999, Mr. HUNTER had been diagnosed with cancer but refused to have surgery. He began years of treatment at a Mexican cancer clinic that specialized in non-conventional medical treatments.
In November, he told the University of Toronto audience that he was happy, despite his eco-gloom and his own ill health. Things were changing because people made a difference, he said. There was still hope for the three-legged salamander. "The only thing incurable about me," he confessed, "is my optimism."
Robert HUNTER was born in St. Boniface, Manitoba, on October 13, 1941, which happened to be Thanksgiving Day. He died of prostate cancer in Toronto on May 2. He was 63. He leaves his wife, Bobbie, and his children Will, Emily, Conan and Justine.

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-05 published
Businessman established Top 40 radio, MuchMusic
A money-losing station at the outset, CHUM became broadcasting empire
By Fred LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, December 5, 2005, Page A3
Allan WATERS, who died Saturday at the age of 84, started Top 40 radio in Canada, making a huge success of CHUM, the small money-losing Toronto radio station he bought in 1954. He built his stake in CHUM into a radio and television empire that included Toronto's CITY-TV and other television stations across the country.
CHUM went on the air in 1945 and was Toronto's fifth radio station. It broadcast on a weak signal and only from sunrise to sunset. Mr. WATERS, who had made some money in advertising and the pharmaceutical business, bought the station in 1954 from a man he worked for, Jack PART.
He took his time learning the radio business and the station began to break even. He increased its power to 50,000 watts -- the maximum allowed in North America. He also started to listen to recordings of the kind of radio stations that were making money in the United States. He liked the style of the Storz family of Omaha, Neb., which is credited with inventing Top 40 radio on their U.S. stations.
In a speech in May of 1957, Mr. WATERS told the small staff at CHUM: "I haven't been in the radio business as long as anyone in this room, but if I was in the shoe business and operating a poor shoe store, I think I would find out who is running a good shoe store and copy his style. CHUM is going to be patterned after a Storz station. As Storz owns five stations and is first in each market, it's actually not a bad pattern to follow."
All Shook Up by Elvis Presley was the No. 1 song on CHUM's Top 40 radio when it started on May 27, 1957. Within five weeks, CHUM's slice of the audience went from 5 per cent to 24 per cent. By 1958, its 1050 CHUM was the No. 1 radio station in Toronto. By 1968, CHUM Ltd. was listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and Mr. WATERS was a rich man.
He was born in east-end Toronto. At 16, he finished school and went to work as an office boy for $16 a week. Mr. PART, his employer, ran a successful patent medicine operation. Mr. WATERS worked his way up the ladder in sales and advertising. All his life he would say modestly, "I'm just a salesman."
The war interrupted his business career as he served overseas with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1942 to 1946. He returned to work for Mr. PART, who had also started York Broadcasting and established CHUM at the end of the war.
CHUM's success allowed the WATERS empire to expand. He had the rights for Muzak in Canada. In 1963, he started CHUM-FM and later bought a television station in Barrie, north of Toronto. He was frustrated when he was not allowed to move the station's transmitter closer to Toronto to tap into the larger metropolitan market.
Expansion into television came slowly. He bought into the Maritimes, but failed to win regulatory approval to buy CFCF in Montreal. With his television stations he became one of the owners of CTV, the private television network that at the time was a kind of co-operative.
Perhaps his biggest success in television occurred in 1981, when he bought the floundering CITY-TV. He left the charismatic Moses ZNAIMER in charge, but the station was owned by CHUM Ltd. It expanded into pop video with MuchMusic, as successful and innovative as Top 40 radio in the 1950s. This decade, 1050 CHUM.com became the world's first all Internet radio station.
"Everyone criticized him when he [went with the Top 40 format]," his son, Jim WATERS, said on the weekend. "They said: 'Allan, you must be crazy. You're not going to really play that loud music are you?' Even my mother criticized him."
The son, now chairman of CHUM, said his father had a knack for picking winners, whether it was Top 40 radio or a new local television format.
