CHO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-21 published
MARSLAND, Ina (née COWAN)
After a lengthy battle with declining health, Ina MARSLAND (nee COWAN) passed away at the Woodstock Private Hospital at the age of 92 years, after being compassionately cared for by the wonderful staff; Our mentor was finally released from her pain and struggle on Tuesday, April 19th, 2005. Ina was predeceased by her husband and best friend Robert (1996.) Beloved mother to Bernice MARSLAND of Woodstock and Fred MARSLAND of Keswick Road. She is survived by many special nieces and nephews. Ina was predeceased by her son Glen (1960,) her parents John and Axaie COWAN, her siblings Cecil; Guy; Alvretta PIPE; Wilfred; LaVerne; Montressor; Viola MATLOCK; Edsell and Emery.
She was a compassionate lady who overlooked imperfections and cared deeply for both people and animals. The family welcomes Friends and family to join them for visitation at Ostrander's Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell Street, Tillsonburg (842-5221) on Friday, April 22, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral services for Ina will be held in Ostrander's Funeral Home Chapel on Saturday, April 23 at 11 a.m. Reverend Hyuk CHO of Brownsville United Church and Reverend Steve HERSHEY of Central United Church, Woodstock officiating. Interment at Evergreen Cemetery in Lynedoch, Ontario. Memorial donations (payable by cheque) may be made to the Brownsville United Church, Oxford United Way or Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital. Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostranderfuneralhome.com

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CHO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-17 published
RIDDELL, Grace Bernice (SIMPSON)
At the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Saturday, October 15, 2005. Grace Bernice (SIMPSON) RIDDELL of Dayspring Retirement Center formerly of Brownsville in her 95th year. Predeceased by her husband Alexander RIDDELL (March 16, 1986.) Beloved mother of Allan RIDDELL (Linda) of Brownsville, Margaret HOLLISTER (Robert) of Tillsonburg. Proud grandmother of Jeffrey RIDDELL, Bradley RIDDELL and Kathryn RIDDELL. Also survived by 4 great-grandchildren. Resting at Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg. For complete service in the chapel on Monday, October 17, 2005 at 3 p.m. conducted by Reverend Huyk CHO of Brownsville United Church. Interment Pond Mills Cemetery, London. Visitation from 1: 30 p.m. Monday October 17, 2005 until time of service. Donations to Brownsville United Church or Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated (payable by cheque).

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CHO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-01 published
CHO- CHUNG- HING, Ruby Winnifred
At William Osler Health Centre, Etobicoke Site, on Saturday, July 30, 2005. Ruby CHIN, dearly beloved wife of the late Henry CHO- CHUNG- HING. Beloved mother of Claude CHO, Brenda (Winchoy) CHO-CHUNG-HING, Frank and his wife Valerie CHO- CHUNG- HING, Alfred and his wife Marcia CHO- CHUNG- HING, and Mary CHOW. Loving grandmother of Brian and his wife Heather, Lorraine and her husband James, Richard and Bernard and his wife Rania. Dear sister of Albert CHIN. Fondly remembered by her many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. Resting at the Newediuk Funeral Home, Kipling Chapel, 2104 Kipling Ave., Etobicoke (two blocks north of Rexdale Blvd.) from Monday 2 p.m. Funeral Tuesday from St. Hugh and St. Edmond Church, 7314 Goreway Dr., Malton, at 11 a.m. Interment Glendale Memorial Gardens. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated. (The family will receive their Friends in the funeral home Monday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and at St. Hugh and St. Edmond Church on Tuesday from 10 a.m. until service time).

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CHOAT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-26 published
FRACZKOWSKI, Sally " Sabina"
Passed away peacefully at Credit Valley Hospital on Friday, February 25, 2005 at the age of 78. Beloved wife of the late Stefan. Much loved mother of Stephen and his wife Lynne, Karen, Laurel and her husband John CHOAT. Loving " Grandma" of Heather and Matthew and "Bobbi" of Adam, Alex, Tracey, David, and Michael. Dear sister of Jean PETERS, Mike RAWSKI and his wife Ursula, and aunt of Eleanor, Diane, Sarah, Jim and Christine. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane subway on Saturday from 7-9 p.m., and Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Monday, February 28, 2005 at 2: 30 p.m. Private interment Sanctuary Park Cemetery.

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CHOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-02 published
BURROUGHS, Huguette
After an inspiring life of devotion, courage and compassion, Huguette died peacefully surrounded by her family and Friends at the Ottawa Hospital (General Campus), on Thursday, March 31, 2005. She was the daughter of Eugène BURROUGHS and Aurare BRABANT, dear sister of Charles BURROUGHS (Ginette) of Ottawa and Yvan BURROUGHS of l'Orignal, beloved aunt of Line (RICHER) and great aunt of Samuel and Vincent RICHER all of Ottawa. Huguette valued life and the talents with which she was gifted and she also accepted with serenity and resolve the great physical challenges which she had to overcome. Despite total blindness, she was for almost 25 years the journalist who put out the entire weekly edition of her community's French language weekly, Le Journal de Cornwall. This followed upon many years as a journalist with the then French language radio station, CFML. She was a passionate Franco-Ontarian who cherished her language and her heritage. She always sought to honour and enrich that heritage. In this spirit she was instrumental in establishing Cornwall's French language community radio station, CHOD-FM. She was a devoted member of the governing bodies of many organizations including the Cornwall Community Hospital, the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Legal Clinic and Big Brothers and Big Sisters. Her many achievements were recognized with a number of provincial and national awards including the Order of Ontario, the highest honour which our province can bestow, and l'Ordre des francophones d'Amérique. Her crowning achievement was to be honoured with the trust of her beloved community and elected as City Councillor, despite suffering an amputation and requiring dialysis. She carried out her role conscientiously and lovingly. Huguette had an abiding and deep faith and a Mass of Christian Burial officiated by her good friend Reverend René DUBÉ will be celebrated on Monday, April 4, 2005 in the Nativity Co-Cathedral at 2 p.m., followed by cremation. The family will welcome her Friends from 2 to 5 p.m. and from 7 to 10 p.m. Sunday, April 3 and from 11 a.m. until 1: 30 p.m. on Monday, April 4 at the Lahaie and Sullivan Cornwall Funeral Homes, Each Branch, 614 First Street East (613-933-2841). As expressions of sympathy, donations in her memory to the Cornwall Commmunity Hospital Foundation, the great endeavour of the community which she loved dearly and which loved her in return, would be deeply appreciated.

