CHALMERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-10 published
SCOTT, Evelyn Mae (CHALMERS)
On Wednesday, February 9, 2005, peacefully at home, Camlachie, Evelyn Mae SCOTT (CHALMERS) (Gramma) age 81. Ev was an avid Sarnia Sting Fan, bowled with North Stars at Marcin Bowl for many years and loved going to watch baseball games. She was a member of Camlachie United Church. Beloved wife of the late John Milton SCOTT (2000.) Loving mother of Leslie and Cheryl SCOTT of Camlachie, Carole and Phil WADE of Conyers, Georgia, Stella and Charlie STEVENS of Camlachie, Roy and Donna SCOTT of Camlachie, Ronnie and Irene SCOTT of Sarnia and Nancy and Slavko SAPETA of Camlachie. Dear grandmother of 17 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Sister of Marie and Les WILSON, Neil and Elsie CHALMERS and Les and Marg CHALMERS and sister-in-law of Joan CHALMERS all of Sarnia, Lorne and Lexie SCOTT and Gord SCOTT all of Petrolia. Predeceased by brother Lou CHALMERS and sister-in-law Sue CHALMERS. The funeral service will be held on Saturday, February 12, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. from Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia. Interment to follow in Resurrection Cemetery. Friends and family will be received at Smith Funeral Home on Friday afternoon from 2 to 4 and evening from 7 to 9 p.m. Sympathy through donations to the Parkinson Foundation, Camlachie United Church Building Fund or the Charity of Choice would be appreciated by the family. Memories and condolences may be emailed to smithfuneralhome@cogeco.net

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-22 published
WELSH, Mary Louise
Peacefully at Victoria Hospital on Thursday, August 18th, 2005 in her 60th year. Cherished daughter of the late Muriel (nee EASTES) and William WELSH. Loving sister of Gordon, James (Janet LEE), Betty Jean (Doug) CHALMERS, Barbara Mae BRUNSCHOT and her late husband Gary. Loved aunt of Angela, Robert, Dennis and Matthew. A graveside service will be held at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens, 2001 Dundas Street East, London on Tuesday, August 23, 2005 at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be gratefully appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Memorial Funeral Home 452-3770.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-05 published
FORSYTH, Eileen Jessie (née CHALMERS)
Of Saint Thomas, on Saturday, September 3, 2005, at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, in her 78th year. Wife of the late Sheldon FORSYTH and loved mother of Sheldon and his wife Michelle FORSYTH of Shedden and John FORSYTH of Saint Thomas. Dearly loved grandmother of Julie, Shelly and Robbie. Eileen was born in Sarnia on December 10, 1927, the daughter of the late John and Jessie CHALMERS. A private family service will be held Tuesday. Interment in St. Thomas Cemetery. Flowers gratefully declined, with remembrances to the Canadian Cancer Society. Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas in charge of arrangements.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-13 published
ROBERTSON, Reverend Walter Bradford
Passed away peacefully on November 11th, 2005 at Regional Mental Health Care after a lengthy illness. Brad was born 56 years ago on April 25, 1949 in Stratford, Ontario. Brad was a minister for many years (Port Lambton, Kapuskasing) and a News Director at CHYR radio in Leamington. Beloved husband of Bev (née CHALMERS) ROBERTSON. Loving father of Kelly of Kitchener and Heather of London. He is survived by his mother, Marion ROBERTSON of St. Marys and mother-in-law, Minnie CHALMERS of Tilbury. Brother-in-law of Bill CHALMERS of Windsor, Bob CHALMERS (Kathleen) of Saint Thomas and Larry CHALMERS (Sharon) of Windsor. He is also survived by many nieces and nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins. Predeceased by father-in-law, Morley CHALMERS in 1993 and sister-in-law, Marj CHALMERS in 1994. Friends and relatives may visit at Memorial Funeral Home, 1559 Fanshawe Park Rd. E., London (east of Highbury) on Monday, November 14th at 1 p.m. (visitation 1 hour prior) with Reverend Mark HOLLYWOOD and Reverend Terry SANDERSON officiating. A reception will be held following the service at North Park Community Church. As expressions of sympathy donations may be made to World Vision or the charity of one's choice. Memorial Funeral Home 452-3770.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-25 published
GRAY/GREY, Katherine Margaret
Suddenly on her way to her favourite Tai Chi, at Bluewater Health Mitton Street Site, Sarnia on Tuesday, November 22, 2005 Katherine Margaret GRAY/GREY, age 45 of Sarnia. Beloved daughter of Allan and Irma GRAY/GREY. Dear sister of Marie and Terry CHALMERS of Camlachie, Bill and Betty GRAY/GREY of Wyoming, Cheryl and John HARDICK of Sarnia, and Pat CASEY of Sarnia. Dear aunt of nieces and nephews: Darryl, Terry and Jodi CHALMERS, Melissa, Lisa and Stephen GRAY/GREY, Shawn and Robert HARDICK and Jamie CASEY. Dear niece of Neta DURRETT and Gloria JOHNSON. Special friend of Al GRAHAM. A funeral service will be held at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia (519) 542-5541 on Saturday, November 26, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m.. Family and Friends will be received at the Smith Funeral Home on Friday afternoon from 2 to 4 p.m., Friday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. and again on Saturday from 12: 00 p.m. noon until service time at 1: 00 p.m. Sympathy through donations to the M.S. Society of Sarnia-Lambton (Client Care or Patient Care) or the Sarnia Branch of the March of Dimes. Memories and condolences may be sent online at www.smithfuneralhome.ca The GRAY/GREY family would like to say a special thank you to the Caregivers at the March of Dimes, the M.S. Society, and Point Edward Taoist Tai Chi for their care and love.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-24 published
Tom PATTERSON, Impresario: 1920-2005
He was a hometown boy not long returned from the Second World War when he had the bright idea of holding a Shakespeare festival in Stratford, Ontario, writes John ALLEMANG. In 1953, employing a combination of enthusiasm, chutzpah, good luck and characteristic innocence, he pulled it off
By John ALLEMANG, Thursday, February 24, 2005 - Page S7
Tom PATTERSON, the man whose dreams and determination brought the Stratford Festival to life, has shuffled off his mortal coil.