"I think a very significant move that Dad made was buying CITY-TV in Toronto. We weren't in television. The move into specialty television was groundbreaking with MuchMusic," Mr. WATERS said.
Allan WATERS didn't have a gift for picking records or television programs, but he knew how to pick people who did.
"His great talent wasn't as a programmer, but as a salesman. Mr. WATERS was a super salesman. He had a system where he knew what every salesman and every station was doing week by week," said Senator Jerry GRAFSTEIN, who co-founded CITY-TV and worked with Mr. WATERS for decades.
His personal life was the opposite of his business life. While the music was flashy, he was not; while his station thrived on publicity, he was a private person. MuchMusic was hip; he sported a crew cut and glasses. Most entrepreneurs and business people in Canada are listed in Who's Who, but there was never an entry for Allan WATERS. He wasn't interested.
He also thought long hours were a waste of energy. Most days he went home to his wife at 5: 30. "If you work 20 hours [a day], you're doing too much or you're doing something wrong," he told a reporter.
Mr. WATERS was a frugal man. For many years he walked to work from his home in the neighbourhood of Leaside. His office was relatively modest. His companies almost never borrowed to make purchases. And in a business that thrives on global glitz, he never invested outside Canada.
He was generous and loyal to his employees and in a business where hiring and firing was the norm, even some disc jockeys and announcers -- such as Gord MARTINEAU at CITY-TV -- stayed with his stations for decades. Mr. WATERS did part company with announcer Larry SOLWAY after the boss refused to allow him to discuss a sex manual on the air. Later, CHUM Ltd. would own Sex-TV.
At his death, the CHUM empire Mr. WATERS built owned and operated 33 radio stations, 12 local television stations and 21 specialty channels, including MuchMusic and Space. It also controlled other sideline businesses, including Muzak.
When he died peacefully in his sleep Saturday morning in hospital, he was surrounded by family, including his wife of more than 50 years, Marjorie. He also leaves two sons; Ronald, deputy chairman, and Jim, chairman of CHUM Ltd. The funeral is private. A public memorial will be held on Wednesday in Toronto.

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-05 published
WATERS, Allan (August 11, 1921-December 3, 2005)
CHUM Limited founder and Canadian broadcasting pioneer Allan Waters passed away peacefully at St. Michael's Hospital, surrounded by his wife Marjorie and family. Allan WATERS served his country in the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1942-46 as a wireless radar mechanic posted to active duty in England and Belgium. After returning to Canada, he excelled in the marketing of proprietary medicine, which led him to become President of Adrem Limited and Private Brands Packagers Limited. In 1954, he left the pharmaceutical business to found what is now CHUM Limited with the acquisition of radio station 1050 CHUM in Toronto, which under his leadership became the first Top 40 radio station in Canada. As CHUM Limited's Chairman and President until 2002, Allan WATERS created the vision for CHUM's growth from that single radio station to its current place as one of Canada's premier media companies with radio and television stations across the country. Allan WATERS inspired both employees and colleagues with a commitment to the broadcast industry that spanned five decades. Among his many contributions, he served as President of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, President of the Central Canada Broadcasters Association, was founding Chairman of the Radio Sales Bureau and a Director of the CTV Television Network. Over the course of his career, Allan WATERS was bestowed a number of prestigious honours recognizing his contributions to the broadcasting industry including, the Ted Rogers Sr.