CARTERET o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-07-22 published
McDONALD, Marion Geneva (née MacKAY)
At the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital, on Wednesday, July 20th, 2005. Marion McDONALD, of Collingwood, and formerly of Thornbury, in her 87th year. Daughter of the late George H. and Lillie Ann (MATHESON) MacKAY. Predeceased by her beloved husband, Jack McDONALD, November 23rd, 1994. Also predeceased by her brother, Donald MacKAY, December 22nd, 1983, and remembered as a dear aunt by his family: Marlene and her husband Glenn CREVIER, of Collingwood, Gordon MacKAY, of Hanover, Marg, and her husband, Bill MacDOUGALL, of St. Joseph's, and Carol, and her husband, Harvey MARECHAL DE CARTERET, of Wyevale. Loved aunt also of Sheila ARSCOTT, of Toronto, Mary BENNETT, of Connecticut, and Ron MacEACHERN, of Hong Kong. Fondly remembered by several grand nieces and nephews and their families. Also remembered by Rod and Darlene TURNER, of Meaford. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home - The Valley Chapel, in Thornbury, on Friday evening from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. where funeral services, officiated by Reverend Frances SAVILL, will be conducted on Saturday, July 23rd, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment and committal will follow at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. As your expression of sympathy, donations to St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Thornbury, would be appreciated.
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CARTHER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-29 published
CARTHER, Wilfred G.
A resident of Dresden, passed away suddenly at Hotel Dieu Hospital, Windsor on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 at the age of 62. Born in Chatham, son of the late Garnet and Helen (CRAGG) CARTHER. Beloved husband of Sharon (HAWKINS) CARTHER. Loving father of Michele STOCKING, Michael and Elly CARTHER, George and Kim CARTHER all of Dresden, Kenneth and Karen CARTHER of Kingsville. Loving grandfather of Kristopher, Adam, Kodie, Katie, Terra and step-grandchildren Richard, Liz and Dan. Dear brother of Leroy and Verna CARTHER of Bothwell, Lanny and Phyllis CARTHER of Thamesville and Brian and Brenda CARTHER of Thamesville. Dear brother-in-law of Shirley HAWKINS of R.R.#3 Dresden. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Wilfred will be sadly missed by all his Friends at Leisure Lake, Leamington. Predeceased by a brother-in-law Bob HAWKINS. The CARTHER family will receive Friends at the Badder Visitation and Reception Centre, 679 North Street, Dresden (519-683-4444) on Thursday evening from 7-9 p.m. and Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday, October 1, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Mayhew-Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Thamesville. If desired, donations may be made at the funeral home by cheque to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to Badder Funeral Homes, Thamesville. "A tree will be planted in Memory of Wilfred CARTHER in the Badder and Robinson Memorial Forest, Mosa Twp."

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CARTHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-09 published
CARTHER, John Robert " Jack"
Passed away after a brief illness on Friday, June 3, 2005 in his 84th Year. Loving husband to Dorie of 62 years. Devoted father to Lynne MITCHELL, the Late Brian CARTHER and the Late Bruce CARTHER. Dear father-in-law to Lynn RICKERBY and David MITCHELL. He will be fondly remembered by his grandchildren Kelly and Diane MITCHELL. With respect to Jack's wishes a private family memorial service has been held.

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CARTHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-11 published
CARTHER, John Robert " Jack"
Passed away after a brief illness on Friday, June 3, 2005, in his 84th year. Loving husband to Dorie of 62 years. Devoted father to Lynne MITCHELL, the late Brian CARTHER and the late Bruce CARTHER. Dear father-in-law to Lynn RICKERBY and David MITCHELL. He will be fondly remembered by his grandchildren Kelly and Diane MITCHELL. With respect to Jack's wishes, a private family memorial service has been held.