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CHOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-28 published
Huguette BURROUGHS, Reporter, Politician: 1949-2005
Born with a form of glaucoma, she never allowed problems to cloud her ambitions, writes Sandra MARTIN. A brave Francophone voice in an overwhelmingly English media, she single-mindedly overcame all obstacles
By Sandra MARTIN, Thursday, April 28, 2005, Page S7
Lots of journalists switch from covering politicians to holding office, but few overcome more obstacles or embrace public service with such fervour as Huguette BURROUGHS. Blind, with one leg amputated because of diabetes and requiring dialysis three times a week, Ms. BURROUGHS was revered in Eastern Ontario for her spirit, her outreach and her accomplishments.
"She had a tough childhood, but she blossomed in later life," said Etienne SAINT- AUBIN, a Franco-Ontarian lawyer, who met Ms. BURROUGHS in 1987, shortly after he left the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney-General in Toronto to move to Cornwall, Ontario, so he could work in a legal aid clinic.
At the time, Ms. BURROUGHS was the sole reporter for the French language weekly Le Journal de Cornwall. Mr. SAINT- AUBIN met her when he put an ad in the paper and saw her peering at her typewriter about an inch away from the keys. She had an original way of putting things and was able to get to the quick of the matter very well, he said, but she wasn't a muckraker. Instead, she preferred to present information in a straightforward way that let people make up their own minds.
For nearly 30 years, Ms. BURROUGHS was first a radio and then a print journalist for francophone media outlets. And when her health deteriorated to the point where she could no longer cover municipal politics, she ran for city council and served her community from the other side of the microphone and the podium.
Huguette BURROUGHS was born July 16, 1949, in L'Original, a village between Ottawa and Hawkesbury, the middle child and only daughter of Eugene and Aurore BRABANT. Her father was a seasonal construction worker, toiling as a dynamite handler for highway crews, and her mother was a homemaker. Huguette and her younger brother Yvan were born with a degenerative form of glaucoma. Huguette was luckier than her younger brother, retaining some vision until she went blind at 32.
Her problems never clouded her ambition. "I was always wearing heavy glasses," she said in an interview in The Cornwall Standard-Freeholder in 1999, so I was always the last to be picked for any type of game." Instead of moping, she kept score or wrote reports, and determined to excel academically.
"Her childhood was mortgaged by the thought that she would eventually go blind, so she used the time to soak up as much reading as she could because she wanted to be a journalist," said her friend Etienne SAINT- AUBIN. Her brother Charles, an editor for Le Droit in Ottawa, remembers his younger sister writing poetry as small girl and, when she was in high school, producing a column on local events for Le Carillon, a weekly in Hawkesbury.
When Huguette was in Grade 9, she read Jane S. McIlvaine's novel It Happens Every Thursday, about a couple of journalists who decide to flee their cramped New York apartment and start a weekly newspaper in a small town. The book was subsequently made into a film starring Loretta Young, John Forsythe and Bob MacAvoy. Although neither the novel nor the film is memorable, Huguette never forgot these lines in the text: "If, despite all obstacles, you want to do one thing more than anything else in the world, go ahead. You will certainly succeed."
She kept those words as a personal motto. She wanted to work on the high-school newspaper, but was rejected on the grounds that this activity was reserved for kids in senior grades. So she wrote a letter to the editor saying that "my grandfather fought in the war so we could avoid discrimination and here I was facing it in my own school." Point taken. Huguette became the first Grade 9 student to work as a reporter on the school paper. And when she graduated, she quoted that same passage from It Happens Every Thursday as the theme in her valedictorian's speech.
There was a price for all of this single-mindedness. "I had practically no Friends," she confessed to the Standard Freeholder. After high school, she got a job with CFML, a French language radio station in Cornwall. She showed up for work in September of 1967 and loved the job so much she worked 11-hour days, from 6 a.m. until 5 p.m., covering the police and fire beats and translating documents -- and all for $45 a week.
She worked at the radio station for 11 years until the ownership changed in 1978. By then, she was 29 and her eyesight was declining rapidly. Nevertheless, she switched from broadcast to print, taking a job as news editor at Le Journal de Cornwall.
"She was a very hard worker, and I'm sure she could have spent 24 hours a day working, which she probably did sometimes," the paper's general manager, Roger DUPLANTIE, said later. "She never considered the work she did as a job. It was something she loved and she believed in very strongly."
All of her hard work paid off in a number of French-language awards for editorial writing. "For the longest time, she basically did the paper herself," said her brother, "writing everything that got in the paper -- editorials, news, features. They had a translation business on the side and she would do that, too and I don't think she ever made more than $400 a week."
At the same time as she was working more than fulltime on the newspaper, she wrote La radio malgré tout (radio or nothing), a history of CFML and its impact on the cultural and economic landscape of Cornwall.
She never learned Braille because she could see enough as a child to read on her own. By the time she went blind, she listened to books on tape and used a computer with a voice synthesizer. Self-effacing to the core, Ms. BURROUGHS always said that she was lucky because by the time she needed it, computer technology was advanced enough to scan written text and produce an audio read-out.
An excellent typist, she used a tape recorder like a note book, memorized the sounds of hundreds of voices and relied on her prodigious memory and ferocious energy to overcome her disabilities. Cornwall Mayor Phil POIRIER said "she was probably the best reporter I ever worked with. She was fair, she was objective, not subjective, she did her homework and you couldn't trip her up." When it came to budget deliberations, he said Ms. BURROUGHS knew "as much if not more" than elected officials.
According to Mr. SAINT- AUBIN, she also served as an unofficial community scribe for Franco-Ontarians who needed help with application forms and official letters. "We came to expect so much of her that we would forget she was blind," he said. "She was blessed with work habits that overcame her limitations."
She never married and had no children. Instead of family, she worked as a super-heated volunteer for organizations such as Big Brothers/Big Sisters, United Way and Legal Aid. She was instrumental in establishing CHOD-FM, Cornwall's French-language radio station. In 1992, she was named a woman of distinction in Ontario; in 1994, she was profiled in an National Film Board of Canada documentary series on francophones who were helping to preserve their linguistic culture. In 1996, she received the Order of Ontario.
Her health continued to plague her. She developed diabetes and had trouble keeping it under control. In 1999, she had to have a leg amputated and undergo dialysis three times a week to supplement her faltering kidneys. She was in hospital and then at a rehabilitation facility for six months. Afterward, according to her brother, she defied the pronouncements of health-care workers and insisted on moving back into her own apartment. "She had a very close circle of Friends and they helped her a lot."
Two years later, she reluctantly gave up journalism and plied her skills in a new forum -- municipal politics. Instead of covering city hall, she ran for office in the election in November of 2003 and finished fifth among 23 candidates for 10 seats on Cornwall City Council. "Vision isn't just about eyesight," she wrote in one of her flyers. "It comes from experience. It comes from the heart, and my heart is filled with respect and love for this community and its kind and good people who deserve the best."
And that's what she provided, maintaining a perfect attendance record for council meetings in 2004, taking her laptop computer with her to help follow documents that were being debated. "It was the highlight of her life and her career" to be given the mandate to represent the people of Cornwall at city council said Mr. POIRIER. " She did more than most people, who are strong and healthy, and you'd never hear her complain about anything -- not the weather, not her political opponents."
She continued to support her constituents until she collapsed in late March and was taken unconscious to an Ottawa hospital.
Huguette BURROUGHS was born July 16, 1949, in L'Original, Ontario She died on March 31 of complications from diabetes. She was 55. She is survived by her older brother, Charles, and his family and her younger brother, Yvan.

