CHRISTIANSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-25 published
PHILLIPS, Jean Elizabeth "Chris" (née CHRISTIANSON)
Passed away peacefully in her home in Burlington on Saturday, January 22, 2005 at the age of 84. Beloved wife of the late Albert. Loving mother of Robert, Terry and Tammy CUTLER. Cherished grandma of Christopher and Holly. Predeceased by her two brothers Charles and Paul. "Chris" was a registered nurse and a graduate of The Hospital for Sick Children. Cremation. A Memorial Service will be held at Aldershot Presbyterian Church, 937 LaSalle Park Road, Burlington on Saturday, January 29, 2005 at 11 a.m. If desired, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be sincerely appreciated by the family. (Arrangements entrusted to Smith's Funeral Home, Burlington, 905-632-3333) www.smithsfh.com

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CHRISTIDIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-10 published
HASLAM, Beryl (née DAVIES)
Peacefully entered into rest, in her 75th year, and after a long struggle, at the Ross Memorial Hospital, in Lindsay, on Tuesday, February 8, 2005. Beryl, loved wife for 50 years of Malcolm of Lindsay. Dear mother of Carol (CHRISTIDIS) and her husband Michael of West Hill. Sister of Bernice (Ted) and Tanis of England and Ingrid (Frank) of Australia, all predeceased. Special friend of Maggie. Sincere thanks to Dr. Rosalie JACKSON and the staff of the Palliative Care Unit at Ross Memorial Hospital for their compassion and superb care. Thanks also to the Access Centre, Paramed Home Health Care Services and Medigas for their excellent help over the last number of years. Cremation has taken place. Friends are invited to join the family at the Mackey Funeral Home, 33 Peel Street, Lindsay (705-328-2721) on Saturday, February 12, 2005 from 11: 30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. Private interment at Riverside Cemetery, Lindsay. Flowers would be appreciated by the family. Memorial donations may be made to the Ross Memorial Hospital Palliative Care Unit or Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-08 published
CHRISTIE, Robert William " Bill"
It is with sadness we announce that Bill passed away on Thursday, December 9th, 2004 in his 70th year. He is survived by wife Barbara and mother-in-law Opal ARMSTRONG " Mom" of London. Dear father of Paul and his wife Dianne, Bellville and Blair and his wife Sarah, Ottawa. Lovingly remembered and devoted Grandpa to Michelle and Jamie-Lynn CHRISTIE, Toronto and special loved Papa to Taylor William and Andrew James, Ottawa. Sadly missed by his brother Arthur CHRISTIE and wife June, London and brother-in-law Ken ARMSTRONG and wife Donna of London. Fondly remembered by nieces Linda, Susan, Sheryl and nephews Shawn, Scott and all their families. Predeceased by mother Marguerite CHRISTIE, only sister Shirley BAKER and brother-in-law Jack BAKER, brother Allan CHRISTIE, all formerly of London and first grand_son Matthew Paul CHRISTIE. Remembered by many extended family members, neighbours and Friends. Cremation has taken place.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-15 published
WOOD, John Stevenson " Jack"
John Stevenson (Jack) passed away at Parkwood Hospital on Friday, March 11, 2005, in his 86th year. Beloved husband of the late Elizabeth (Betty) WOOD (2001.) Much loved father and father-in-law of Laura and Michael ROZEN of London and Susan and Marc CHRISTIE of Mississauga. Loving grandpa of Lisa and Jennifer CHRISTIE. Dear brother of Robert (Bob) WOOD of Brockville and brother-in-law of Don and Ann CAMPBELL of Toronto. Also survived by a number of wonderful nieces and nephews. Jack was a World War 2 veteran who served in the Royal Canadian Corps Signals from 1941 to 1945 in Britain, Italy and Holland. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at Erindale United Church, 1444 Dundas Crescent in Mississauga at a future date. In lieu of flowers, please support the Palliative Care Unit at Parkwood Hospital or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Our thanks to the staff of 4 Medicine at London Health Sciences Centre and the Palliative Care Unit at Parkwood Hospital for your care and compassion. Forest City Cremation Services 675-0772.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-29 published
DOW, Dorothy Isobel
Mrs. Dorothy Isobel DOW, 83, a resident of the Ritz Lutheran Villa, Mitchell and formerly of Cromarty passed away at the Palliative Care Unit of Stratford General Hospital on Wednesday, April 27, 2005. Beloved wife of the late Harvey K. DOW (Jan. 11, 2002.) Mother of Floyd and Willow DOW, Marlene and Ray FELTZ, Joyce and Ralph FELTZ, Bruce and Joan DOW, Brenda and Barry MASON and Jean DOW and friend Gord PULLMAN. Special grandma of 18 grandchildren and 25 great grandchildren. Dear sister of Hazel COLQUHOUN and Norman DOW and wife Win. Dear sister-in-law of Harold PRIDHAM and Velma DOW. Predeceased by her parents Clifford and Irene (CHRISTIE) DOW, sisters Margaret Jean DOW, Elsie PRIDHAM, brother Nelson DOW, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law Tom COLQUHOUN, Lena and Jim LARSEN, Cliff DOW, Evelyn and Bill HACK. Friends will be received at the Lockhart Funeral Home, 109 Montreal Street, Mitchell on Friday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Saturday at 11: 00 a.m. with Irene RICHARDSON officiating. Interment in Roy's Cemetery, West Perth (Fullarton). Memorial donations to the South Hibbert Athletic Association, Ritz Lutheran Villa or charity of one's choice would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.lockhartfuneralhome.com.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-19 published
Nancy OAKES, Heiress: 1924-2005
The Toronto-born socialite's courtroom testimony helped save her playboy husband from the gallows. He had been accused in the sensational 1943 murder of her father, the Ontario mining magnate Harry OAKES
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, February 19, 2005 - Page S9
A young Nancy OAKES faced a tragedy beyond comprehension. Her millionaire father, Sir Harry OAKES, was bludgeoned and set afire at his beachfront mansion in the Bahamas; her playboy husband, a Mauritian-born count, was charged with the murder.
Police described to her in sordid detail a killing about which they had no doubt as to guilt. The widow, Eunice Lady OAKES, believed police had fingered the culprit. The opinion was shared by her peers in Bahamian high society, who at last found an excuse for their lingering dislike of the foreigner with a French title.
In the face of overwhelming animosity, with evidence weighing against her husband, Nancy OAKES chose to believe the word of the man with whom she had eloped a scant 14 months earlier. The love affair scandalized her parents, who harboured great antipathy for a son-in-law they suspected of being a gigolo and a gold digger. The daughter's marriage put at risk her inheritance of one of the world's greatest fortunes, created from gold found in Northern Ontario.
Blessed with the good fortune to be born the beautiful daughter of a multimillionaire, with auburn hair that turned heads at the yacht club, Nancy OAKES accepted the role of faithful and trusting wife with a sang-froid beyond her years. She agreed to be the final witness for the defence at her husband's trial.
Her testimony could determine his fate -- freedom, or the gallows. She was just 19.
The murder and subsequent trial bumped war news from the front page of newspapers around the English-speaking world in 1943. The teenaged bride would forever after be known for what happened in those days, a legacy that she would carry to her death, on January 16 in London, at the age of 80.
The case has inspired a television mini-series, as well as Hollywood films and several true-crime books. Novelists also have delighted in the characters: a wealthy gold miner, his beautiful (but spoiled) daughter, her louche lover, and, irresistibly, the Duke of Windsor, the abdicated Edward VIII appointed governor of the colony, who was to have golfed with Mr. OAKES on the day of his murder and whose inexplicable interference with the investigation raises questions that remain unanswered to this day.
Born in Toronto, Nancy OAKES was the first of Harry OAKES's five children. Their father was a gruff and irascible man whose ample generosity did not always extend to his offspring.
Mr. OAKES, who was born and raised in Maine, quit medical school as a young man to join the Klondike gold rush in 1898. He laboured in poverty for years before staking a successful claim near Swastika, Ontario He later sold his share in the claim to finance what would become the greatest gold discovery in the Western Hemisphere, the Lake Shore Mine at Kirkland Lake.
Soon, he was the richest man in the land, owning a lakeside chateau near the mine as well as a hilltop estate on 20 acres overlooking the Niagara River. These would be Nancy OAKES's first homes.
In 1934, he abandoned Canada for the British West Indies to avoid taxes levied on his great fortune by the Conservatives. Five years later, he was granted a baronetcy by the king for his philanthropy.
His eldest daughter was schooled at Heathfield in Ascot, England the Fermata in Aiken, S. C.; and the French School for Girls in New York. She spent holidays with her family on the Bahamian archipelago. On one of those visits she danced with Marie-Alfred Fouquereaux DE MARIGNY, known as Count MARIGNY of Mauritius to the newspapers and as Freddie MARIGNY to his Friends. Majestic at 6-foot-5, dark-skinned from many hours aboard his yacht, he was possessed of many flamboyant skills.
On May 19, 1942, two days after Nancy OAKES attained her majority, she was married to her dashing suitor by a county-court judge in a ceremony in the Bronx. News of the elopement shocked her parents, who disapproved of the groom, who, at 32, was already twice divorced. (Sir Harry seemed to forget he was 48 when he married Eunice McINTYRE, 26, following a whirlwind romance.) Relations were frosty.
On the morning of July 8, 1943, Sir Harry was discovered on his back in bed in his second-floor chambers at Westbourne, a seaside estate surrounded by hibiscus and bougainvillea. He was found by his best friend, Harold CHRISTIE, a wealthy real-estate agent risen from poverty who was the baron's only house guest that night.
As court would be told, Sir Harry's face was blackened by soot, his groin and left hand burned. He had four small puncture wounds above his left ear. Blood from his ear had dried across the bridge of his nose. The body was covered in small pillow feathers, which waved grotesquely from the stirrings in the room.
As governor, the Duke of Windsor decided not to entrust the investigation into the murder of the colony's wealthiest citizen to the local constabulary, nor to Scotland Yard. Instead, he called in two detectives from nearby Miami. If the duke wished a quick resolution, he got it. Within hours, the detectives arrested Mr. DE MARIGNY, announcing they had found his fingerprints on a Chinese bed screen at the murder scene.
The count's wife, who, like her mother and siblings was in the United States at the time of the killing, returned home convinced of her spouse's innocence. She visited him in jail twice a week. "I do all I can to make my husband comfortable," she told a reporter. "I send linens and special dishes to him -- chicken and fish and things like that. I suppose Freddie is what you'd call a gourmet."
Meanwhile, Sir Harry's will was filed for probate shortly before the opening of what was billed as the trial of the century. Rumours of disinheritance proved wrong. The will, representing Nassau holdings only, disposed of £3,671,700. The widow was awarded one-third, with the remainder to be divided among the five children. The countess was to receive two-fifteenths of her father's fortune on turning 30, with an annual living allowance until then.
A Bahamas Supreme Court jury heard the Miami detectives present the Crown's only physical evidence against the count, a single print from the pinky finger of his right hand, introduced as Exhibit J.
The count wept silently in the dock before composing himself as his wife began testifying on November 9, 1943. She was dressed in a black suit with white polka dots, wearing a white hat and white gloves, "an appealing figure," one writer noted, "composed but pale."
The defence wished to use her testimony to rebut the Crown's suggested motive for murder.
"Mrs. DE MARIGNY," asked defence counsel, "at any time during your married life has the accused ever attempted to obtain money from you?"
"No," Nancy replied.
"Has the accused ever made a statement of hatred toward your father?"
"No."
The defence had demolished earlier the Crown's fingerprint evidence, proving the print had come not from the bed screen but likely from an opaque drinking glass, or the cellophane wrap from a pack of cigarettes. Both had been handed to the count by the Miami detectives, raising questions as to their competence, if not criminality.
The jury deliberated for one hour, 55 minutes before reaching a verdict of not guilty on a 9-3 vote. The verdict was cheered in the courtroom, yet the jury had also called for the count's expulsion from the colony.
With the baron's estate tied up in court, the young couple auctioned household goods to finance their exile in Cuba, where they stayed with Ernest Hemingway.