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CARTHEW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-14 published
WOODRUFF, Doctor Merrill Emerson, O.D., M.A., PhD.
(February 3, 1925-May 8, 2005)
After a long illness, Emerson WOODRUFF of Waterloo, passed away at Chateau Gardens, Elmira on May 8, 2005.
Merrill Emerson WOODRUFF was born in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada. After completing high school, he served in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He was discharged in 1945 with the rank of Flying Officer, and soon after began his optometric studies at the College of Optometry of Ontario. When Doctor WOODRUFF graduated in 1950, he received the J.C. Thompson Memorial award for highest achievement in theoretical optometry.
Doctor WOODRUFF practiced optometry in West Lorne and Blenheim, Ontario from 1950 to 1962. He was also an active member of the Ontario Association of Optometrists. He served as the local society president and later as vice-president of the Ontario Association of Optometrists. In the early 1960s, Doctor WOODRUFF was a co-author and presenter of the Ontario Association of Optometrists' brief to the Royal Commission on Health Services in Canada.
In 1963, Doctor WOODRUFF began his graduate studies at Indiana University. In the first year of his PhD program in physiological optics, he authored a position paper entitled 'The Effective Utilization of Optometrists within the Programs of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare' for the American Optometric Association. While completing his PhD studies, Doctor WOODRUFF was appointed as a lecturer in optometry at Indiana University. In 1966, he became an Assistant Professor.
In 1967, Doctor WOODRUFF accepted the posts of Associate Professor of Optometry and Director of Clinics at the School of Optometry, University of Waterloo. In 1967, he was co-author of the University's brief to the Ontario Government's Committee on the Healing Arts in Ontario.
As clinic Director, Doctor WOODRUFF became part of a faculty team that introduced several innovative concepts (such as mobile clinics and satellite clinics) to clinical teaching. Some programs focused on geriatric care and particularly on improving refractive care of infants and children. This area was the subject of Doctor WOODRUFF's Doctoral dissertation. Clinics were operated in certain Caribbean Islands, throughout much of northern Ontario, and in New Brunswick and Manitoba. In northern Ontario, the visual problems of several thousand Cree Indian children were attended to in these clinics.
Doctor WOODRUFF taught environmental optics, which relates visual abilities and vocational and avocational activities. He also taught a variety of clinical and theoretical subjects including Geometric Optics, Visual Physiology, Children's Vision Care, Ocular Pathology, Anatomy of the Visual Apartus, and Clinical Pathology. From 1975 to 1981, Doctor WOODRUFF served as Director of the School of Optometry at the University of Waterloo.
Over the years, Doctor WOODRUFF has lectured to numerous societies on a broad range of clinical and theoretical aspects of vision care. He has testified as an expert witness for the Indiana and Wisconsin State Boards and for several Canadian Royal Commissions. He also served as a consultant to the Ministry of health of New Brunswick.
Doctor WOODRUFF has been a member of the Graduate Studies Committee, Faculty of Science, and Graduate Officer for Waterloo's School of Optometry. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry, a member of the American Optometric Association, the Canadian Association of Optometrists, the Ontario Association of Optometrists, Sigma Xi, and the Association for Research in Ophthalmology. Doctor WOODRUFF was appointed to the Waterloo Regional Health Planning Council and later became Chairman of the Waterloo District Health Council.
Doctor WOODRUFF's academic excellence was widely acknowledged. In addition to being the recipient of many academic awards, he received scholarships and research grant awards of over $150,000. He retired from the University of Waterloo in 1990.
He was a deeply loved and loving husband to his wife Doris, his daughters, Elaine CADELL and partner Greg CORNFORTH, Ann SIMPSON and husband David, Susan WOODRUFF and husband Alan ISRAEL. Grandchildren, Katherine BUSSE, Emma and Ned SIMPSON, Emily, Evan and Eric ISRAEL. Great-granddaughter Grace TAILOR/TAYLOR. Loving brother of Elnor McNAUGHTON and husband Findlay, David WOODRUFF and his wife Joyce, Cheryl WILKIE and husband Ralph.
Predeceased by his parents Merrill WOODRUFF and Bernice SMITH.
A graveside service was held to celebrate Emerson's life on May 13, 2005, at St. Matthew's Lutheran Church Cemetery, Conestogo with The Venerable Peter TOWNSHEND, Church of the Holy Saviour, Waterloo, Ontario officiating.
Donations in Emerson's memory can be made directly to The Dr. Emerson Woodruff Graduate Scholarship in Vision Science, School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. N., Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 c/o Andrea CARTHEW or the Canadian Optometric Education Trust Fund c/o of the Canadian Association of Optometrists, 234 Argyle Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K2P 1B9 or can be arranged by calling the funeral home.
Condolences/Donations www.edwardrgood.com 519-745-8445

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CARTIER o@ca.on.kent_county.wallaceburg.wallaceburg_courier_press 2005-06-29 published
JOHNSTON, Ronald L.
Mr. Ronald L. JOHNSTON a resident of Wallaceburg passed away on Tuesday, June 21, 2005 at C.K.H.A. "Sydenham Campus", in Wallaceburg at the age of 59. Ron was born in Chatham and was a son of the late Norman and Bernice (KELLER) JOHNSTON. Beloved husband of Gail (EASTCOTT) JOHNSTON. Loving father and father-in-law of Amy and Brian EVERAERT of Sombra. Kind brother and brother-in-law of Bob JOHNSTON of Saint Thomas, Sharron PINSONNEAULT, Brian and Joan JOHNSTON, all of Wallaceburg, Darrell and Tracy JOHNSTON of Edmonton, Dawn and Ken CRAWFORD of St. Catherines and Greg JOHNSTON also of Wallaceburg. Also survived by many aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Ron will be missed by Scat, his cat. The late Ron JOHNSTON rested at the Eric F. Nicholls Funeral Home, 639 Elgin Street, in Wallaceburg until Friday, June 24, 2005 when funeral services were held in the chapel of the funeral home at 1 p.m. with Jason CARTIER, Officiant. Words of remembrance were given by Dawn CRAWFORD, Ken CRAWFORD, Jaclyn JOHNSTON, Sharron PINSONNEAULT and Betty Somr. "One More Day" and "I Will Remember You" were played, in tribute, for the service. Pall bearers were Len EASTCOTT, Mark EASTCOTT, Dr. Darcy JACOBS, Jim SNARY, Jason PINSONNEAULT and Bob FOSTER. Flower bearers were Jaclyn JOHNSTON, Nicole PICKERING, Yvette ARSENAULT, Niki HAGARTH, Colette STERLING, Sherry BESELAERE, Sheenagh PAHL and Lori CHARRON. Interment was in Riverview Cemetery, Wallaceburg. As an expression of sympathy donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation may be left at the funeral home. As a living memorial a tree will be planted in Nicholls Memorial Forest in memory of Ronald L. JOHNSTON.

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CARTIER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-23 published
GRAHAM credited with fishing group's growth
By Joe MATYAS, Free Press Reporter
The man credited with transforming the Ontario Commercial Fisheries Association from a kitchen-table, volunteer organization into a $1 million-a-year operation, has died after a battle with cancer. Robert GRAHAM, 60, made his mark at the association, in civic politics, in the food service industry and as president of the Blenheim Chamber of Commerce and Blenheim Rotary club.
"He was a visionary, a man who could initiate and accomplish things," said Dennis CARTIER, secretary-treasurer of the association.
The life and achievements of the long-time Erie Beach resident were celebrated at a visitation at J.L. Ford Funeral Home on January 14 and a funeral mass at Saint Mary's Church in Blenheim the following day.
The fisheries association was a volunteer group with only one part-time employee paid through membership fees from 1945 until 1990, when GRAHAM became the sole employee, said CARTIER.
At the time, it had an annual budget of $50,000, he said.
Today, the association employs 13 part-time and seven full-time people at its Blenheim headquarters and has an annual operating budget of about $1 million, said Cartier. "It was all because of Rob's dreams and drive."
"Rob was able to procure a number of government contracts," especially through Ontario's Natural Resources Ministry, said CARTIER.
The association now conducts an annual assessment of the Lake Erie fishery through an indexing program at 176 sites because of ground work laid by GRAHAM, said CARTIER.
"It's a major component of tracking the fish population by type, sex, weight, age and other factors," he said.
GRAHAM wasn't a fisher or particularly knowledgeable about the fisheries before he was hired, said CARTIER.
A graduate of Ryerson University, GRAHAM was trained in the hospitality industry and managed large institutional food services before starting his own business, said CARTIER.
"He had many successes in that business, including setting up the food services for Wheels Motor Inn (in Chatham)."
Reeve of Erie Beach from 1977 to 1988, GRAHAM also served on Kent County council.
He was instrumental in bringing water service and underground wiring to Erie Beach and coach lights to the streets, said CARTIER.
GRAHAM also sat on the St. Clair Parkway Commission and chaired the Canadian advisors to the Great Lakes Fishery Commission.
"Rob was a guy who could bring coalitions of people together in a common cause," said London lawyer David NASH, a friend, legal adviser and eulogist.
"He could resolve touchy internal issues and get people to move on. He was a tough negotiator in a board room, but friendly outside. He put people at ease because he was so genuine."
His wife Barbara says, "He was a wonderful husband and father. Rob loved people and found the best in them. He made everybody feel important because he was always interested in them, their families and what they were doing."