Shakespearean quotes weren't his line when as a young war veteran he first set out to bring summer theatre to a small southwestern Ontario hometown that improbably was filled with references to the Bard. Stratford in the 1940s may have had a Romeo St. and a King Lear public school and a river Avon where graceful white swans nipped at anyone trying to get too friendly. But it was no outpost of high culture - a steam-locomotive repair plant dominated the local economy, and the idea of a Shakespearean festival in the heart of Ontario farm country should have been dismissed as utter craziness.
Steam turned into diesel, the plant was declared redundant, and suddenly a failing Stratford was open to the inspired lunacy that propelled Tom PATTERSON through life. Though his theatre experience was largely limited to the London music halls he'd patronized during the war - even as a much-feted luminary later in life, he was happy to declare that he didn't know "one damn thing" about the dramatic arts -- he couldn't shake off the marketing man's logic that a place named Stratford should have its own stage.
In 1951, barely 30 years old and something of an itinerant journalist who specialized in writing about sewage plants for Civic Administrator magazine, he took his idea forward to the Stratford town council. The key to understanding the unlikely success of the festival can be seen in what followed - Tom PATTERSON was able to convince a sober group of Ontario burghers that a theatre was a dream worth pursuing, a sign both that Mr. PATTERSON possessed rare powers of persuasion and that the small-town leaders were a lot less sober and a lot more daring than they're ordinarily given credit for.
In 1952, Mr. PATTERSON was dispatched to New York City, reckoned to be the capital of the theatre world, with $125 of civic funds. He admitted in his autobiography First Stage that he didn't quite know how one went about starting a theatre festival, but such innocence was always his greatest asset. He decided to seek the advice and support of Laurence Olivier, who was then appearing on Broadway. When getting through to Lord Olivier proved impossible, Mr. PATTERSON talked his way into the Rockefeller Foundation, which enabled him to report back to his Stratford team in his highly exaggerated way that the Rockefellers were on side - he threw in Lord Olivier's name as well, to tide himself over until he had a comparable big name to wave around.
By the next year, he had those names: Tyrone GUTHRIE, Alec Guinness and Irene Worth all agreed to launch a project that would never have happened if they'd reacted with Lord Olivier's common sense. It was one thing to talk about bringing a theatre to Stratford (PATTERSON's early idea was that performances could be held in the town band shell). But to lure the most restless thinker of the British theatre along with two of the genre's leading actors to an empty lot above the small town's baseball diamond - that took some extraordinary combination of enthusiasm, chutzpah and good luck.
Mr. PATTERSON found Mr. GUTHRIE at exactly the right time. The Irish director was obsessed with the idea of producing Shakespeare on a thrust stage that would project right into the surrounding audience and supply the kind of Elizabethan intimacy theatre lost when it moved into the proscenium setting. In England, people scoffed.
He was open to the idea of starting something new, and came to Stratford as artistic adviser in 1952 to see what could be done. In his memoirs, Mr. PATTERSON tells of the subterfuge he'd dreamed up to help win over the sophisticated Irishman to his new setting. Fearful that Stratford's plain-looking downtown might not impress a man used to London's West End, Mr. PATTERSON as chauffeur took a detour along the more presentable Avon and pointed out the rise of turf along the river where both of them could fulfill their dreams.
"His perseverance was indomitable," Mr. GUTHRIE later observed.
Mr. PATTERSON needn't have worried. His future artistic director was no snob, and acted as if he was right at home in the Ontario town, spending half the night drinking and talking with his hotel clerk to get a feel for the spirit of the place. His only real concern was the question of the thrust stage, and the likelihood of something so revolutionary getting a hearing in a conservative Canadian town.
But Stratford's leaders were too practical-minded to be caught up in parochial squabbles about which stage was best. Mr. GUTHRIE had been recommended to them by Dora Mavor Moore, the doyenne of Canadian theatre. If he wanted a thrust stage, so be it.
Mr. GUTHRIE was supremely well-connected, and Mr. PATTERSON found it easier to make his pitch to leading actors after that. While the Festival from the start was determined to make use of Canadian talent - William Hutt, Don Harron and Timothy Findley were among those in the inaugural casts - it was felt that name performers such as Mr. Guinness were needed to get the festival going and ensure that the banks didn't foreclose on the local worthies who'd put their assets up for security. Mr. PATTERSON was also helped by the London connections of his former employer at Civic Administrator magazine, arts patron and Maclean-Hunter chairman Floyd CHALMERS. Making Friends in high places was never a problem for Stratford's first general manager.