-Velma Rogers Graham Award, the RadioTelevision News Directors' Association's President's Award and the Canadian Association of Broadcasters's Gold Ribbon Award for Broadcast Excellence. He was also recognized for contributing to Canada's cultural legacy through the support of Canadian talent. At the 1999 Juno Awards, Allan WATERS was the first broadcaster to be honoured with the Walt Grealis Special Achievement Award for contributions to the Canadian music industry. Concurrently, he was also inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. In 2002, in a special ceremony at the Canadian Music Industry Awards, he was inducted into the Canadian Music Industry Hall of Fame where he was honoured for lifetime achievement in the Canadian Music and Broadcast Industries. Allan WATERS' dedication to the broadcasting industry was equalled only by his unwavering commitment to community service and philanthropy with the founding of the CHUM Charitable Foundation. Today, the Foundation assists hundreds of thousands of people by providing financial assistance to charitable organizations and social services agencies. In December 2002, Mr. WATERS stepped down from his position as Chairman and President of CHUM Limited. He continued on as an active member of the Board of Directors until October 2005, when he retired from the Board and was named an Honorary Director. A devoted husband, father and grandfather, Allan WATERS leaves behind his wife of 63 years Marjorie, their three children Jim, Ron and Sherry (BOURNE,) daughtersin-law Sheila and Leslie, son-in-law Sean and grandchildren Michael, Darren, Amy, Maxine, Kyle, Lauren, and Ellie. Allan WATERS will be profoundly missed by Friends and colleagues, and by his extended family of over 3,000 CHUM employees past and present, from coast to coast. A private service will be held for the family. A public memorial will be held on Wednesday, December 7th, 2005 from 2-4 p.m., at The Westin Harbour Castle Conference Centre, Metropolitan Ballroom, 2 Harbour Square, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the CHUM Charitable Foundation c/o The CHUM Building, 299 Queen Street West, Toronto, M5V 2Z5.

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-07 published
JARRETT, Merrick (1924-2005)
Following a lifetime filled with music and joy, Merrick died peacefully in Peterborough, Ontario, December 6, 2005, a year after the death of his dear Mary. He will always be loved by his sister, Sheila, and his three children, Linda (David WHITFIELD,) Stephen (Theresa MORRISSEY,) and Kate (John HART.) " Muk" was very proud of his eight grandchildren, Lindsay and Andrew WHITFIELD Adam, Michael and Peter JARRETT; and Terry, Martha and Rachel HART. He will also be missed by his nieces and nephews, Brian, Robin, Kim, Andrew and Rob.
Merrick JARRETT was a singer of folk songs, piper and yodeller extraordinaire. His mother, Sassa, instilled in him a love of folk music at an early age. He began performing on radio station VORG in Newfoundland, and continued with programs on CKEY, CHUM and CFRB in Toronto, as well as a number of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio series. He made a number of recordings, and performed at various folk clubs and festivals, including Mariposa. Thousands of children were introduced to folk music through his concerts in schools and libraries across Canada. For 17 years he taught folk music at Conrad Grebel College, University of Waterloo. Merrick was the recipient of the 2002 Kitchener-Waterloo Arts Award (Music).
Family and Friends are invited to share memories of Merrick's life on Friday, December 9, 2005 at the Sunshine Centre, 141 Father David Bauer Drive, Waterloo, Ontario, from 3: 00-6:00 p.m.
To honour both Mary and Merrick, a donation to Lisaard House, 990 Speedsville Rd., Cambridge, Ontario N3H 4R6, would be appreciated.
"It sounds an echo in my soul,
How can I keep from singing?"

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-07 published
'Mac' led heady days at CHUM
Disk Jockey Bob McADOREY as popular as music
'Bon vivant' later a Global television fixture
By Jim BAWDEN, Television COLUMNIST
Bob McADOREY helped usher in radio's rock 'n' roll era and set the musical agenda for a generation of Toronto teens.
Few today realize the power that Disk Jockeys like McADOREY exerted over Toronto popular culture 40 years ago, when radio ruled. It was a cozy time for music -- and then CHUM entered the fray, blew the cobwebs away and ushered in the crazy days of rock broadcasting.
McADOREY, 69, died Saturday at St. Catharines' Hotel Dieu hospital after a long illness.
McADOREY grew up in Niagara Falls and attended Stamford Collegiate, also the alma mater of Titanic director James CAMERON. He was in the same graduating class as Barbara FRUM, the legendary Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television interviewer.