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CARTIER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-24 published
CARTIER, Roland J.
Roland J., a resident of Chatham passed away at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance on Wednesday March 23, 2005 at the age of 58. Beloved husband of the late Phyllis (PROVOST) CARTIER (1999.) Loving son of Stella and the late Henry CARTIER of Chatham. Dear brother of Jim CARTIER of Chatham. Loving uncle of Nicole, Wilfred, Monique, Michael, Kyle and Melissa. Predeceased by sisters Stella, Marie and a brother Peter CARTIER. The CARTIER family will receive Friends at the John C. Badder Funeral Home, 72 Victoria Street, Thamesville on Thursday evening 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held in the chapel of the funeral home on Friday March 25, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Paul McPHAIL officiating. Cremation. Interment in St. Paul's Cemetery, Thamesville at a later date. Donations may be made at the funeral home by cheque to the Heart & Stroke Foundation. A tree will be planted in Memory of Roland CARTIER in the Badder and Robinson Memorial Forest, Mosa Twp.

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CARTIER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-27 published
JACKSON, Marjorie Mae (née COOK)
Marjorie Mae of Chatham passed away on Thursday, August 25, 2005 at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance. Born in Stevenson 72 years ago daughter of the late Nelson COOK and Fannie TEBO. She is predeceased by her husband Earl Gorham JACKSON in 1997, sister Marie SHARP, and brothers Jim and Roy COOK. Dear mother of Dianne CAMPBELL and Gilbert, Pam and family, Doug CUNNINGHAM and Debbie, Sandra CUNNINGHAM and Charles, Caroline DEVOGELAERE and Larry, Brad CUNNINGHAM and Kay, Doreen BLOOM and Bob, Mary-Jo CARTIER and Scott. Proud grandmother of twelve grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Also survived by sisters-in-law Vera and Mary Jean COOK, several nieces and nephews. Resting at the J.L. Ford Funeral Home, in Blenheim for visitation on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and where a funeral service will be held on Monday at 11: 00 a.m. with Reverend Paul McPHAIL officiating. Interment will be in Blenheim Evergreen Cemetery. Memorials to the Chatham Christian Centre would be appreciated.

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CARTIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-29 published
BUTLER, Theresa (née CARTIER)
After a brief, but hard fought illness on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 at St. Michael's Hospital, in her 77th year. Theresa, beloved wife of the late Arthur (Bill). Beloved mother of Sandra, Carol, and Barbara. Sister of Loretta, Frank and Arthur. She will be sadly missed by her grandchildren Stephen, Laura, Michelle, Teri and Mark and great-grandchildren Scott and Gabrielle. Family and Friends may visit at the "Scarborough Chapel" of the McDougall and Brown Funeral Home, 2900 Kingston Rd. (east of St. Clair Ave. E.) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday, May 1st. Funeral service on Monday, May 2nd at 1 p.m. in the chapel of the funeral home. Interment Bethel Pioneer Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. A special thanks to a dear friend Randy. Reception to follow at the funeral home. In her own words she was a "tough old bird", but decided it was time to fly home to the Lord.

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CARTLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-14 published
CARTLAND, Mark
Suddenly on Sunday, June 12, 2005 Mark CARTLAND age 41 of Sarnia. Mark is survived by beloved wife Sandy CARTLAND and his two wonderful boys Shawn and Travis. Survived by his mother Pauline CARTLAND & Jeremy SELWYN and his father Jack CARTLAND and Valerie WOODWARD. Brother of Grant and his wife Becky. Also survived by mother-in-law Kae MENEGHIN, sister-in-law Karen THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and her husband Mike. Loving uncle of Kaitlyn THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and Jenna CARTLAND. Special friend of Vickie, Alex and Liam ROBINSON. A funeral service will be held on Thursday, June 16, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. from Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia. Cremation will follow. Interment of ashes in Lakeview Cemetery. Friends will be received at the Smith Funeral Home on Wednesday afternoon from 2 to 4 p.m. and evening from 7 to 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Sunshine Foundation. Memories and condolences may be sent online to www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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CARTLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-15 published
CARTLAND, Mark
Suddenly on Sunday, June 12, 2005 Mark CARTLAND age 41 of Sarnia. Mark is survived by beloved wife Sandy CARTLAND and his two wonderful boys Shawn and Travis. Survived by his mother Pauline CARTLAND & Jeremy SELWYN and his father Jack CARTLAND and Valerie WOODWARD. Brother of Grant and his wife Becky. Also survived by mother-in-law Kae MENEGHIN, sister-in-law Karen THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and her husband Mike. Loving uncle of Kaitlyn THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and Jenna CARTLAND. Special friend of Vickie, Alex and Liam ROBINSON. A funeral service will be held on Thursday, June 16, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. from Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia. Cremation will follow. Interment of ashes in Lakeview Cemetery. Friends will be received at the Smith Funeral Home on Wednesday afternoon from 2 to 4 p.m. and evening from 7 to 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Sunshine Foundation. Memories and condolences may be sent online to www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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CARTLIDGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-04 published
CARTLIDGE, Percy
In loving memory of a dear uncle, Percy CARTLIDGE, who passed away on February 4, 1991.
No longer in our lives to share,
But in our hearts you are always there,
Time passes but memories stay,
Quietly remembered every day.
Forever remembered by Charlene and Gord.