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CHODOROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-02 published
MARCUS, Margaret
On Saturday, January 29, 2005 at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto in her 97th year. Margaret MARCUS, beloved wife of the late Julius MARCUS. Devoted mother and mother-in-law of Anita MARCUS and Charlotte and Sam PRICE. Dear sister of Lil CHODOROW and the late Sidney WOLFE, Ralph WOLFE and Aubie WOLFE. Loving grandmother of Judi PRICE- ROSEN and Kevin ROSEN and Barbi and Jared GREEN. Adoring great-grandmother of Miranda GREEN. Funeral took place at Steeles Memorial Chapel on Monday, January 31. Shiva at 400 Walmer Road, East Tower, Apartment 621 from 2 p.m. daily. If desired, donations can be made to the Baycrest Centre Julius and Margaret Marcus Endowment Fund, 416-785-2875.

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CHODOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-04 published
COOMBS, Elizabeth
On Wednesday, November 2, 2005. Beloved wife to Henry of 65 years. Loving mother to Marge TURNER (Mike CHODOS,) and Phil (Dorothy.) Cherished grandmother to Philip, Lynn, and Michael. Great-grandmother to 7 great-grandchildren. Visitation at Andrews Community Funeral Centre, 8190 Dixie Road, Brampton (north of Steeles Ave.), 905-456-8190, on Friday, November 4, 2005 from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Christ Church (4 Elizabeth Street, Brampton), on Saturday, November 5, 2005 at 11 a.m.

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CHOFFE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-05 published
PAOLUCCI, Margaret (née CHOFFE)
Peacefully in her sleep at York Central Hospital on Tuesday, May 3, 2005. Beloved wife of Benny. Loving mother of Nick (Tania), Vincent and Chuck. Grandmother of Jensen and Eric. Sister of Teresa, Alex and Chuck. Predeceased by brothers Andy, Louie, Domenic, Bill, Joe, Danny and sisters May and Anita. Friends may call at The Marshall Funeral Home, 10366 Yonge Street, Richmond Hill (4th traffic light north of Major Mackenzie Dr.) on Friday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Memorial Service Saturday 11 a.m. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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CHOFFE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-29 published
CIOLFE, Alex " Butch"
Passed away peacefully on Tuesday, September 27, 2005. Husband and best friend of Greta for 54 years. Cherished father of Lorraine MOORE and husband Bob and Alex CIOLFE. Proud grandfather of Ryan and his wife Leslie, Dayna and her friend Steve, Stephen and Daniel. Survived by his sister Theresa HAMILTON and brother Chuck CHOFFE. Alex's family will receive relatives and Friends on Friday, September 30, 2005 from 7-9 p.m. and Saturday, October 1, 2005 from 12 noon till 12: 45 p.m. at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener (519-749-8467). A memorial service will follow in the chapel of the funeral home at 1 p.m. Interment at Memory Gardens. Reception to follow. As expression of sympathy, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family (cards available at the funeral home).