As a teen, McADOREY won a province-wide public speaking contest and was the popular president of his high school fraternity.
He also played ragtime piano.
"Crowds would go around him," said his older brother, Terry McADOREY.
McADOREY's radio career started in 1953 when the Niagara Falls native first signed on with CHVC near the Falls, introducing listeners to his unique style of easy-going patter.
"I looked like Buddy Holly back then," McADOREY told the Toronto Star in a 1981 interview. "I weighed about 95 pounds and we played songs like 'Que Sera Sera.' Everything was a lot softer, smoother then."
After additional stops in London, Guelph, Hamilton and Dawson Creek, McADOREY wound up at Toronto's CHUM, coaxed to climb aboard by resident star Disk Jockey Al BOLISKA.
"I'd lived with Al above a variety store in London and he kept telling me to come to CHUM. I asked for $600 a month, after all Gordie TAPP was making $100 a week, and to my surprise I got the job."
Starting in 1960, McADOREY began a stint that many people consider rock programming at its finest: brash, spontaneous and pretty wild. And the Disk Jockeys were the stars.
CHUM became the rock station to listen to and McADOREY was the man who told you if a song was going places. The guy who hung out with The Beatles and The Stones when they were in town (and introduced them from the stage) was known simply as "Mac."
For years, he hosted the all-important 4 to 7 p.m. slot. CHUM's chart of the week's top records was posted everywhere: in record stores and high school lockers. Eaton's and Simpson's would only stock those 45s that were on the CHUM list. When a new record called "The Unicorn" came in, McADOREY liked it so much he immediately put it on the air and it sold 140,000 copies in Canada in two weeks and made The Irish Rovers.
Thinking back on those heady days, McADOREY said, "We kept it all clean up here. There was no payola as in the U.S. and we deliberately helped a lot of Canadians. It was personality radio. We were promoted like crazy back then. And the pressures were unbelievable. We dictated what records were going to go. And what kids would eat, drink.
"I could have written five books about what happened at CHUM. There'd be one book if I saved my memos. The most frightening thing was the British invasion. There weren't enough cops to handle the crowds -- it was out of control."
Off the air, he was a bon vivant, said 72-year-old Terry McADOREY.
"We did a lot of drinking. He was a good friend of Ronnie HAWKINS."
In 1968, the CHUM deal fizzled. When owner Al WATERS brought in American consultants, McADOREY felt the business was becoming too heavily formatted and left.
McADOREY headed to CFGM in Richmond Hill, which was trying to invade Toronto with a country music format. As morning man, he energized the station. He moved to CFTR in 1970 and after a few years returned to CFGM.
A constant listener was Bill CUNNINGHAM, head of Global television news, and he asked McADOREY to contribute satirical bits, which eventually became a full-time job.
Sample segment: during an airline strike McADOREY headed out to Terminal 2 with bowling equipment and pins to demonstrate the building was only of use as a bowling alley. Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers saw nothing funny in this and whisked him out as the piece was being filmed.
Another time during a city campaign to get dog owners to scoop up deposits, McADOREY and a cameraman went out to do field tests, which consisted of chasing terrified dogs whose owners had failed the test.
By 1980, he was entertainment editor. In 1983, Global tried to fire him when he disagreed over assignments. Global's Three Guys at noon telecast was a big hit (the others: Mike Anscombe and John Dawe) and hundreds of daily phone calls forced management to reconsider. For a time, Global even outperformed Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Midday.
McADOREY later got his own afternoon entertainment show where he'd report from movie junkets and comment on the entertainment scene.
I last chatted with him in 2000 when he was railing against Global's retirement-at-65 rule. But he looked frail and had been off for months after a fainting attack.
McADOREY had a farm at Gormley and a place in Niagara-on-the-Lake. Despite his television success he still yearned for the golden days of radio: "I'd walk into the booth in pyjama tops and jeans and talk one-on-one to people. At least that's the way I always imagined it."