Though general manager was his title, Mr. PATTERSON had no gift for the finicky details of administration, and was more likely to be found playing pinochle with actor Jason Robards than analyzing a balance sheet. His methods belonged more to the seat-of-the-pants school of getting things done fast and moving forward. When it came to pricing tickets for the opening night of July 13, 1953, he didn't commission economic studies or embark on a fact-finding mission. Instead, he just bought a New York paper, checked the prices of the best theatres and decided that Stratford should have the bravado to match them.
His high-energy, anything-is-possible style was more of an asset, especially in the festival's feverish first year. Alec Guinness had it written into his contract that he could walk away from the production of Richard III if the Stratford's first tent theatre wasn't ready for rehearsals three weeks before opening night. In fact, the theatre wasn't ready until a week before first night. Until then, the celebrated stars of the London stage made do with a tin-roofed barn filled with mating sparrows. And when they moved over to the festival theatre, it was discovered from Mr. Guinness' first soliloquy that the newly laid concrete bowl effectively muffled all sound.
Members of the Stratford board were pressed into service stapling custom-designed matting into the concrete. On a sweltering opening night, all went splendidly - church bells pealed, a regimental cannon was fired, Louis Applebaum's brass fanfare resounded, and a crazy dream came to be in a tent theatre where you could hear the screams of the town's baseball players on the adjacent diamond.
Nothing in his later life could match that moment for Tom PATTERSON, but he had too much joie de vivre to mind the inevitable conflicts that a growing enterprise created. As Stratford's general manager, he felt more at home with actors than with other managers. "He enjoyed life, sang a lot and had a great time," actor Barry MacGregor last year said of his friend.
After the festival's first year, Mr. PATTERSON founded the touring theatrical company Canadian Players with actor Douglas Campbell, and later served as founding director of the Canadian Theatre Centre, founding president of the National Theatre School of Canada, and founder of the Dawson City Gold Rush Festival. He worked with the Stratford Festival until 1969, when he joined a consulting company. A year later, he criticized the festival organization for being out of touch with local interests. He later described himself as a freelance theatre consultant and worked on arts festivals across North America.
As time passed, Stratford became better able to single out the contribution he'd made to its success and dedicated the Tom Patterson Theatre to him. The town of Stratford also named an island in the Avon after its least solitary citizen - by that point, his store of quotations was good enough for him to joke how Donne was wrong in insisting that no man is an island.
Tributes had come his way long before. In 1967, he was made a member of the Order of Canada in 1967 and promoted to officer 10 years later. He also received honorary degrees from the University of Toronto and the University of Western Ontario.
"I can safely say I think (PATTERSON) has done more as an ambassador of goodwill than any leader of our country has ever done," the Montreal-born Christopher Plummer said yesterday. The actor has performed often at the festival.
In his later years, Mr. PATTERSON was beset by ill health, suffering both a tracheotomy and laryngectomy that took away most of his vocal power but in no way deprived him of his ability to command a room. He spent his last years in the veterans wing of Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital, where he was renowned as a live wire. Despite his disabilities, he still found ways to get back to Stratford - for two seasons he organized a visit for his fellow hospital residents, who delighted as much in seeing their comrade applauded by the appreciative crowds as they did in theatre's more Shakespearean moments. On one trip, he strayed from the group to visit with the actors and actually managed to get himself locked up in the theatre for several hours.
By this time, the ebullient Tom PATTERSON could talk only in short bursts through a often-wonky voice amplifier, but it in no way subdued his good humour. When someone generously observed that he was looking well on his final visit to Stratford, Mr. PATTERSON replied, in his amplifier's deadened monotone, "I don't think I could play Darth Vader with this thing."
Harry Thomas PATTERSON was born in Stratford, Ontario, on June 11, 1920. He died on yesterday at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto after a long illness. He was 84. He is survived by his wife, Pat, and by children Bob, Tim, Lucy Ann and Lyle Scott. He was predeceased by his daughter, Penny. Funeral information was not immediately available, but the festival plans a memorial service on March 13.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-07 published
George SALVERSON, Playwright: 1916-2005
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's first drama editor wrote a thousand radio plays, switched effortlessly to television and wrote a hit musical
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, May 7, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- He was Canada's king of radio drama in its golden age. George SALVERSON wrote about a thousand radio plays in a career that began in 1945 and lasted until long after the arrival of television. He was a volume man who never kept count and, in fact, held few copies of his work. Week after week, Mr. SALVERSON generated a one-hour Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio play with a careful story line and perfect dialogue. The phrase "writer's block" didn't exist for him; he was a freelancer and he had to eat.
He did have a routine, though. For many years he worked for Stages, the main Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio drama of the week. His work week started on a Tuesday or a Wednesday with an idea. It could be something in the news, such as prison reform or mental health. Radio dramas were used to deal with social issues the same way television documentaries or long news items are today.
After the idea was nailed down, Mr. SALVERSON would write one act a day, with almost all his plays having three acts. That left him ready for the rehearsal, which took all day Saturday. During and after the rehearsal, he and the director, either Esse LJUNGH or Andrew ALLAN, would work polishing the script.