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-11 published
SHONIKER, Rita Ann (née WINTERMEYER)
L.H.S. passed away peacefully with her children, sisters, nephews and grandchildren at her side, on Saturday, July 9th, 2005, at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, in her 86th year, after a valiant and courageous battle with cancer. She was predeceased by her loving and devoted husband, Edward James SHONIKER, parents Alfred and Caroline WINTERMEYER and her brother the Honourable John J. WINTERMEYER. " Mom" will be forever in the hearts of her children Jim (Barbara), Linda (Ellen), Peter (Renée) and Paul (Julia). "Nana" will be greatly missed by her six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. She leaves her loving and devoted sisters Mary (the late Malachi Edward QUIGLEY,) Lucy (the late Thomas Henry QUIGLEY,) Elizabeth (Betty) (the late William Shaughnessy BRENNAN), Therese (Dr. James WILEY) and thirty-one nieces and nephews, their spouses and children. The family would like to express its most heartfelt gratitude to John KING (Executive Vice-President St. Michael's Hospital,) Doctors Rashida HAQ, Victor HOFFSTEIN, Dory ABOSH, Lloyd CARLSEN, Jerry ZOWNIR, John MAROTTA, Ted QUIGLEY, James CHOI, and the palliative care nurses who have cared for mother throughout her battle with cancer. Friends and family were invited to pay their respects at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (south of Wellesley), on Sunday, July 10, 2005 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Parking adjacent to the funeral home. A Roman Catholic Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church (78 Clifton Road -- one block west of Mount Pleasant Road on the north side of St. Clair Avenue East,) on Monday, July 11, 2005 at 2 p.m., where the SHONIKER family have been parishioners for over fifty years. Interment will follow thereafter at Mount Hope Cemetery -- 305 Erskine Avenue (east from Mount Pleasant, one light north of Broadway Avenue). Flowers gratefully declined. The family's most sincere wish is for donations to be made in Rita's memory to "2 Queen Oncology Unit" at St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8.

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-14 published
Viceroy praises murder victim
By Paul CHOI, Wednesday, September 14, 2005, Page A15
Lieutenant-Governor James BARTLEMAN said yesterday that two brief encounters with a homeless man who was beaten to death last month "enriched" his life.
Mr. BARTLEMAN joined more than 100 people at the Salvation Army Gateway to remember Paul CROUTCH, 59, who died on August 31 after suffering a beating while sleeping on a bench in Moss Park in Toronto.
Three reservists have since been charged in his death.
"He was an individual with a unique sense of dignity, whose life we have come together to commemorate," Mr. BARTLEMAN said in a speech at the funeral. "He was a man with accomplishments in his life, with Friends, and was someone who touched the lives of many."
His connection with Mr. CROUTCH began a few years ago, when he took part in a breakfast run conducted by the Salvation Army, Mr. BARTLEMAN said. He said he offered Mr. CROUTCH coffee after spotting him sleeping on a bench and they struck up a conversation.
"We talked for a few minutes. He told me he had been a newspaper editor in a small community in northern British Columbia, and had been living on the streets of Toronto for years," he said.
"I had the pleasure of meeting him again elsewhere. He was always well-spoken, obviously a person who was celebrated and very likable. I remember after that first morning, I told my wife when I went home that I had met a really remarkable person. He enriched my life from those brief encounters."
Yesterday, Friends and family of Mr. CROUTCH remembered the man with stories of his "healthy" days -- before paranoid thoughts pushed him to the streets.
"He was entrepreneurial, he had successes in his chosen professions," said Don HARRIS, director of the Good Neighbours' Club, a drop-in centre where Mr. CROUTCH would take showers and rest. "But slowly his illness began to overtake his logic... until finally he had to be on his own."
Gary McCRIMMON, a worker at the centre, said Mr. CROUTCH was a bit of a "loner" who never caused any trouble while he ate his meals and did his laundry.
"He was a quiet guy who mostly kept to himself," Mr. McCRIMMON said. "He was easygoing, very smart, and very opinionated. But much of his time was consumed by thoughts of paranoia toward those he believed wronged him."
At the service, Marilyn HOWARD, who was married to Mr. CROUTCH for 25 years, said he was a loving father who lived a "really good life" until his mental illness began to consume him.
"Unfortunately, he refused help at every turn," said Ms. HOWARD, who urged people to treat the problems of homelessness and mental illness more seriously.
"We need to talk about these [mental health issues]," she said. "We shouldn't pretend we don't see these people. Look them in the eye and say 'hello.' Just try to elevate people's lives. One person can make a difference."

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-06 published
Teen struck by three cars after getting off Toronto Transit Commission bus
By Paul CHOI, Thursday, October 6, 2005, Page A15
A 15-year-old girl who ran across the road in front of a Toronto Transit Commission bus was killed when three passing cars struck her Tuesday night.
At about 7: 30, the girl disembarked the Toronto Transit Commission bus, which was travelling north on Danforth Road at the intersection with Linden Avenue, police said.
She ran across the front of the bus and into the northbound passing lane of Danforth Road and was struck immediately, police said.
She came to rest in the left lane of southbound Danforth Road and was hit by two more cars, officers said.
Sohada KABIR died of her injuries a couple of hours later.