By 1945, they had separated, the count signing an agreement reneging on claims on her inheritance. He came to Montreal and enlisted in the Canadian Army. In 1949, the New York Supreme Court ruled the count's second divorce had not met statutory requirements at the time he married the heiress. Their marriage was annulled.
In April, 1946, the heiress flew to Copenhagen after receiving news of the death of Joergen Edsberg, a Danish Royal Air Force pilot she planned to marry as soon as each obtained a divorce. She arrived the day after a military funeral attended by the pilot's wife and son, leaving a bouquet of lilacs at a grave left open at the request of the pilot's mother.
Nancy OAKES's life was filled with tragic loss, her father's savage murder being only the best known. An aunt drowned in the sinking of the liner S.S. Mohawk off the New Jersey coast in 1935; a brother, William Pitt OAKES, died of a heart attack complicated by a liver ailment at 27 in 1958; brother Sydney, who inherited Sir Harry's title, was killed at 39 in 1966 when his Sunbeam Alpine failed to negotiate a curve. A sister, Shirley, spent the final years of her life in a coma following an accident.
After the war, Nancy OAKES provided fodder for gossip columnists by being squired by dashing Hollywood stars. "Heiress Nancy OAKES and Philip Reed are Movietown's Big Talk," Walter Winchell wrote in an item typical of what was also to be found under the bylines of Dorothy Kilgallen and Hedda Hopper.
In a candlelight church ceremony performed by the Lord Bishop of Nassau before a society crowd on December 29, 1952, Nancy OAKES wed Baron Ernst Lyssardt VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE of Oberammergau, Germany, a union that would end in divorce less than four years later.
On March 1, 1962, she married Patrick Claude Henry Tritton, a Cambridge-educated importer of typewriters and firefighting equipment. Her third wedding was held before a handful of close Friends at the British ambassador's residence in Mexico City. Mr. Tritton was said to have been the model for the Anthony Powell character Dicky Umfraville, a likeable rogue.
After that marriage failed, she resumed using her second husband's name, not discouraging the practice of being called the baroness.
Erle Stanley Gardner, the creator of Perry Mason, called the baffling case "the greatest murder mystery of all time." Sent by Time magazine to cover the trial, he maintained Sir Harry was not killed in bed, but was moved there after death, as the burns on the bedding did not match those on the body. As well, the dried blood across the bridge of the nose indicated the body had been rolled over after death. The writer raised the spectre of the baron being tortured.
The murder has been attributed to a love triangle, to a voodoo ritual killing, and to mobsters Meyer Lansky and Lucky Luciano, whose dreams of casinos in the colony might have been thwarted by the powerful Sir Harry. Even the Duke of Windsor is not above suspicion.
Count DE MARIGNY, who died in Houston in 1998, wrote a book accusing Mr. OAKES's best friend, Mr. Christie, later Sir Harold, of ordering the murder. The crime remains unsolved 61 years after Nancy OAKES successfully asserted her husband's innocence.
Nancy Oakes VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE was born in Toronto on May 17, 1924. She died in London on January 16, aged 80, and was buried in Nassau, the Bahamas, on January 28. She leaves a son, Baron Alexander VON HOYNINGEN- HUENE, known as Sasha; a daughter, Patricia Oakes LEIGH- WOOD; and a younger brother, Harry OAKES.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-01 published
Leo LABINE, Athlete: 1931-2005
The hard hitter from Haileybury, Ontario, was one of the players most feared by Rocket Richard. And with good reason -- in 1952, he almost put the legendary Canadien away for good
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, March 1, 2005 - Page S7
Toronto -- Memorable events in sports history need a stage on which to be played out, and Leo LABINE was a man who could set that stage.
The hard-rock right winger who played 11 bone-rattling seasons in the National Hockey League with the Boston Bruins and Detroit Red Wings played a key role in one of hockey's most dramatic Stanley Cup moments, and in one of the league's most historic events.
Mr. LABINE was a legendary hard hitter in the six-team era of the National Hockey League. He had ample skill, scoring 128 goals and 321 points in 643 career games, and still holds a Bruins club record of five points in one period against Detroit on November 28, 1954, the night after Hurricane Hazel had torn through the Great Lakes region. That mark endured even through the high-flying days of Bobby Orr and Phil Esposito.
Mr. LABINE's stock in trade, when he came out of his native Northern Ontario and through St. Michael's College in Toronto, was as a feisty winger who could make his 170 pounds hit with the robustness of a 200-pounder. He also collected 730 penalty minutes in 643 games.
The late Maurice (Rocket) Richard knew first-hand why Mr. LABINE was nicknamed the Lion. Mr. LABINE was first called up by the Bruins from the minor-league Hershey Bears late in the 1951-52 season. He was retained for the Boston-Montreal semifinal series that would prove one of the most thrilling of the National Hockey League's six-team era.
Montreal looked to be running away in the first two games, 5-1 and 4-0, but the Bruins, led by Milt Schmidt, stormed back in the next three, (4-1, 3-2, 1-0). Montreal took the sixth 3-2 in overtime to push the series to the limit.
On April 8, 1952, Mr. LABINE enraged the fans at the Montreal Forum when he caught their hero, Rocket Richard, with his head down and delivered a crushing check. Mr. Richard's head crashed on the ice and he lay unconscious, bleeding. He was helped to the trainer's room where he spent the second period fading in and out of consciousness while doctors sutured his scalp.
The score was tied late in the third period when Mr. Richard got to his feet at the Canadiens bench, blood still trickling from his stitches, and announced it was time to play. Mr. LABINE may have knocked him cold but he hadn't quite knocked out his will to win. With less than five minutes left, Butch Bouchard sent him a long pass. He deked star defenceman Bill Quackenbush, and beat goalie Sugar Jim Henry with the winning goal.
The Rocket later said he was still so woozy from the check he wasn't certain which net he was heading for. He also admitted he never did remember scoring the goal.
"I don't remember it clearly," a Boston website recounted yesterday. "My legs were all right, but my head was all foggy. I had a hazy idea of what I should do, and I did."
Mr. LABINE's tough checking on Mr. Richard made him one of the players Montreal fans loved to boo.
According to the website bruins-legends.com, Mr. LABINE once recalled: "I was lucky to get out of the game alive. I was a little aggressive, sometimes."
When remembering his playing days, Rocket Richard was asked to name the men he most hated to play against: They were tough customers all, Leo LABINE, Ted Lindsay and Tony Leswick.
In January, 1958, it was Mr. LABINE's absence rather than his presence that led to a bright moment in National Hockey League history. He was laid low by the flu and that caused Boston to call up a Quebec City minor leaguer named Willie O'Ree, the first black player to suit up in the National Hockey League.
Mr. LABINE, born in Haileybury, Ontario, in 1932, moved to North Bay in 1953. He'd had a junior career with St. Michael's College and the Barrie Flyers, with whom he won a Memorial Cup in 1951. He turned professional with the Bruins organization in 1951-52, helping their Bears farm club reach the American Hockey League final before being called up. The Bruins reached the Stanley Cup final three times with Mr. LABINE in the lineup, but lost each time to the Montreal Canadiens. Mr. LABINE was the Bruins' leading scorer during the 1954-55 season, notching 24 goals and adding 18 assists for 42 points. He was also named the team's most valuable player.
In 1961, he was traded to the Detroit Red Wings as part of a five-player deal, joining the likes of the legendary Gordie Howe and long-time friend Norm Ullman. After two seasons with the Red Wings, Mr. LABINE joined the World Hockey League's Los Angeles Blades, where he played the final five years of his professional career. He retired in 1968. In retirement, he indulged in his second love, pitching fastball and thus won the Northern Ontario championships as well as an Ontario title.
It's in hockey, though, where his name lives on. In fact, Mr. LABINE still graces the Bruin record book. According to the Bruins's website, on November 28, 1954, Mr. LABINE recorded a hat trick, and added two assists in the second period of a 6-2 win over the Detroit Red Wings. The five points in one period remain the standard among Bruin players.
Leo Gerald LABINE was born in Haileybury, Ontario, on July 22, 1931. He died of liver cancer in hospital in North Bay, Ontario, on February 25, 2005. He was 73. He is survived by wife Rosemary KELLY and by four children from an earlier marriage: Cindy, Mary Anne, Dan LABINE and Laura. His first wife, Betty SOUCIE, died in 1974.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-25 published
DECORY, Lancelot Chester
80, passed away peacefully on March 20, 2005 in Mesa, Arizona. Born in Lead, South Dakota he became the world's youngest Eagle Scout and multiple letterman at Lead High School. He served with distinction in World War 2. A graduate of the South Dakota School of Mines he had a career as an engineer eventually becoming President of the Canadian Portland Cement Association. He is survived by loving wife Ardyce, daughter Lanette FINICAL and her husband Allen, son Jed DECORY and his partner Dominique GIGUÈRE, grandchildren Jessica and Sean DECORY and surrogate children Vivian POOLEY, Dagmar SIMONS and her husband Don, Tony CHRISTIE, Heather CHRISTIE, Max MacCRIMMON and his wife Pat and 10 surrogate grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. A memorial service in Toronto is being planned. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to The Citadel Care Center, 5121 East Broadway Road, Mesa, Arizona 85206. Attention Kathy WOJCIK.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-30 published
ELMSLEY, Elizabeth Ruth (née CHRISTIE)
Elizabeth Ruth Christie ELMSLEY passed away quietly at Cummer Lodge, Toronto, on Monday, March 28, 2005 in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late James B. ELMSLEY. Loving and beloved mother of Chris CURRELLY of Port Hope and Tom CURRELLY of Vancouver. Loving grandmother of Katie of Vancouver. Sister of Zoë FLEMING/FLEMMING (Jock) of Owen Sound and Joan GOODWIN (Desmond) of Ottawa. Remembered by her nieces and nephew. A memorial service will be held in the chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto (2 stoplights west of Yonge Street), on Friday, April 1 at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Cummer Lodge, 205 Cummer Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M2M 2E8 would be appreciated.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-20 published
Helen Margaret CHRISTIE
By Carl A. CHRISTIE, Wednesday, April 20, 2005, Page A18
Mother, grandmother, air-force wife, small-town church stalwart. Born March 27, 1917, in Wentworth County, Ontario Died September 12, 2004, in Aylmer, Ontario, of heart failure, aged 87.
"Helen CHRISTIE was a gracious, gentle Christian lady," intoned family friend Reverend Norman JONES in his marvellous Welsh brogue. Family and close Friends knew the importance in her life of St. Paul's United Church, along with membership in her United Church Women's group, but by the time he had finished his eulogy, speaking about the numerous unsung things Helen had done in, through, and for the church, we started to realize that there was much more to the woman we all knew and loved as Mom and Grandma. Discoveries made in ensuing days deepened our understanding.
Norman JONES mentioned several times the impossibility of speaking of Helen without including her husband Andy; it was invariably "Helen and Andy" or "Andy and Helen" whenever people talked about either of them. Indeed, that is how most family, Friends and even casual acquaintances appear to have looked upon them. This would undoubtedly have been the case whatever path they had chosen to follow through life's travails; the decision that Andy would pursue an air-force career made it a certainty.
The years of separation when Andy served overseas during the Second World War, and later when the Berlin wall went up, brought challenges to Helen (née SHAW,) as such developments invariably do for armed forces' spouses. In addition to Andy's unaccompanied postings, the air force provided Helen with an opportunity to share the British and European experience with him.
Air-force life may not have been easy, but living in exciting new places such as England and Belgium or a different Canadian province every few years gave those with an open mind unrivalled opportunities. And Helen always maintained an open mind. She did not care where Andy was posted: "As long as I can go with him." Helen CHRISTIE epitomized the quintessential air-force wife. Perhaps she compared the life with what might have been had she and Andy chosen to remain in the industrial heart of Toronto's east end where they both were raised.
As it was, their life together took them to Aylmer, the southwestern Ontario town where they had lived from 1955 to 1959, while it still had an air force station. They fell in love with the place and had a house built; they moved there on Andy's retirement from the air force in 1973. Family worried about them living in isolation "down in Aylmer; " however, such big city folk could not appreciate the way small town people support one another. Life in Aylmer proved a comfortable and fitting retirement haven.
