BOULTER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-07-08 published
BOULTER, Gladys
July 8, 1995
To know her was to love her
Both for family and friend,
And the sweetness of her memory
Time can neither dim nor end.
Forever in our hearts, Rick, Ingrid and James.

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BOULTON o@ca.on.kent_county.wallaceburg.wallaceburg_courier_press 2005-08-31 published
BOULTON, Frances Josephine (née DESHAW)
Ms. Frances Josephine BOULTON, a resident of Wallaceburg passed away on Monday, August 22, 2005 at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance, "Public General Campus", in Chatham, at the age of 58. Frances was born in Chatham and is a daughter of Mabel DESHAW and the late Gerald DESHAW. Loving mother of Michael BOULTON of Wallaceburg and Stephen BOULTON, of Windsor. Dear grandmother of Taylor. Predeceased by a sister Mary. The late Frances BOULTON rested at the Eric F. Nicholls Funeral Home, 639 Elgin Street in Wallaceburg, until Thursday, August 25, 2005, when the funeral mass was celebrated from Holy Family Church at 11 a.m. with Fr. Greg BONIN, Celebrant. Kit KELLER presided at the organ. Pall bearers were: Michael BOULTON, Stephen BOULTON, Sam CIPOLLA, Tony CIPOLLA, Stacey CIPOLLA and Rick BOULTON. Interment was in Riverview Cemetery, Wallaceburg. As an expression of sympathy donations to the Holy Family Church Building Fund or the Arthritis Society may be left at the funeral home. As a living memorial a tree will be planted in Nicholls Memorial Forest in memory of Frances Josephine BOULTON.

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BOULTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-01 published
BOULTON, Matthew
And if I go:
While you're still here,
Know that I live on,
Vibrating to a different measure,
Behind a veil you cannot see through,
You will not see me,
So you must have faith,
I wait for the time when we can sore together again,
Both aware of each other,
Until then live your life to its fullest,
And when you need me just whisper my name in your heart,
I will be there.
He is Matthew BOULTON,
March 12, 1980.
Loving memory, Mum.

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BOULTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-01 published
CAIRNS, Isabell " Bell" Elizabeth (McKEE)
At Roberta Place, Barrie on Saturday, July 30, 2005 Isabell McKEE in her 84th year, beloved wife of the late Donald CAIRNS, Rosemont. Loving mother of William and Lynda, Robert and Diane, Dennis and Donna, Douglas and Annie, Barbara and Paul BOULTON, Brian, Kenneth and predeceased by Elizabeth Ann and Bruce. Fondly remembered by 18 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of the late William McKEE. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy 50), Bolton (905-857-2213) Tuesday afternoon 2-4 and evening 7-9 o'clock. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Wednesday, August 3 at 2 o'clock. Interment Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bolton. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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BOUMA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-05 published
DIELEMAN, Marie
While we grieve Marie's passing, we rejoice that she is now with her Lord. Marie DIELEMAN was taken into glory on Wednesday, August 3, 2005 in her 98th year. She was born on August 5, 1907 and was predeceased by her husband William (November 21, 2001) after 75 years of marriage. She will be sadly missed by her children, grandchildren and greatgrandchildren; Kay and Everett HOOYER of Dresden, Marilyn and Andrew OUDMAN, Betty BOUMA, Wayne and Martha HOOYER, Ed and Laurie HOOYER, Glen (August 4, 2004) and Irene HOOYER; Jane DIELEMAN of Chatham; Adrian and Attie DIELEMAN of Chatham, Bill and Grace DIELEMAN, Brenda and Ken VAN OMMEN, Ken and Ingrid DIELEMAN, Ron and Nancy DIELEMAN; Marie and John VERBURG of Chatham, Marcia and Tom KROESBERGEN, Jim and Jean VERBURG; Jim and Ann DIELEMAN of Chatham-Linda DIELEMAN, John and Carol DIELEMAN, Karen and Dennis GOFORTH, David and Jacky DIELEMAN, Mark and Susan DIELEMAN; Wilma and Jake VAN GURP of Brownsville, David and Charlene VAN GURP, Lois and Bob FORSYTH, Jana and Rich HAMSTRA, Carol and Johan TANGELDER, Susan and Eric KNIGHT, Nancy and James EILSEN, Ellyn and Keith SINKE, Joel VAN GURP; and 65 great-grandchildren. A private family interment will take place at Maple Leaf Cemetery, Chatham followed by a public Memorial Service at First Christian Reformed Church, 25 Tweedsmuir Ave. E., Chatham on Friday August 5, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. with Reverend Paul STADT officiating. Donations to the Back to God Hour would be appreciated. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham, Ontario, (519) 351-2040.

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BOUMA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-31 published
LIMBERTIE- BOUMA, Aleida
On December 28, 2005 after a valiant struggle, our mother, grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend drew her last breath surrounded by her loving family. Hers was a forceful voice in support of Toronto's artistic diversity - as one of the founding directors of the Community Folk Arts Council she pioneered Toronto's Christmas and Easter Around the World Festivals and was a passionate advocate for Canadian folklore and folkways. Awarded the Centennial Medal of Canada for her services to the arts, she was also knighted by Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands for her contributions to the preservation of Dutch culture among immigrants here. A board member of countless organizations, including Folklore Canada International, she helped program folkloric festivals around the world with Canadian dancers of many heritages. Survived by her four daughters Ineke (Catherine), Wendy, Melinda (Ken) and Maya (Erle), grandchildren Jackie, Alex, Maya, Nicholas and Caroline as well as her family in the Netherlands, the United States, Germany and Oman. Predeceased by her husband Adrian. Cremation has taken place and a Memorial Service will be held at Our Lady of Lourdes, 520 Sherbourne Street (at Wellesley), Thursday, January 5, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a charitable donation to the Community Folk Art Council may be made.

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BOUMA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-31 published
LIMBERTIE- BOUMA, Aleida
On December 28, 2005 after a valiant struggle, our mother, grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend drew her last breath surrounded by her loving family. Hers was a forceful voice in support of Toronto's artistic diversity - as one of the founding directors of the Community Folk Arts Council she pioneered Toronto's Christmas and Easter Around the World Festivals and was a passionate advocate for Canadian folklore and folkways. Awarded the Centennial Medal of Canada for her services to the arts, she was also knighted by Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands for her contributions to the preservation of Dutch culture among immigrants here. A board member of countless organizations, including Folklore Canada International, she helped program folkloric festivals around the world with Canadian dancers of many heritages. Survived by her four daughters Ineke (Catherine), Wendy, Melinda (Ken) and Maya (Erle), grandchildren Jackie, Alex, Maya, Nicholas and Caroline as well as her family in the Netherlands, the United States, Germany and Oman. Predeceased by her husband Adrian. Cremation has taken place and a Memorial Service will be held at Our Lady of Lourdes, 520 Sherbourne Street (at Wellesley), Thursday, January 5, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a charitable donation to the Community Folk Art Council may be made.

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BOUNDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-07 published
BRADLEY, Dr. Leonard Orville (1914-2005)
On Friday, March 4th, Dr. Leonard Orville BRADLEY (Brad) passed away at the age of 90. He will be greatly missed by his wife of 63 years Mona, his four children, Leslie, Bill, Heather and Tom and their families, his two sisters, Dorethy and Helen, and his many Friends and family from across Canada.
Brad was always proud of his prairie roots and had fond memories of growing up in Neudorf, Saskatchewan.
He accomplished much in his 90 years, but his best decision was pursuing Mona BOUNDS, his companion through life and its many adventures, challenges and travels.
Brad was passionate and committed to the healthcare field. He was a pioneer in post-war hospital administration, having studied at the University of Chicago and helped develop and teach courses at University of Toronto. His career included many senior positions including Administrator of the Calgary General Hospital (1952-56), Executive Director of the Winnipeg General Hospital (1956-67), President of the Minneapolis Medical Center (1967-69), Executive Director of the Canadian Council on Hospital Accreditation (1969-1974), and Medical Director of the Vancouver General Hospital (1975-78). He received a number of honours for his work including the George Findlay Stephens Memorial Award (1980), the Outstanding Achievement Award for 1984 from the Medical Alumni Assoc. of the University of Alberta, and the Extendicare Award from the Canadian College of Health Service Executives (1988).
Brad also gave much time to the community over the years through his involvement in Rotary and Probus, serving as President of both organizations. Brad also enjoyed his involvement with the United Church.
Brad strongly believed in life-long learning. He received his M.D. in 1938. He achieved a number of other public administration designations and notably, received his final University Degree, a Bachelor of Arts from Athabasca University at the age of 86.
Brad always had a special place in his heart for the family cottage on Betula Lake in the Whiteshell Provincial Park, Manitoba. Mona and Brad never missed a summer for 46 years and it was there that Brad was able to pursue many of his passions: playing cards (including cribbage and bridge), kibitzing with the kids and calling them George and Mary Jane, taking on construction projects with son Bill, and swimming.
Brad passed peacefully, shortly after winning his final game of cribbage.
There will be a funeral service held at Scarboro United Church (134 Scarboro Avenue, S.W., Calgary) on Wednesday, March 9th at 3: 00 p.m. The family thanks Darlene and the other wonderful staff at Rockyview Hospital for their professional and compassionate care of Brad.

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BOUNTIS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-27 published
BOUNTIS, John
Peacefully with family at his side at Parkwood Hospital on Monday, April 25, 2005, John BOUNTIS of London in his 52nd year. Much loved husband and best friend of Vicky BOUNTIS. Predeceased by his parents Elias and Panagiota BOUNTIS. Beloved brother-in-law of Mary and her late husband George, brother of Voula and Kosta and his wife Ntina of Greece. He will be missed by his parents-in-law Niko and Niki PARASKEVOPOULOU of Greece, also his brother-in-law Alexi and his wife Katerina and his two sisters-in-law Gina and Ntina. Dearly remembered by nieces, nephews, many relatives and Friends in Greece and in Canada. Friends will be received at the Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas St. (between Waterloo and Colborne St.) on Wednesday 5-8: 30 p.m. Prayers will be held at 5: 00 on Wednesday by Father Elias DROSSOS. Friends who wish may make memorial donations to the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church Building Fund or the London Regional Cancer Centre. There will always be a heartache There will often be a tear, For all those precious memories Of when you were here. Love you forever, Vicky. Online condolences www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mr. BOUNTIS.