McADOREY leaves daughter Colleen, her husband Jim TATTI, a Global sports broadcaster, and four grandchildren.
He was predeceased by his wife Willa, daughter Robin and son Terry.
A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at St. Patrick's Church in Niagara Falls.
With files from Gabe GONDA

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-07 published
NELSON, William Andrew (1912-2005)
Peacefully at Bankside Terrace Retirement Residence, Kitchener on Friday, May 6, 2005, at age 92. Bill was born on July 18, 1912 at Morningside Farm, Seymour West Twp. He graduated from Queen's University with a B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering in 1937. He joined the Bailey Meter Company in 1938 and retired as Senior Vice President in 1976. He served in the Canadian Army during World War 2 as a Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers officer and was awarded M.B.E. He was an active member of the United Church of Canada since 1928. Beloved husband of the late Isabelle (CHUM) and Helen; loving father of John, and Peter and Sharon. Loved grandfather of Kevin, Drew and Christopher and great-grandfather of Kyle, Joshua, A.J., Michael and Matthew. Dear brother of Janet Stevens HART. Lovingly remembered by Ann PAYNE, Karen PATTERSON and their families. Bill was predeceased by Fran WATKIN. Friends are invited to share their memories of Bill with his family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King St. S., Waterloo on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service to celebrate Bill's life will be held in the chapel of the funeral home on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 at 11 a.m. A reception will be held in the Fireside Reception Room of the funeral home immediately following the service. Interment and a graveside service will take place in Burnbrae Cemetery, Campbellford. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of your choice and can be arranged through the funeral home. Condolences and Donations www.edwardrgood.com 519-745-8445

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-21 published
DELLAI, Dedena (née MORELLO) (June 16, 1907-May 19, 2005)
To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die. Dedena lived a long wonderfully adventurous life. Sshe began singing with the Rosslino Opera Co. in the 1940's as well as acting. Her career on radio started with CHUM, then in Hamilton, followed with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television on Wojak, with John Vernon. In her 85th year Dedena worked for various provincial courts as an interpreter. She learned to drive near age 63; after a car repair, officers would warn each other "watch out guys, Ma's on the road again." So many talented and dedicated people shared her days. Dedena enjoyed a loving working and social relationship with her dear friend Ontario SARRICINI. They shared hard work and humour, and I'm afraid pranks on and off radio were sometimes the order of the day. A Friendship that tugs at the heart as the memories linger, she will always be remembered with fondness by Ontario and his wife Anna, and their children Christina and Anthony. Predeceased by her dear husband Giovanni, precious daughter Maria, son John, deeply loved sister Pierina, brothers Aldo and Ezio. Dedena leaves her adored broken-hearted family, daughter Joan, darling grandchildren Leah, Christina, Andrea, John and Tom. She dearly loved her David (Barba Rosa) Gordon and son-in-law Paul. Great-grandmother to dear Tarra, Alex, Michael and the late Barbara. Dedena's true and deep love for her sister Ida FAZZARI was unfailing in its devotion; she held her close to her heart to keep always and forever, "Ia vita mia legato a te." She purely loved her nephews and nieces, dearest Maria, Ida, "picola" Lucille, Les, Joanne, Naldie, and the late Lolita and Anne. Her babies Nikki and Clementine were a constant joy for her, as well as little Coco who screeches "Ma" all day. Many thanks to St. Elizabeth's staff, and their caregivers Ida and Elizabeth, with special love to dear Shirley and Nadine, whose loyalty and skill were exceptional. Thanks to dear nurse Renata, and loved nurse Ganine JACKS, for their constant skill and devotion, "bella, non te scordar di me." In lieu of flowers, a prayer for families listed here today and for those who have loved ones in hospitals would be appreciated. Cremation. A celebration of Dedena's life will take place this summer. Sleep warm darling mother. Gather a star for each of us and their light shall show the strength in what remains behind.