Helen embraced and contributed to the community around her, as the outpouring of sympathy on her sudden death revealed. Of course, Helen alone did not inspire all of this; what today we might called good old-fashioned values are ingrained into the fabric of small-town society.
Visiting Friends and family, many from much larger centres, expressed amazement at the respect shown the funeral procession as it drove from St. Paul's to the cemetery south of town. Vehicle as well as pedestrian traffic in both directions stopped along the route and, in the middle of the intersection of Talbot and John Streets, a town constable saluted as we passed. People stopped whatever they were doing -- even a man mowing his lawn -- and paid their respects to the procession. None of this would have surprised Helen; that is just the way she and the other good people of Aylmer say goodbye to their fellow citizens.
Carl A. CHRISTIE is Helen CHRISTIE's son.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-29 published
Reginald 'Red' HORNER, National Hockey League Hockey Player: The bad-boy captain of the prewar Toronto Maple Leafs shared the ice with such legends of defence as 'King' CLANCY and established a record for penalties that stood for 20 years
By James CHRISTIE, Friday, April 29, 2005, Page S7
The night of December 13, 1933, was a landmark night in the history of the National Hockey League. The career of Toronto Maple Leaf Irwin (Ace) BAILEY was ended with a life-threatening head injury suffered when he crashed to the ice following a hard check by Boston Bruins' Eddie SHORE.
What is not always mentioned is the fact that Mr. BAILEY was not the only man carried off the ice at Boston Garden that night. He had an avenger, a flame-haired bad boy named "Red" HORNER, the prototype of hockey's "policeman."
Red HORNER was the oldest Toronto Maple Leaf captain and oldest living member of the Hockey Hall of Fame. Red HORNER embodied Toronto Maple Leaf history. He was on the ice for the very first shift played at Maple Leaf Gardens in 1931 and was involved in ceremonies at the closing of the Gardens on February 13, 1999.
On the dangerous night in Boston Garden, Mr. BAILEY recalled in a 1985 interview with The Globe and Mail's Paul PATTON that "SHORE took my feet from under me. I wasn't facing him and when I fell, my head hit the ice and I went into convulsions.
"SHORE was standing over at the other side of the rink when Red went over and said, 'Put up your hands, I'm going to hit you.' And HORNER did. One punch was all he needed. The boys told me afterwards that they carried SHORE out feet first, just moments after they carried me out, and they needed seven stitches to sew him up."
While Ace BAILEY was still unconscious and recovering from surgery done at Boston City Hospital to relieve pressure on his brain, "My dad went to Boston and he checked into the Copley Plaza hotel because he knew that was where Conn SMYTHE (the Leaf manager) was staying. He had a.45 revolver with him and wanted to know where he could find SHORE. SMYTHE said, 'Let's go up to my room and have a chat.' SMYTHE got two of the hotel policemen to come up, and they must have slipped dad a couple of mickeys. SMYTHE put him on the train back to Toronto and Dad didn't wake up until he was back in Canada. Two weeks later, he got his gun back through the mail."
Fortunately, Red HORNER was all the avenger the Toronto Maple Leafs needed most nights during his 12-year career. Hockey feuds were serious matters and Mr. HORNER was hockey's version of the blunt instrument.
"Red" HORNER was born in a small rural community near Brantford, Ontario He was the son of a farmer. The HORNER family moved first to Ancaster, where he started school, then to Hamilton and eventually to Toronto. He was playing bantam hockey with North Toronto by his early teens, living with his half-brother who was a grocer, and his wife.
He was one of 72 players trying out for Frank SELKE's Marlboro juniors in 1926 and although young Red did not distinguish himself in that first practice, Mr. SELKE felt that he would be as patient as possible with him. The fact that Red was Mr. SELKE's grocery boy didn't hurt his chances.
Leafs founder Conn SMYTHE was a builder and well acquainted with Mr. SELKE, who was business manager of the electrical union. Mr. SELKE's autobiography recounts how Mr. SMYTHE was tiring of his Leafs being manhandled by the likes of the Montreal Maroons but couldn't pry any strong physical talents away from other National Hockey League teams.
Mr. SELKE's suggested solution was for Mr. SMYTHE to unload his vulnerable veterans and fill the lineup with robust kids from the Marlboros. Red HORNER made his National Hockey League debut on Saturday, December 22, 1928. He had already played a Friday night game with the Marlboro juniors and a Saturday afternoon match with a senior team when he was informed he'd be suiting up as a Toronto Maple Leaf that night at Arena Gardens on Mutual Street, the predecessor of Maple Leaf Gardens.
In a 2003 interview with the Internet site legendsofhockey.net, he recalled his debut: "He said, 'I'll tell ya what I'm gonna do. I'll pay you $2,500 for the balance of the season.' I thought about it and it sounded pretty good because I was making $25 a week as a clerk at the Standard Stock Exchange.
"I said, 'Well Mr. SMYTHE, I've only seen two pro games in my life before, I don't know any of your players, I haven't a car but if you'd like to pick me up and take me down tonight, I'll take you and introduce you to my mother and father.'
"He said, 'That's a deal,' and we shook hands on it. No signing or anything, just a handshake."
He was not a graceful skater but could move the puck quickly and possessed a gift for concentration under pressure. He could make a pinpoint pass while two forecheckers were zeroing in on him.
His tough, physical style of play earned him the league leadership in penalty minutes for eight of his 12 National Hockey League seasons. He set a record for penalties that lasted 20 years.
Mr. SMYTHE dispatched Mr. HORNER to a summer camp to work out and to put on weight in the summer of 1931. He was trained by Olympic pole-vaulter Ed ARCHIBALD. By the end of the summer, Mr. HORNER had gone from a soft 180 pounds to a solid 190.
In 1932, he was on a Stanley Cup winner with Toronto. For seven of his seasons, he played alongside another Toronto legend on defence, Francis Michael (King) CLANCY. Mr. HORNER played his entire career with the Maple Leafs and served as team captain from 1938 until his retirement in 1940. In 490 regular season games, he scored 42 goals and added 110 assists for 152 points. But his scoring statistics pale beside the fact he collected 1,264 penalty minutes during that time. He once collected 17 penalty minutes in the first 20-minute period of a game.
The scuffles didn't end when he retired as a player. Mr. HORNER, like Mr. CLANCY, turned to officiating and was an National Hockey League linesman for two seasons. On January 11, 1943, at Maple Leaf Gardens, he was working a game between the Maple Leafs and Detroit Red Wings when Detroit manager Jack ADAM/ADAMS berated him, alleging he had missed an icing call. Later in the game, Mr. HORNER lined up for a faceoff near the Detroit bench and Mr. ADAM/ADAMS reached out and shoved him, claiming he was blocking the view. Mr. HORNER swung around with an elbow that grazed his chin. Mr. ADAM/ADAMS shoved him again. Detroit player Syd ABEL took a swing at Mr. HORNER, who shoved Mr. ADAM/ADAMS hard before referee Bill CHADWICK stepped in.
Mr. HORNER went on to a business career managing North American Coal in Cleveland, Ohio, where he was the majority owner.
George Reginald (Red) HORNER was born in Lynden, Ontario, on May 28, 1909. He died in Toronto on April 27, 2005. He was 95. He was predeceased by his wife.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-31 published
John D'AMICO, Hockey Official: 1937-2005
Last of the linesmen from the National Hockey League's six-team era, he was an honest and powerful whistle-blower who earned the respect of the big bruisers he separated on the ice
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, May 31, 2005, Page S7
There is a breed of macho hockey player who believes he needs to flout the rules of order and batter others with his fists in the name of "respect." John D'AMICO earned respect by prying them apart and setting the game back on track.
One of the most honoured officials in the history of the National Hockey League, Mr. D'AMICO got respect the hard way. Linesmen and referees have no home games and they score no goals. Fans don't buy tickets to cheer for the men in black and white. In fact, the greatest compliment an official can receive is that no one takes notice of him doing his job. It means he's been efficient and fair and hasn't made a questionable call that interfered with the game.
Mr. D'AMICO was a powerful and honest man throughout 40 years in professional hockey, 23 of them on the ice. He was enshrined in the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1993 after working 1,689 regular-season National Hockey League games and 247 playoff contests. He was trusted to serve in the most critical situations and, over the years, officiated in 52 games in Stanley Cup final series. He also was called on for six international series.
"No one is more respected than John," former officiating partner Ray SCAPINELLO said in an interview, reflecting on Mr. D'AMICO's place in the game. Mr. SCAPINELLO, who retired last season, was teamed with him for most of his first three seasons.
"Everyone knew, if it was an important game, John would be one of the two linesmen. If it was the deciding game of a Stanley Cup playoff series, it was John's. The seventh game of the Stanley Cup finals? It was automatic. We went to training camp in the fall knowing that, if the Stanley Cup went to seven games, John D'AMICO would be one of the three officials deciding the game."
Playoff wars between the Boston Bruins and the Montreal Canadiens were often put into Mr. D'AMICO's hands.
On May 21, 1978, Don Cherry's "lunch bucket" Bruins were engaged in a bitter final with Scotty Bowman's great Canadiens dynasty team. A vicious punch-up ensued between Boston's Stan Jonathan, as solid as a fire hydrant and about as tall, and Montreal's Pierre Bouchard. It was Mr. D'AMICO's task to step in and subdue the bigger man -- and Mr. Bouchard was happy he did. He had suffered a broken nose and a cut face ("like he'd been out kissing bumpers on Highway 401," according to one report.) As a result, Mr. D'AMICO's zebra stripes were blood-soaked, and looked like the punchline to that old joke: black and white and red all over.
Dan Maloney, a famed scrapper in Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit and Toronto, said the league's tough men held Mr. D'AMICO in high regard. "I could take care of myself in a scrap, but when John put that bear hug on you, it was all over. He wouldn't let you get hurt. He was a man's man when it was a man's game."
National Hockey League executive vice-president Jim Gregory said Mr. D'AMICO's legacy is the respect that players, general managers, coaches, fellow officials and fans held for the linesman. He "brought a passion and dedication to his profession, both on the ice as a linesman and later as a supervisor of officials."
Mr. D'AMICO started off as referee, officiating his first game on October 12, 1964. After serving 22 games in the role, he became a linesman. When he retired in 1987, he was the last of the officials who had worked in the National Hockey League's six-team era. He moved to the National Hockey League's front office as a supervisor of officials, but made one final on-ice appearance in an emergency role in 1988. He'd been watching a game on television when he saw an official go down with an injury. He grabbed his skates and raced to Maple Leaf Gardens in minutes.
Mr. D'AMICO was qualified to referee but took the rules of the game seriously and found that role to be very stressful. Paul Stewart, a one-time brawler as a player, became a referee who tended to let players settle scores for themselves. Once, when Mr. Stewart was injured in a match, Mr. D'AMICO took over his whistle "and the game went from no penalties to 10 penalties," Mr. Stewart said.
Don Cherry remembered Mr. D'AMICO's stringent calling of the rules. On May 10, 1979, with the Bruins on the verge of upsetting the Canadiens in the semi-finals at Montreal Forum, it was Mr. D'AMICO who caught Mr. Cherry's team with too many men on the ice. The Habs tied the game on a power play, then won in overtime.
As a boy, John D'AMICO played church hockey in Toronto and reached the junior B level. He was working at a job in construction when a friend suggested he try officiating church hockey. He found he was good at it and loved it. Mr. D'AMICO moved up to the Toronto Hockey League and then the Ontario Hockey Association before a job opened up in the National Hockey League.
Mr. D'AMICO maintained a high profile in the off-season, using his name and popularity in charity work, on an individual basis and in conjunction with players who staged golf and tennis tournaments for foundations.