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BOURAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-14 published
BOURAS, Harry
Passed away at Credit Valley Hospital on Monday, December 12, 2005 at the age of 73. Dear brother of Millitsa LIMBERIS, Pat MILLAR, Dena GAUTHIER, Demi BOURAS and Elaine ANDREWS. Sadly missed by brother-in-law John MILLAR, nieces and nephews Tracy ANDREWS, Susie DELROSARIO, Tim GAUTHIER and David GAUTHIER. Friends will be received the Scott Funeral Home, Brampton Chapel, 289 Main St. N., Brampton on Wednesday, December 14th, 2005 from 6-9 p.m. Funeral Services will be held at St. Barbara's Greek Orthodox Church, 7295 McLaughlin Rd., Mississauga at 10: 00 a.m. on Thursday, December 15th, 2005. Interment to follow at Meadowvale Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Barbara's Church or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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BOURASSA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-06 published
BOURASSA, Paul Emile
World War 2 Veteran - Royal Canadian Air Force No. 419 Squadron
It is with sadness that we announce the passing of our father, Paul BOURASSA, on Monday, July 25, 2005, in his 90th year after a lengthy illness fought with courage and dignity. He joins his beloved wife of 53 years, Thelma BOURASSA (née MARSHALL.) Dad is survived by his five children: Lynn, Paul (Violet), John and Dale BOURASSA and Anne HARDY (Glenn COOKE;) his ten grandchildren Ryan, Renee, Shawn, Paul, Shannon, Michael, Jody and Krista BOURASSA, Lauren and Jordan HARDY; two great-grandchildren - Kayleigh and Shane MITTS and his sister Jeanne MILJOURS of Noranda, Quebec.
Dad was a terrific father. He spent the larger portion of his income on housing, feeding and clothing five children yet he still found money to purchase passes to the local outdoor swimming pool during the summer, take us on camping trips to Lake Simcoe as well as outings to Musselman's Lake and Niagara Falls.
And it was pretty amazing having a Dad who was a war hero. He saved three men from his burning Lancaster bomber when it crashed in England after returning from a bombing mission. For that feat, he personally received a Distinguished Flying Cross from King George VI.
Dad was a fitness guru long before it became popular. Even in the last year of his life, test results indicated his heart was like that of a 50 year old man. He walked vigorously after every meal and was still cycling at the age of 85. In addition, to exercising, Dad loved to garden, golf, bowl, tend to his dog and cat, read biographies and do crossword puzzles, all while listening to his beloved country music.
We children have learned a lot from Dad. We get our love of cleanliness and orderliness from him as well as our strong work ethic. If something broke down in the house, he would fix it before eating his dinner. He was not a procrastinator and neither are any of his children.
At Dad's request, there will be no funeral or memorial service. However, a Dedication Ceremony will be held at Trenton War Museum on Saturday, September 24, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. to commemorate a plaque in his honour. Dad, we willl remember the twinkle in your eye.

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BOURASSA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-04 published
BOURASSA, Paul Emile
World War 2 Veteran - Royal Canadian Air Force No. 419 Squadron. It is with sadness that we announce the passing of our father, Paul BOURASSA, on Monday, July 25, 2005, in his 90th year after a lengthy illness fought with courage and dignity. He joins his beloved wife of 53 years, Thelma BOURASSA (née MARSHALL.) Dad is survived by his five children: Lynn, Paul, John and Dale BOURASSA and Anne HARDY; his ten grandchildren Ryan, Renee, Shawn, Paul, Shannon, Michael, Jody and Krista BOURASSA, Lauren and Jordan HARDY; two great-grandchildren - Kayleigh and Shane MITTS and his sister Jeanne MILJOURS of Noranda, Quebec. Dad was a terrific father. He spent the larger portion of his income on housing, feeding and clothing five children yet he still found money to purchase passes to the local outdoor swimming pool during the summer, take us on camping trips to Lake Simcoe as well as outings to Musselman's Lake and Niagara Falls. And it was pretty amazing having a Dad who was a war hero. He saved three men from his burning Lancaster bomber when it crashed in England after returning from a bombing mission. For that feat, he personally received a Distinguished Flying Cross from King George VI. Dad was a fitness guru long before it became popular. Even in the last year of his life, test results indicated his heart was like that of a 50 year old man. He walked vigorously after every meal and was still cycling at the age of 85. In addition, to exercising, Dad loved to garden, golf, bowl, tend to his dog and cat, read biographies and do crossword puzzles, all while listening to his beloved country music. We children have learned a lot from Dad. We get our love of cleanliness and orderliness from him as well as our strong work ethic. If something broke down in the house, he would fix it before eating his dinner. He was not a procrastinator and neither are any of his children. At Dad's request, there will be no funeral or memorial service. However, a Dedication Ceremony will be held at Trenton War Museum on Saturday, September 24, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. to commemorate a plaque in his honour. Dad, we willl remember the twinkle in your eye.

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BOURDAGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-05 published
BOURDAGE, Stephen John (April 9th, 1963 - January 5th, 2003)
We though of you with love today
But that is nothing new
We thought about you yesterday
And days before that too.
We think of you in silence
We often speak your name
Now all we have are memories
And your picture in a frame.
Your memory is our keepsake
With which we'll never part
God has you in his keeping
We have you in our heart.
Loved and missed by Mom, Dad, Rick, Michael and all other Family Members.

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BOURDAGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-14 published
McINTYRE, Jerry / Gerald
Jerry/Gerald (L.F.) born Glace Bay, Nova Scotia June 9, 1936 - died Nanaimo, British Columbia May 12, 2005 at N.R.G.H. after a short, but courageous battle with cancer. Survived by his beloved wife and best friend Joan, son William (Gale) McINTYRE, daughters Kathleen and Christy McINTYRE, brothers Frank (Linda) HUBLEY, Gordon (Sharon) HUBLEY, sister Cheryl (John) KOZEY, sisters-in-law Carol (George) HOY and Judy BOURDAGE, 8 grandchildren, several nieces and nephews, his Aunt Beauty, many cousins and dear Friends. Predeceased by his mother and step-father Sarah and Fred HUBLEY, and his father Lauchlin MacKAY. At Jerry's request, there will be no service. Joan asks that this man simply be remembered for his great ability to listen, his laughter and love of life, friend to many, and as he wished, leaves us and this world quietly. Thanks to Dr. Helmut Mark for always being there. Donations in his may be made to the Liver Foundation, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, or charity of choice. Cremation.

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BOURDAGES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-01 published
RICHARD, Weillie
With thanksgiving for his life, the family of Weillie RICHARD announce his passing. He succumbed peacefully, surrounded by the love of his family at London Health Sciences Centre - University Hospital in London on Wednesday, September 28th, 2005. He leaves many fond memories for all who knew him. Dearly beloved husband of the late Madeleine Bélanger RICHARD. Cherished father of Catherine RICHARD, and Sandra RICHARD- MOHAMED and her husband Mahms of London. He will remain forever in the hearts of his grandchildren François RICHARD- KRAFCHEK, Stéphane and Élise RICHARD- MOHAMED. Dear brother of Irène BAILLARGEON and Yvette ROY. Dear brother-in-law of Thérèse CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER- BÉLANGER, Jeanne BOURDAGES, Lorraine TANGUAY, Beatrice MORIN, Thérèse BÉLANGER (Rolland GINGRAS), Simone LESSARD (René), J. Edouard BÉLANGER (Ginnette VERREAULT), Marie-Ange DORVAL (Adonia), Denyse KRAJCIK (Jean), Denis BÉLANGER (Diane BENOIT.) Sadly missed by his much loved Godchildren Joelle Dorval BERGERON and Marcel BÉLANGER. Remembered with fondness by his many cousins, nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents Joseph and Élise (née GODBOUT) RICHARD, his siblings Léda LABELLE, Marie-Ange LAROCHELLE, Adalbert RICHARD, Marie-Anne LAVIGNE, Évangéliste RICHARD, Rita GUITAR, Blanche RICHARD, Berthe GUILLEMETTE, Elizabeth DESROSIERS, Fernande FELTEAU, Cécile JOHNSON, Ernest RICHARD and his brothers and sisters-in-law Jean-Paul and Fernand BÉLANGER, Adhemar BOURDAGES, Jean-Laval TANGUAY, Yvonne BÉLANGER, Gilberte NADEAU, Raymond MORIN, Maurice LAFLAMME and Gilles PAQUETTE. Friends will be received at l'Église Assomption de Notre-Dame, 384 Hillside Avenue, Oshawa on Monday after 10: 00 a.m. The Funeral Mass will follow at 11: 00 with Father Viateur LAURIN officiating. Rite of Committal at Resurrection Cemetery Mausoleum in Whitby. If desired and in lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the London Health Sciences Foundation, University Hospital - Palliative Care, 747 Baseline Road East, London, Ontario N6C 2R6. Donations may be arranged through J.J. Patterson and Sons Funeral Residence, 19 Young Street, Welland or on-line with memories and condolences at www.jjpatterson.ca A special word of thanks goes to Brenda DALEY, Debbie JARVIS, Jenna GOODHAND, the 3rd floor staff at Chelsey Park Retirement Community, Dr. LO, London Health Sciences Centre - University Hospital 4th Floor Medicine Team 3 and nursing staff, Dr. SCHULZ and Lynne Hughes MARSH of the London Health Sciences Centre Palliative Care - University Hospital. As a memorial tribute, a tree will be planted in Memory Woods. A tree grows - memories live.
How 2 letter Surnames like LO work in OGSPI

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BOURDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-22 published
JENSMA, Regina
After a brief illness at London Health Sciences Centre, University Campus, Regina JENSMA of Strathroy in her 45th year. Beloved mother of Brandy JENSMA, Amanda WILSON and Jason JENSMA all of London. Grandmother to Chase and Madyson. Also survived by her parents Jasper and Ina (BEINTEMA) JENSMA of Strathroy, and brothers and sisters Peter JENSMA of Strathroy, Wilma and Steve BOURDEAU of London, Tina JENSMA of Windsor, Theo JENSMA of Strathroy, Frank and Brenda JENSMA and Steven JENSMA all of London. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her brother John JENSMA (1998.) Visitation will be held at the Denning Bros. Funeral Home Ltd., 32 Metcalfe St. W., Strathroy on Thursday February 24th from noon to 1: 00pm when funeral service will take place officiated by the family. Cremation at Woodland Cemetery and Crematorium. Donations to Brain Tumor Research would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Regina.

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BOURDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-01 published
ELDER, Blake Gerald " Gerry"
Peacefully at Strathroy Hospital on Sunday, February 27, 2005 Blake Gerald (Gerry) ELDER of MacHenry St. (Forest) Lambton Shores. Beloved husband and best friend of Norma Jean (BORTHWICK) ELDER. Dear father of Lori (Doug) ROSS, Strathroy; Connie LICHTY (Bob WELLINGTON) of Forest. Fondly remembered by grandchildren Andrew and Ian ROSS, Chad, Jessica and Derek LICHTY. son of Vera PARSONS of Chatham. Brother of Audrey (Bob) BOURDEAU of Port Lambton. Step-brother of Ron PARSONS and Marjorie BURTON, both of London. Predeceased by Helen and Arthur. Son-in-law of Gladys BORTHWICK and the late Chris. Brother-in-law of Thelma LARSEN, Ruby STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and the late Inez WATSON. Also surviving are nieces and nephews. Aged 67 years. Resting at the Ronn E. Dodge Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, McFarlane Chapel, 9 James St. S. at Watt St. (Forest) Lambton Shores where funeral services will be conducted on Wednesday, March 2, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Beechwood Cemetery. Donations appreciated to Legion Poppy Fund (Cheques only received at the Funeral Home). Visitation Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Legion Parade Tuesday evening 7 p.m. A memorial tree will be planted in memory of "Gerry" by the Dodge family.