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-30 published
TROIANO master of 'Toronto Sound'
Legendary guitarist, band leader is missed
Friends remember innovative spirit, business acumen
By Greg QUILL, Entertainment Columnist
The jaunty beret, capricious moustache, warm smile, bright eyes and inquiring brow are the features his family, Friends and admirers are remembering today as legendary Toronto guitarist, band leader, composer and music producer Domenic "Donnie" TROIANO is laid to rest in North York, following a funeral mass near his longtime home in Thornhill.
One of Canada's most influential and innovative rock musicians during the 1960s and '70s, and a revered session player, record producer, television and movie score composer and jazz recording artist in the following decades, TROIANO succumbed last Wednesday night to a 10-year struggle with prostate cancer. He was 59.
Born in Modugno, Italy, TROIANO and his family came to Toronto in 1949. A little more than a decade later, he was immersed in the city's burgeoning rock and R&B music culture, and, along with other budding guitar slingers, used to study The Hawks' Robbie Robertson at Concord Tavern Saturday matinees. By age 17 he had taught himself to play from chord books and by studying the work of his musical heroes.
While he defined what contemporaries call "The Toronto Sound" during stints with Robbie LANE and The Disciples, Ronnie Hawkins, The Five Rogues, Mandala, and Bush -- bands in which he became known as "the guitarist to beat" in Toronto in the years following Robertson's long ascendancy -- and carried the hopes of a generation of Canadian guitar slingers to the world as Joe Walsh's replacement in the American band The James Gang, and as Randy Bachman's in The Guess Who, TROIANO remained a polite and even humble presence in the industry, a musician's musician who eschewed the trappings of fame and excess.
"Donnie was the last person ever to talk about his achievements," says LANE, one of the guitarist's closest Friends from the age of 14, even before he and TROIANO formed The Disciples, the band that a few years later would replace Robertson and The Hawks as Arkansas rockabilly singer Hawkins' posse.
LANE, who is still performing "for fun" and hosts a radio show Saturday and Sunday afternoons in 1050 CHUM, paid tribute to his longtime friend on the weekend with a special segment featuring many of his recordings and the on-air memories of his musical contemporaries, including former wife, singer Shawne JACKSON.
"Donnie was two things -- a giant musician and producer, and a giant human being who really cared about people."
George Olliver, singer and frontman for the bands (Whitey And The Roulettes, The Rogues) that would become Mandala following TROIANO's split with the Disciples, was one of the guitarist's last visitors a week ago.
"He knew I was there, but it was impossible for him to speak but he managed a smile. I remember when I first saw him play in 1962 at Le Coq D'Or with Ronnie Hawkins on Yonge St. It was very soulful music, straight from the heart. It was mind-boggling to have him join our band just two weeks later. And from the minute he came in, he was the leader.
"He knew exactly what he wanted, and he had great ideas. He was headstrong in those days, very focused, and what he wanted always turned out to be the best thing for the band."
Three years later, Olliver and TROIANO parted ways, and though the guitarist went on to form the groundbreaking jazz-influenced rock trio Bush with Toronto bassist Prakash JOHN and drummer Whitey Glan, his reputation had already spread south via Mandala's recordings with the prestigious American R&B label KR Chess and tours of the U.S.
The band's first single, "Opportunity," is still credited by local musicians as the cut that took the Toronto Sound -- distinguished by a "heavily distorted, sustained vibrato guitar, a very dangerous noise," says veteran Toronto bassist Dennis PINHORN -- to Los Angeles and beyond. In 1968 Mandala (with singer Roy Kenner, who had replaced Olliver and would later join The James Gang with TROIANO,) recorded its only album, Soul Crusade, for Atlantic Records.
"Donnie was more than a great musician, he was also a great businessman," Olliver continues. "He was always reading up on production news, the latest trends in recording and management deals, and he was able to parlay that knowledge into a lucrative career as a songwriter, and an award-winning music score composer and producer for television shows (including Night Heat) and movies. One of the songs he wrote for Bush, 'I Can Hear You Calling,' was recorded by Three Dog Night as the B-side of the multi-platinum hit 'Joy To The World.' He made a fortune."