John D'AMICO was born on September 21, 1937, in Toronto. He died on May 29, 2005, after a struggle with acute myeloblastic leukemia. He was 67. He leaves his wife, Dorothy, children Jeff, Anthony, Angelo and Tina and his grandchildren. son Angelo has followed his father's path as an National Hockey League linesman.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-13 published
CHRISTIE, Lowrey Patrick (Oct. 22, 1950-Dec. 30, 2004)
To celebrate Lowrey's life, a Memorial Service and Interment of cremated remains is being held on June 17, 2005 at Trinity Anglican Church, 757 Rue Du Village, Morin Heights, Quebec.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-14 published
Neil YOUNG's father was an icon in own right
Sports journalist also a noted author
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, June 14, 2005, Page S1
With reports from William HOUSTON and Canadian Press
The labels that people attach to the name of Scott YOUNG inevitably mention prominently that he was the father of pop music icon Neil YOUNG.
But YOUNG, who died Sunday in Kingston, Ontario, at the age of 87, deserved the title of icon in his own right as a journalist, author, colleague and spinner of big-league dreams for kids who grew up in the 1950s and 1960s.
YOUNG's trilogy of hockey books for boys, Scrubs on Skates, Boy on Defence and Boy at the Leafs' Camp, were food for fantasy for the youth of a hockey-loving country. They were only a part of a body of work that included 40 books of fiction and autobiography drawn from a career in which YOUNG travelled the world covering everything from the Second World War to the assassination of John F. Kennedy and nearly every major sporting event in North America.
In his own field, he was just as big a star as the heroes he covered working for The Globe and Mail, the Winnipeg Free Press, The Canadian Press, the Toronto Telegram and Maclean's and Sports Illustrated magazines. He loved his craft. He was skilled in the telling of stories, and lessons were more important than the vanity of embellished prose. He made a reader comfortable, involved.
"He was someone who preferred to be at home," Margaret HOGAN, his wife of 25 years, said yesterday from Kingston in an interview with the Peterborough Examiner. "He went to bed early, he got up early. He wrote early in the morning. He was a writer, he was a kind, hospitable person who loved to walk in the country and follow the seasons."
YOUNG was born April 14, 1918, in Cypress River, Manitoba He lived with his mother and other relatives in several Prairie towns after his parents split up when he was 13. As an adult, YOUNG would follow a similar path.
He married three times, to Edna Blow RAGLAND, Astrid Carlson MEAD and HOGAN and had a total of seven children and step-children.
YOUNG began his journalism career officially at age 18 as a sportswriter at the Winnipeg Free Press in 1936. He also supported the family selling short stories published in Collier's, Argosy and the American magazines.
He moved to The Canadian Press in Toronto, where he would cover both news and sports, at the age of 23 after the paper refused to give him a raise.
YOUNG told Canadian Press in 1994 that Free Press managing editor George FERGUSON told him, "You will never be worth more than $25 a week to the Winnipeg Free Press."
YOUNG covered the Second World War for Canadian Press from London, then served in the Royal Canadian Navy 1944-45.
In 1957, YOUNG joined The Toronto Globe and Mail as a sports columnist.
He covered Grey Cups, World Series, Stanley Cups, the Olympics and appeared on Hockey Night in Canada broadcasts.
A talented and resourceful reporter, he was seconded to cover a Royal tour and write a general column, leaving an opening on the sports page that would be filled by Dick BEDDOES. He jumped to the Telegram in the 1960s, then made his way back to The Globe in the 1970s.
YOUNG said in his memoir A Writer's Life that his hockey books for boys "were based on hockey as I had known it in Winnipeg high schools and junior teams."
Hockey, as YOUNG knew it, was the brand espoused by Toronto Maple Leafs founder Conn SMYTHE and Stanley-Cup-winning coach George (Punch) IMLACH, for whom he would also author books.
He gave up newspapers in 1980, dismayed by what he saw as a twist in the journalistic profession, away from reporting facts and quoting real contacts to scandal hunting via "unnamed sources."
His novels and non-fiction work included The Flood, the two Arctic thrillers Murder in a Cold Climate and The Shaman's Knife, and 1984's Neil and Me, about his relationship with his famous rock 'n' roll son.
HOGAN said her husband hadn't written for several years.
Peterborough Mayor Sylvia SUTHERLAND said YOUNG's death left a void in the landscape of Canadian journalism.
"He was one of the outstanding journalists of his time," she said. "He had an incisive intelligence. He knew how to get a good story. I love Scott. I miss him a lot, everybody will. He's one of the great legends of Canadian journalism and it's a loss to those of us who love journalism."
SUTHERLAND said she first met YOUNG in the mid-1960s, when she worked at the Toronto Telegram. "We became close Friends in the '70s when we all moved to Peterborough," she said.
HOGAN said she and her husband moved to Kingston last October to be closer to her family. But they kept the family farm in Cavan.
"We still use and love the farm," HOGAN said.
"In the late '60s he was looking for property. He settled on this property in the Cavan hills."
The couple were there only two weeks ago, the last time SUTHERLAND saw her friend.
"Right until the end he was a very graceful and gracious man," she said. "He had been ill for a number of years, but he was still the same sweet Scott. He loved to talk about the old days in journalism and it was fun to do that with him."

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-15 published
STAPLETON, David " Tim" Outram
Engineer, Retired
"Tim" passed away peacefully in the early morning hours of June 13th, 2005, at Riverpark Place, in his 90th year.
Born March 24, 1916 in Exmouth, Devon, England, the youngest son of Henry E. STAPLETON and Eleanor N. EVANS. Beloved husband of Brenda Jean (née RISEBROW.) Loving father of Tony (Laurie,) White Lake, Ontario and Mark (Jani), Toronto, Ontario. Proud grandpa of Kathryn and Christopher, Toronto, Ontario. Survived by his sister Elizabeth (late John CHRISTIE,) Kent, United Kingdom, his brother John (Bren), Sussex, United Kingdom and many nieces and nephews.
Immigrated from Jersey, Channel Islands, United Kingdom to Canada in 1933, settling in Montreal. Graduated from McGill University in 1938, with a Bachelor's Degree in Engineering (Mech). Served with the British Air Commission in the U.S.A. and Canada during World War 2. Employed by Canadair in Montreal, Quebec for 27 years, then with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba for 5 years. Involved with amateur theatre in Montreal for many years, meeting his future bride Jean at the Montreal Repertory Theatre group. In his retirement, a volunteer for the National Aviation Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.
A sincere thank you to Riverpark Place nurses and staff, the palliative care team, Doctors McLEOD and ESDAILE, as well as Friends of Hospice Ottawa, for all the care and personal attention given to "Tim".
Friends may call at the Racine, Robert and Gauthier Funeral Home, 180 Montreal Road, Ottawa (Vanier) 1-613-241-3680, on Friday, June 17th, 2005 from 1: 00 p.m. until the memorial service in the chapel at 2: 00 p.m. A blessing service and interment of the ashes will take place at St. Brelade's Church, Jersey, Channel Islands, United Kingdom, at a later date. As an expression of sympathy, memorial contributions to the Prostate Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated. For messages of condolences by email at r-r-g@telus.net

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-18 published
I Remember -- Scott YOUNG
By Gerry FRYER, Saturday, June 18, 2005. Page S9
Thornhill, Ontario -- Scott YOUNG's obituary appeared on June The passing of Scott YOUNG this week brought back for me memories of September, 1964, and the conversion of Toronto's CJBC into a French radio station. I came to Toronto at the time to work as an announcer on the newly converted station.
There was some hostility in the newspapers regarding the conversion, as CJBC was popular with the English-speaking audience. But we found an unexpected friend in the most unexpected place: Scott YOUNG, a columnist for The Globe and Mail who had written several columns supporting a French CJBC.
On October 1, 1964, our first day on air in French, we had wanted to interview Mr. YOUNG. When we phoned him for an appointment, we found out he did not speak French. But we agreed to meet anyway. We met at his Rosedale home and, for the next two hours, painstakingly, we put together a good minute and a half of Scott YOUNG in French.
Word by word, Mr. YOUNG repeated each word of a prepared French text several times until he had reached a perfect pronunciation for each one. Back at CJBC, it was my job to edit Mr. YOUNG's voice. It took me a good three hours of minute splicing of quarter-inch audiotape. But, at the end, we had Mr. YOUNG wishing the best for the new CJBC in a more than passable French.
This was my first interview with a member of our new Toronto audience. I could not have had a better introduction to this city than the one I got with this most civilized and broadminded Torontonian.
Vive Scott YOUNG!
Jacques GAUTHIER, Toronto
On learning of Scott YOUNG's passing, I was immediately taken back to the early 1960s in Winnipeg. Then, most schoolboys played hockey year-round, watched Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday and read every book that could be found about the greatest team sport in history and "the world's fastest game."
At the time, many of us still thought we had a legitimate shot at playing professional hockey, despite the nearly insurmountable odds against that prospect. Mr. YOUNG's scintillating trilogy Scrubs on Skates, Boy on Defence and Boy at the Leafs' Camp was the cornerstones of most of our rather limited personal libraries.
I ripped through the pages of Scrubs on Skates so many times that the book nearly disintegrated. Somehow, Santa knew to put another copy under the tree that year.
Mr. YOUNG's books were the first works of fiction that ever set my heart racing while broadening my horizons to consider some of life's possibilities. For many, it was the closest we ever got to the training camp of a professional hockey team, and we can all thank Scott YOUNG for that opportunity. His power with the pen could thrill and excite while magically transporting you to the world of your dreams.
Roy MacGREGOR notes that Canadians now have "no Scott YOUNG to connect the national game to the national culture" (This Country June 15). Fortunately for many of us, he already has and his legacy will live on for generations to come.
Jeffrey PECKITT, Oakville, Ontario
About 45 years ago, during my first (and only) year in Ryerson's journalism program, I decided -- in my desire to become Canada's greatest sportswriter -- that I should write about my school's teams for The Globe and Mail.
Shamelessly invoking the name of an uncle who knew him, I visited Jim VIPOND, the Sports editor, and suggested that The Globe needed to cover Ryerson sports -- and that I was just the man to do it. Without missing a beat, he sent me out of his office to write a brief autobiography to help him make a decision.
Choosing an empty chair in front of an old manual typewriter, I almost froze when I noticed that the man pounding away next to me was Scott YOUNG, an icon in sports journalism and one of my heroes. I recall no greeting or sign of acknowledgment from my neighbour (and I certainly would not have dreamed of interrupting him); but that brief near-encounter remains one of my fondest memories.
Despite shaking, clammy hands, a suddenly dry throat and a blank mind, I managed to bang out something for Mr. VIPOND. I got the non-paying "job" and, for a few months, wrote for the same newspaper as Scott YOUNG at the peak of his career.
Eventually, I met my wife, Gail. She bettered my story: She and a former boyfriend used to double-date with Scott YOUNG's son Neil. Together, we still feel a certain affinity with the YOUNGs.
Carl A. CHRISTIE, Winnipeg
In the late 1950s, my parents purchased the full Encyclopedia Britannica on my behalf. Being more sports mad at the time than now, I was delighted to find an article titled Hockey -- A Nation's Pastime in the 1960 yearbook. The article left an indelible impression on me, and I have read it many times since.
It was built around a 1-0 game in December, 1959, between the Maple Leafs and the Canadiens. The author, Scott YOUNG (at that time a Globe and Mail columnist), described the atmosphere inside and outside Maple Leaf Gardens beforehand, including the scalpers and the standing-room patrons, who at that time were about 15 per cent of the Gardens' ticket holders. Then came "the whole beauty of the game" - teamwork, body checks, high skills and reflexes, and the individuality of stars like Doug Harvey, the Pocket Rocket, Jean Beliveau ("moving with the effortless power of a big buck deer"), and the only goal scorer, Frank Mahovlich.