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BOURDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-18 published
PARSONS, Ronald " Ron"
Ronald (Ron) at home on Monday, April 11, 2005 peacefully passed away in his 74th year. He was dearly loved and cherished by his wife Joan (MADIGAN) PARSONS who was by his side when his four month battle with cancer ended. He was a loving, devoted and caring father to Don and his wife Deb, Linda and her husband Dave, David and his wife Joan, Dan and Bob and Derek. Will be loved and remembered by his grandchildren Angela and Steve HENDERSON, Bob BOS, Josh MADIGAN, Crystal BOS and Marisa MADIGAN. Survived by his step-mother Vera PARSONS. Also survived by his loving sisters Marjorie BURTON and Audrey BOURDEAU, and sister-in-laws Joey and Norma. Dearly remembered by his many nieces and nephews and their families. He will be sadly missed by his in-laws and longtime buddy Ross MADIGAN and also by his Friends and neighbours. Predeceased by his brothers Art and Gerry and sister Helen. Also predeceased by his parents Gertrude and Arthur Sr. Cremation has already taken place. A celebration of Ron's life will be held at a later date. Forest City Cremation Services 675-0772.

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BOURDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-27 published
LUYT, Joyce Beryl (DAFOE)
Peacefully at Sunnybrook Hospital on Monday, May 23, 2005, in her 66th year. Predeceased by her parents Clifford and Elfreda (BOURDEAU) DAFOE. Survived by her sister Loretta (Dave) ROBERTS of Chatham and niece Lisa ROBERTS of Toronto. Loving companion to Jim PATTERSON for 27 years. Joyce will be remembered by Jeffery PATTERSON, Jim PATTERSON (jr.), Jennifer POWELL and Julie KREIGER and their spouses. A memorial service will be held at the Trull "North Toronto" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence), on Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Canadian Cancer society or the Toronto Humane Society.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-07 published
Tony COSTANZA, Hairdresser: 1928-2005
Immigrant from Italy took up barbering in Ottawa; for decades, he trimmed the locks of the important and not so important
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, February 7, 2005 - Page S6
Ottawa -- For 45 years, ambassadors, prime ministers, viceroys and thousands of less-celebrated men had their hair cut by Tony COSTANZA at the Roma Barber Shop on Elgin Street in Ottawa. Holding court behind his favourite barber chair -- the first on the right when you came in -- he dispensed advice, jokes, opinions and stories to a never-ending stream of customers.
Everyone felt welcome, from working stiffs to the late Ray HNATYSHYN when he was governor-general. Pierre Elliott TRUDEAU dropped by, as well as judges from the nearby provincial courthouse and cadres of lawyers from surrounding office buildings. National Defence Headquarters isn't far away, so he served soldiers, airmen and sailors of all ranks, too.
All his clients received the same, no-fuss treatment. The interior of the tiny shop, which also houses Tony's Smoke Shop, is decorated with postcards, military cap badges and framed photos of favourite clients. The late Conservative politician George Hees is up there, along with former chief of defence General Ramsey Withers, and Paul Robinson, a former U.S. ambassador to Canada.
Retired warrant officer Roger DESPARDE was one of many clients who made Friends with Mr. COSTANZA. "I was in at least once a week. I got to like him and we got along very well. He was like a brother to me, he confided in me."
The shop is an oasis of civility in an uncivil world, a place "where people came by to talk," said David HOMA, a long-time client who recognized Mr. COSTANZA for his acts of kindness. "From time to time, someone would come in for a haircut but couldn't pay. He'd thank them for their business, even though he knew they wouldn't be back to pay. I'm sure that happened a hundred times."
Originally from Sicily, Mr. COSTANZA served in the Italian border police in the late 1940s and then spent five years working in the coal mines of Lancashire, England. In 1955, he immigrated to Canada equipped with little English and just $20. A year later, he sent for his wife, Genoveffa, and son Alex.
Settling in Ottawa, he found work wherever he could. In 1955, he took up barbering. After working for others, Mr. COSTANZA set up on his own in 1960. Nine years later, he moved across the street to the present location and never looked back.
It wasn't easy, though. Six days a week, Mr. COSTANZA opened the shop at 7 a.m. and spent the next 13 hours there. He only took a vacation twice, returning to Italy in 1976 and 1988.
On a good day, he served about 10 clients, or roughly 100,000 haircuts in a career. Now and then, he felt obliged to exert professional influence. "If a guy wanted a particular style and my father thought he didn't have the hair for it, he would tactfully suggest something else," said son Mario COSTANZA. " The guy would usually walk away happy."
The late 1960s and early 1970s weren't kind to Mr. COSTANZA. Long hair was fashionable and most males no longer wanted a "short back and sides" every two weeks. He waited patiently for better days and played a lot of checkers.
However, things changed when son Alex COSTANZA began work at the shop. "I thought it would be a good idea to learn the trade and help my father out. We got along, didn't have any disagreements."
His younger brother Mario had already come to know the shop in the 1960s. He had a job there sweeping floors after school. "It was a thrill to be there and see my father at work and listen to him shooting the breeze with his customers. At the end of the day, he'd throw me a quarter."
In 1978, Mario decided to make it a family threesome. "I liked the relaxed atmosphere [so] I decided to follow in my father's footsteps."
On January 10, Tony COSTANZA cut his last head of hair. He went home early after deciding he did not feel well, and now his chair sits unoccupied and his brushes, scissors, clippers and combs lay untouched.
Gaetano (Tony) COSTANZA was born in Sicily on February 13, 1928. He died in Ottawa on January 13. He was 76. He leaves his wife, Genoveffa, sons Alex and Mario, and his sister, Concetta.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-23 published
James COWAN, Army Officer 1928-2005
As a raw lieutenant, he took command in the middle of a battle in the Korean War and was recommended for the Military Cross
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, March 23, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Jim COWAN achieved a rare distinction for an inexperienced 22-year-old army officer when he took command of his infantry company in the middle of a battle. On May 30, 1951, he was a lieutenant with the Second Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, commanding a platoon of 35 infantrymen during their first major action in the Korean War when his company commander was wounded.
Mr. COWAN's seniority got him the job, said John WOODS of Ottawa, one of two other platoon commanders during the battle of Kakhul-Bong almost 54 years ago. "John STRICKLAND of 9 Platoon had lost three-quarters of his platoon in the first five minutes of the attack. [My platoon] came up and took over his position, so Jimmy and I fought side by side up the hill."
Suddenly, word came that their commander, Major Harry BOATES, had been hit by a Chinese mortar bomb. Mr. COWAN sprinted breathlessly over to Mr. WOODS. " What date was your commission?" he asked.
Even in the middle of a battle, it was important for officers to observe certain professional niceties. "Feb. 16, 1948," Mr. WOODS replied.
"That gave him three months seniority over me, [which] entitled him to take over the company."
They discussed what to do next. "We thought about making a full bayonet charge with both platoons, but we decided... it would have been suicidal."
The Second Battalion, which had formed at Camp Petawawa, Ontario, less than a month after North Korea invaded South Korea on July 25, 1950, had trained at Fort Lewis, Washington., before shipping out on May 4, 1951. Placed under the command of the 25th U.S. Division, it had been advancing north of Seoul when it was ordered to capture the heavily fortified 500-metre summit of Kakhul-Bong and the village of Chail-li beyond it.
D Company, including Mr. COWAN and his men of 10 Platoon, had been told to take the main objective -- the twin peaks of Kakhul-Bong. At 6: 30 a.m., Major BOATES sent his three platoons leapfrogging forward until they were pinned down by Chinese machine-gun fire. A driving rainstorm that started at 7 a.m. didn't help matters. Not long after, Major BOATES was wounded and Mr. COWAN took over the attack.
"Jimmy was very cool and very professional," said Mr. WOODS, who remained a lifelong friend. "The way he accepted the responsibility of taking command was very impressive."
A handful of men advanced to within six metres of the summit of Kakhul-Bong, only to be stopped by heavy fire. "Victory was so near -- yet so far. Below, the Chinese could be seen concentrating in substantial numbers for a counterattack," wrote G.R. Stevens in The Royal Canadian Regiment, Volume Two, 1933-66.
"Determined to deny them access to the Chorwon Plains -- to which Kakhul was virtually the key -- the enemy opened up with mortar and artillery fire. In pelting rain and with no high ground for observation, it was obvious he was firing from guns which had been previously dug in and ranged," wrote correspondent Bill BOSS of The Canadian Press. For three hours, both Mr. COWAN and Mr. WOODS deployed their platoons "in a bombardment not seen by this correspondent since... the Second World War."
Mr. COWAN radioed battalion headquarters that his right flank was entirely exposed, reported that 3,000 Chinese soldiers in the valley below were preparing a counterattack and said he had only 70 men left. Brigadier-General John ROCKINGHAM, commander of 25 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group, ordered him to disengage.
Second Battalion had suffered six dead and 25 wounded. Both Mr. COWAN and Mr. WOODS were recommended for the Military Cross. Years later, Mr. COWAN, who had been wounded that day, said that "becoming a company commander while under fire is an experience no young man ever forgets."
The son of a Toronto police officer, Mr. COWAN joined the cadet corps of the 48th Highlanders of Canada at 13. He was commissioned into the regiment seven years later before volunteering for the regular army in 1950. After the Korean War, he followed the conventional career path of thousands of officers, including battalion and staff postings in Canada and Europe.
In 1953, he enjoyed an unusual job for an army officer when he cruised the North Atlantic, the Mediterranean and the Pacific as ground-liaison officer aboard the aircraft carrier H.M.C.S. Magnificent. While in Halifax aboard Magnificent, he met a navy nurse named Betty-June BALLANTYN and they became sweethearts. Then, after spending a number of years in Vietnam and Laos as part of the International Truce Commission, Mr. COWAN returned home in 1957 and they married.
The next 13 years saw Mr. COWAN and his family assigned to postings around the world, including stops in India, Germany and the United States. He commanded his original unit, the Second Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, in Soest, West Germany, from 1968 to 1970. He retired from the Canadian Forces in 1982 as a brigadier-general. He later spent seven years as Chief Executive Officer and priory secretary of Saint John Ambulance.
Brigadier-General James Albert COWAN was born on September 30, 1928, in Toronto. He died of lung cancer on January 1, 2005, in North Bay, Ontario He was 76. He is survived by his wife, Betty-June, sons Ian and Scott and brother Bill.
He was predeceased by his brother Dave and his sister Jean.
He will be interred with full military honours in Ottawa's National Military Cemetery in May.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-14 published
Douglas GUNTER, Army Officer: 1921-2005
Artillery officer who experienced savage fighting in the liberation of Europe was years later lauded as a 'gallant base commander' who played host to the Royal Family
By Buzz BOURDON, Thursday, April 14, 2005, Page S9
Special to The Globe and Mail
Ottawa -- Colonel Douglas GUNTER loved organizing things, so when National Defence Headquarters told him in 1972 to expect a Royal visit to Canadian Forces Base Shilo, he found himself in his element. For three months, he was everywhere, planning, inspecting and double-checking everything. He resolved that Shilo, the home station of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, would be in tip-top shape for a visit to Manitoba by the Queen, Prince Philip, the Prince of Wales and Princess Anne.
Even his own family was involved. A possible rail strike meant they might have to be evicted to house the Royal Family. "When I told them that we might be moving out to make room for royalty, the children thought that would be exciting, while my wife, with her Irish heritage, was less enthusiastic," Mr. GUNTER wrote in a 1993 family memoir.
His daughter, Anne BRIGHAM, who was 10 at the time, recalled the havoc. "German shepherds were brought in to sniff for bombs. My mother's silver tea service was replaced by 'something better.' She was offended!"