Olliver and TROIANO collaborated recently on remixing the reissue of Live at the Bluenote with George Olliver and Gangbuster, the classic 1980s recording of Toronto's legendary soul/R&B band.
To Ronnie Hawkins, who recently recovered from a bout with cancer, TROIANO was "a member of an endangered species, one of them semi-geniuses who live for their music yet remain polite and human and real. Donnie was a good ol' buddy... he was always there for you."
In TROIANO's memory the Metronome Canada Culture Heritage Foundation has established a $1,500 annual scholarship to a Canadian guitarist pursuing post secondary guitar education. Details at 416-367-0162, or http: //www.metronomecanada.com.

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CHUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-05 published
WATERS, Allan (August 11, 1921-December 3, 2005)
CHUM Limited founder and Canadian broadcasting pioneer Allan Waters passed away peacefully at St. Michael's Hospital, surrounded by his wife Marjorie and family. Allan Waters served his country in the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1942-46 as a wireless radar mechanic posted to active duty in England and Belgium. After returning to Canada, he excelled in the marketing of proprietary medicine, which led him to become President of Adrem Limited and Private Brands Packagers Limited. In 1954, he left the pharmaceutical business to found what is now CHUM Limited with the acquisition of radio station 1050 CHUM in Toronto, which under his leadership became the first Top 40 radio station in Canada. As CHUM Limited's Chairman and President until 2002, Allan WATERS created the vision for CHUM's growth from that single radio station to its current place as one of Canada's premier media companies with radio and television stations across the country. Allan WATERS inspired both employees and colleagues with a commitment to the broadcast industry that spanned five decades. Among his many contributions, he served as President of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, President of the Central Canada Broadcasters Association, was founding Chairman of the Radio Sales Bureau and a Director of the CTV Television Network. Over the course of his career, Allan WATERS was bestowed a number of prestigious honours recognizing his contributions to the broadcasting industry including, the Ted Rogers Sr.-Velma Rogers Graham Award, the Radio-Television News Directors' Association's President's Award and the Canadian Association of Broadcasters's Gold Ribbon Award for Broadcast Excellence. He was also recognized for contributing to Canada's cultural legacy through the support of Canadian talent. At the 1999 Juno Awards, Allan WATERS was the first broadcaster to be honoured with the Walt Grealis Special Achievement Award for contributions to the Canadian music industry. Concurrently, he was also inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. In 2002, in a special ceremony at the Canadian Music Industry Awards, he was inducted into the Canadian Music Industry Hall of Fame where he was honoured for lifetime achievement in the Canadian Music and Broadcast Industries. Allan WATERS' dedication to the broadcasting industry was equaled only by his unwavering commitment to community service and philanthropy with the founding of the CHUM Charitable Foundation. Today, the Foundation assists hundreds of thousands of people by providing financial assistance to charitable organizations and social services agencies. In December 2002, Mr. WATERS stepped down from his position as Chairman and President of CHUM Limited. He continued on as an active member of the Board of Directors until October 2005, when he retired from the Board and was named an Honorary Director. A devoted husband, father and grandfather, Allan WATERS leaves behind his wife of 63 years Marjorie, their three children Jim, Ron and Sherry (BOURNE,) daughters-in-law Sheila and Leslie, son-in-law Sean and grandchildren Michael, Darren, Amy, Maxine, Kyle, Lauren, and Ellie. Allan WATERS will be profoundly missed by Friends and colleagues, and by his extended family of over 3000 CHUM employees past and present, from coast to coast. A private service will be held for the family. A public memorial will be held on Wednesday, December 7th, 2005 from 2-4 p.m., at The Westin Harbour Castle Conference Centre, Metropolitan Ballroom, 2 Harbour Square, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the CHUM Charitable Foundation c/o The CHUM Building, 299 Queen Street West, Toronto, M5V 2Z5.

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