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-08 published
STARKMAN, Willy -- Dispatch:
By Paul CHOI, Saturday, October 8, 2005, Page M4
For 55 years, Willy STARKMAN stood tirelessly behind the counter at Sunnyside Hardware in Parkdale. And for 55 years, Mr. STARKMAN's booming laugh and generous spirit made him a local celebrity in the neighbourhood.
"He was a real character. He loved people, he really did," says his son, Randy.
Born in 1928 in Toronto, Mr. STARKMAN set up his small, old-fashioned hardware shop on Queen Street West in 1950 shortly before marrying his wife, Estelle, in 1956. Devoted to his business and supporting his family, Mr. STARKMAN worked six days a week, rising at 4 a.m. to take his daily one-hour walks even into his 70s.
Over the years, as looming big-box stores forced the closing of many small hardware shops, Mr. STARKMAN's local business continued to stay open. Sunnyside Hardware's longevity was a testament not to its relatively small inventory of nails and paint, but rather, to the man who owned it, his son says.
"He did all the little things for certain customers. He had a tiny little fridge in his store, and he'd keep a Pepsi just for one customer or he'd keep an apple juice for another customer," Randy says. "Sometimes he would get some little thing they needed and it would end up costing him money to get the thing, but just for customer service, he would go and do it. He loved what he did."
On top of his generosity, Mr. STARKMAN's sharp humour and blunt honesty helped him win many Friends among his customers. Randy recalls when his father would hold court in the store, talking with three or four people at a time about politics and other topics. He would always playfully joke with them, often giving customers nicknames such as "Big Shooter."
"Our dad could always put a smile on anybody's face," says Mr. STARKMAN's son, Laurie. "He was the kibitzing king, an Olympic champion at needling."

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-15 published
KAPLUN, Lillian -- Dispatch
By Paul CHOI, Saturday, October 15, 2005, Page M6
Lillian KAPLUN was a woman well ahead of her time.
As an ardent supporter of women's rights, Ms. KAPLUN used her love of baking to break the prevalent gender roles of the 1950s and 60s, becoming a businesswoman, writer and teacher.
"For her time, she was a forward-thinking person," said her daughter Jill, 59. "She wasn't satisfied with being a housewife who was invisible. She was driven to do something, to have a career, to distinguish herself."
Born in Englehart, Ontario, in 1909, Ms. KAPLUN was raised by her Russian immigrant parents to be an independent person. Using her knowledge and expertise in scientific baking techniques, Ms. KAPLUN began a small bun factory in Vancouver after marrying her late husband, Hyman, in 1937.
After moving to Toronto in the 1950s, Ms. KAPLUN began imparting her baking knowledge to women in her small Bathurst Street apartment, setting up makeshift classrooms there three nights a week. During the 1960s, Ms. KAPLUN took the classes out of her apartment and set up a cooking school on Eglinton Avenue. The ambitious mother of two also became an author, publishing several how-to books on baking.
In Ms. KAPLUN's later years, her spirit never waned as she fought off breast cancer, endured a brain aneurysm and recovered from two hip replacements. Even up to her death on September 19, at the age of 96, Ms. KAPLUN continued to fiercely abide by her strong feminist ideals.
"She was just an incredible fan of women. She wanted women to succeed," her daughter said. "She always said that if the world were run by women, we wouldn't be in the pickle we are in now. She was always 10 years ahead of her time."

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-21 published
CHOI, Jung-Yul
Passed away on Sunday, September 18th, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Loving wife of Kyu-Chan for 58 years and mother of 7 children and 13 grandchildren. Visitation at Jerrett Funeral Home, 6191 Yonge Street, North York on Wednesday from 2-5 p.m. Funeral Mass 12: 30 p.m. Thursday, September 22 at St. Andrew Kym Korean Catholic Church, 849 Don Mills Rd., North York.

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-24 published
3 arrests after tips about fatal stabbing near bar
By Paul CHOI, Staff Reporter
Peel Region police have made three arrests after an argument outside a Brampton bar led to a 28-year-old man apparently being stabbed to death by a stranger.
But police say one suspect in the Friday slaying is still at large.
At about 8 p.m. Friday, Paul MEDEIROS, of Brampton, was in the parking lot of a bar near Clarence and Centre Sts. when he became involved in a verbal dispute with a man he didn't know, police said.
After heated words, one man left the scene, but returned a short time later with two other men. As MEDEIROS and the suspect continued their argument, another man came up behind MEDEIROS and stabbed him, investigators said. He later died at William Osler Health Centre.
witnesses: told police three men were seen fleeing the scene.
"It's a pretty unusual occurrence, considering these people aren't believed to have been known to each other," said Constable Kathy WEYLIE, of Peel Region police.
Yesterday, after homicide investigators received tips from the public, officers arrested two men and a woman.
The two men are charged with first-degree murder and the woman with being an accessory to murder.
Peel police are still looking for a third man.
Police don't know what caused the original quarrel between the two men, but officers say the incident is unusual because it wasn't a dispute that started inside the bar and spilled onto the streets.
The two men, police said, were complete strangers passing each other outside.
"The suspects weren't patrons in the bar," WEYLIE said. "This didn't happen in the bar. And the original dispute that started with the one suspect, he was just passing by."
Sheldon KEOUGH, 19, of Mississauga, and Christopher BROWNE, 22, of Brampton, have been charged with first-degree murder. Erin BOTELHO, 35, of Brampton, has been charged with being an accessory to murder.
All three suspects appeared in court yesterday for a bail hearing and were remanded in custody.