The family was instructed on etiquette, she said. "I had to curtsey to the Queen, Prince Philip, Charles and Anne; my brother had to bow. My mother was a good girl and did what she was told for my father's sake."
Finally, the big day arrived on July 13, 1970. Father and daughter made a final tour of the base at 9 a.m. to see that everything was ready. Then the weather, the one thing beyond Mr. GUNTER's control, went haywire. Appalled, he could only watch in horror as the clouds unleashed lightning, thunder and pelting rain on the royal enclosure. "Vicious rains were soon blowing chairs, bunting and children horizontally across the prairie," he wrote.
In due course, the Royal Family arrived and took their places on a reviewing stand to watch paratroopers from the Canadian Airborne Regiment make a free-fall parachute jump. Other soldiers then demonstrated rappelling by sliding down ropes from a hovering helicopter. That's when the spit hit the fan. Unexpectedly, backwash from the helicopter struck with a prolonged blast of air. Hats went flying and soldiers arrived at a dead run to steady the dangerously teetering structure.
A young Princess Anne managed "to hang on to her hat while her lime-green mini-skirt was flying in all directions. The ever-alert members of the media rushed with their cameras to the front of the stand to capture the royal thigh on film," wrote Mr. GUNTER.
Reacting quickly, he shielded her with his umbrella, earning him transatlantic kudos as "the gallant base commander, protecting the modesty of the young princess."
"Not since the days of Sir Walter Raleigh 400 years ago has such gallantry been seen," one newspaper reported.
Doug GUNTER had joined the army in 1939 and attended the University of New Brunswick. He was posted to 12 Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery. He landed in Normandy shortly after D-Day in 1944 and fought his way across France, Belgium, the Netherlands and into Germany.
In February of 1945, he took part in a major operation to clear the west bank of the Rhine River for the drive into Germany. The attack opened with 1,200 guns in the biggest artillery barrage of the war. "My guns started firing high explosive at 0400 hours the continual flashes of gunfire meant you could read a paper anywhere," he wrote. "We continued firing until 1600 hours."
Retired Major-General Reg WEEKS of Ottawa first met Doug GUNTER during the autumn of 1944. Operating about 150 metres behind the fighting, Mr. GUNTER was acting as a forward observation officer, recording the fall and effect of artillery and calling in corrections amid the noise and confusion. A wrong move could mean untold casualties by friendly fire.
"I never knew him to make a mistake in bringing down artillery fire in the right place and the right time," said Mr. WEEKS.
Those desperate months remained with Mr. GUNTER for the rest of his life. "Our gun positions were usually littered with the purple, bloated bodies of horses, cows, pigs and enemy soldiers."
He never did become accustomed to the discovery of body parts. "I remember doing a reconnaissance for a gun position near a Dutch farm house. I discovered a teenaged girl and started to question her when artillery shells started to fall. We both dove for shelter in different areas. When the shelling stopped, I found [her] decapitated body in the farm yard. That I found very disturbing."
After the war, Mr. GUNTER transferred to the regular army, moving his#17 times before he retired in 1974 as director of artillery. He served in Canada, Korea, Germany, Britain and Cyprus.
Mr. GUNTER spent the next 10 years as the executive director of the Canadian Figure Skating Association.
Douglas Hayward GUNTER was born on March 22, 1921, in Saint John, New Brunswick He died of cancer on March 4, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 83. He leaves his wife, Josephine, children Anne and Richard, sister Dorothy and brother Harold.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-05 published
Tom HOUGH, Fighter Pilot and Lawyer: 1922-2005
Royal Canadian Air Force Spitfire pilot survived the notorious 'long march' of allied PoWs near the close of the Second World War
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, May 5, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- The order came with characteristic German terseness. All Allied prisoners, more than 1,000 aircrew from Canada, Britain and other Commonwealth countries, were to be ready to evacuate Stalag Luft III on 30 minutes' notice.
Tom HOUGH of the Royal Canadian Air Force had been expecting it, but the news still hit him and his fellow prisoners, or "kriegies," like a ton of bricks. "Hysteria reigned. The pervading feeling was of immense relief not unaccompanied by apprehension. Val started playing his guitar, and in a spontaneous excess of spirits we all started singing," he wrote 40 years later in an unpublished memoir.
After packing his meagre belongings, Mr. HOUGH, a Spitfire pilot who had joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941 and served with the Royal Air Force squadrons and with the Royal Australian Air Force in Egypt, had crash-landed behind enemy lines in Italy. A prisoner of war for almost a year, he paraded with the rest of the men. It was very cold and snowing lightly.
The Russian army had launched an explosive attack across the Vistula River two weeks earlier on January 12, 1945. Hitler's Third Reich was falling to pieces all over Europe, but German authorities saw fit to evacuate tens of thousands of Allied PoWs away from Russian forces. The Germans thought they would be useful in peace negotiations.
On January 28, 1945, they marshalled the prisoners -- all of them hungry, exhausted and fearing the worst -- and sent them by foot across 90 kilometres of frozen countryside from Stalag Luft III, near Sagan, in southeastern Germany, to Luckenwalde, near Berlin. Now known as "the long march," the event was duplicated at many other camps. It is regarded as one of Germany's worst war crimes.
Walking 15 or 20 kilometres per day took its toll on the prisoners, many of whom had been in captivity for five years, Mr. HOUGH said. "What would happen to those too ill to walk? Many of us were suffering from foot trouble. Socks were removed, carrying parts of burst blisters with them. An increasing number were developing painful limps; many had developed coughs and running noses. Some had temperatures. Many had diarrhea or intestinal infections."
It was also the coldest winter Germany had experienced in 50 years and hundreds of PoWs collapsed and perished by the wayside. Ironically, Mr. HOUGH and his mates also had to contend with Allied aircraft that mistook them for a German column. In one incident alone, Royal Air Force Typhoon fighter bombers strafed and killed 60 PoWs.
Despite the horrors of the march, a comic incident occurred when a German officer made an unusual appeal, Mr. HOUGH wrote. "'If the kriegie who has stolen [his] birthday goose from his staff-car does not return it forthwith, you'll all have to sleep in the snow. If he returns it immediately, no questions will be asked.' The word was that it was too late, but apparently the officer settled for a D-bar [chocolate] and an unstated number of cigarettes."
Five days later the ragged column arrived at a rail siding and a long line of boxcars labelled 40 hommes ou 8 chevaux. Hundreds of men were crammed inside each car. Conditions were worse than primitive, Mr. HOUGH said. "The press was so acute that no one could lie down. At best, perhaps half of us could sit down at one time, knees drawn up to our chests. Later, when complete exhaustion set in, some collapsed on top of others, so in places we lay in layers."
Three days later, Mr. HOUGH and his comrades arrived at Stalag IIIA, 50 kilometres south of Berlin. Advancing Soviet forces soon cast aside German defences and on April 21, 1945, he simply walked to freedom.
After the war, Mr. HOUGH qualified as a lawyer at Osgoode Hall before joining the Royal Canadian Air Force's legal branch. In 1962, he founded his own law firm in Ottawa and was later appointed Queen's Counsel.
Thomas Harris HOUGH was born on January 2, 1922, in North Bay, Ontario He died of a heart attack on March 27, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 83. He leaves his son Tom, daughters Teri, Lynne and Janet, sister Pat and brothers Bill and David. He was predeceased by his wife Denise and son Mark.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-17 published
Evelyn HORNE, Civil Servant and Volunteer: 1907-2005
Ottawa secretary worked for Mackenzie KING and was acquainted with a succession of prime ministers. From her vantage point at the centre of power, she saw everything and knew everyone
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Tuesday, May 17, 2005 Page S9
Ottawa -- Everyone came to see Evelyn HORNE to pick her brains on people and policy, including Jean CHRÉTIEN. She spent 30 years at the centre of political power. Starting with Mackenzie KING, Miss HORNE knew five prime ministers in a row, including Louis SSAINTURENT, John DIEFENBAKER, Lester PEARSON and Pierre TRUDEAU.
From 1941 to 1973, Miss HORNE perched just off centre stage as a perceptive spectator of some of the most tumultuous events in recent Canadian history -- from the anxious years of the Second World War to the new welfare state that came later. Surrounded by statesmen, politicians, governors-general and civil servants, Miss HORNE knew practically all of them, many on a first-name basis.
"She told me that she knew CHRÉTIEN when he was a young pup who came and sat on the corner of her desk and talked politics," said her nephew, Robert PIKE of Ottawa.
Other Ottawa mandarins who valued Miss HORNE for her administrative skills during the '40s and '50s included Prime Minister Paul MARTIN's father, Paul MARTIN Sr., Jack PICKERSGILL and C.D. HOWE.
For all that, Miss HORNE never forgot the years she spent working for Mackenzie KING. Getting that job was a "case of being in the right place at the right time and knowing the right people though I would be selling myself short if I didn't admit that I had some native intelligence and was willing to go the second mile into overtime when it was necessary," she said in 1997.
Miss HORNE first attracted Mr. King's attention when, as a provincial civil servant, she was secretary of the committee organizing the Nova Scotia segment of the 1939 visit to Canada of King George Virgin Islands and Queen Elizabeth.
"When Mr. KING asked to meet me during his tour of East Coast defences in the fall of 1940, I knew I was to be interviewed for a job. And what an interview! Presumably, someone had told him that I could write a fairly good letter; he asked me nothing about my work capabilities," said Miss HORNE.
Instead, Mr. KING quizzed her about the architectural features of the room they were sitting in at Nova Scotia's Province House, Canada's oldest seat of government. "[It was] the most perfect example of Adam architecture in North America. He asked me to explain the symbolism of the bas-relief around the fireplace and recount the history behind the life-size portraits of kings and queens that adorned the walls," she said.
Fortunately, Miss HORNE knew all the answers and found herself in Ottawa in January of 1941. "My first reaction was disappointment. I found the city dull and boring -- after Halifax. There was no immediate awareness that there was a war on. And I was very disappointed in [my new] job. I was assigned to do the 'routine correspondence.' "
It was so simple and repetitive, she was "bored to tears. When I could stand it no longer, I complained to the boss -- not Mr. KING, of course, but [to his] principal secretary. I said I wanted to go back home. The work was too easy -- there was no challenge I didn't have enough to do. As a result, I was given the responsibility for the whole of the Prime Minister's correspondence."
That task was not without its lighter moments, Miss HORNE told her niece, Frances PIKE. " One day, she reached an envelope addressed 'To the Biggest Prick in Canada.' There was nothing inside except an unused condom. 'Mr. PICKERSGILL,' she said, 'what do I do with this'? He said, 'Miss HORNE, I'll take care of it. As far as the contents are concerned, you may do with it what you will.'"
Although Miss HORNE rarely saw Mr. KING during the war, the Prime Minister's Office "was an exciting place to be, right at the heart of government, during those increasingly intense years of war. There were so many pressing concerns, and all kinds of people wrote to the Prime Minister about all kinds of problems. I had to find the answers, or find the people who could.
"I learned so much, not only about government, but also about the people of this country, who showed so much courage, stoicism, and forbearance in the face of all the tragedy and the hardships that affected us all during those terrible years."
In 1946, Miss HORNE moved from the East Block to Laurier House, Mr. KING's home, where she handled his personal correspondence and did some speechwriting. "I became acquainted with [him] as a person, and I liked him."
In 1950, Miss HORNE struck an early blow for women's rights after she went to work for the assistant private secretary to Robert WINTERS, then minister of reconstruction and supply. Despite all her experience, Mr. WINTERS "wouldn't take her on trips because he thought that was unseemly. So he hired a man, whom she had to train. He was hopeless, but making more money than her," said Mr. PIKE, the nephew.