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CARTLIDGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-04 published
CARTLIDGE, Percy
In loving memory of my brother Percy who passed away February Time has passed but memories linger,
As I travel along life's way,
Wherever I go, whatever I do,
I cherish the memories I have of you.
Remembered and greatly missed by Reta.

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CARTLIDGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-31 published
BREWER- SKINNER, Teresa Suzanne (née BREWER)
Teresa Suzanne BREWER, peacefully at London Health Sciences Centre-Victoria Campus on Monday, March 28, 2005, in her 46th year. Loving husband of Richard "Rick" SKINNER. Cherished stepmother of Christina and Bradley SKINNER. Beloved daughter of William and Beatrice BREWER and Patricia and Gordon SKINNER. Dear sister of Barry (Lori) BREWER, Bruce (Rebecca) BREWER, Elizabeth CARTLIDGE and Bonita (Bruce) JOHNSON. Suzanne will also be missed by two nieces and five nephews. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), London, for a funeral service on Saturday, April 2, 2005 at 2 pm. Visitation from 12-2 pm. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or Victorian Order of Nurses would be greatly appreciated.

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CARTLIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-27 published
HORNBY, Brien A.
August 25, 2005, with dignity, after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Beloved father of Raegan MIGHTON and Devon HORNBY (Dixie,) and their mother, the late Betty HORNBY. Dear grandfather of Chloe, Lorea and Annika. Beloved brother of Heather CARTLIDGE and Patricia RODDY (William.) Dear uncle of Gabrielle (Chris,) Justin, Beverley and Linda (Paul). Great-uncle to many nieces and nephews. Eternal gratitude to the staff and chaplancy of Sunnybrook Palliative Care Centre and special friend Marjorie SHU. Cremation has taken place and a memorial service will be held October 23. As expressions of sympathy, donations to a charity close to your heart would be appreciated by the family.

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CARTLIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-26 published
FARRAGHER, Kathleen (née COLE)
Peacefully, surrounded by family, at Providence Manor in Kingston, on Thursday, March 24, 2005, in her 87th year. A former president of the Toronto Archdiocesan Council of the Catholic Women's League, Kathleen was predeceased by her loving husband, James George FARRAGHER. Dear sister of Connie LAGRANGE and Cecilia CARTLIDGE (deceased). Fondly remembered by her children, Mary Lapeer (husband, Dr. Gerard Lapeer), John (wife, Maureen), and Elaine (husband, Ulli DIEMER.) Proud grandmother of Sean, Christine, Kevin, Colleen, Kathleen, Keara, and Janine. Visitation to take place at Paul O'Connor Funeral Home, 1939 Lawrence Avenue East (between Warden and Pharmacy), at 10: 00 a.m. on Monday, March 28th. Service at 11 o'clock in the Chapel and reception to follow. In recognition of their kind support, the family wishes to extend its sincere thanks to the staff and residents at Providence Manor and to Dr. Ivan STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Parkinson Society of Canada.