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-24 published
83-year-old hit-and-run victim dies
Dad of ex-Tory minister killed on crosswalk
'Sad time' for family of David TSUBOUCHI
By Paul CHOI, Staff Reporter
David TSUBOUCHI says he's not angered with the way his 83-year-old father died.
The victim of a hit-and-run Friday morning, Thomas TSUBOUCHI suffered massive internal injuries to the head and torso after a car hit him on a marked crosswalk near Huntingwood Dr. and Brimley Rd. TSUBOUCHI succumbed to his injuries in the presence of grieving relatives at Sunnybrook hospital about 4 p.m. yesterday.
David TSUBOUCHI, Ontario's former solicitor-general and a former provincial Conservative cabinet minister, says his family is not bitter, just saddened by the loss.
"We're not people who get angry," he said. "We don't go out and say, 'We need to have vengeance.' But it's a pretty sad time for all of us right now."
There had been a glimmer of hope Saturday for the family when doctors said the elder TSUBOUCHI's condition appeared to stabilize after surgery, even though he remained in a coma.
But later, doctors said TSUBOUCHI's condition worsened and his internal systems appeared to be shutting down.
"It's not for (lack) of trying. These are the best doctors for trauma in this country. And I know for a fact they've done everything they could for my father," David TSUBOUCHI said. "But no matter how much you do expect it, you don't expect it."
Yesterday, police continued to urge the driver of the vehicle to turn himself in.
"Basically, what we've been saying all along to the driver is to look for a lawyer and surrender (yourself)," said Sgt. Edmund WONG of traffic services.
Investigators are looking at surveillance footage that shows a car hitting a pedestrian. Police are looking for a light-coloured vehicle that may have a damaged hood and windshield.
Meanwhile, TSUBOUCHI said he is disturbed by the number of hit-and-runs taking place on Toronto's streets. He said drivers should be taking more responsibility for their actions.
On Thursday, an 87-year-old woman was struck and killed while she crossed Wilson Ave. near Bathurst St. On Friday, an unidentified pedestrian suffered serious injuries after being hit by a car at Scarlett Rd. near Kingdom St. The driver fled the scene and the pedestrian has since fallen into a coma.
"There's too much of this going on," TSUBOUCHI said. "The real tragedy in this is that someone hits an elderly man and drags him for 70 or 90 feet and leaves him to die on the street. That's the crime."
Saddened as he was by his father's death, TSUBOUCHI said he and his family would try to move on and remember the legacy his dad left behind.
A Japanese immigrant, the senior TSUBOUCHI came to Canada and worked two jobs to support his family, even in the face of immense prejudice, TSUBOUCHI said.

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CHOI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-24 published
Crash kills 3 kids, mother
'She wasn't supposed to go,' 10-year-old's grieving aunt says
By Peter EDWARDS, Staff Reporter, Page A1
Hamilton -- Ten-year-old Emily PORTO loved to watch her cousin Francesco play hockey, and begged to watch his game on Thursday night, even though it would mean staying up a little late.
Emily's mother relented, and so Emily went to 13-year-old Francesco's elite-level game in Guelph with Francesco, his mother, Vivian PORTO, 43, and his sister, 10-year-old Azzidene.
They were all killed in a two-vehicle collision around 10: 45 p.m. Thursday along a deadly stretch of Highway 6, north of Parkside Dr.
Four people in a sport utility vehicle that collided with the PORTO minivan suffered potentially life-threatening injuries. Their identities have not been released, but they are a 40-year-old Cambridge man, who was driving, and a 38-year-old Cambridge woman and the man's 17-year-old son and 14-year-old daughter from Perth. They are all in serious condition in area hospitals.
Police blame bad weather for the collision.
"She wasn't supposed to go," Emily's aunt Lisa ULRICH said yesterday in an interview at Emily's home. "Emily got very excited about attending. She begged her mother to go. The cousins are very, very close."
Hanging behind her in the family garage was a wall of sports equipment for Emily and her family.
Their mother, Vivian, loved being a hockey mom, even though Francesco's membership on the triple-A elite level minor bantam Hamilton Junior Bulldogs meant several nights a week on the road.
When not caring for her four children -- including older boys Amadeo and Riccardo, who also play hockey -- Vivian PORTO ran three fabric stores.
"There was never any doubt that her commitment was to the children," ULRICH said. "It was hockey, hockey, hockey. She was a hockey mom."
Other family members were also devastated by the accident.
Emily's brother Gabriel, 3, still hadn't been told about her death yesterday.
Emily and Gabriel were thrilled earlier this month when they got to sit on the knee of Santa in a mall near their home, their grandmother Diana BORDONARO said.
BORDONARO stared at Emily's bicycle in disbelief, then said she loved to show pictures of Emily and her wide, distinctive smile to everyone she knew.
"She had a dimple on one cheek.... I bragged about her to everyone," her grandmother cried. "... I can't imagine this...
"I just took them to see Santa. It was wonderful."
BORDONARO said she doesn't know how to break the news to Gabriel, who's excited about Christmas.
"He never called her Emily," she said. "It was 'sister'... She became a little mother to him. She protected him."
Several people witnessed the accident near the intersection with Highway 5, including other members of the Junior Bulldogs and their parents.
Highway 6 has caught the attention of the regional coroner, Dr. David EDEN.
"We're very concerned about this and we'll look at an inquiry, but we're a long way from making that decision," EDEN said. "I travel that road and it's a very busy stretch of road."
The 24-kilometre stretch of road linking Highways 403 and 401 has been the scene of at least 20 fatal accidents since the early 1990s.
Residents and police blame a lack of barriers between the north and southbound lanes as well as the absence of snow fences to block snow drifts that blow in from surrounding open fields.
"The roads were generally good," said Ontario Provincial Police Sgt. Cam WOOLLEY. " However, during the evening winds had picked up and there was blowing snow that had drifted along Highway 6. When (the victim's) van hit the snowdrift she lost control.
"She ended up in the northbound lanes sideways and into the path of the Blazer. Both vehicles were believed to be doing the speed limit of 80 km/h. So it was not survivable.
"The minivan was hit broadside and then pushed back into the guardrail."
Hamilton Jr. Bulldogs president Frank CASALE said he first heard of the accident at 8 yesterday morning and immediately set out to get grief counsellors for the team.
"I couldn't believe it," CASALE said. "We're all in shock. The team, the coaches, the executives are all grieving. He (Francesco) was a wonderful kid, a good hockey player."
Francesco's and Azzidene's dad and Vivian's husband, Sam, is a trainer on another of their teams where he has another son playing, CASALE said.
"I just don't know how he is coping with it all," CASALE said.
The funeral for all four PORTO family members will be 10: 30 a.m. Wednesday at Saint Margaret Mary Church. Funeral arrangements are being handled by the Friscolanti Funeral Chapel.
With files from Paul CHOI, Lois KALCHMAN and The Hamilton Spectator