When Miss HORNE complained to her boss that she should be earning as much as the new man, he retorted that he saw no reason for a raise -- she was making excellent money "for a woman."
"So she packed up and went home," said Mr. PIKE. " Then she called Jack PICKERSGILL, who told her to sit tight for a few days and he'd see what he could do. Very soon after, she went to work for Ellen FAIRCLOUGH at the Department of Citizenship and Immigration."
Miss HORNE finished her career with the federal government in 1973 when she retired from the National Film Board. Awarded the Coronation Medal in 1953 and the Centennial Medal in 1967, she received a Governor-General's Caring Canadian Award in 2004 for her years spent as a volunteer.
Miss HORNE first started volunteering during the First World War, when she knitted scarves for the troops. "I distinctly remember the outbreak of the war in 1914, and I recall many occasions when I went to the train station in Truro with my mother to meet the troop trains to present gifts of food and cigarettes and warm knitted items."
When the Second World War broke out in 1939, Miss HORNE's volunteering became a "way of life. I worked as a check-girl for the weekly dances at the famous North End Services Canteen, and playing the odd game of snooker with the boys who didn't feel like dancing. Many times, I would best serve by lending a sympathetic ear or looking at pictures of sweethearts or wives and children back home."
Life in Halifax during the war was grim, she recounted. "The most vulnerable spot in all of Canada, the city was actually at war and everyone pitched in to help. I can laughingly say that my war work was entertaining and being entertained by the officers of the great battleships that anchored in Halifax harbour. We had a lively social life.
"But the shadow of war was always close at hand; and more than once, men I had danced with one night were brought back two days later, burned beyond recognition when their ship was torpedoed by German U-boats just beyond the harbour headlands. Volunteer visits to Camp Hill, the [military] hospital, were a high priority for me at that time."
Evelyn Annie Ethel HORNE was born on February 23, 1907, in Truro, Nova Scotia She died of heart failure on March 21, 2005, in Ottawa. She was 98. She leaves her niece, Frances; nephews Robert, David, Peter and Donald; 16 great-nieces; and 11 great-great-nieces and nephews.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-03 published
Alex SMART, Hockey Player: 1918-2005
Left winger from the minors set a scoring record in his first National Hockey League game that still stands
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, June 3, 2005, Page S7
Ottawa -- Alex SMART burst into the National Hockey League like a meteor. In his very first game, on January 14, 1943, he defeated the Chicago Black Hawks single-handed by scoring three goals for the Montreal Canadiens.
His first two goals, scored in the final minute of the second period, came only 14 seconds apart; the third goal occurred in the third period. Final score: Canadiens 5, Black Hawks 1. Along the way, he also racked up an assist. Then 24 and on loan to the Habs from the Montreal Senior Canadiens of the Quebec Senior Hockey League, he set a benchmark for goals scored by a rookie in his first National Hockey League game. The record, which was tied by Real Cloutier of the Quebec Nordiques in 1979, still stands.
Montreal's daily newspapers were delighted. "Amateur Alex SMART Paces Canadiens to Brilliant 5-1 Victory," crowed the The Gazette the following day. Veteran Montreal hockey reporter Baz O'Meara described Mr. SMART, who played left wing, as "a smooth skater with an accent of speed. He is solid enough despite his rather frail appearance, one of those sinewy fellows who shed body checks easily, who is effortless in the extreme."
Mr. SMART, who scored his four points against Chicago goaltender Bert Gardiner, played with Buddy O'Connor and Gordie Drillon. They accounted for four of Montreal's five goals.
Joe GORMAN of Ottawa, the son of Canadiens' general manager, Tommy GORMAN, was in the Forum that night. "Alex impressed me because he was a natural left winger and played his position. Buddy O'Connor was able to feed him passes from centre."
One person who wasn't present in the crowd of 6,549 was Mr. SMART's wife of seven months, Freda. "He was so nervous he didn't want me to go. I went to the show at the Seville Theatre with my girlfriend (instead). I found out what he had done that night when he came home. I couldn't believe it."
Mr. SMART continued to burn up the National Hockey League for another seven games, scoring a total of five goals and two assists, for seven points in eight games. Fellow rookie Maurice "Rocket" Richard needed twice as many games as Mr. SMART to score five goals and six assists before he broke his leg, ending his season. The Rocket, of course, eventually scored 624 goals and hall-of-fame immortality while Mr. SMART found himself back in the minors.
Mr. SMART developed his skills in southern Manitoba during the 1930s. After playing for the Toronto Marlboros and the Verdun Maple Leafs in Montreal, he landed a spot with the Senior Canadiens in 1940. Over the next six years, he scored 86 goals and 188 points over 183 games, some of which were in the service of the Montreal Royals and Montreal Vickers.
It was also in 1940 that he met his wife Freda. "I was going to O'Sullivan Business Collage and he saw me every day. He found out that a girl who lived where he boarded knew me and asked her to arrange an introduction."
To break the ice, Mr. SMART asked Freda -- who wasn't "the least bit interested in hockey" -- if she'd like to attend a game. "He said, 'here's two tickets.' I said, 'I thought I was going with you.' He said, 'no, I'm playing.' "
Mr. SMART and his Senior Canadiens won the game and "from then on, I watched a lot of hockey games," said Mrs. SMART. They were married the day after his 24th birthday. "I told him I was his birthday present."
After the war, Mr. SMART got a job in Ottawa with the Goodyear Tire Company, where he worked for 45 years. He still loved playing hockey and found a spot with the Ottawa Senators of the Quebec league. Over the next four seasons, he was one of the Senator's best point getters. In 1947-48, his best year, Mr. SMART scored 28 goals and 66 points in 47 games.
Besides his eight games in the National Hockey League, the highlight of Mr. SMART's hockey career occurred in the spring of 1949 when the Senators beat the Regina Caps to win the Allan Cup as the best senior amateur club in Canada. They had lost to the Edmonton Flyers the preceding year.
The Senators, all of whom had full-time jobs, were a powerhouse right after the war. The roster included such names as George GREENE, Emile DAGENAIS, Jack McLEAN, Stu SMITH, Legs FRASER, Ray TRAINOR and Ab RENAUD, who, as a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force Flyers, had won a gold medal at the 1948 Winter Olympics.
After he retired as a player, Mr. SMART coached at the local level in Ottawa. He also scouted for the Los Angeles Kings for 25 years.
Alexander SMART was born on May 29, 1918, in Brandon, Manitoba He died of heart disease on April 18, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 86. He leaves his wife, Freda, and daughter Susan. He was predeceased by his daughter Donna Jean.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-22 published
Frank LACE, Soldier And Investment Expert: 1911-2005
Artillery officer who reached the rank of acting brigadier at 33 was decorated for providing Canadian infantrymen in the Netherlands with devastating fire support
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, June 22, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Commanding artillery in battle, whether a battery of four guns or a regiment boasting dozens of guns, takes an enormous amount of professional knowledge plus the ability to calculate complex fire plans under extreme pressure. A lot of luck comes in handy, too. By all accounts, Frank LACE of Toronto displayed all those qualities during the Second World War, building a reputation as one of the most experienced and decorated officers in the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery.
Mr. LACE received his first important decoration on June 8, 1944, just two days after D-Day, when he was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire. In October of 1945, he was mentioned in dispatches for "gallant and distinguished services in the field" before receiving the Distinguished Service Order for his leadership on the battlefields of northwest Europe, where he showed "at all times great devotion to duty without regard to himself, visiting forward observation posts or making use of small aircraft to get the first-hand picture of enemy dispositions and strong points."
On top of that, he achieved the rank of acting brigadier in late 1944 when only 33 and commanded two artillery regiments.
During the battle of Savojaards Plaat, fought during the Scheldt Estuary campaign in the Netherlands in October of 1944, Mr. LACE displayed tactical innovation as the commanding officer of 13 Canadian Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery. He was directly responsible for the co-ordination and control of the artillery support required by the three brigades of 3 Canadian Infantry Division.
Although Operation Switchback initially called for the division to turn back to Dunkirk after stopping at Watou, the Germans blocked the approach to the strategically important port of Antwerp through the West Scheldt, so a change in plan was required.
Because of stiff resistance, Canadian infantrymen were ordered across the Plaat, a muddy bay opening off the West Scheldt, to extend their bridgehead, so artillery could follow.
"The ground was ideal for defence, being flat, almost at sea level, and intersected by countless dikes and drainage ditches," wrote regimental historian Lieutenant W. BARRETT.
Then Mr. LACE had an idea. Why not fire at the Germans from behind, even though it meant shooting toward advancing Canadians? The tactic left the enemy without the protection of the dikes and demoralized their defence.
Mr. LACE's contribution earned him the Distinguished Service Order. "In spite of extreme difficulties and transportation, LACE, by his tireless effort, although without sleep for several days at a time, succeeded in preparing and executing the complex fire plan and ensuring that the absolute maximum support was given to the infantry throughout that difficult week," the citation read.
Week after week, the soft-spoken Mr. LACE lived under tremendous emotional and physical strain. The constant pressure never let up, since he was directly responsible for the lives of his gunners, and for providing the infantry with desperately needed firepower.
Mr. LACE, after matriculating at Upper Canada College, graduated from the Royal Military College of Canada in 1932, during an era when it was pretty much a finishing school for the upper classes. During the Depression, he worked in Toronto as an investment salesman and soldiered part-time with 7 (Toronto) Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, of the Non-Permanent Active Militia.
Two days after Canada declared war, Mr. LACE married his sweetheart, Barbara CALDWELL, before shipping out to Britain in January of 1940. A few months later, he was a major. Mr. LACE later commanded 15 Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, before becoming a staff officer at 1st Canadian Army headquarters.
Late in the war, Mr. LACE was given command of Royal Canadian Artillery for the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division. During the assault into Germany, he was responsible for organizing fire support for a series of tough operations in February and March of 1945.
"The success of these operations was in no small measure due to the fire support provided by units commanded by this officer," said his citation.
After the war, Mr. LACE returned to the investment business, finishing as chairman of Matthews and Co. Ltd. from 1972 to 1975.
His other great passion was golf, said his son, Roger.
"He treated the investment business as a military campaign replete with strategies and skirmishes. He took the same approach to golf, which he studied and practised intensively, rain or shine. His relentless persistence resulted in a hole-in-one in his 91st year, all the more remarkable as he was legally blind."
Francis Dwyer LACE was born on November 20, 1911, in Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan. He died on April 29, 2005, in Toronto. He was 93. He leaves his wife, Barbara, son Roger and daughter Cathy. He was predeceased by his sister Marion.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-24 published
John KEYSTON, Physicist And Nato Scientist: 1908-2005
British-born boffin was courted by two countries for his vital work in undersea warfare -- and chose Canada
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Friday, June 24, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- As a backroom Canadian Cold Warrior, he was "one of the greatest brains in North Atlantic Treaty Organization." Yet, for English-born John KEYSTON, it almost didn't happen. As a physicist whose brilliance gained the attention of Albert Einstein, the Royal Navy considered him such a prize that the British were reluctant to let him go.