Mr. YOUNG's article soared by translating the Canadian passion for ice hockey into poetry. He wrote, "Throughout the game the noise of the crowd was a constant series of great Ohs," and, at game's end, "Here I had seen something to remember -- the Canadian equivalent of an Italian opera audience, rising as one to shout 'Bravo.' "
That article is a time capsule of my love for the game, and also of what the return of great hockey would mean for our country. Thank you, Scott YOUNG.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-25 published
BUTLER, Dr. Vincent John Patrick Thomas "Jack"
Dr. Vincent John Patrick Thomas 'Jack' BUTLER, 75, died peacefully on June 20, 2005 in El Paso, Texas. Born in Toronto in 1930, he was the only child of Thomas and Mary Hazel (née MORRIS) BUTLER, both deceased. Dr. BUTLER attended high school at University of Toronto Schools (1945-49), graduated from the University of Toronto Medical School in 1955, and completed psychiatric residencies at the University of Toronto and Queen's University in Kingston. Subsequently, he joined the faculties at Queen's University and University of Toronto Medical School. He served as Chief of Psychiatry at Toronto General Hospital (1966-68), Chief of Psychiatry and then Staff Psychiatrist at Scarborough Centenary Hospital (1968-77), and founded the Scarborough Community Mental Health Service. Dr. BUTLER married Yolanda Wendy AITKEN in 1955 and their children, Lisa Deirdre and Michael Thomas Ormond, were born in 1959 and 1962, respectively. Dr. BUTLER married his second wife, Bette Milne CHRISTIE, in 1971 and moved to El Paso, Texas in 1977. There Dr. BUTLER practiced consultation/liaison and adult psychiatry and became a faculty member at Texas Tech Regional Academic Health Sciences Center. He held staff appointments at local area hospitals and memberships in local, state and national medical and psychiatric societies. In 1991, he opened a dedicated psychiatric emergency unit at R.E. Thomason General Hospital, and became Chief of Psychiatric Emergency Services at the El Paso Psychiatric Center. Dr. BUTLER retired in 1998. Dr. BUTLER's honours include: Minister of Health (Ontario) Gold Medal in Psychiatry, University of Toronto; R.S. McLaughlin Travelling Research Fellowship (London); Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine (London); Fellow in Psychiatry of the Royal College of Physicians (Canada); Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association; and election to office in Ontario, Canadian, and Texas Psychiatric Associations. Dr. BUTLER is survived by both his first and second wives and his children. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Schuster Fund for Mental Health, c/o El Paso Community Foundation, P.O. Box 272, El Paso, Texas, 79943. A memorial service will be held in El Paso on Saturday, June 25 at University Presbyterian Church. A second memorial service will be held in Toronto later in the summer (date and location to be announced).

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-26 published
PASHBY, Thomas Joseph, C.M., M.D., C.R.C.S.C., D.S.C. (Hon)
'Doc' passed away peacefully at home surrounded by his family on August 24, 2005. Predeceased by his loving wife of 62 years Helen. Beloved father of Bill (Liz), Bob (Penny) and Jane. Lovingly remembered by his grandchildren Kathy (Dan), Christie (Max), Karen, Brad (Leslie), Leslie (Andy) and Julie and great granddaughter Grace. He is sadly missed and proudly remembered by his Friends, colleagues and patients whose lives he touched over 90 years. 'Doc' was born in Toronto. He was the only child of Norman and Florence PASHBY. He attended Riverdale Collegiate where he met and fell in love with Helen CHRISTIE whom he married in 1941. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force after graduating in medicine from the University of Toronto. In 1945 he moved to the home in Leaside where he lived for the past 60 years. It was here that he and his 'Katy' raised their children. After obtaining his certificate in ophthalmology, he treated the eyes of thousands of grateful patients at The Hospital for Sick Children, The Toronto Western Hospital and Scarborough Centenary Hospital as well as his private practice offices in North Toronto and Don Mills. He was a very strong family man and provided a wonderful life and role model for his children. He enjoyed his 55 years of summering on Georgian Bay and dozens of family winter vacations involving many trips to Disney World. He coached and sponsored hockey and baseball teams in Leaside for over 40 years. His interest in sports led him mid-career to develop a passion for eliminating catastrophic injury in sports. For his ground-breaking work in this area he was a recipient of The Order of Canada and inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. Upon his retirement from his medical practice at age 85, he continued to be very active in the sports safety field pushing for rule and attitude changes and acting as a resource for people around the world. This work will continue through The Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Fund which was established in his honour in 1989. He was very proud of his children, the 'extras' and his grandchildren. As leader of the Pashby Team he encouraged everyone in all their endeavors and was sincerely interested as he watched their lives unfold. He adored his 'Katy' who was his sweetheart of 70 years. He had very good judgment in everything he did. His was a full life with many accomplishments and many good times. A private family service was held on August 26, 2005. Donations may be made to The Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Safety Fund, 40 King Street West (W.T.P.), Suite 4100, Toronto, Ontario M5H 3Y4 in Doc's memory.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-27 published
Tom PASHBY, Ophthalmologist (1915-2005)
In 1959, appalled by a hockey injury to his son, he campaigned relentlessly for the adoption of protective devices. Today, young players across Canada owe him their health, their eyesight and, in some cases, even their lives
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, August 27, 2005, Page S9
At a Saturday morning hockey game in 1959, 13-year-old defenceman Bill PASHBY was carrying the puck when checked from behind by an opponent. The boy fell awkwardly, striking his bare head on the ice at Leaside Arena in Toronto. He suffered a severe concussion and a broken collarbone; he also swallowed his tongue, and was saved from suffocation by the quick action of a doctor in the stands.
Bill awoke briefly in a speeding ambulance, still dressed in his hockey gear. One of the first to arrive at his bedside at the Hospital for Sick Children was his father, Tom PASHBY, an ophthalmologist on staff.
The young defenceman survived the injury and, today, William T. PASHBY is a partner in the Toronto law office of Borden Ladner Gervais. Yet, the terrible morning during which his eldest son was unconscious so disturbed his father as to change his life. The close call led to a lifelong search for a means to halt such potentially catastrophic injuries. Dr. PASHBY's quest became a campaign and, eventually, a crusade.
Over the years, he overcame hockey's macho posturing, as helmets and visors became as much a part of a player's equipment as skates and a stick. Generations of hockey players, from professionals in the National Hockey League to weekend warriors playing pickup, owe their health, their eyesight and, in some cases, their lives to his unwavering advocacy.
Dr. PASHBY won many awards during his career, including an Order of Canada and induction into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. He always said his greatest satisfaction came from annual statistics, as helmets and visors prevented young hockey players from losing eyes to high sticks and stray pucks.
Thomas Joseph PASHBY was the son of a butcher who traced his ancestry to Yorkshire. The only child of Norman and Florence PASHBY attended Frankland Public School and Riverdale Collegiate Institute in east-end Toronto. After school and on weekends, he made deliveries by bicycle for his father's butcher shop. The job kept him in shape for hockey, football and baseball, sports in which he participated with more enthusiasm than skill.
At a tea dance at Riverdale, he met Helen CHRISTIE, daughter of the neighbourhood doctor. They would wed in 1941, by which time Dr. PASHBY had graduated with a medical degree from the University of Toronto.
As a squadron leader in the Royal Canadian Air Force, he spent the war years in domestic postings, conducting eye tests while also being involved in recruitment campaigns, according to his son. While in uniform, he became interested in eye injuries and diseases, and that became his specialty in the years following the war.
The Toronto Maple Leafs asked him to treat National Hockey League players, including captain George Armstrong and Tom Johnson of the visiting Montreal Canadiens. The doctor befriended many of his patients.
On most Saturday mornings, he could be found at Leaside Arena, where he coached and managed hockey teams for 40 seasons. In the days when players of every age skated with bare faces and heads, Dr. PASHBY's nimble fingers were often called on to stitch a patient or two at the bench.
He played a similar role at the annual peewee hockey tournament at Quebec City. At one tournament, he bought skates for a child whose parents were too poor to replace his broken pair. The boy went on to an National Hockey League career.
Dr. PASHBY was on duty at the hospital when his son was injured in 1959. He decided he would not allow his boys to play without headgear. "No one wore helmets then," he told the Medical Post in 1999.
"I was doing work with the Toronto Maple Leafs at the time and Bert Olmstead, a left winger, said that you couldn't get any helmets around here that are any good and offered to get me one from Sweden.
"My younger son Bob wore that helmet. At first, he didn't want to go on the ice with it. I said, 'You wear that helmet or you don't play.' Bob PASHBY, who would later join his father as an ophthalmologist, is believed to have been the first player in the Toronto Hockey League to have worn a helmet. The primitive headgear, jokingly called a "white eggshell," is now part of the Hockey Hall of Fame's collection.
While his advocacy now seems so commonsensical as to be inevitable, Dr. PASHBY faced a long battle to change the culture of a sport that regarded the wearing of helmets as a manifestation of sissiness. His son's initial reluctance was shared by other players even as most parents accepted the change. By 1965, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (now Hockey Canada) made the wearing of helmets mandatory.
Dr. PASHBY, meanwhile, worked with the Canadian Standards Association to develop safe and affordable headgear. Over the decades, the doctor's campaigns went from helmets to visors to neck guards. He also argued for an end to checking from behind as well as to checks to the head, a rule change adopted by Hockey Canada three years ago to reduce the number of concussions.
In 1972, on his own initiative, Dr. PASHBY embarked on a survey of all 700 of the nation's ophthalmologists. In the 1974-75 season, before face masks became mandatory, 258 eye injuries were suffered, including 43 blindings. The average age of the victim was 14. "The injuries are shocking, alarming and generally unnecessary," Dr. PASHBY said at the time.
By the 2001-02 season, only four eye injuries were reported, including two blindings.
According to the Canada Safety Council, 311 eyes have been blinded since Dr. PASHBY's first survey in 1972. Not a single one of those was suffered by a player wearing an approved full-face protector.
His untiring dedication to sports safety earned him numerous awards from sporting and medical bodies. As well, the Ontario Women's Hockey Association has named its trainer-of-the-year award after him.
Dr. PASHBY was a long-time teacher in the medical faculty at the University of Toronto, winning the ophthalmology department's Jack Crawford Teaching Award in 1992. (His youngest son won the same award four years later.) He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Waterloo in 1996.
Dr. PASHBY was named a member of the Order of Canada in 1981. He was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
The Toronto hall also provides a permanent home for the Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Safety Award, a trophy honouring "outstanding contributions toward the prevention of catastrophic injuries in sports and recreational activities." The award comes with a $10,000 prize.
Patrick BISHOP, a Waterloo professor and amateur hockey coach, was the inaugural winner last year for his work on impact biomechanics. This year's winner is Karen JOHNSTON, a McGill University neurosurgeon who researches concussions.
Dr. PASHBY retired from medical practice five years ago at 85, although he remained an active crusader until last month.
Tom PASHBY was born on March 23, 1915, in Toronto. He died at his Toronto home on Wednesday. He was 90. He leaves a daughter, two sons, six grandchildren and a great granddaughter. He was predeceased by his wife of 61 years, Helen, who died in 2003. The family has requested that donations be made to the Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Safety Fund, a charity founded in 1990.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-02 published
SMITH, Donald A.
At St. Joseph's Hospital, on Wednesday, November 30, 2005 at the age of 82. Loving husband of 54 years to Dorothy L. SMITH (née WILSON.) Cherished father of Susan CHRISTIE and her husband Bill, Laura WORLEY and her husband Bob, Paul RODGERS and the late Ross RODGERS and his wife Carole. Loved grandfather of Kelly, Mallory, Brandon, Glenn, Chris, Paul, Connie, Jamie, Heidi and great grandchildren Colin, Cameron, Alex, Alexander, Sarah and Benjamin. Dear brother of Helen HAGGAR and her husband Robert and the late Janet BECKER and her husband Robert. He will be sadly missed by his many nieces, nephews and their families. Don was a Naval Veteran in World War 2 and worked for T.H. and B and Canadian Pacific Railway for over 40 years as a ticket and freight agent. He was involved in youth sports in Grimsby for over 45 years especially with the Grimsby Minor Hockey and Grimsby Peach Kings organization. A special thank you to Dr. Don SMITH and Dr, J. GINSBURG and their staff, Shoppers Drug Mart Pharmacists, Tom, Liz, Dinah and their staff and St. Joseph's Hospital for all their tender care and compassion. Visitation at Stonehouse-Whitcomb Funeral Home, 11 Mountain Street, Grimsby on Sunday, December 4, 2005 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Service of Remembrance will be held at a later date. Memorial donations in memory of Don to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Diabetes Association or Grimsby Minor Hockey Association would be appreciated by the family.
www.smithsfh.com

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-22 published
CHRISTIE, Lindsay W.