"The live performance was on Sunday," remembers Alfie SCOPP who was one of the actors. "We could come dressed casually for the rehearsal, but when we went live at 5 o'clock on Sunday we had to be dressed in a suit and a tie."
Studio G on Jarvis Street in Toronto would be filled with as many as 20 actors, including such well-known names as John DRAINIE, Aileen SEATON and Bud KNAPP. No matter how long their part, actors were all paid $45 a performance.
One example of the radio play as social commentary was a series called Return Journey, which Mr. SALVERSON wrote in 1951. It was based on research done at Kingston Penitentiary on how hard it was for a released prisoner to make it on the outside. The story tells how a prisoner was afraid of the outside world but also afraid of failure and a return to behind bars.
He did much of the research for that particular play while on his honeymoon in Kingston, Ontario His wife Olive SCOTT, went by the stage name of Sandra SCOTT, and acted in many of his productions. "George was always amazed that this glamorous actress married him," remembers his friend Mr. SCOPP.
The work on his honeymoon showed how an idea could be plucked from the headlines. In a recent e-mail to his daughter, Julie, he said the early Canadian Broadcasting Corporation almost invented documentary drama for radio. "Now it's routine in Law and Order."
Later when Mr. SALVERSON moved to television, he used the same techniques for coming up with story ideas. Once he met a man he knew who had been a successful advertising executive but could no longer find work because he was over 45. "The trouble is, I'm over-age and over qualified," the man told Mr. SALVERSON.
The same line came out of the mouth of Walter, the fictional version of the ad man in the television play, The Write-Off. Mr. SALVERSON spoke to people in the business world, talked to employment agencies and tried to find out just how many Walters there were in Canada. He figured there to be at least 500,000 under-employed older people.
"The real Walter attended one of the taping sessions and he walked into the control room as Rudi [director Rudi DORN] was directing the firing scene," recalled Mr. SALVERSON in a 1968 interview. "When I asked him was this anything like the way it really happened, he gave me a long look and remarked, 'Have you ever been through a nightmare twice?' "
George SALVERSON's early life read like an improbable script for a radio play. His father, the son of Scandinavian immigrants, worked for the Canadian National Railway and the family lived, at one time or another, in Port Arthur, Ontario, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Kamloops, British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria. Fortunately, he spent enough time in Port Arthur to go to high school there. His mother, Laura Goodman SALVERSON, wrote and published 10 books. She won the Governor General's Award twice -- for her novel The Dark Weaver in 1937 and then for her autobiography Confessions of an Immigrant's Daughter in1939.
Even so, George SALVERSON never wanted to be a playwright. He set out to be a newscaster and was headed in the right direction when he got his first job at CFAR in Flin Flon, Manitoba He performed every role at the tiny radio station, including writing and reading the news. The highlight of his newscasting career occurred on December 7, 1941, when he told the 7,000 people of Flin Flon of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and he did it dressed in a suit.
His second job came along in what was then the biggest city in Western Canada -- Winnipeg. But at CKRC, they had other plans. He could read the occasional newscast if he liked, but it wasn't news readers they wanted. They had plenty, thanks. What they needed was a playwright, someone who could knock off a quickie radio drama and also take a part or two.
His first play was a success, and Mr. SALVERSON soon found himself doing the writing, acting, producing and sound effects. He resolved to perfect his dramas, drifting over to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to pick up pointers on how to write believable dialogue and interesting story ideas.
For a couple of years, Mr. SALVERSON wrote, produced and directed plays for Eaton's, when the department store used radio dramas to sell its wares. Then, in 1948, he was given work by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and moved to Toronto. Among his first shows was Paper Railroad, a play based on his father's work life.
From the time he arrived in Toronto he was never short of works or awards. He won a first in the Canadian Radio Awards of 1948 and, the following year, received another from Ohio State University. In 1949, he adapted Dracula for radio, a play that starred Lorne GREEN, Alan KING and Lister SINCLAIR.
When the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation turned to television in the fall of 1952, Mr. SALVERSON was soon writing both radio and television plays and he became the network's first drama editor. One of his plays, The Discoverers, was performed on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and on Kraft Theatre in the United States. The play was about Banting and Best's discovery of insulin.
Later on he wrote documentaries as well as dramas for television. Perhaps his most famous was Air of Death. "That changed the course of public affairs programming on television," said Jane CHALMERS, vice-president of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio. "In October of 1967, this documentary report, written by George, and dealing with air pollution in Canada, aired on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television, pre-empting the top-rated The Ed Sullivan Show."
His script laid the subject bare and resulted in a lawsuit.
"Dad worked for six months helping the lawyers and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with the lawsuit. They won their case," said Julie SALVERSON. "He used to joke it was the only time he had such steady work."
He wrote one production for the stage, the musical The Legend of the Dumbells, which was produced at the Charlottetown Festival in 1977. It was about a Canadian troupe of First World War entertainers and used songs from the era. It travelled to the National Arts Centre in Ottawa and the Elgin Theatre in Toronto and continues to be staged.
When Studio G closed in July 1993, before the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation moved to its new Toronto headquarters, he wrote a 10-minute sketch for radio. It was called End Credits.
For many years, Mr. SALVERSON taught writing at Ryerson University in Toronto and, in the process, found that some people were unteachable. He told his daughter Julie, in one of their many e-mails, the story of a 50-year-old novelist who wanted to turn one of his books into a screenplay. He just couldn't do it.