For all that, Dr. KEYSTON was determined to turn his back on Britain. He arrived in Canada after taking a roundabout route with intermediate stopovers in Rhodesia and India. It all started when he was offered a job in the United States after he had played a vital part in scientific research during the Second World War.
The Americans, it seemed, knew his wartime worth. In 1947, they recognized his highly classified work in anti-submarine warfare by awarding him the U.S. Medal of Freedom with Bronze Palm. He had performed "very meritorious service in the field of scientific development," the citation said. "Dr. KEYSTON promoted and effectively implemented an Anglo-American interchange of scientific and engineering information concerning new weapons and devices of warfare and collaborated closely himself with American research groups, contributing substantially to the Allied war effort."
It was then that they tempted him with a plum job. Dr. KEYSTON, then deputy director of the Royal Navy's Research Programs and Planning Department, was offered a spot as director of the British Commonwealth Scientific Office, which would have required him moving to Washington. By all accounts, he was eager to accept, but, as it turned out, the British would have none of it. At the time, Britain still saw itself as the senior member of a scientific and intelligence partnership with the United States and regarded such approaches as poaching. The Admiralty, the headquarters of the Royal Navy, considered his departure as harmful to its scientific interests.
"Insofar as the Admiralty is concerned, I have to point out that I regard Dr. KEYSTON as one of the really key men in the Admiralty Scientific Organization," wrote F. Brundrett of the Admiralty on February 19, 1947. "The very fact that he has been appointed to [his] rank at so early an age [38] is an indication of the value that we place upon him."
And, as if to put a stamp of ownership of him, the British government saw to it that he was named an officer of the Order of the British Empire in King George VI's New Year's honours list of 1946.
For all that, or possibly because he was denied the job in the United States, Dr. KEYSTON still felt compelled to emigrate. Later in 1947, he made a back-door exit to become research director of the Central African Council in what was then Southern Rhodesia. After that, he spent part of 1949 as scientific adviser to the newly formed Indian Navy, then moved his family to Canada to become chief superintendent of the Naval Research Establishment, now Defence Research Establishment, in Dartmouth, N.S.
It was an exciting time for a researcher in the Royal Canadian Navy. The formation of North Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1948, coupled with the Cold War and the Korean War, saw the federal government spend enormous sums -- almost $2-billion in 1952-53 alone -- to build up the Canadian Army, Royal Canadian Air Force and Royal Canadian Navy. By 1952, about 40 cents of every tax dollar was being spent on defence.
Although the Royal Canadian Navy had only 7,000 sailors and 12 ships when Dr. KEYSTON arrived in Halifax, the fleet saw a dramatic expansion in just a few years. "Eight years later, the Royal Canadian Navy had some 50 warships in commission with a personal strength of nearly 20,000. By 1958, the navy was big, bold, and brash," wrote Marc Milner in Canada's Navy: The First Century (1999). "Its fleet, its weapons, equipment and scientific innovations were all cutting edge."
Anti-submarine warfare was to be the Royal Canadian Navy's main role, and Dr. KEYSTON, who soon signalled his intention of accepting his new home by taking out Canadian citizenship, was at the centre of it, supervising research and development. Richard BLAKE, who worked for him as the head of Naval Research Establishment's engineering section, said the design and building of H.M.C.S. Bras d'Or, Canada's first hydrofoil, was foremost among projects undertaken during Dr. KEYSTON's time at Dartmouth. Also high on the list was research into variable-depth sonar and cathodic protection of ships.
Dr. KEYSTON began his rise from his lower-middle-class roots his father kept the books at a local cement works -- by winning a scholarship to King Edward VII grammar school in Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, at 9. Eventually, after completing a degree in physics at Nottingham's University College, he conducted research in Potsdam, Germany, on the hyperfine structure of spectral lines. In 1930, his work on the electrical properties of gases won the praise of Albert Einstein during the legendary physicist's visit to Nottingham. In 1933, Dr. KEYSTON obtained a doctorate in physics from Magdalen College, Oxford.
During the Second World War, he established his expertise in waging war below the waves. His daughter, Judith KEYSTON, of Lewes, England, knew her father was engaged in top-secret work during the war, but was unaware of its nature. She learned some details decades later.
"[He worked] in particular on the effects of underwater explosions, such as depth charges and torpedoes. It was a difficult area because explosions underwater behave differently. For example, if you develop a depth charge, you need to know where and how it will impact," she said. "Submarine warfare was of the utmost strategic importance in Britain's defence and the Allied war effort."
From 1957 to 1964, Dr. KEYSTON worked in Ottawa as vice-chairman of the Defence Research Board before being appointed director of a North Atlantic Treaty Organization technical centre in the Netherlands as part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Command Europe. Better known as SHAPE, it had come into existence in 1951 as part of a North Atlantic Treaty Organization effort to establish an integrated and effective military force that could counter Moscow at a moment's notice.
In 1967, Dr. KEYSTON reached the top of North Atlantic Treaty Organization's scientific world when he was appointed director of armaments and defence research, a post he held for six years. The Cold War, then in its third decade, was still very hot, with dozens of Soviet and Eastern bloc divisions seemingly poised to hurl themselves across Western Europe to the English Channel.
When Dr. KEYSTON retired in 1973, a North Atlantic Treaty Organization admiral called him one of the alliance's most "competent, authoritative and decisive figures. When we had a difficult problem, we came to seek your advice [and] have all been impressed by your intuition and quick reactions indicating the best solution. From the scientific and military points of view, we all consider you one of the greatest brains in North Atlantic Treaty Organization," said Vice-Admiral E. Cioppa on June 20, 1973.
To his peers, he was an accommodating and understanding colleague. "He was a splendid man to work for, an outstanding administrator," said Mr. BLAKE, who is now retired and lives in Guelph, Ontario "He was much respected and his personality blended very well with the rest of us. His calibre was such that he would have earned a knighthood [in Britain]."
John Edgar KEYSTON was born on July 7, 1908, in Nottingham, England. He died of natural causes on April 8, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 96. He leaves his son John and daughter Judith. He was predeceased by his wife, Irene.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-30 published
Peter BACHENSKIE, Cobbler: 1914-2005
For 65 years, he operated a shoemaker's shop in an Ottawa neighbourhood
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Saturday, July 30, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Peter BACHENSKIE wasn't much interested in making a lot of money over the eight decades he practised his craft as a shoemaker in Ottawa. Sure, it came in handy for supporting his family, but he had more important things on his mind.
Day after day, for 65 years in all, Mr. BACHENSKIE opened his shop bright and early at 8 a.m. in Ottawa's Hintonburg neighbourhood. He didn't have to travel far to go to work, since his workbench was in the front of his tiny, two-storey house.
Ten hours later, around 6 p.m., he called it a day and went for supper. Of course, if you needed a quick repair job, you could always knock on the door and hope for the best -- and get it, too.
Starting in 1936, through the tail end of the Depression, the Second World War and the postwar boom, the people of working-class Hintonburg could look in the Wellington Street window of P. Bachenskie Shoe Repair and see the proprietor bent over his bench.
Richard RACINE first went there in 1955. People wore leather shoes back then, he said, and paid good money to get them repaired. He kept going back for the next 46 years. "I bought a leather belt [once] and he charged me $7. The buckle probably cost him $3.50. You couldn't get that quality for under $25 now."
That was the thing about Peter BACHENSKIE. For the past 20 years or so, he charged ridiculously low prices -- Depression-era prices, really. Five minutes of stitching a pair of shoes or a purse would cost you all of 25 cents. After years of argument from his family, Mr. BACHENSKIE finally gave in during the 1980s and doubled his price to 50 cents.
"I told him, 'It's ridiculous, Dad, you're working for nothing,' said his son, Richard BACHENSKIE. "He was losing money at the end. For the last five years, he used his old-age pension to support the business."
Mr. BACHENSKIE could fix just about anything, from shoes to saddles to police gun holsters. His craftsmanship so impressed Armstrong and Richardson, a big shoe chain, that it filmed Mr. BACHENSKIE in 1964 for a television commercial. It aired for a year, to the delight of Hintonburg.
Mr. BACHENSKIE was also a good teacher, eager to pass on his knowledge. Vassili NETCHAEV first went to the shop in 1996 to get some stitching done. Twice a week, for more than a year, the master taught Mr. NETCHAEV how to use the big stitcher, which attaches an outsole to a shoe.
"He was a very good teacher, very patient, a very open-hearted person," said Mr. NETCHAEV. "He treated everyone as a friend, no matter if you were a customer or subcontractor. Even if you made a mistake, he wouldn't yell at you or make you feel bad. He'd say, 'Let me show you again.' "
Mr. BACHENSKIE, who left school after the third grade, worked briefly as a lumberjack after growing up on the family farm near Otter Lake, Quebec After serving a short apprenticeship, he set up on his own and never looked back. Business was good during the Second World War, despite a shortage of thread. In 1943, Mr. BACHENSKIE married his sweetheart, Loraine, and bought $5,000 in war bonds. After war-time restrictions were lifted, business boomed despite that fact that the shop had five competitors within a three-block radius.
When each of his children turned 4, he would allow them into his shop. That was the age when he thought they could be relied on not to stick their fingers in the machines. "I remember the noise of the finisher, the bustle of Wellington, the good smell of leather," said his son.
People also dropped by to shoot the breeze, although Mr. BACHENSKIE himself never said much. All the same, you could count on him when you were in trouble.
"Peter had a soft spot for a certain kind of downtrodden individual. He would regularly let [them] stay in his shop to sober up, get out of the summer heat, or warm up in winter. There were three in particular: Skippy, Victor and Joe."
Mr. BACHENSKIE also fed them, clothed them and gave them money. "The only condition he gave them is that they don't get drunk again. They got drunk again and the cycle was repeated. He even tried to apprentice them into the business. He kept trying to help them."
During the 1970s, the shoemaking business started to decline, partly because of the growing popularity of running shoes and because of throwaway consumerism. "People wanted new and shiny versus old and repaired. [Also] new synthetic materials did not lend themselves to be repaired easily," said his son.
In 1989, when he was 75, Mr. BACHENSKIE decided that he needed to retool and bought several new machines. That cost him $50,000, despite his shrinking client base. He kept doing what he did best, even after suffering two mild strokes, and finally retired on January 13, 2001.
Peter Paul BACHENSKIE was born on June 13, 1914, in Otter Lake, Quebec He died of liver failure on May 16, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 90. He is survived by son Richard and daughters Dianne, Carol and Rose-Mary. He was predeceased by his wife, Loraine.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-02 published
James KENNY, Royal Air Force Pilot and Businessman 1922-2005
Flying Typhoon ground-attack aircraft, he was shot down over Normandy but not before he brought home the beer
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Tuesday, August 2, 2005, Page S7
Ottawa -- Fighting a war is thirsty business, so when the pilots of the Royal Air Force's 181 Squadron decided they'd been without beer for long enough, they sent Canadian James KENNY back to England to do something about it.
Taking off from Coulomb, France, in his Hawker Typhoon IB fighter-bomber on July 4, 1944, Mr. KENNY viewed his assignment with pleasure. Not only would the mission entail a brief break from fighting the Germans over Normandy, he'd also enjoy a night out in London.