(Norstar Securities)
Peacefully after a courageous battle with cancer on Monday December 19th 2005 at Hill House Hospice. Lindsay, cherished father to Linda and partner Alex, Ian, Darlene and her husband Jim, Teresa and her husband John. Proud grandfather to Daniel and Skye. Lindsay is survived by his brothers Ted, Gary, Kurt, Noël and Paul. A memorial celebration of Lindsay's life will be held on Saturday January 7th 2006 from 1: 30-4:30 p.m. at The Oakview Terrace 13256 Leslie St. Richmond Hill north of Stouffville Road. In Lindsay's memory donations may be made to Hill House Hospice 36 Wright Street, Richmond Hill.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-15 published
POMERLAN, Doris
Passed away on Tuesday, January 11, 2005, at South Miami Hospital, Miami, Florida, peacefully. Beloved sister and sister-in-law of Esther and her late husband Louis KESTEN, David and Evie SEGAL, and the late Sandra SEGAL, devoted Aunt of Darlene and Steven WOLK, Jory and Jeanne KESTEN, Myles KESTEN and Carol Wood- KESTEN, Brian and Tina SEGAL, Marty and Tammy SEGAL, Roxanne and Robert CHRISTIE, and of her grand-nieces and grand-nephews Adam and Sand, Blair and Deanna, Shelby and David, Jeremy, James, Annsley, Zachary, Ilea, Shawn, Rachel, Joshua, Alexa and Olivia, and her great-grand-nieces and great-grand-nephew Spencer, Asher and Samara. She will be deeply missed by her dear Friends in Miami, and her many Friends and family. She was a treasure to us all, and we will continue to cherish her memory. Funeral will take place on Sunday, January 16, 2005, at 11: 30 a.m. at Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West, Toronto, Ontario. Shiva at 5 Marwood Road, Toronto. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or to the Doris Pomerlan Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation (2401 Steeles Ave. West, Toronto, Ontario M3J 2P1, 416-780-0324).

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-17 published
GARRETT, Jean Rutherford
Peacefully, at Halton Hills Extendicare, on January 16, 2005. Beloved wife of the late Dr. D.A. GARRETT, loved mother of Katherine and her husband Norman ELLIOT/ELLIOTT of Acton, Douglas and David of Minden and Steven and his wife Phyllis of Bracebridge. Grandmother of five and great-grandmother of one. Predeceased by her brothers Ross and Stewart CRERAR and her sister Eleanor CHRISTIE. At the request of the deceased, there will be no funeral. A family service will be held in the spring. Remembrances to The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, M5G 1X8 would be appreciated by the family. MacKinnon Family Funeral Home "Shoemaker Chapel" 1-877-421-9860

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-19 published
Murray COOPER lived 'to be a star'
Acted as female impersonator
He was also a nightclub owner
By Debra BLACK, Staff Reporter
It's rare that your first and only acquaintance with someone is when he is dying. But that's how I met Murray COOPER.
He was dying at Toronto's Grace Health Centre's palliative care unit. And I was there to write a story about dying. And yet when I think about COOPER, I don't think so much of his weak and fragile body, but more about his spirit and exuberance for living.
I will always have this image of COOPER strutting down the halls of the palliative care unit on the sixth floor getting ready for his 55th birthday party. It was a Friday night late last year. On another occasion, he might have been holding court at a club. But on this night, his Friends were coming to celebrate at the hospital and balloons hung from the ceiling of the lounge. He wore a blue embroidered caftan and woolly socks, and he refused to use his walker.
"Darling," he said as I approached him on the night of his party. "You look fabulous."
"So do you," I said.
COOPER was a truly unusual man: a well-known Toronto stylist, a female impersonator and a nightclub owner. He died last Thursday at the palliative care unit at Toronto's Grace Health Centre.
Everything about him was larger than life. "I always wanted to be a star," he said when interviewed late last year.
For the past two weeks, he hovered close to death as the ravages of liver disease, hepatitis C and diabetes continued to take their toll, said friend, singer and actress Dinah CHRISTIE.
One night, he turned blue, had only a weak pulse and was hardly breathing. Staff at the Grace thought it was the beginning of the end. They called CHRISTIE. She came immediately and watched over him, held his hand and spent the night and the morning serenading him with a little song she had written him to help ease the pain.
Then she switched gears and sang every Judy Garland song she had ever known, including "Meet Me In St. Louis."
The music revived COOPER. He suddenly sat up and began talking to CHRISTIE and another friend. He lived miraculously for another week, CHRISTIE said in an interview Sunday as she packed up his apartment.
When he finally died last Thursday, he lay wrapped in a blue-green pashmina and was surrounded by pictures of angels. The staff at the Grace sat with him until he took his last breath.
He had hoped to winter one more time in his former home of Eleuthera in the Bahamas but had come to grips with the fact he was dying.
"The grand thing is I have no regrets," he said when interviewed about his impending death. "I have cirrhosis of the liver, diabetes and hepatitis C. Any one of those could kill me. Now it's finally caught up to me and I've resigned myself to it. You can't really fight it. You can medicate it. You can slow it down. You can just be very nice to it. But that's about it."
For CHRISTIE, life without her friend won't be the same.
She recalls one of her favourite moments with him back in the mid-1980s. They were in Calgary shopping. Some of the locals were shocked by COOPER's attire. He was dressed in an off-white muumuu and had short dyed blond hair with rhinestone blue studded eyeglasses. As CHRISTIE retells it: two very tall cowboys walked by and looked COOPER up and down. CHRISTIE expected a scene. But instead the cowboys broke out into a fit of giggles, obviously enjoying COOPER's flamboyant clothing.
"They let go of their façade and I could see two very gay cowboys," said CHRISTIE. "I loved that."
Another favourite memory of hers involves another shopping trip, this time on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills. COOPER was mistaken for Elton John, CHRISTIE said. A flock of very chic kids came up to him and asked for his autograph. Later, when CHRISTIE asked him what he'd written, he told her he'd signed his name as Amelia Earhart. It was perfect Murray, she said. Perfect.
COOPER leaves behind his elderly parents, his brother and his devoted dog, which has been adopted by one of the Grace staff.
No service is to be held. But COOPER was cremated and his ashes will be spread in Eleuthera at the end of January.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-15 published
WOOD, John Stevenson " Jack"
Passed away at Parkwood Hospital, London on Friday, March 11, 2005, in his 86th year. Beloved husband of the late Elizabeth (Betty) WOOD (2001.) Much loved father and father-in-law of Laura and Michael ROZEN of London and Susan and Marc CHRISTIE of Mississauga. Loving grandpa of Lisa and Jennifer CHRISTIE. Dear brother of Robert (Bob) WOOD of Brockville and brother-in-law of Don and Ann CAMPBELL of Toronto. Also survived by a number of wonderful nieces and nephews. Jack was a World War 2 Veteran who served in the Royal Canadian Corps Signals from 1941 to 1945 in Britain, Italy and Holland. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at Erindale United Church, 1444 Dundas Crescent in Mississauga at a future date. In lieu of flowers, please support the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the charity of your choice.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-21 published
CHRISTIE, Nicholas Earl (CHRUSZCZ)
(Soldier and Officer of the First Polish Armoured Division during World War 2 and employee of Mutual of Omaha for over a quarter century) Passed away suddenly in his 88th year at the Milton District Hospital on Saturday, March 19, 2005. Predeceased by his loving wife Marianna. Devoted father of Isabel (Brian) STRATTON, Peter (Karen) CHRISTIE and George CHRISTIE. Beloved grandfather of Michael CHRISTIE, David CHRISTIE, Laura STRATTON and Matthew STRATTON. Friends will be received from the J. Scott Early Funeral Home, 21 James Street, Milton (905) 878-2669 on Tuesday, March 22nd from 7-9 p.m. Vigil Prayers will be prayed at 8: 30 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated from Holy Rosary Church, 139 Martin Street, Milton, on Wednesday, March 23rd at 10 a.m. Private interment to occur on a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Parkinson Society of Canada, or to the charity of one's choice.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-26 published
DECORY, Lancelot Chester
Age 80, passed away peacefully on March 20, 2005, in Mesa, Arizona. Born in Lead, South Dakota, he became the world's youngest Eagle Scout and multiple letterman at Lead High School. He served with distinction in World War 2. A graduate of the South Dakota School of Mines, he had a career as an engineer eventually becoming President of the Canadian Portland Cement Association. He is survived by loving wife Ardyce, daughter Lanette FINICAL and her husband Allen, son Jed DECORY and his partner Dominique GIGUERE, grandchildren Jessica and Sean DECORY and surrogate children Vivian POOLEY, Dagmar SIMONS and her husband Don, Tony CHRISTIE, Heather CHRISTIE, Max MacCRIMMON and his wife Pat and 10 surrogate grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. A memorial service in Toronto is being planned. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to The Citadel Care Center, 5121 East Broadway Road, Mesa, Arizona 85206 Attention Kathy WOJCIK.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-11 published
CHRISTIE, Jean Elizabeth (née HARDING) (1922-2005)
Passed away peacefully, at Saint Mary's Hospital, Kitchener, on Saturday, April 9, 2005, at the age of 82. Beloved wife of George. Cherished mother of Karen (Tom) DAGG, and Calvin CHRISTIE. Lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Jennah and Eric. Jean is survived by her sister Margaret SINIBALDI. Predeceased by her parents Frederick and Doretta HARDING, and a brother William HARDING. Friends are invited to share their memories of Jean with her family during visitation at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home on Wednesday, April 13, 2005 from 10 to 11 a.m. The service to celebrate Jean's life and faith will follow in the funeral home Chapel at 11 a.m., with the Reverend Lowell NUSSEY officiating. Interment to follow a reception in the funeral home at Memory Gardens Cemetery. Jean's family wishes to extend their heart filled thanks to the wonderful staff, and Friends that she made during her stay at Beechwood Manor, as well as the care shown to her by the doctors and nurses at Saint Mary's Hospital Emergency Department. In Jean's memory, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Kitchener-Waterloo, and can be arranged through the funeral home. Condolences/Donations/Flowers www.edwardrgood.com 519-745-8445

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-20 published
VALLE, Nicola " Nick"
It is with great sadness we announce Nick's passing on April 18th, 2005 after a courageous battle with cancer. Much loved husband and best friend of Karen and beloved father of Catherine. Cherished son of Carmine and Maria VALLE, dear brother of Filomena and husband Ed LEUTRI. Sadly missed by father and mother-in-law Dave and Faye CHRISTIE and brothers and sisters-in-law David and Pat and Don and Kim CHRISTIE. Loving uncle to Stephanie, Sandra, Jennifer, Jeffery, Stephen and Kevin. Fondly remembered by his many relatives and Friends. Family would like to thank everyone who supported them through his illness. Family will receive Friends at the Fratelli Vescio Funeral Homes Ltd. (8101 Weston Rd., south of Langstaff Rd., 905-850-3332) on Tuesday from 6-9 p.m. and Wednesday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Thursday at 9: 30 a.m. from Immaculate Conception Roman Catholic Church (300 Ansley Grove Rd., north of Chancellor Ave.). Interment to follow at the Queen Of Heaven Catholic Cemetery (on Hwy. 27, south of Hwy. 7). In lieu of flowers, if desired, donations to Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-24 published
CHRISTIE, Margaret
Peacefully, at the Leisureworld Nursing Home, on Monday, May 23, 2005 in her 95th year. Predeceased by her beloved husband Victor. Loving mother of Stephanie MEREDITH and her late husband Michael and Alan and his wife Ann. Friends will be received at the Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Road (west of Victoria Park Ave.), Toronto (416-698-2861), on Wednesday, May 25, 2005 from 11 a.m. until time of service in the Chapel at 12 noon. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to The Hospital for Sick Children in Margaret's memory would be greatly appreciated.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-08 published
CHRISTIE, Carole
Peacefully at home on June 6, 2005 with loving family and Friends at her side. Devoted and loving mother of Gordon, Natalie and Mark, sister of Deborah and Joanne and dear aunt to Romana. Cherished friend to Linda and Gail. Will forever be remembered and missed by family and Friends. Family and Friends will be received at McDougall and Brown Funeral Home, Scarborough Chapel, 2900 Kingston Rd. (east of St. Clair), on Thursday from 4-9 p.m. Funeral Mass on Friday 10 a.m. at Corpus Christie Catholic Church, 1810 Queen Street East 416-694-0382. Private interment. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-13 published
Dorothy THOMAS stormed city hall
One of reformer group elected to council in 1972
She started poop and scoop program in Toronto
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
Once upon a time, when Toronto was younger and believed in itself much, much more, a group of urban idealists stormed city hall. They called themselves reformers and they got into the council chamber by getting themselves elected. David CROMBIE was their leader, a man dubbed Toronto's "tiny perfect mayor" by the media of the day, and great things were expected and sometimes even delivered.