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CHOINIERE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-26 published
GREENE, William " Bill" George (1920-2005)
P.Eng. (Queen's 1949) S.A.E. Royal Canadian Air Force
Suddenly at his residence in West Brome, Québec in his 85th year. Survived by the mother of his children Ruby Mary O'NEILL, his sister Dorothy Mary KING of Saint John's, Newfoundland. Predeceased by his brother Randal and parents William Hackett GREENE and Elsie Dorothy HUNT. Very proud and devoted father of 7 children Mary (Doug ADAM/ADAMS) (Oakville, Ontario); Bill Jr. (Rosalind WILLIAMS) (Armstrong, British Columbia); Margaret (Sutton, Québec); Randal (Bolton, Ontario), Cathy (St. Louis, Missouri); Theresa (Sutton, Québec;) and Vincent (Marleen OGILVIE) (St. Bruno, Québec;) and revered grandfather of Krystina, Mark and Stephen POLUDNIKIEWICZ, Andrew and James GREENE- TASSE, Emily and Abigail CHOINIERE, Miranda and Joshua OGILVIE- GREENE, and Connor ADAM/ADAMS. Great grandfather to Aaron and Dillon LEON. Uncle to Rosemarie and Marianna KING. Bill was a lifelong Bell Canada employee (34 years), member of the Bell Pioneer Association and retired in 1983. He was a devout Catholic and a creative man who raised his children to believe that there was nothing they could not do with "creativity and a bit of elbow grease". Special thanks for all the assistance provided by many Friends over the years, especially Georges LAPLANTE. Family and Friends will be warmly received at Desourdy Wilson Funeral Home, 104 Buzzell Street, Cowansville, Québec, on January 25 from 7-9 p.m. and January 26 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. Rose-de-Lima Church, 605 Main Street, Cowansville, Québec on Thursday, January 27th at 11 a.m. Reception to follow. Donations can be made in his name to the Brome Mississquoi Perkins Hospital, 950 Main Street, Cowansville, Québec.

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CHOJNACKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-30 published
CHOJNACKI, Janina
Peacefully, in her 100th year, at Copernicus Lodge on Saturday, May 28th, 2005. Cherished mother of Mieczyslaw and his wife Maria, Irena KUS- LACH of Montreal and late Edward and Julian. Janina will be dearly missed by many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and one great-great grand_son. Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Funeral Home, 436 Roncesvalles Avenue (at Howard Park) on Tuesday from 4-8 p.m. Rosary Prayers at 6 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at St. Casimir's Church, 156 Roncesvalles Avenue, on Wednesday, June 1st, 2005 at 9 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, remembrances may be made to Copernicus Lodge.

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CHOJNACKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-29 published
CHOJNACKI, Janina
Peacefully, in her 100th year, at Copernicus Lodge on Saturday, May 28th, 2005. Cherished mother of Mieczyslaw and his wife Maria, Irena KUS- LACH of Montreal and the late Edward and Julian. Janina will be dearly missed by many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and one great-great-grand_son. Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Funeral Home, 436 Roncesvalles Ave. (at Howard Park) on Tuesday from 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at St. Casimir's Church, 156 Roncesvalles Ave., on Wednesday, June 1st, 2005, time to be determined. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, remembrances may be made to Copernicus Lodge.