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CARTMELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-28 published
He helped bring CanLit to the world
Gordon ROPER sneaked books on to curriculum
Group of Friends read to professor who went blind
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
Gathered around Mollie CARTMELL's kitchen table in Peterborough are the chair, associate chair and past chair of Trent University's department of English, talking about the man who has meant the world to them and who helped bring the world the study and appreciation of Canadian literature.
Prof. Gordon ROPER had been teaching at the University of Toronto's Trinity College some 45 years ago when he found a circuitous if not somewhat duplicitous way to slip the study of home-grown Canadian novels into Trinity's previously wholly Anglophile curriculum.
These three -- and many, many others in academia -- are the products of that subterfuge, a generation of scholars and former students who proudly and wryly describe themselves as "Roperized."
They were also the core of a group called Roper's Readers, eight people who read to the 93-year-old at a set time each week, because ROPER had become blind about 25 years ago and because, they all said, ROPER was simply wonderful company.
"He made it always a pleasure, an unalloyed pleasure," said James NEUFELD, chair of Trent's department of English literature. "You'd knock at the door of Applewood (the retirement home where ROPER lived until he died in his sleep on February 20) and he would leap up, stride to the door, thrust his hand out. 'James, so good to see you.' Why wouldn't you go?"
"When he talked to you, he wasn't a blind old man," said CARTMELL, a retired high school teacher who met ROPER 15 years ago while writing a history of the local Young Men's Christian Association. She read him newsmagazines and papers Friday evenings, and treasured his conversation and commentary. "He turned me on to The New Yorker magazine, for which I will be eternally grateful."
The group started in earnest and on a schedule in 1997, after the death of ROPER's beloved wife, Helen. ROPER fell into a deep despair, a shocking revelation for NEUFELD, who had idolized ROPER since he took an English course from him his first year at Trinity College. It was NEUFELD who called Gordon JOHNSTON, associate chair of the English literature department and also a former Trinity student of ROPER's, as well as Mike PETERMAN, past department chair and currently a visiting scholar at Princeton in Canadian studies, and suggested they set up a regular timetable for visiting and reading. Others soon joined, including Peterborough Mayor Sylvia SUTHERLAND.
Tuesdays were NEUFELD's time; Mondays, JOHNSTON read poetry with him; Thursdays, PETERMAN and ROPER often read and discussed PETERMAN's current writing: "It was a special bond and terrific for me. I could hear myself making headway or getting caught. He would make suggestions; he was my best reader."
The last time they were together PETERMAN read from Leaven of Malice, a book by Robertson DAVIES that he's been teaching in his Princeton course on Canadian literature. DAVIES was one of ROPER's oldest and fastest Friends. "I said to him that I thought the novel held up well -- that it was bracing and funny -- and he was thrilled."
And that was ROPER's secret. He was the gentlest of critics he valued literature, studying it with a rigorous intellect but also with a genuine and generous affection. He made neither waves nor academic headlines; his scholarly output was small by some standards, but careful and precise, and always illuminating. Gabrielle Roy said his introduction to her classic novel Where Nests the Water Hen was the best critical piece on her work she'd ever read. Initially a student of American literature who was fascinated by Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Samuel Clemens, ROPER wrote an introduction to Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter because when he began teaching in 1948 there was no text available of this work for university study.
He was chair of English at Trinity College, a member of the graduate faculty at the university, a senior founder of Massey College and responsible as Senior Fellow Emeritus for developing the Massey College library, later renamed the Robertson Davies library. Northrop Frye and E.J. Pratt were his Friends. Governor General Adrienne CLARKSON was a student who phoned his nursing home last year when Peterborough was flooded to make sure ROPER was all right.
"Our class was small -- about 10 of us -- clustered around a table beneath the mullioned windows under the eaves. But as a result, years later, I never hear the word 'ambergris' (a waxy substance secreted by sperm Wales that's added to perfume) without thinking about Dr. ROPER explaining the elaborate metaphor of Ishmael's world," she wrote from Rideau Hall when she learned of ROPER's death. "He taught me not only literature, but also the meaning of caring about literature."
ROPER's greatness was displayed in the classroom. "He could give a whole lecture on the words 'Call me Ishmael,' said JOHNSTON. ROPER was a high-school dropout; he often joked it was the basis of his Friendship with Robertson DAVIES, also a doctor of letters without a high-school diploma. They met at a meeting at Peterborough's Y, when ROPER, from the back of the room, tossed off one of his trademark puns. ROPER took out his first library book when he was eight. When he was in Grade 10, the head librarian at Peterborough's library gave him the keys to the basement stacks because he was spending so much time there instead of across the street at Peterborough Collegiate Institute.
Nevertheless, ROPER attained his PhD in American literature in 1944 from the University of Chicago and was teaching there when he received the offer from Trinity College. At the time, ROPER had to work hard to obtain permission to teach a course on American literature, but by the early 1960s he'd manage to slip in two Canadian volumes at the end of that course. "It was a toehold," said NEUFELD, but not enough for ROPER, who hatched a plot with a colleague in the divinity school to devise a course of Canadian content he called "Spiritual Issues in Literature."
"That's how he got Canadian literature on to the syllabus," said NEUFELD. "It was one of the best courses I ever took. I taught CanLit at Trent on the basis of that course."
JOHNSTON remembered how ROPER smuggled Margaret Laurence -- another friend -- on to campus to address a class just after she had written The Stone Angel, one of a generation of Canadian books that jump-started the entire CanLit industry. In 1969, ROPER returned to Peterborough to teach at the fledgling Trent University. He was back in the classroom, where he was happiest, and he was closer to the family cottage on Roper Island on Stoney Lake where he and Helen spent summers with their children, Mark and Susan.
Later he suffered a colostomy, angina and blindness, but he remained upbeat and busy. When Roper's Readers decided to honour their friend last fall at the annual Rooke Reading Series by inviting the public to hear them read to him -- "and get a taste of our pleasure in doing it," as CARTMELL put it -- ROPER started making a suggestion, here, then there.
"He started to choreograph it," said JOHNSTON, with a laugh. One of his suggestions was that they read from the works of a local nature writer. It was a good one, they all agreed. "He always had in mind what he thought would be good for the community to hear."