Now, these reformers were feisty and forward-thinking -- they were people like the late Colin VAUGHAN, an architect turned activist, lawyers Dale MARTIN and Karl JAFFARY, renegade thinker John SEWELL. And three of the newly minted aldermen -- for that was the job title of councillor in those days -- were women.
But only two -- Anne JOHNSTON and Dorothy THOMAS -- made it through the first term of office. JOHNSTON, who retired from municipal politics at the time of the last election, says that was only because they learned to be tough and because they had each other.
"I met her December 4, 1972, the night we were all elected. There was a spontaneous gathering of all the reformers at city hall and I remember Dorothy was wearing a hat and she came up to me and said: 'You and I are going to be Friends,'" she said.
They were a gang of citizen politicians who believed they were going to create a livable, even lovable city, but THOMAS was right about at least one thing that night: she and JOHNSTON were Friends until May 9 this year, when THOMAS died of cancer at Dorothy MIKOS was the proud daughter of very proud Hungarians. Her father, a tailor, and her mother, a talented seamstress, came to Canada in the 1930s. Theirs was the classic immigrant story, according to THOMAS's only child, Nye THOMAS, a lawyer and policy director of the Ipperwash provincial inquiry. His grandparents worked hard in Spadina Ave. sweatshops so their children would never have to and were thrilled when their daughter went to the University of Toronto.
THOMAS discovered journalism there -- it was the heyday of the varsity press -- as well as Ralph THOMAS, another journalist who would become a well-known Canadian filmmaker. Now living in California, he is best known here for Ticket To Heaven and The Terry Fox Story. Dorothy THOMAS left university before she graduated to work at the Toronto Star, where she was an arts reporter under the watch of the legendary entertainment editor Nathan COHEN.
She was a stay-at-home mom living in a fourplex on Wineva Ave. in the Beach when she joined up with a group of residents to successfully fight the construction of the Scarborough Expressway, which would have cut right through her neighbourhood.
THOMAS served two terms on Toronto council, from 1972 to 1976 and from 1981 to 1985, representing the old Ward 9 until ousted by a tag team of Paul CHRISTIE and Tom JAKOBEK. She had been one of the founders of the City of Toronto's Person's Day Award and had headed the Mayor's Task Force on the Status of Women.
"She was an excellent politician," said Barbara CAPLAN, a former Toronto city clerk. "She could build consensus across political ties."
JOHNSTON said her friend initiated Toronto's poop and scoop program, an achievement not among those noted on the condolence motion passed by council 10 days after THOMAS died, but not without its significance.
"She owned the public works committee," said JOHNSTON. " She was always the chair. She liked it because it was working on neighbour stuff."
Attractive and articulate, THOMAS was also blunt. "There was no filter with her, ever," her son said.
She made headlines when she and Alderman Dale MARTIN visited Calgary in 1985 for the 48th annual convention of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. "The whole of downtown Calgary shows an amazing lack of planning," she said. Ralph KLEIN was the mayor then and he summoned photographers to record him standing in front of Calgary City Hall wearing boxing gloves and dissing the smug politicians from the East.
THOMAS didn't back down. "It's very ugly in Calgary," she told the Star. "It even makes (Metro planners) look good."
By then a single mom working punishing hours, THOMAS still made a point of being home every night to have dinner with her son. When she quit politics the first time, it was to spend time with Nye. When she left municipal politics for good, she moved to Euclid Ave. and got a job heading and helping clean up the Metro Licensing Commission, serving on the subsequent Toronto Licensing Tribunal until 2003.
A spectacular cook and a stylish hostess, she was often asked to donate her talents to fundraising events. A dinner party for four catered by Dorothy THOMAS was always a hot ticket at silent and not-so-silent auctions for the New Democratic Party. She was generous with her money as well as time, donating to 60 charities, including the Canadian Marmot Foundation (because she thought no one else would, her son said).
Her dinner table was a natural gathering place for Friends and their families. For 10 years she met one Wednesday night every other month with a group of powerful women such as June CALLWOOD, Doris ANDERSON and Sylvia OSTRY, and for twice as long as that, she was part of a poker player gang of Friends that included fellow activist Ethel TEITELBAUM, who often travelled with THOMAS.
"She was a complicated woman who attacked a lot of people who loved her. But we hung in there because she was loyal and wonderful company -- witty, generous. I always thought she was beautiful," said TEITELBAUM.
Last fall they had travelled to Sicily, one of THOMAS's must-see destinations. "We had a ball," said TEITELBAUM.
But THOMAS, who disliked doctors, was in pain and in fact had been suffering for some time. When she was finally diagnosed with cancer at Christmas, it was too late. THOMAS was admitted to Princess Margaret Hospital, where she had hundreds of visitors. "They said they had never seen anything like it," said CAPLAN, who was soon sending out regular emails about THOMAS to 125 recipients.
In recent years, THOMAS had moved to Port Hope and had been immersed in developing the Port Hope Ecology Garden.
THOMAS never got home again: she spent 17 weeks in hospital, latterly at the Toronto Grace where she celebrated her 67th birthday with Friends. She wasn't in pain, but she was unable to read or watch much television, and every morning she would wake up and be angry that she was still around. "She wanted to leave the arena," CAPLAN said.
She insisted both Nye and his wife, Karen, go to China on a long-awaited trip to bring home Mei Leigh, their adopted daughter and her first grandchild. She died two days after they left Canada.
Her many Friends are gathering tonight at 7 p.m. at the Gladstone Hotel for her memorial. There will be good food, wine, Friends reuniting, laughter and only four speeches. Her son says it is where and how she would have wanted it.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-25 published
MacNEIL, John Alexander
John Alexander MacNEIL, 74 of Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia, passed away suddenly on Wednesday, June 22, 2005 in his Ontario home. He was born on June 16, 1931, son of the late John and Irene (MacDONALD) MacNEIL. As a young man in the early 1950's, John MacNEIL joined the Navy. During his Navy career he was a member of the Canada Steamship Lines, travelling on the Great Lakes as a seaman. His career continued as a crew member of the White Star Line, and he served on the Olympic aircraft carrier known as "The Magnificent". He proudly served two years on the H.M.C.S. Haida during its second tour of duty in Korean waters and travelled the world. Throughout the later years, close to retirement, he enjoyed serving on the "Sam McBride" ferry boat for the City of Toronto. During his retirement years he truly enjoyed the life of leisure and kept busy creating woodworking masterpieces! Beloved husband of the late Gertrude TREMBLETT (BUTT,) also of Sydney Mines, who died at age 57 on March 10, 1992 in Ontario. Loving father of 8 children, Sheila KING (husband Johnny) and Mike TREMBLETT, both of Nova Scotia, Jane CHRISTIE (husband Fred,) Judy TETTMAN (husband Chris,) Susan TREMBLETT, Peter TREMBLETT (wife Tammy,) Sandra GHANY (husband Herold) and Irene KAY, all of Ontario. Proud grandfather of 17 and great-grandfather of 3. He is survived by two sisters, Marjorie HARDING of Nova Scotia, Yvonne JERRETT of Ontario, and one brother Ronald MacNEIL, also of Ontario; four nieces, Erna, Irene and Donna of Ontario, and Corrine of Texas. Also survived by close companion Shirley, her five children and two grandchildren, Sheldon and Jordan. We love you Dad and may God keep you by his side as you rest in peace. Visitation for the late John A. MacNEIL " Sandy" will be held at Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home located at 467 Sherbourne Street, Toronto. The viewing will be held on Sunday, June 26, 2005 from 7-9 p.m. and again Monday, June 27, 2005 from 10-11 a.m. with a Chapel Service at 11: 00 a.m. and cremation to follow. The ashes of John A. MacNEIL will be laid to rest at the Brookside Cemetery in Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia at the footstone of the late Gertrude TREMBLETT (BUTT) at a later date.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-28 published
CHRISTIE, Pearl (née BOLEYCHUK)
(Retired School Teacher)
It is with great sadness our family announces her sudden passing at home on Sunday, June 26, 2005 in her 64th year. Beloved daughter of Mary and Walter BOLEYCHUK, loving sister of Doris UHRAYN (BOLEYCHUK) and brother-in-law Bill UHRAYN, cherished mother of Laura CHRISTIE, Jamie CHRISTIE, mother-in-law of Michelle CHRISTINE (Mathe) and adored Babcha of Kyra CHRISTIE. She is truly loved and will be greatly missed by all her family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston, on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A complete service will be held in the funeral home chapel on Thursday at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation. Condolences may be send to the family at pearl.christie@wardfh.com

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-03 published
KOSS, Olga Ida Minnie
Peacefully at home on Tuesday, August 2, 2005 with her family at her side. Olga, beloved wife of the late Edward KOSS. Loving mother of Joyce and her husband George CHRISTIE, Rod and his wife Patricia, Gale and Gary. She is survived by her grandchildren Edward, Cindy, Jackie, Andrew, Glenn, Brian, Brenda and her great-grandchildren Jason, Shawn, Kevin, Clayton, Alanna, Matty and Cameron. Olga will be sadly missed by her brother Harold and his wife Audrey and her sisters Adeline LIEBECK and Helen HARVEY. She is predeceased by her brothers Ewald and Verner PANKE and sisters Edna YANDT and Esther NEUMAN. Friends will be received at the Ridley Funeral Home, 3080 Lakeshore Blvd. W. (between Islington and Kipling Aves., at 14th Street, 416-259-3705) on Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., followed by a service in the chapel at 4 p.m. Interment at Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Pembroke, Ontario. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Messages of Condolence may be placed at www. RidleyFuneralHome.com.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-04 published
KOSS, Olga Ida Minnie
Peacefully at home on Tuesday, August 2, 2005 with her family at her side. Olga, beloved wife of the late Edward KOSS. Loving mother of Joyce and her husband George CHRISTIE, Rod and his wife Patricia, Gale and Gary and his wife Norma. She is survived by her grandchildren Edward, Cindy, Jackie, Andrew, Glenn, Brian, Brenda, Sherry, Dee and her great-grandchildren Jason, Shawn, Kevin, Clayton, Alanna, Matty and Cameron. Olga will be sadly missed by her brother Harold and his wife Audrey and her sisters Adeline LIEBECK and Helen HARVEY. She is predeceased by her brothers Ewald and Verner PANKE and sisters Edna YANDT and Esther NEUMAN. Friends will be received at the Ridley Funeral Home, 3080 Lakeshore Blvd. W. (between Islington and Kipling Aves., at 14th Street, 416-259-3705) on Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., followed by a service in the chapel at 4 p.m. Interment at Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Pembroke, Ontario. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Messages of Condolence may be placed at www. RidleyFuneralHome.com.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-08 published
CHRISTIE, Donald M.