"When I dramatized, I always went into the scene myself. I was sitting there doing the acting. And away went the characters, whooping it up. My writer friend remained a writer. He stood outside the scene and tried to tell you what was going on. And nobody felt anything."
As he grew older, George SALVERSON kept his mind in shape with mental exercises. One of them was memorizing The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. He could recite any verse on command, and was working on memorizing it backwards. He also wrote a lot of limericks. On the Saturday before he died, he had a new one for Alfie SCOPP. It went like this:
A well-endowed woman from Brussels
Had a veritable plethora of muscles,
She said with some pride,
There are others I hide,
And bring them out only in tussles.
He also wrote a book called Around the World in 80 Limericks, with bits of doggerel for each of the world's major cities. He wrote until the end.
George SALVERSON was born in St. Catharines, Ont, on April 30, 1916. He died on April 9, 2005, after a fall at his apartment at the Performing Arts Lodge in Toronto. He was 88. A public memorial service will be held there at 6 p.m., Monday, May 9. He is survived by his daughter Julie and son Scott. His wife died in 2000.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-30 published
CHALMERS, Evelyn Frances (née HEIDAHL)
(July 2, 1913-July 28, 2005)
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Evelyn in Ottawa, widow of loving husband Frederick William CHALMERS.
For more than 90 years her life shone like a beacon as an inspiration to family and Friends alike. She was strong, yet sweet, gentle and generous. Her mind was as clear as her North Sea blue eyes. Her warmth, intelligence and flashing wit were the essence of her personality.
She was kind. Throughout her life, she devoted herself to service to others through membership in the Lady Aberdeen League in Edmonton, church groups and Goodwill in Toronto. Her greatest energies over the years were always focused on her family.
She is survived and mourned by her children, Dennis and Kate CHALMERS, Frances (Lassie) and Howie WILSON, Barb and Joe IZZIO her grandchildren, Heather and Glen KELLY, Holly CHALMERS, Gordon CHALMERS, Patricia WILSON and Christopher MALLORY, Stewart WILSON and Shannon FYNN, Andrew WILSON and Céline NADREAU, Peter and Sally IZZIO, Carol IZZIO and Glen ROWLAND, and Siobhan IZZIO sixteen great-grandchildren; her sister Norah GOOD; brother-in-law Bob BAXTER; sisters-in-law Dorothy CHALMERS and Win CHALMERS cousins Karen and Don OGSTON; special Friends Lorne LEIGHTON, Elinor MURPHY, and Paul and Christine CLARK.
Dennis said "I hope that Lass, Barb and I, our children and grandchildren, all have the good fortune to live the remainder of our lives with the wit, courage, grace and good nature that Mother demonstrated so admirably."
A family celebration of her life will be held in the fall.
Arrangements in care of the St. Laurent Chapel of Hulse, Playfair & McGarry 1200 Ogilvie Road, Ottawa, Ontario. Telephone (613) 748 1200. Condolences/tributes www.mcgarryfamily.ca

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-08 published
CHALMERS, Clarice, LL.D., O.Ont.
Died peacefully on December 6, 2005 at Belmont House. She is survived by her sons Brian and Clive, her daughter Patricia, her sister-in-law Joan CHALMERS, and several grandchildren. Clarice will be sadly missed and fondly remembered by all who knew her. In keeping with Clarice's wishes, there will be no funeral service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Belmont House Foundation, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1R1.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-10 published
BALL, Kenneth Lloyd
At Trillium Hospital, Mississauga Campus, on Thursday, December 8, 2005, Kenneth Lloyd BALL, in his 82nd year beloved husband of Mary CHALMERS. Dear father of Jim (Anne) BALL, Christine (Jim) POOK, Douglas (Michelle) BALL. Loving grandfather of Barbara Ann (Pekka) TOIVANEN, Valerie (Zolton) HAWRYLUK, Michael and Sarah BALL. Foster son of the late Ruby and Lloyd SMITH. Dear brother of Joyce (Ed) JONES and uncle of Cathy JONES. Predeceased by brothers Charles and Lloyd and mother Jessie CAMERON. Ken served for several years as a flight engineer on a Halifax bomber with the Royal Canadian Air Force His working life was spent as an insurance adjuster. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, December 14 at one o'clock at St. Andrew's Memorial Presbyterian Church, Port Credit, located at 24 Stavebank Road North (between Highway 10 and Mississauga Road - north of Lakeshore Road). Visitation will take place one hour prior to service. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Vision 2020 Program, c/o Saint John's United Church, 11 Guelph Street, Georgetown, Ontario L7G 3Z1. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home, Bolton (905-857-2213). Condolences for the family may be offered at
www.eganfuneralhome.com

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-12 published
CLENDENNING, Thomas Gerald, P.Eng.