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CARTMILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-07 published
CARTMILL, George Walter
At his home in Orillia, Ontario on Thursday, May 5, 2005, at age 71 years. Walter CARTMILL, beloved husband of Janice CARTMILL. Walter will be missed by family and Friends. Friends may call at the Scott Funeral Home "Georgian Chapel", 264 Burton Ave. (between Essa Rd. and Huronia Rd.), Barrie, 705-737-2040, on Friday, May 13th at 12 noon until the time of the Memorial Service in the Chapel at 1: 00 p.m. If so desired, a donation to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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CARTNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-27 published
BROOKS, John " Jack" Frederick
(Long time resident of Midhurst and retired from General Electric) After a short but valiant fight with cancer at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, on Tuesday, September 20th, 2005, in his 85th year. Jack was predeceased by his beloved wife Eleanor (McLEAN) BROOKS (1994.) Predeceased by his dear friend Elizabeth CRAIG. Jack will be dearly missed by his daughters Beverly GILLILAND (California) and Sherry BROOKS (Lindsay,) and his step-son Gerry McLEAN. Predeceased by step-sons Gordon and Gaynor McLEAN. Left to grieve his passing are many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Jack leaves two sisters Joyce (Joseph) MORELL and Erva (and the late Sandy) CARTNER, and a brother Ken (Dorothy) BROOKS. Predeceased by brother Ed BROOKS. Cremation has taken place. In keeping with Jack's wishes, there will be no funeral service.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-22 published
WOOD, Nina Marion (née SMITH)
Nina Marion a resident of London and formerly Chatham passed away at St. Joseph's Hospital, London on Wednesday January 19, 2005 at the age of 85 years. Born in Chatham, the daughter of the late Herbert John and Clara (CARTWRIGHT) SMITH. Beloved wife of the late Paul Darl WOOD (1996.) Dear mother of Judy McCALLUM of London and her late husband John, Darla MARTIN and her husband David of London and the late Terry WOOD. Mother-in-law of Muriel WOOD of Regina Saskatchewan. Loved by her grandchildren Paul WOOD of Winnipeg, Nanlee WOOD of Saskatoon, Jodee and Rod NAYLOR of Woodstock, Jennifer CALDWELL of London, Jessica McCALLUM of Edinburg, Texas, Terri and Al WILSON of London and the late Scott MARTIN. Great grandmother of Aaron and Nicolas WILSON and Alexandra and Benjamin NAYLOR. Sister of the late Leslie SMITH, Merle CARROLL of Chatham, the late Ethel STOCKING, Glenadene PRICE of Michigan, Janet TUCK of Chatham, Catherine CUSHMAN of Wallaceburg and Evelyn SCHMIDT of Detroit. Mrs. WOOD was a member of the Community of Christ Church and the Ladies Auxiliary of the Community of Christ Church, Chatham. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service celebrating Marion's life will be held at The Community of Christ Church, 174 Faubert Dr., Chatham on Sunday January 23, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. with Elder Nancy MOOR officiating. Inurnment of the cremated remains Maple Leaf Mausoleum. Donations made by cheque to Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation as expressions of sympathy appreciated by the family. McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham entrusted with arrangements. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-14 published
CARTWRIGHT, Keith
In loving memory of a dear husband, Keith, who passed away October 14, 2004. My life goes on without you But nothing is the same I have tried to hide my heartache When someone speaks your name. Sad are the hearts that miss you Silent the tear that falls Living my life without you Is the hardest part of all. Always remembered by your wife Linda.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-14 published
CARTWRIGHT, Keith
In loving memory of our dear father Keith, who passed October 14, 2004. Little did I know when I awoke that morning the sorrow the day would bring The call was sudden, the shock severe, to part with one I hold so dear You didn't have time to say farewell nor me to say goodbye You were gone before I realized and only God knows why You left so suddenly your thoughts unknown but lasting memories I'm proud to own. Sadly missed by Donna and Jim, Trish and Stan.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-14 published
CARTWRIGHT, Keith
What my Grandpa Keith, up in heaven would give to say hello To hear your voice, see your smile, to go outside, to play awhile. I love my grandpa, I miss him dearly and I wish that we could be near him. Loving grand_son, Travis.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-19 published
CARTWRIGHT, Winnifred Viola " Winnie"
With strength, courage and dignity at London Health Sciences Centre, Westminster Campus, on Tuesday, October 18, 2005, Winnifred Viola "Winnie" CARTWRIGHT of Aylmer in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late Kenneth CARTWRIGHT (1961.) Dear mother of Frances HUSTLER and husband Paul of London and Jim CARTWRIGHT and wife Marilyn of Port Stanley. Loving grandmother of Kim SMITH and husband John, Dianne HOFFMAN and husband Dwight, Cheryl THORNTON and husband Steve, Ken CARTWRIGHT and wife Ann, David CARTWRIGHT and wife Bonita and great grandmother of Graham, Nadia, Danielle, Ian, Allison, Devon, Chase, Treyton, Rhys, Olivia, Emma and Julia. Also survived by a brother Russell MARTIN and a number of nieces and nephews. Predeceased by 9 brothers. Born in Arkona on February 20, 1919. Winnie worked as a receptionist for Dr. ROBINSON and Dr. SCOTT and worked at the E.E.S.S. Cafeteria. She was a volunteer at Terrace Lodge for over 25 years. She was a former member of the Avalon Rebekah Lodge #224, Aylmer and a 50 year member of the Carnation Chapter #135-Order of the Eastern Star, Springfield. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Friday, October 21, 2005 at 11: 00 am. Interment, Aylmer Cemetery. Her grand_son, Reverend David CARTWRIGHT, officiating.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-01 published
Richard OUTRAM, Poet 1930-2005
Writer who was a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation stagehand by day viewed the world in a grain of sand. A private and intensely emotional man, his devotion to his art was nourished by a lifelong love of his wife, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Tuesday, February 1, 2005 - Page S7
On the coldest night of the winter, poet, stagehand and widower Richard OUTRAM, having consumed a quantity of pills and drink, sat on the enclosed side porch of his house in Port Hope, Ontario, and, in a grand Blakean gesture, contemplated the universe and quietly allowed himself to die.
Everything that made his life joyful emanated from his love for his wife and collaborator, the artist Barbara HOWARD. She died in 2002 during an operation to fix a broken hip. "Devotion is not too strong a word," said writer Barry CALLAGHAN. " The two of them fed each other beautifully and with enormous intensity. They were the closing of the couplet. So, what are you going to do with a one-line couplet? He really was his work and his love for her."