Where to store the beer was a problem, though, since the powerful single-engine Typhoon, which was the Royal Air Force's most important tactical air-support aircraft of the Second World War, was built to fight, not carry bottles of beer. "Finally, a solution was found... Take out two cannons to make room for beer and leave two cannons to defend the valuable freight," Mr. KENNY wrote in 1998.
After landing at Oatlands Hill in England, he stored as much beer as he could in his aircraft's wings, behind the cockpit and anywhere else he could find. In all, he managed to hide away eight dozen pints.
His next stop was Redhill air base near London but while approaching the airfield in the dusk, he noticed a small aircraft to starboard. "[It was] a buzz bomb, a V-1, and the first I had ever seen."
A series of conflicting emotions tore through him. What should he do, attack the V-1 or ignore it and so preserve his precious cargo? "Must shoot it down?" he later wrote. "No, it will break all the bottles. Duty says I must... The Squadron will hate me."
Suddenly, the V-1 engine cut out, solving his dilemma. The pilot-less rocket fell to earth, letting Mr. KENNY and his beer off the hook. After a night in London, he returned to a hero's welcome.
James KENNY had joined the Royal Canadian Air Force from McGill University in Montreal in 1941. After pilot training at bases all over the country, he was awarded his wings by prime minister Mackenzie KING on October 23, 1942. Mr. KENNY's brother, Robert, also received his wings then.
Arriving in Britain in early 1943, Mr. KENNY, who had acquired the nickname Slim because of his six-feet-four-inch height, spent some time flying Spitfires and Hurricanes before being posted to No. 181 Squadron in November. In fact, he was assigned to a Typhoon squadron because he was too tall to fit comfortably in a Spitfire.
The "Tiffie" was a formidable aircraft. It first flew in 1940 as an interceptor before the Royal Air Force realized its 700 km/h speed and ability to carry a powerful armament made it perfect for attacking ground targets such as bridges, tanks, trains and rail junctions. By D-Day on June 6, 1944, the Royal Air Force boasted 26 Typhoon squadrons. Required to fly low, the Typhoons suffered fierce anti-aircraft fire and many were shot down.
Over the seven months he spent in action, Slim KENNY successfully flew dozens of dangerous sorties until, in late July of 1944, his luck finally ran out. With three other pilots, he attacked a German convoy and ran into heavy return fire. Despite suffering serious damage to his aircraft, he sprayed the targets with rockets and cannon fire.
"Flak very bad," he later wrote in his log book. "Hit behind cockpit before attack - hit on starboard wing on way in - large hole in gas tank - on fire - several pieces of flak in legs - hit in engine after attack - engine on fire - aileron jammed - aircraft rolling to starboard - Bailed Out."
Floating through the air under his parachute, Mr. KENNY was relieved he was alive. "My second thought, 'My gosh, I'm at tree top level, about 30 or 40 feet, better prepare for landing, and my third thought, there are soldiers behind every tree, are they American?" he wrote.
Unfortunately, they were German. Once on the ground, he realized that he was "hurting several places, one of which was where I kept the family jewels. I got to my feet and unbuckled [my] parachute, undid my belt, unbuttoned my fly, took down my underwear and had a look.
"The Germans watched this performance with some surprise and surrounded me with a lot less hostility. I believe that the crucial moment when one might shoot [me] was dissipated by the circumstances. After all, at that moment I hardly appeared to be a threat."
After liberation from a PoW camp in March of 1945, he returned home and made a career in the textile business and bought a large company in Hull called Hanson Mills Ltd. In 1994, he went back to France to attend the unveiling of a memorial, at Noyers-Bocage, to the 151 Typhoon pilots who died during the Normandy campaign.
James Henry Frederick KENNY was born on January 3, 1922, in Buckingham, Quebec He died of cancer on June 13, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 83. He leaves sons Michael, Matthew and Wallace, and daughters Lamar and Ann. He was predeceased by his wife Lamar.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-30 published
Krystyna SZNUK- SPARKS, Resistance Fighter (1922-2005)
A member of the Polish Home Army during the Warsaw uprising of 1944, she cared for the wounded and survived by her wits until sent to Ravensbruck and Buchenwald
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Tuesday, August 30, 2005, Page S11
Ottawa -- A loud pounding at the door meant only one thing for people living in occupied Poland during the Second World War: The Germans had come for you.
Krystyna SZNUK watched in horror as the door opened. The Warsaw uprising had erupted two weeks earlier, on August 1, 1944, and as a member of the Polish Home Army, she was on the run.
"Two Vlasov men walked in. They looked us over. No, they were not interested in males, they wanted a female. Jazdia was holding her child in her arms, so I was the obvious choice," she wrote 50 years later in an unpublished memoir. The soldiers, members of General Andrei Vlasov's so-called Russian Liberation Army, Soviet soldiers who had switched sides to fight with the Germans, ordered her to come with them. She knew they wanted her for sex. Just 22 at the time, she refused.
"They both had hand grenades and indicated that if I didn't go, they would throw [them] at us. They promptly began to remove the pins. There was no choice so I went, my mind racing with plans of escape," she said.
Fortunately, the soldiers started to argue about "who would go first." She bolted up a flight of stairs, knocked desperately on a door and was admitted to an apartment where someone whisked her across to a window. "[I went] through the open window where a helping hand was outstretched to me. A minute or so later we heard a pounding at the door and noises of a search."
After that, she took to disguising her looks by smearing coal ash on her face and hair. Later, she came upon more of Vlasov's men in an abandoned factory. "[They] were checking for jewellery. One of them noticed a diamond and blue-enamel ring on my finger, which I had inherited from my grandmother. He almost tore my finger off trying to get [it] so I took it off and gave it to him. Being dirty and smeared with ashes seemed to repulse them and I was left alone," she said.
During the uprising, during which almost 50,000 members of the Polish Home Army attacked the German garrison, she helped care for the wounded. When the Poles surrendered two months later, about 18,000 Polish fighters had been killed, along with 150,000 civilians.
The Nazis destroyed 90 per cent of the colourful and cosmopolitan capital she had known as a child. Her family was upper-middle class, with connections throughout Polish society. "[They] lived in very comfortable circumstances," said daughter Mariea SPARKS. "They lived in a large, comfortable apartment filled with art and employed a cook and a maid."
Major-General Stefan SZNUK was a pioneer Polish aviator who fought in the First World War for Imperial Russia and later, after the Russian revolution, with the counterrevolutionary White Russians. For his daughter Krystyna, who studied at the exclusive Plater-Zyberk School, life as a teenager during the 1930s centred on school and family.
Dr. Danuta PODKOMORSKA, now living in retirement in Winnipeg, first met her when they were both eight years old. "We went to prep school and then to high school together, where we sat at the same desk. My mother died when I was very young so her mother mothered me as well."
It was "carefree and naive," said Dr. PODKOMORSKA. "We were sheltered from the world through school and family." In May of 1939, young Krystyna graduated from high school. "I was bursting with life and joy. The world was open to me, first the holidays, then entrance exams to university, and maybe an occasional meeting with my boyfriend. Those were my plans."
It all came to an end on September 1, 1939, when Germany invaded Poland. Over the next six years, she and her mother, Stanislawa, survived a brutal and oppressive occupation in a "grey and sad" Warsaw. Food was short and fear was endemic. One day, two Gestapo agents barged into their apartment and interrogated her on the whereabouts of her father, who had escaped to Britain, where he became an aide to General Wladyslaw SIKORSKI, head of the Polish government-in-exile.
"Of course we did not know, and what little we suspected we would not divulge." Her mother was arrested the following day. Weeks later, her uncle was shot.
Desperate to get her mother out of jail, she borrowed money, which she gave to a lawyer to bribe the Gestapo. It worked, and her mother arrived home a few days later.
"I opened the door and my heart sank with pity, a feeling stronger than the joy of seeing mother free. I could not believe it was the same person. She was so thin, poor soul, and her hair had gone completely white. Four months of prison took its toll, but she was free, free, free and we were together."
She herself was not free for long. For the last eight months of the war, she was a slave labourer at the infamous Ravensbruck and Buchenwald death camps. Risking their lives, she and her Friends "deliberately sabotaged the shells they produced," said daughter Nina SPARKS. " She knew that if the Germans caught them, they'd be killed."
After the war, Krystyna SZNUK decided to emigrate to Canada, where her parents had already settled. They were reunited in Ottawa and in 1948 she married Roderick SPARKS, scion of a prominent local family.
Krystyna SZNUK- SPARKS was born on January 2, 1922, in Warsaw. She died of an aneurism on June 11 in Ottawa. She was 83. She leaves her daughters Nina, Mariea and Anna, and son Robert. She was predeceased by her husband, Roderick SPARKS.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-26 published
Ewart REID, Economist (1910-2005)
Ottawa economist and idealist was Canada's presence at a United Nations agency founded to help feed the world's poorest people
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, September 26, 2005, Page S8
Ottawa -- Ewart REID never forgot the misery of the Depression, when millions of Canadians struggled to survive amid horrendous unemployment and general despair. Dubbed the "Dirty Thirties," the decade profoundly marked Mr. REID for the rest of his life. It made him a life-long socialist, as well as developing a strong sense of social justice for the less fortunate that later took him around the world.
Mr. REID was one of many who were attracted to socialism during the 1930s, keenly interested in finding solutions to the world's overwhelming economic and social problems. Some thought the liberal democratic countries, such as the United States and Britain, were doing a poor job so new ideas should be given a chance. Rejecting capitalism, many idealists were seduced by Communism and became apologists for the crimes of Stalin's Soviet Union.
Studying economics at Montreal's McGill University from 1928-32, Mr. REID didn't become a communist, as some of his peers did. Instead, he became involved in the Student Christian Movement. It was an exciting time for Mr. REID. Besides working as the sports editor of the McGill Daily, he took an economics course taught by Stephen LEACOCK (who was better known as a humorist.) That was interesting, he told his son Malcolm decades later, but Mr. LEACOCK's students had to keep on their toes. "His remarks in class could sometimes slash pretty hard at us."
Mr. REID also got to know J.S. WOODSWORTH, the Methodist minister who became the first president of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. He was influenced, too, by the McGill teacher Carl DAWSON, who encouraged a social conscience in his students. During the summer of 1932, Mr. REID performed field research in various Doukhobor communities for Prof. DAWSON's 1936 book, Group Settlement, Ethnic Communities in Western Canada. Often criticized for their pacifism and rejection of secular government, the 7,400 Doukhobor settlers developed one of North America's largest and most complex undertakings in communal living. Among the communities Mr. REID visited were the Yorkton colony near Great Spirit Lake, and the Blaine Lake colony, both in Saskatchewan. He reported that the Doukhobors had not discarded the original communistic principles which they had elected to follow in Canada, but had supplemented them with farming and business practices learned since their arrival.
Mr. REID, who came from a comfortable middle-class background, also spent time in Montreal getting to know the "kings of the road," or hobos. That included nights in the Old Brewery Mission, a shelter for the homeless. It was an eye-opener, he told Malcolm REID. " They put the soap right on our heads when we went into the shower. It flowed down on us. It had to wash us."
He learned to respect the views of the footloose unemployed. "Once, I was sitting in the port of Montreal with grain elevators [nearby]. A guy came over and said, 'See those elevators? There's no food for us, but in those elevators there's enough food to feed everybody.' He was a hobo... or a hobo politician, I guess you could say."
After obtaining his master's degree in economics in 1938, Mr. REID was hired by the federal Department of Agriculture.