Peacefully on Tuesday December 6, 2005 at Eagle Terrace in Newmarket, Ontario, surrounded by his wife and three children. Gerald was born July 26, 1918, and was the third of four sons of Campbell and Anna May (McNEELY) CLENDENNING, on a farm near Gananoque, Ontario. A graduate of Queen's University (1941), he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Corps of Engineers and served in the invasion of Italy and the liberation of the Netherlands. He married Evelyn Marie PRESTON of Portland, Ontario in England on November 14, 1943. After the war he joined Ontario Hydro and retired from its Research Division in 1983, having used his expertise in the science of concrete engineering to work on nuclear waste disposal, and as a private consultant, on the construction of the Toronto City Hall, Trent University and the C.N. Tower. He was a founding member of the Canadian Concrete Institute. Gerry enjoyed summers on Rideau Lake for many years. In 1972, the family relocated from Etobicoke to a minifarm near Barrie, Ontario, where they stayed for 27 years. After suffering a stroke, Gerry became a resident of Eagle Terrace in Newmarket, whose fine staff gave him warm and understanding care during his 5 years there. In retirement, his favourite pastimes included planting the kitchen garden, driving for the Red Cross, analyzing current events and the stock market, and partnering Evelyn at the bridge table. He loved limericks, peanuts and small dogs. His intellect, sense of humour and gentle nature will be fondly remembered by Evelyn, Anne (Ken ROBERTS) of King City, Bob (Christine) of Sudbury, and Linda (Colin CHALMERS) of Stony Plain, Alberta. He also leaves his brother Don (Carolyn) of San Jose, California; seven grandchildren, Will, Virginia and Mary Roberts, and Rob, James, Anna and Grace CLENDENNING; his nieces, nephews and cousins in the Clendenning, McNeely, Thomson and Spence families; and many beloved in-laws and Friends cherished over his 87 years. He was predeceased by his brothers Leonard (Thunder Bay) and Kenneth (La Jolla, California). Cremation has taken place and memorial arrangements to follow are entrusted to the Roadhouse and Rose Funeral Home, Newmarket (905-895-6631). The family would be thankful for donations in his memory to the Canadian Red Cross or to Queen's University in lieu of flowers.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-23 published
KING, Bertha
Passed away peacefully, on Monday, February 21st, 2005 in her 86th year at the West Parry Sound Health Centre. Predeceased by her husband Edward and her daughter Debra SIMPSON. Cherished mother of Dianne (Jack CHALMERS,) John and Christine KING. Beloved grandmother of Susan (Grant STUMMER,) Taylor and Logan KING. Great-grandmother of Serena, Quinton and Tiffany STUMMER. Dear sister of Elsie BEAMISH. A favourite Aunt to many nieces and nephews. Mom's brave encounter with pancreatic cancer was an inspiration to us all. Cremation has taken place. A service to Celebrate her Life will be held at the Mactier United Church at 11: 30 a.m. on Friday, February 25th, 2005. In lieu of flowers, a donation to your favourtie charity would be appreciated by the family. Cremation arrangements entrusted to the Torrance Funeral Home and Chapel (89 Bowes Street, Parry Sound, Ontario P2A 2L8, 705-746-4664)."She was a Grand Lady"

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-26 published
MEHEDAN, Alex
(Served overseas, Governor General's Horse Guards, World War 2) Peacefully on Thursday, March 24, 2005 at the Humber River Regional Hospital - Finch Site, in his 84th year. Loving husband of the late Olga MEHEDAN. Dearest father of Gary, Rick and his wife Judy. Proud grandfather of Carol and Laura. Survived by his sister Mary CHALMERS and her husband George. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday. A service will be held in the funeral home chapel on Wednesday at 11 a.m. Interment Beechwood Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-25 published
DALEY, Agnes Elizabeth (née GOODFELLOW)
Died peacefully, on April 23, 2005, in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Jim (Joseph MORRISEY) DALEY. Loving mother of Marilyn Jean McDONELL, and the late Susan CHALMERS. She will be sadly missed by her son-in-law Peter PASSAILAIGUE. Lovingly remembered by many nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston, on Monday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Saint John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church (49 George St.), on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-28 published
DAVIS, John Elliot
Passed away peacefully at Scarborough Grace Hospital, at the age of 83 on Tuesday, April 26, 2005. John will be leaving behind his beloved wife Joan. Always remembered by his children Bryan (Joanne), Monica, Peter (Nadeira) and his grandchildren John LABENNETT, Sonya and Jason DAVIS, Paul LABENNETT, Dominique and Peter Elliot DAVIS, close relatives Yvonne LORD (Desmond,) Don and Judy CHALMERS. Friends and family may visit at the Jerrett Funeral Home, 660 Kennedy Road, Scarborough (between Eglinton and St. Clair Aves. E.) on Saturday, April 30 between 1-2 p.m. A Memorial Service to be held in the funeral home chapel following the visitation at 2 p.m. Reception immediately following the service. In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting donations be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-27 published
HEFKEY, Sara Marie (née FOTHERGILL)
Passed away peacefully, on June 22, 2005, at the great age of 102, at her home in Fellowship Towers in Toronto. Marie, an inspiration to all who knew her, shall be greatly missed by her son Bruce of Cobourg, sister Elizabeth YOUNG of Oakville, grandchildren Susanne and John, great-grandchildren Kelly and James, many nieces and nephews, and by so many that cherished and enjoyed her Friendship and amazing attitude towards life. A very special thanks to her nieces Marion, Jan and Shirley for their caring and devoted hours. Also, to the caring Friends at Fellowship Towers, Dr. HEATH, Lorraine CHALMERS, Marjorie and all the health care providers. A private interment service after cremation, will be at Belleville Cemetery so she can be with her dearly loved husband, Irvine, who passed away in 1951. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date, arrangements to be announced.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-13 published