Mr. OUTRAM was not the only poet to have a day job that required entirely different skills from his literary vocation. The poet Raymond SOUSTER, for example, spent his working life at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. It was Mr. OUTRAM's conscious decision to spend his days at physical labour so his mind would be free in the evenings to devote to his poetry. But unlike other working poets, such as Mr. SOUSTER, Mr. OUTRAM won very little popular or critical acclaim.
Although he published steadily for more than 40 years, he won only one major prize -- the City of Toronto Book Award in 1999 for his volume Benedict Abroad. There is only one book-length critical study of his work, Peter Sanger's "Her kindled shadow..." An Introduction to the Work of Richard OUTRAM, which was published in limited numbers by The Antigonish Review in 2001.
Instead of a popular audience, he had a series of passionate champions, such as Mr. Sanger, a retired academic. "Richard has both a physical and a metaphysical orientation that isn't compromised at either level," explained Mr. Sanger. "When Richard writes well there is absolutely no distinction between those two levels." Although Mr. Sanger agrees some poems are better than others, he says what makes Mr. OUTRAM's work stand out is its "magnificence coherence." Every poem is ultimately linked to the rest of his body of work.
Richard Daley OUTRAM was born in Oshawa, Ontario, the son of Mary Muriel DALEY, a teacher, and Alfred Allan OUTRAM, an engineer who served in the artillery in The First World War and was wounded at Ypres in Belgium. His mother's father was a Methodist minister who was deeply involved in the negotiations to form the United Church of Canada in 1925. His paternal grandfather ran the hardware store in Port Hope, the town east of Oshawa where Mr. OUTRAM and his wife moved in 2000.
Shortly after young Richard's birth, his parents moved to the Leaside area of Toronto. As a teenager, Mr. OUTRAM was already interested in music and botany, two areas that remained central to his poetry for the rest of his life. Graduating from Leaside Secondary School in 1949, he went that autumn to Victorian College at the University of Toronto to begin an honours degree in English and Philosophy. There he encountered two professors, philosopher Emil FACKENHEIM and literary critic Northrop FRYE, both of whom had a huge impact on the way he thought about the world. He also enlisted as an officer cadet in the reserve system of the Royal Canadian Navy, spending the summers of 1950 and 1951 aboard frigates in the Bay of Fundy and at H. M. C. S. Stadacona in Halifax.
After he graduated from the University of Toronto in 1953, he worked for a year at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto as a stagehand and then moved to England where he found a job in the same capacity for the British Broadcasting Corporation. It was in London that he first began to write poetry and where, in 1954, he met visual artist Barbara HOWARD. From that meeting their lives were entwined until her death in 2002.
"You can't speak of them apart," said Louise DENNYS, executive vice-president of Random House Canada. "They were so completely connected and so beloved of each other, and that is what proved in the end to be impossible for him to live without."
Four years older than Mr. OUTRAM, Ms. HOWARD was born in Toronto in 1926, began drawing as a child, graduated with honours and a silver medal from the Ontario College of Art in 1951 and then taught school to earn enough money to continue her studies in the major art centres of Europe.
They returned to Canada in 1956 and Mr. OUTRAM went back to working as a stage hand and then crew leader at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, a job he would hold until he retired at 60 in June, 1990. The late typographical designer Allan FLEMING/FLEMMING (of the Canadian National logo among other work) was the best man at their wedding in April, 1957, and also the designer and publisher of Mr. OUTRAM's first collection, Eight Poems, a chapbook with a print run of 190 copies that appeared in 1959 under the Tortoise Press imprint.
The next year, Mr. OUTRAM and Ms. HOWARD founded The Gauntlet Press, producing an elegant series of hand-printed volumes of Mr. OUTRAM's poetry over the years decorated with Ms. HOWARD's beautifully coloured wood engravings.
Early in their marriage, the OUTRAMs had a daughter who lived for only a day. His grief is encased in several poems including Sarah, which appeared in his first major collection, Exsultate, Jubilate (1966,) an elegant volume designed by Mr. FLEMING/FLEMMING and published by Macmillan Co. of Canada.
Toronto writer Barry CALLAGHAN, who was one of the hosts on Weekend, a local Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television show, met Mr. OUTRAM on the set in the late 1960s. "I became aware of this intense man standing beside the camera, dressed like a guy working on the floor but staring at me like a hawk," Mr. CALLAGHAN said in a telephone conversation. After the two men struck up a conversation, "I discovered this very isolated and intensely intellectual man who was interested in poetry and ideas."
In the middle 1970s, Mr. OUTRAM took the manuscript for Turns and Other Poems to the now defunct Clarke Irwin publishing house. Two young editors, Susan KEENE and Louise DENNYS pushed the collection, but Clarke Irwin was already in its demise and was doing very little original publishing.
"He had a shining, sharp, sense of the natural world and he was able to give it a sense of form, a sense of greatness larger than and one moment," said Ms. DENNYS. "He saw the world in a grain of sand and he did that in a way that was very beautiful and very particular to his work and to him."
Ms. DENNYS wanted to find a way to publish the book and Mr. OUTRAM suggested she meet his friend bookseller Hugh ANSON- CARTWRIGHT. Bookseller and poet had met years before, the way such people usually do, over a volume of Mr. OUTRAM's poetry that Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT was trying to sell in his bookstore. Then it turned out that they were neighbours and a lifelong Friendship ensured.
The Christmas of 1974, Ms. DENNYS took the manuscript on a visit home to her parents in England and cold-visited the Hogarth Press, a division of Chatto and Windus. She met poetry editor D. J. Enright, who eventually offered to publish Mr. OUTRAM's poems. She came back to Canada and was able to tell Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT that if he wanted to form a little publishing company, here was a British partner. That is how Turns and Other Poems was published by Chatto and Windus with the Hogarth Press in London in 1975 and by Anson-Cartwright Editions in Toronto the following year. "That moment, when I elided happily in his life back then, was a moment of great pride for Hugh and for me too," she said. "It was the first time that I was involved directly in a book's publication."
Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT published another volume of OUTRAM poems, The Promise of Light in 1979 and Mr. Callaghan's Exile Editions did a Selected Poems in 1984. "He had a fantastic sense of form and a musical ear for what he was doing that was almost perfect, but often his poems were the prisoner of his skill," said Mr. CALLAGHAN, adding that "you can't be first rate every time out and there are times when the form traps what he is trying to do."