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CHOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-15 published
Frank STALLEY, Broadcaster: 1924-2005
Television pioneer who lost the power of speech during a boyhood bout of Bell's palsy was one of the first Canadian Broadcasting Corporation anchors on The National, writes Sandra MARTIN. He later became a network executive
By Sandra MARTIN, Tuesday, March 15, 2005 Page S7
Long-time Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television broadcaster Frank STALLEY was a co-host with Anna Cameron on Open House, the precursor to Take Thirty, and an anchor and newsreader on the nightly news before moving from behind the cameras to a series of management jobs in London and across Canada.
Francis (Frank) Palmer STALLEY was born in Stratford, Ontario, the only child of Frank and Sarah Frances STALLEY. By the time he was 4, his parents realized that he had a natural aptitude for music. For the next 17 years, he trained to be a concert pianist and performed in recitals on radio and in local venues, winning many awards and scholarships. He studied piano at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and later at the Royal Schools of Music in London.
His musical training was interrupted in the mid-1930s when he was struck simultaneously with polio (then called infantile paralysis), which left him unable to walk, and Bell's palsy (trauma to the seventh cranial nerve), which deprived him of speech. To regain the ability to walk, he took swimming lessons and practised hard to regain the ability to talk, he spent hours speaking with a pencil between his teeth. A biographical sketch written for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1959 says Mr. STALLEY's "speech recovery was extremely difficult and even now... he has to consciously form each word before speaking."
He tried to enlist in the Royal Canadian Navy during the Second World War but was rejected the first time because he was too young and the second time because he was suffering from mastoiditis, a condition that left him with diminished hearing in one ear.
So, in 1944, the 20-year-old Mr. STALLEY found a position as supervisor of elementary school music in Ontario's Bruce County. A year was enough to persuade him to seek his fortunes elsewhere. Through a mix of ingenuity and happenstance -- a neighbour offered him a job -- he found himself the "announcer-operator-news editor-commercial writer and technician" at CJCS in Stratford, Ontario Apparently, he also swept out the place at night.
A year later, he switched to CFCH in North Bay and a job as staff announcer. Even though he was promoted to chief announcer in 1947, he moved to KVER in Albuquerque, N.M., and a dual position as news editor and newscaster. Moving up meant moving around, or so he thought, as he headed for Los Angeles, where he was reduced to washing dishes, or "pearl diving" in the slang of the time. He found some success as a freelance announcer and as a writer of scripts for classical music programs. In 1948, he moved to San Francisco, where he stayed until the Korean War broke out. He then headed back to radio station CHOK in Sarnia, this time as program manager, a position he held until he went to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as an announcer in 1954.
He was a regular anchor on The National news, along with Larry Henderson and Rex Loring. Broadcaster Patrick WATSON remembers directing him as a newsreader when "I was a new boy and he a staff announcer, and that he was helpful and courteous and good at his job."
Broadcaster Vincent Tovell also remembers him from the early 1960s. "My memory of him is totally positive. He was easy, pleasant, very efficient, all of those nice things. Television was live and you had to be cool."
Among many other assignments during the 1950s and 1960s, Mr. STALLEY was the co-host of the first women's program, Open House, with broadcaster Anna Cameron. She remembers him as "a very nice and gracious man" who played the piano, sometimes even on the show.
Actor and broadcaster Paul SOLES, who co-hosted Take 30, the successor to Open House, first with Ms. Cameron and then with Adrienne Clarkson, says Mr. STALLEY "had a light, genuine, engaging manner and voice."
As a neophyte performer on television, Mr. SOLES looked on announcers such as Mr. STALLEY as "the standard setters" for the use of language and phrasing. "I recall his calm, often wry, welcoming and gentleness" as a host, and his "quiet formality."
After only a decade before the cameras, Mr. STALLEY "moved up the line" into administration, working first in Ottawa as executive assistant to Charles Jennings, the vice-president of regional broadcasting. That's where he met and married Sarah GRANT, his wife of nearly 40 years. "He was a wonderful, intelligent, humorous, caring individual," she said.
In 1968, he was posted to Vancouver as director of radio for British Columbia, and then to London as the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's radio and television program representative. "He loved that," said Mrs. STALLEY. " His family had come from England and he had spent a lot of time there with his parents in his youth. Living in London in the '70s was the time to be there."
After London, he was given the choice of moving to Toronto or Halifax; he chose the latter partly because his wife's family came from there and partly because he wanted a quieter posting as he headed toward retirement. He stepped down from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation at the age of 63 in 1987. In retirement, travel, music and his membership in the Presbyterian church became big interests.
In the past decade, he survived three serious illnesses -- bacterial meningitis, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and a pulmonary embolism. "We thought he would always survive everything," his wife said last week. Then shortly before Christmas, he developed an unusual and aggressive type of lung cancer. Not even he could beat cancer.
Frank STALLEY was born in Stratford, Ontario, on May 29, 1924. He died of lung cancer in Halifax on March 4, 2005. He was 80. He is survived by his wife, Sarah and daughter Christian.

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CHOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-23 published
WEBBER, J. Grant
(Retired 35 year employee of Ontario Hydro, prior to that a broadcaster with CFRN Edmonton and CHOK Sarnia; graduate of Banff School of Arts; member of Oshawa Historical Society and founding family member and historian of Columbus United Church). At Lakeridge Health Corp., Port Perry, on Monday, March 21, 2005, Grant, in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of the late Edythe Lillian (nee AUSTIN.) Dear father of Robert and his wife Sandra WEBBER of Lindsay, Patricia Maureen "Trish" and her husband Fred NESBITT of Columbus and the late Scott WEBBER. Loving grandfather of Grant KEAST, Simon MILES, April Jean, Erin Maureen and Scott GORMAN, Meghan Rachel and Kieran O'RIORDAN. Proud great-grandfather of Sinead Marie. Brother of Gertrude and the late George McKENZIE, the late Mildred WEBBER and the late Stanley and Bertha WEBBER. Relatives and Friends will be received at the McIntosh-Anderson Funeral Home Ltd., 152 King St. E., Oshawa (905-433-5558) on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and on Saturday, March 26, 2005 from 10: 00 a.m. until the time of service in the chapel at 11:00 a.m. Interment Groveside Cemetery, Brooklin. Donations made in memory of Grant to Columbus United Church Memorial Fund would be appreciated.

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CHO surnames continued to 05cho002.htm