CHALMERS, Margaret
At the Ajax and Pickering Health Centre, on Friday, August 12, 2005. Predeceased by her husband Thomas CHALMERS. Beloved mother of Carol MOLE (Norman,) and James CHALMERS. Dear grandmother of Stephen, Gregory, Lisa, Heather, Michelle, and Amy, and great-grandmother to 11 great-grandchildren. The family will receive Friends at the McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax (Pickering Village), 905-428-8488 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Monday, August 15, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-17 published
CHALMERS, Bernard " Bernie"
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved Bernie on August 16, 2005 at Markham-Stouffville Hospital at the age of 64 after a brave journey through lung cancer. He is survived by the many who loved him: his wife Rosemary; his sons Brian (Lorraine), Scott, Craig (Lisa), and Marc (Janis) his stepdaughters Lorraine, Diane (Brad), and Julie Ann (Rafael) his grandchildren Ashley, Cassandra, Gregory, Matthew and Eric his brother Norman, and many, many Friends, relatives and colleagues. He is predeceased by his parents, William and Annette CHALMERS, his sister Jean and his brother Donald. He is also mourned by the Diaconate community of the Archdiocese of Toronto. As a Permanent Deacon, Bernie served at St. Patrick's Parish in Markham and Good Sheppard Parish in Thornhill. He truly lived the motto of a Deacon, "not to be served, but to serve" (Mark 10: 45) all his life. We will always remember and be grateful for his humour, his strength and for the support he gave to so many. He has been our rock. We know he is welcomed into the arms of our loving God who must be saying, "Well done, good and faithful servant." Visitation will be held on Friday August 19, 2005 at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home 166 Main St. N. (Markham Rd.), Markham from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be at 9: 30 a.m. on Saturday August 20, 2005 at the Church of St. Patrick, 5633 Hwy. 7, Markham, followed by a reception. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Canadian Cancer Society in Bernie's name.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-23 published
MURPHY, Margaret Ishbel (née MacDONALD)
Passed away peacefully at her home on September 20, 2005. She will be lovingly remembered by her daughters Sheena MURPHY (Geoff BOVETT) and Deirdre MURPHY (Ron MEHMEL.) Left to cherish her memory are her brother Lewis MacDONALD (Agnes,) sisters Jeri WINDSOR, Mairi CHALMERS (Bill) and her nieces and nephews. We would like to express our heart felt thanks to the MURPHY and MacDONALD families, and to all of Mum's Friends who have touched her life and have provided compassion and support to all of us, recently and over the years. Special thanks to the Scarborough Palliative Interdisciplinary Network team and all those involved in her care. Cremation has taken place and at Mum's request there will be no formal service. A gathering in celebration of her life will be held at the house on Sunday, September 25th, 2-7 p.m. Flowers are graciously declined. In lieu, donations in her memory may be made to the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals at 16586 Woodbine Ave., R.R.#3, Newmarket, Ontario, L3Y 4W1 or to your charity of choice.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-03 published
CHALMERS, Mary Catherine
Peacefully at Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket on Thursday December 1, 2005 at the age of 92 years. Mary Catherine CHALMERS of Sutton, daughter of the late Walter and Martha CHALMERS. Predeceased by her sisters Anne CLARKE and Margaret CHALMERS and her brother Bill CHALMERS. Lovingly remembered by her niece Shirley GERSTER and her husband Fred of Sutton, her nephew Paul CLARKE of Brockville, and niece Mary DOYLE and her husband John of Florida, her great niece Bridgetanne and her husband David THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and her great nephew John Paul DOYLE. Resting at the Taylor Funeral Home, 20846 Dalton Road, Sutton from 1: 00 p.m. Saturday until time of the Funeral Mass in the Church of Immaculate Conception, 20916 Dalton Road at 3: 00 p.m. Saturday. Interment Briar Hill Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-07 published
CHALMERS, Clarice, LL.D., O.Ont.
Died peacefully on December 6, 2005 at Belmont House. She is survived by her sons Brian and Clive, her daughter Patricia, her sister-in-law Joan CHALMERS, and several grandchildren. Clarice will be sadly missed and fondly remembered by all who knew her. In keeping with Clarice's wishes, there will be no funeral service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Belmont House Foundation, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5R 1R1.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-10 published
BALL, Kenneth Lloyd
At Trillium Hospital, Mississauga Campus, on Thursday, December 8, 2005, Kenneth Lloyd BALL, in his 82nd year beloved husband of Mary CHALMERS. Dear father of Jim (Anne) BALL, Christine (Jim) POOK, Douglas (Michelle) BALL. Loving grandfather of Barbara Anne (Pekka) TOIVANEN, Valerie (Zoltan) HAWRYLUK, Michael and Sarah BALL. Foster son of the late Ruby and Lloyd SMITH. Dear brother of Joyce (Ed) JONES and uncle of Cathy JONES. Predeceased by brothers Charles and Lloyd and mother Jessie CAMERON. Ken served for several years as a flight engineer on a Halifax bomber with the Royal Canadian Air Force His working life was spent as an insurance adjuster. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, December 14 at one o'clock at St. Andrew's Memorial Presbyterian Church, Port Credit, located at 24 Stavebank Road North (between Highway 10 and Mississauga Road - north of Lakeshore Road). Visitation will take place one hour prior to service. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made ot the Vision 2020 Program, c/o Saint John's United Chuch, 11 Guelph Street, Georgetown, Ontario, L7G 3Z1. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home, Bolton (905-857-2213). Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-10 published
CLENDENNING, Thomas Gerald, P.Eng.