Don passed away August 6, 2005, after a difficult illness. Don, loving brother and best friend of Ann WYLLIE (Bill deceased,) predeceased by sisters Edna WHITELOCK and Mary McGOWN. His nieces Heather Wyllie and Dawna ROBERTSON were truly devoted to "Uncle Don." Don's greatest treasure was his great-niece Holley ROBERTSON, whom he adored. Uncle to Christine REESE and David McGOWN. Don was a retiree of Ford Oakville and a volunteer for Travellers Aid. His Christian life was evident in his love for people. We wish to thank Irene, Linda, Janice, Lotti, Ena, Jack, Cheuk, Don, Nancy, Bill and so many Friends for their devotion to Don. In his memory, a gift to Knox Church "Out of the Cold" program would be appreciated. Visitation at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home, 6150 Yonge Street (at Goulding, south of Steeles) on Tuesday, August 9th, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday, August 10th, 2005 from 12 p.m. until time of Funeral Service at the Chapel at 1 o'clock. Condolences www.rskane.ca To know Don was to have a friend for life!

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-20 published
JOCKO- ALTON, Jacqueline Mary
Passed away at Grindstone Creek Manor, Waterdown, on Thursday, August 18, 2005, in her 73rd year. Loved mother of Donna ADAMSON (Jay) of Waterdown, Kelly RYE (Ken) of Millett, Alberta, Sharon ZAMMIT (Bill,) Jackie WOOD (Gary) and Andrew ALTON (Bonnie,) all of Burlington. Grandmother of Marley, Myles, Ryan, Jennifer, Kristy, Justin, Kevin, Sean, Kevin, Tyler, Isaiah, Mathew and Joshua and great-grandmother of Hannah, Dylan, Jacob and Noah. Dear sister of Nina CHRISTIE of Toronto and John CHRISTIE of Collingwood. As a case worker for the Aboriginal people in Toronto, her services will be greatly missed. Cremation has taken place. A Service of Remembrance will be held at Wellington Square United Church, 2121 Caroline Street, Burlington, on Tuesday, August 23, 2005 at 11 a.m. If desired, expressions of sympathy to the Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto, 415 Yonge Street, Toronto M5B 2E7, or Wellington Square United Church Memorial Fund would be sincerely appreciated by the family. Arrangements entrusted to Smith's Funeral Home, Burlington, 905-632-3333. www.smithsfh.com

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-25 published
PASHBY changed the face of the game
Players blinded in 1974 season -- before his efforts to make masks mandatory in minor hockey: 43. By the 1978 season: 0
By Glen COLBOURN and Lois KALCHMAN, Sports Reporters
When Dr. Tom PASHBY began searching for hockey helmets for his sons in 1959, he found only flimsy shells better suited for use as fruit bowls than safety equipment.
PASHBY devoted the next 46 years of his life to making helmets stronger and face protection mandatory in Canada and around the world. In doing so, he quite literally changed the face of hockey.
PASHBY, the game's foremost safety pioneer for the last half-century, died at his Leaside home yesterday surrounded by his family. He was 90.
"Thousands of kids have been saved from serious injuries because of him," said Frank SELKE Jr., a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame selection committee and a long-time friend of PASHBY.
"Unfortunately the masses don't know how much work this man has done and that is the tragedy."
PASHBY's labours haven't gone completely without recognition. He was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 1981 and inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 2000, among two dozen national and international awards.
An ophthalmologist, PASHBY launched his crusade to prevent catastrophic injuries in sports after his eldest son Bill suffered a concussion while playing in a Leaside house league game in 1959. Bill smacked his bare head on the ice and was rushed to the Hospital for Sick Children.
"He took what was potentially a very dangerous incident involving me and as a result has saved many other young people from waking up in an ambulance like I did," Bill PASHBY told the Star. "It was scary."
The elder PASHBY already knew about the seriousness of concussions, having suffered one as a high school football player.
"I was out like a light. I don't remember any pain," PASHBY recalled last month. "I do remember going to East General Hospital. I said I was all right, got out of the car, went to walk and fell flat on my face."
After Bill PASHBY's injury, the senior PASHBY forbade his two sons -- Bill, 13, and Bob, 11 -- from playing hockey again without a helmet. It was a hard rule to enforce.
"All I could find were these crazy things made out of cardboard," PASHBY told the Star in 1983. "There was a lot of junk out there."
So PASHBY, a consulting physician with the Maple Leafs, got forward Bert Olmstead to help him import a polycarbonate helmet from Sweden.
"They called Bob 'Caesar' the first time he wore it, but the other parents caught the fever after that game," PASHBY said.
That's believed to be the first time a player wore a helmet in the Toronto Hockey League (now the Greater Toronto Hockey League) and Bob PASHBY's original "white eggshell" headgear has gone to the Hockey Hall of Fame.
But even the early Swedish helmets were unsatisfactory to PASHBY, who began seeking ways of testing and improving them.
"The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association said if I would set a standard they would make (helmet use) mandatory," he recalled this summer. "And so I did."
That was the beginning of a long second career as a hockey safety innovator -- "a hobby that blew up into a big job," PASHBY said when he was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame.
In 1975, PASHBY was named chair of the Canadian Standards Association committee that approved hockey and box lacrosse equipment, a position he held for two decades. His influence was felt almost immediately. In 1976, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association ordered that all amateur players wear Canadian Standards Association-certified helmets. In 1979, the National Hockey League made helmets mandatory for incoming players.
PASHBY also pioneered the development of visors and wire facemasks. He took great pride in the number of blindings they prevented.
In the 1974-75 season, before facemasks were mandatory in minor hockey, the number of players who suffered a permanently blinded eye in Canada was 43. By 1978, the number among players using Canadian Standards Association-certified, full-face protection was zero.
"He affected a lot of people," said Murray COSTELLO, who, as president of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association, worked with PASHBY for three decades.
"You knew he was right in what he said."
PASHBY continued his crusade for safer hockey until his last days. He used Vancouver Canucks' forward Todd Bertuzzi's attack on Colorado's Steve Moore in 2004 to call on the National Hockey League to ban all hits to the head. The International Ice Hockey Federation, U.S.A. Hockey and Hockey Canada had already adopted such a rule -- at PASHBY's behest.
Over the years, he also pushed to ban unsafe moulded goalie masks, introduce neck protection and disallow hitting from behind to reduce spinal injuries. He set up the charitable Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Safety Fund, which has raised approximately $600,000 for research and education and annually confers a $10,000 award for outstanding contributions to preventing catastrophic injuries in sport.
"He has had phenomenal impact on amateur hockey," said Greater Toronto Hockey League president John GARDNER.
That impact is evident in PASHBY's personal collection of hockey safety gear, which shows the development of facemasks and helmets through the decades. Earlier this year, the Hockey Hall of Fame selected 50 items from the collection for the Hall.
PASHBY was born into a family of butchers in east-end Toronto in 1915. He grew up in the Danforth and Pape area and graduated from University of Toronto's medical school in 1940. He married high school sweetheart Helen CHRISTIE in 1941 just 10 days before joining the Royal Canadian Air Force. In the military, he conducted eye tests on would-be pilots, bombardiers and tail-gunners and became interested in ophthalmology.
In 1948, he started his own practice in Leaside, which his son Bob joined and still runs.
Helen died in 2003 of colon cancer. PASHBY is survived by their three children, Bill (Elizabeth), Bob (Penny) and Jane, as well as six granddaughters, one grand_son and a great granddaughter.
The family is planning a private funeral.
For more information on the Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Safety Fund go to http: //www.drpashby.ca

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-27 published
CHRISTIE, Alexander
Quietly, at York Central Hospital, on Thursday, August 25, 2005. Alex, dear husband of Donna. Loving father of Catherine and her husband Alex SANNA. Alex will be sorely missed by his sister Irene and her husband Alistair DAVIE, by his mother-in-law Joyce MORRA, his cousin Joe MUNRO, and all his Friends and family in Canada and Scotland. Friends may call at the Marshall Funeral Home, 10366 Yonge Street (4th traffic light north of Major Mackenzie Drive), Richmond Hill on Monday, August 29th after 1 p.m. for a Funeral Service at 2: 30 p.m. Cremation. In Alex's memory, donations may be made to the Liver or Kidney Foundation of Canada.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-24 published
COOK, Robert G.
Peacefully, at St. Joseph's Health Centre on Tuesday, September 20, 2005, in his 95th year. Beloved husband of Violet. Loving father of Robert and his wife Margaret, and the late Ronald. Lovingly remembered by his daughter-in-law Rosemary. Dear grandfather of Lynn, Michelle CHRISTIE (Iain) and Phillip (Amanda;) great-grandfather of Jeremy. A private family service has taken place.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-25 published
CHRISTIE, George James
Passed away peacefully on Thursday, November 24, 2005 at the age of 75. Beloved husband of Joyce. Loving dad of Ed, Cindy TAILOR/TAYLOR, Jackie TRAIN and their families. He will be sadly missed by other family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Ridley Funeral Home, 3080 Lakeshore Blvd. W. (between Islington and Kipling Aves., at 14th Street, 416-259-3705) on Saturday from 7 to 9 p.m., Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. and Monday from 11 a.m. until time of Funeral Service in the Chapel at 12 p.m. Interment Glendale Memorial Gardens. Messages of condolence may be placed at www.RidleyFuneralHome.com.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-27 published
RIDLEY, Albert Arthur
Passed away peacefully at Peel Memorial Hospital on Thursday, November 24, 2005 at the age of 88. Beloved husband of Gladys for nearly 64 years. Much loved father of Nancy (Bill) WILSON, Helen RIDLEY and Alberta (Bill) CHRISTIE. Loving grandfather of Cheryl and Glen (Leanna) WILSON. Predeceased by brother Walter and sisters Nellie, Wilma and Hazel. A celebration of Albert's life will take place on Tuesday, November 29 at 2: 00 p.m. at Grace United Church, 156 Main St. N., Brampton. Visitation beginning at 1: 00. Donations to Grace United Church or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-15 published
BURTON, Harriett E.
Peacefully at Headwaters Health Care Centre, Orangeville, on Wednesday, December 14, 2005, Harriett E. BURTON, Orangeville, 79 years of age, beloved wife of the late William BURTON. Dear mother of John CHRISTIE and his wife Christine STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Orangeville and the late Trevor CHRISTIE and Anne CHRISTIE. Loving grandmother of Dawn-Margret and Richard. Dear sister of Pearl DICKSON/DIXON and the late Albert and James GREAVES. Very dear friend of Gordon WELSTEAD. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home Baxter and Giles Chapel, 273 Broadway, Orangeville (519-941-2630) Friday evening 7 - 9 o'clock. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday morning, December 17 at 11 o'clock. Followed by cremation. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Headwaters Health Care Foundation, 100 Rolling Hills Drive, Orangeville L9W 4X9. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-15 published
CHRISTIE, Harriett E.
Please see Harriett E. BURTON notice.

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CHRISTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-27 published
CHRISTIE, Catherine " Cathy"
Passed away peacefully on December 24, 2005 after a long and courageous battle with cancer at the age of 51 years. Her strength and determination were respected and admired by all who knew her. Daughter of Raymond and Joanne CHRISTIE both predeceased. Cathy will be sadly missed by her eight surviving sisters and brothers: Jim CHRISTIE, Mary HEURLIMANN (husband Ernie,) Bernadette CHRISTIE, Teresa LAPIERRE (husband Dennis,) Loretta VRZOVSKI (husband Vasko,) Peter CHRISTIE (wife Deb,) Rosie RYAN (husband Rob,) and Tom CHRISTIE (Sally.) She will always be remembered as "Auntie Cathy" to 17 nieces and nephews: Cassandra, Brittany, Miranda and Sammy; Andy and Franky; Chason and Anthony; Christy and Gillian; Alex, Joey, and Nicky; Raymond; Amanda and Melissa and Oksana. The CHRISTIE family would like to extend their sincere gratitude to the staff and volunteers in the Palliative Care Unit at St. Michael's Hospital whose compassionate care during the past several months made Cathy's journey more bearable by all of us. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or St. Michael's Palliative Care Unit would be appreciated. Friends may call at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (south of Wellesley) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, December 28, 2005. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held from St. Michael's Cathedral, 65 Bond Street (Bond at Shuter Streets) on Thursday, December 29, 2005 at 10 a.m.

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