Shortly after writer Alberto MANGUEL arrived in Canada in 1983, he met Mr. OUTRAM. "I was awed at first by the strange combination of intelligence and devastating humour," said Mr. MANGUEL. " For all the seriousness of his poetry, he was a very funny man."
After reading Mr. OUTRAM's poetry, Mr. MANGUEL says he was surprised, as he has been so many times in Canada, that "a poet of Richard's magnitude" was not celebrated around the world. "Richard's poems were very serious and complex, and in many cases they required a lot of time and patience from readers," said Mr. MANGUEL. " You had to disentangle the references and look up the words, but it was always worthwhile. When you discovered what he meant, the poem built to a different level."
The next person to publish Mr. OUTRAM was Tim INKSTER of The Porcupine's Quill, who released Man in Love (1985), Hiram and Jenny (1989) Mogul Recollected (1993) and Dove Legend (2001). "It is incredibly elegant and sophisticated and passionate and demanding and even, to a lot of people, off-putting, because verbally it is immensely clever and full of allusions and references," said writer and poetry editor John METCALF. "It is probably some of the most rewarding stuff that has been written in Canada."
Writing poetry, even life itself, lost its purpose for Mr. OUTRAM after his wife died. "Richard was always sending me poems that he loved by other people," said Mr. MANGUEL, mentioning the poem Winter Remembered by John Crowe Ransom about an "... Absence, in the heart, /" that was too great to bear and how the only way to soothe it was to "...walk forth in the frozen air/."
"He must have been thinking of that poem," concluded Mr. MANGUEL sadly.
Funambulist by Richard OUTRAM, 1975
I work on a slender strand
Slung between two poles
Braced fifteen feet apart.
My patient father coached me
From childhood to fall unhurt,
Then set me again and again
On a crude slack-rope he rigged
Out back of our caravan,
Raising the rope by inches:
Now, I'm the only acrobat
In the world to include in his act,
As finale, a one-hand-stand
Thirty feet from the ground
With no net. I married
A delicate, lithe girl
From another circus family.
We are very happy. She stands
On the circular platform top
Of one pole, to steady me
As I reach the steep, last,
Incredibly difficult slope
Near the pole: when I turn about
To retrace my steps, no matter
How quickly I spin, she is there
At the top of the opposite pole,
Waiting, her arms outstretched.
From Turns and Other Poems, published by ANSON- CARTWRIGHT Editions.
Richard Daley OUTRAM was born in Oshawa, Ontario on April 9, 1930. He died of willful hypothermia in Port Hope, Ontario, on Friday, January 21, 2005. He was 74. He was predeceased by his wife Barbara. A celebration of their lives is being planned for a later date.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-06 published
COSBURN, Annie Mildred (formerly CARTWRIGHT)
At Brampton Hospital on May 4, 2005, in her 95th year. Predeceased by her husbands, William S. CARTWRIGHT and William W. COSBURN. Loving mother of Bruce CARTWRIGHT and his wife Betty and Donald CARTWRIGHT and his wife Julie Doran. Step-mother of Bill COSBURN (deceased,) his wife Olga, and Russell COSBURN. She will be missed by her grandchildren, Stephen CARTWRIGHT and his wife Cindy, Susan CHOLOD and her husband Murray, and Catherine COSBURN. Great-grandmother of Erik and Julia CHOLOD, and Sarah CARTWRIGHT. Cremation has taken place. A private family celebration of her life will be held at a later date.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-11 published
FALLS, Grace Mildred
of Winston Park Lodge, Kitchener, on Sunday May 8, 2005, at the age of 95.
Grace was born in Walpole Twp, Haldimand County on August 19, 1909. She was predeceased by her parents, Thomas Andrew and Mary Elizabeth (née KEEN) FALLS and by two sisters, Pearl MATTHEWS (Jack,) formerly of Hamilton, and Mary PEIRSON (Jack,) formerly of Port Elgin, and by her long time friend Ruth ADAM/ADAMS. Survived by nieces Diana JAMES (Guelph,) Katharine MATTHEWS (Hamilton,) Ruth CARTWRIGHT and Susan PEIRSON (Port Elgin) and nephews David PEIRSON (Waterloo,) Jim PEIRSON (Brandon, Manitoba,) and John PEIRSON (Southampton.) Grace will be sadly missed by her friend Barb McLAUGHLIN.
Grace worked for The Prudential Insurance Co, in Toronto for over 40 years and for much of that time lived at 425 Avenue Road.
At Grace's request, there will be no visitation. Cremation has taken place. There will be a memorial service at Saint Thomas Anglican Church, 383 Huron Street, Toronto, on Friday May 13, 2005 at 1: 30 p.m.
Interment at the Toronto Necropolis, 200 Winchester Street, Toronto Ontario.
Memorial donations may be made to Saint Thomas Anglican Church.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-26 published
CARTWRIGHT, Sir Richard John, 1912 -- Died This Day
Monday, September 26, 2005, Page S8
Investor and politician born at Kingston, U.C., on December 4, The scion of a rich, powerful, conservative family that traced its Canadian origins to an ancestor who was expelled from the American colonies during the Revolutionary War, he was sent to Dublin to go to university. Instead of finishing a degree, he came home and chose to invest his family's money in transportation, land deals and manufacturing. In 1863, he entered politics as a Tory and held a succession of seats and cabinet posts, including minister of finance, until 1904, when he was named to the Senate. By that time, he had fallen out with the Conservatives and had eventually joined the Liberal Party. He led the Ontario wing of the party and championed the cause of free trade with the United States. He was knighted in 1879.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-06 published
COSBURN, Annie Mildred (formerly CARTWRIGHT)
At Brampton Hospital on Wednesday, May 4, 2005, in her 95th year. Predeceased by her husbands William S. CARTWRIGHT and William W. COSBURN. Loving mother of Bruce CARTWRIGHT and his wife Betty, Donald CARTWRIGHT and his wife Julie DORAN. Step-mother of Bill COSBURN (deceased,) his wife Olga and Russell COSBURN. She will be missed by her grandchildren Stephen CARTWRIGHT and his wife Cindy, Susan CHOLOD and her husband Murray, and Catherine COSBURN. Great-grandmother of Erik and Julia CHOLOD and Sarah CARTWRIGHT. Cremation has taken place. A private family celebration of her life will be held at a later date.

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CARTWRIGHT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-27 published
POWNALL, Gladys Winnifred
Peacefully at Headwaters Health Care Centre, Orangeville, on Saturday, June 25, 2005, Gladys POWNALL, in her 93rd year, beloved wife of the late Albert POWNALL. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Margaret and the late Jack COWARD, Etobicoke; Betty and Maynard CARTWRIGHT, Orangeville; Christine STREET, England; Sheila and Gordon MOAKES, England; Vera and Barrie BAMFORD, England; Janet PRITCHARD, Cobourg. Fondly remembered by her 13 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Dear sister of Harry and Dorothy BAILEY, England; Nellie GIBSON, England and predeceased by Aubrey BAILEY, Bernard BAILEY and Lilly SHAW. Cremation has taken place. Interment of cremated remains will take place at a later date in England. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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