Peacefully on Tuesday, December 6, 2005 at Eagle Terrace in Newmarket, Ontario, surrounded by his wife and three children. Gerald was born July 26, 1918, and was the third of four sons of Campbell and Anna May (McNEELY) CLENDENNING, on a farm near Gananoque, Ontario. A graduate of Queen's University (1941), he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Corps of Engineers and served in the invasion of Italy and the liberation of the Netherlands. He married Evelyn Marie PRESTON of Portland, Ontario in England on November 14, 1943. After the war he joined Ontario Hydro and retired from its Research Division in 1983, having used his expertise in the science of concrete engineering to work on nuclear waste disposal, and as a private consultant, on the construction of the Toronto City Hall, Trent University and the C.N. Tower. He was a founding member of the Canadian Concrete Institute. Gerry enjoyed summers on Rideau Lake for many years. In 1972, the family relocated from Etobicoke to a mini-farm near Barrie, Ontario, where they stayed for 27 years. After suffering a stroke, Gerry became a resident of Eagle Terrace in Newmarket, whose fine staff gave him warm and understanding care during his 5 years there. In retirement, his favourite pastimes included planting the kitchen garden, driving for the Red Cross, analyzing current events and the stock market, and partnering Evelyn at the bridge table. He loved limericks, peanuts and small dogs. His intellect, sense of humour and gentle nature will be fondly remembered by Evelyn, Anne (Ken ROBERTS) of King City, Bob (Christine) of Sudbury, and Linda (Colin CHALMERS) of Stony Plain, Alberta. He also leaves his brother Don (Carolyn) of San Jose, California; seven grandchildren, Will, Virginia and Mary Roberts, and Rob, James, Anna and Grace CLENDENNING; his nieces, nephews and cousins in the CLENDENNING, McNeely, Thomson and Spence families; and many beloved in-laws and Friends cherished over his 87 years. He was predeceased by his brothers Leonard (Thunder Bay) and Kenneth (La Jolla, California). Cremation has taken place and memorial arrangements to follow are entrusted to the Roadhouse and Rose Funeral Home, Newmarket (905-895-6631). The family would be thankful for donations in his memory to the Canadian Red Cross or to Queen's University in lieu of flowers.

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CHALTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-10 published
CHALTON, Robert " Bob" William
Robert "Bob" William of Saint Thomas, on Tuesday, March 8, 2005, at home, in his 76th year. Dearly loved husband of Janette (McNAUGHTON) CHALTON and dearly loved father of Jennifer and her husband Jaden BRADLEY and Stephanie CHALTON and her fiance Sam WILSON, all of Saint Thomas. Loved papa of Brittany and Brennan BRADLEY. Bob was born in Ingersoll on April 13, 1929, the son of the late William and Doris (LIMBERT) CHALTON. He has lived in Saint Thomas the past 50 years. He owned Talbot Furniture and was the former Manager of Woodhouse Furniture for 10 years. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Friday at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Visitation Friday from 10-11: 00 a.m. Remembrances may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

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CHALYKOFF o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-27 published
WADE, Sanna (née CHALYKOFF)
At Mt Hope Centre for Long Term Care, London, Ontario on Saturday, June 25, 2005. Sanna WADE (née CHALYKOFF) of London in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late Herbert WADE (1991.) Dear mother of Peggy WADE and Norman of Montreal, Sue and Berni VOLKMANN of Brampton and Michael and Carol WADE of London. Loving grandmother of Dalene, John, Laurie Ann, Michael CHYSYK, and Christine and Derek VOLKMANN and Robin and Samantha WADE and James and Patrick DOBIE. Also survived by 7 greatgrandchildren. Predeceased by 1 sister Neda and 2 brothers Rod and Nick. As requested by the family there will be no visitation. Cremation with a private graveside service to be held at a later date. Interment of cremated remains at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the C.N.I.B., 749 Baseline Road East, London N6C 2R6, would be appreciated by the family. A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London (433-5184) in care of arrangements. Online condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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CHALYSSIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-14 published
ROOVERS, Paul Arthur
At his residence on Saturday, June 11, 2005. Paul Arthur ROOVERS of Aylmer in his 56th year. Beloved husband of Chris (HAPONIK) ROOVERS and dear father of Jordan, Miranda and Justin ROOVERS. Born in Tukemen, Argentina on March 7, 1950, loving son to Simmone (SCHEPENS) DEBACKER. Step-brother to Antoinette CHALYSSIN. Predeceased by his father, Desire ROOVERS, step-father Prosper DEBACKER and an infant sister Arlette. He was a teacher at East Elgin Secondary School since 1977 and was involved in the Co-op program placing students in local Aylmer businesses. He was a badminton coach and involved in the football program. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Tuesday 7-9 and Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Prayers Wednesday at 8: 45 p.m. The funeral mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of Sorrows R.C. Church on Thursday, June 16, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Queen of Peace Cemetery. Donations to the Paul Roovers Memorial Scholastic Award would be appreciated. “ Paul was a devoted husband, father, teacher and friend.&rdquo

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CHA surnames continued to 05cha004.htm