"He [became] an expert on the transportation of crops to market. He knew all about grain rates on the Canadian National Railway and the Canadian Pacific Railway. He testified at royal commissions on the rail system," said Malcolm REID. "He loved trains. My last trip with him was on a train."
After 27 years at the Department of Agriculture, Mr. REID went to work for the United Nations' World Food Program in 1965. The program, overseen by the United Nations's Food and Agriculture Organization, was founded in 1963 to organize the distribution of food to Third World countries (19 years earlier, in 1946, Mr. REID had been a member of the Canadian delegation when the Food and Agriculture Organization was founded in Quebec City, just a year after the birth of the United Nations in San Francisco).
Over the next 11 years, Mr. REID worked in Rome, New Delhi and Ankara. His job was to ensure that shiploads of wheat, beans, powdered milk and other foodstuffs arrived to feed workers building dams, roads, bridges and health centres. He also organized emergency food deliveries after natural disasters such as floods and mud slides.
Convincing wealthy countries to contribute wasn't easy at the beginning, Mr. REID said later. "We always (had) to fight to get them to pledge." By 1966, amounts on the order of $275-million were being pledged.
Co-ordinating the delivery and distribution of thousands of tons of food over the years was an enormous logistical task. "Whole ships were sometimes leased, and third-world fleets of ships were often used," said Malcolm REID.
Ewart REID, who believed strongly in international co-operation, liked to make that point from time to time to his sons: "It's one world, you know."
Ewart Percival REID was born on July 6, 1910, in Regina, Saskatchewan. He died on June 15 in Ottawa. He was 94. He leaves his sons, Ian and Malcolm, and his third wife, Seval UNAN of Turkey. He was predeceased by his brother, Howard, and his sisters Margaret and Eleanor.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-24 published
Hugh TAILOR/TAYLOR, Sailor (1920-2005)
Chief petty officer served in the Royal Canadian Navy through three periods in its development. In 1940, he was among the skeleton crew that saved a battle-damaged H.M.C.S. Saguenay
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Monday, October 24, 2005, Page S8
Ottawa -- Leading Seaman Hugh TAILOR/TAYLOR had just awakened from a nap in the upper mess deck of H.M.C.S. Saguenay when a torpedo fired by the Italian submarine Argo slammed into her port side at 3: 55 a.m. on December 1, 1940.
The explosion, which blew a large hole in Saguenay's hull three metres from the bow on the port side, killed 21 of Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR's shipmates and started a fire in the fore lower mess deck. Eighteen others, some severely burned, were wounded.
It was the start of a desperate, five-day odyssey that quickly became a naval legend that endures to this day, and Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR was right in the middle of it. He remembered that night for the rest of his life. "It was a helluva crash," he said in 1993. "The ship seemed to go up in the air and come down and just for a minute everything went silent. Then everything was on fire."
Within seconds, the crew of Saguenay, who had been escorting a convoy of 30 merchantmen from Gibraltar to Britain along with ships of the Royal Navy, ran to action stations. Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR, his three years of training in the Royal Canadian Navy kicking in, rushed to join his shipmates but slipped and fell ingloriously to the deck. That fall probably saved him from the burns suffered by those who ran over him in their haste to escape the blaze. He crawled instead. "All the flames were up high and I was laying on the floor. Actually, I think tripping was a godsend."
Miraculously, Saguenay, which had been steaming 300 nautical miles west of Ireland, was still afloat and moving at 12 knots. Damage, however, was severe. The stokers' and seamens' messes were gone and the bridge and wheelhouse had to be abandoned.
Yet the destruction failed to extinguish Saguenay's fighting spirit. Minutes later, the officer of the watch, Lieutenant Ralph WARWICK, spotted a submarine 800 metres off the port bow. Within seconds, a deck gun fired two 4.7-inch shells -- one short and one over the target -- before the submarine dived. At the time, no one knew that the sights on the turret had been knocked out of alignment by the explosion, making accurate fire impossible.
At dawn, H.M.S. Highlander arrived and removed 87 officers and ratings. Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR, who known as Buck, remained on board as one of the few nominated to take Saguenay to safety. It wasn't an easy assignment. Making a pitiful four knots with a fire still raging, Saguenay was forced to steam backward because of excessive vibrations. "Next day, she was relieved of the dead weight of a large section of her hull when it fell away, and she was able to increase speed to six knots," Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR wrote.
He also wondered if they'd ever make it. There were small fires to put out, the engine room was flooded and seawater had seeping into the oil tanks, contaminating the fuel. The temporary repairs to the hole in the hull also had to be monitored, which was one of the worst parts, said daughter Geraldine TAILOR/TAYLOR. " All his dead shipmates were there [inside] so he had to see them. It made him sick to his stomach."
Somehow, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR and his shipmates worked miracles and kept their ship alive. "By December 4th, it was apparent that, barring an act of God or the enemy, Saguenay would be able to reach either Belfast or the Clyde."
One more ordeal remained for Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR and Saguenay, which was commissioned on May 22, 1931, in Portsmouth, England, as the first river-class destroyer built for the Royal Canadian Navy. Early on December 4, a mine exploded underneath the ship but did little damage. Saguenay arrived in Barrow-in-Furness, in northwest England, the following day.
A naval board of enquiry concluded that bringing the ship back to port "represents a very considerable feat of seamanship and endurance, and is one that reflects great credit on her captain, officers and ship's company." Saguenay's captain, Commander Gus MILES, was awarded the Order of the British Empire.
Thirteen months later, at the beginning of January, 1942, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR lived though another dramatic episode when a week-long storm battered Saguenay as she escorted a convoy to Canada. About 400 nautical miles east of Newfoundland, "the wind rose rapidly to full hurricane force creating seas so violently confused that it was impossible to heave through in the normal manner," he wrote. "Hour after hour, in the log, the entries read, 'wind, 12; sea, 99,' which are the highest possible under any scale."
After two days of merciless pounding, Saguenay was "a bit of a mess." The storm had knocked out the main steering gear and Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR and two other men were sent to the "Tilley flats" at the stern, where emergency apparatus allowed the ship to be steered by hand.
First, though, the men had to get there, which meant inching along about 30 metres of sea-swept deck. Waves as high as 25 metres towered over them. "It was very dangerous. They could have been washed overboard," recalled fellow crewman George BORGAL of Halifax. Seventeen hours later, after displaying "remarkable stamina and endurance," Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR and his men were relieved.
Saguenay's punishment continued after Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR left the ship. In November of 1942, a collision on a foggy night off Newfoundland detonated racks of depth charges and blew off the stern. Saguenay once again made port but never returned to convoy duty. After that, the stern was sealed off and the ship became a training vessel.
By then, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR was serving on H.M.C.S. St. Catherines. He was on duty on March 6, 1944, when the ship helped capture German submarine U-744. In an exhausting ordeal that lasted 32 hours, seven ships dropped 291 depth charges until finally U-744 surfaced, its guns blazing.
Buck TAILOR/TAYLOR was a Maritimer born with salt air in his lungs. Orphaned at an early age, he was raised by his Nova Scotia grandmother. At 15, he ran away to sea and joined the merchant marine, only to have his adventure meet an ignoble end when his ship ran aground in Bedford Basin at the north end of Halifax Harbour. It took him two days to walk home.
Two years later, on September 13, 1937, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR joined the navy. Over the next 25 years, he served on 10 ships and cruised all over the world before retiring in 1962 as a chief petty officer. During the Korean War, he served on H.M.C.S. Haida. His career spanned three distinct eras, starting with a tiny prewar navy of 1,800 men and 13 ships that mobilized on September 10, 1939, and evolved into a huge wartime force of 100,000 sailors and 400 fighting ships. During the 1950s, the navy expanded to 20,000 men and 50 modern ships. It was the navy's golden era and Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR helped build it.
Despite a career filled with drama, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR never boasted of his exploits, Geraldine TAILOR/TAYLOR said. "He was one of the unsung heroes of the Royal Canadian Navy because he never talked much about his experiences. He just did his job."
Hugh Edward TAILOR/TAYLOR was born on August 19, 1920, in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia He died of cancer on July 22 in Kemptville, Ontario He was 84. He leaves his wife, Patricia, his daughters Geraldine, June and Kathryn, and his son James.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-08 published
Week of Remembrance: Evelyn FLEMING/FLEMMING, Army Nurse (1918-2005)
Caring for injured servicemen, she wrote letters for those who had lost their eyesight and fed the men without hands
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, November 8, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Evelyn FLEMING/FLEMMING stared at the cards displaying colourful, swirling designs with mounting dismay. Fighting panic, she tried again to identify the reds, greens, blues and other colours right in front of her face. It was no use. She realized for the first time in her life that she was colour blind and there was absolutely nothing she could do about it.
Waves of disappointment washed over her. It was February of 1944, and Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING, a registered nurse, wanted nothing more than to join the Canadian Army and do her bit for king and country, as millions of Canadians had been doing since 1939, either in the military or on the home front.
There was one very tiny, albeit illegal and irregular, chance left. The medical technician supervising Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING's examination at Ottawa's Lansdowne Park had been her schoolmate years ago. Seeing her extreme disappointment, he decided to take an enormous personal risk and help her.
" 'How badly do you want to go?' he asked her. She said, 'I want to go.' She failed the test, but this school friend falsified [the result] because she really wanted to go and so she got in the army," said Brenda KENNEY, one of Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING's daughters.
Soon after, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING took the oath of allegiance to King George VI and was formally sworn in to the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps as a second lieutenant.
After four months training in the hospitals at Kingston and Camp Debert, Nova Scotia, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING shipped out to Britain with her two best Friends, Brenda WILSON and Hazel PERRIN. The three nurses had become fast Friends and decided to stick together no matter what. In fact, they were known far and wide as the "Three Ottawas."
A week after boarding their ship in Halifax, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING and her Friends landed in a Britain reeling from five years of total war. Although the Luftwaffe's blitz had ended years earlier, British service men and women were still fighting and dying all over the world.
Assigned to No. 18 Canadian General Hospital, in Cherry Tree, Colchester, just after the Allies invaded Europe on June 6, 1944, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING quickly adapted to the routine of an Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps hospital at war. Supervised by a formidable matron, she assisted at operations and treated patients in the wards.
It was a hectic and busy time for Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING and the other nurses, doctors and orderlies of No. 18, with wounded pouring in every hour of the day and night in their hundreds, fresh from the fighting in Normandy just over the English Channel. Units of the 1st Canadian Army were pushing inland from the beachhead, making good progress but taking their share of casualties.
"By the end of June, nearly 20,000 casualties from the British-Canadian sector had been evacuated to the United Kingdom, almost 3,000 of them Canadian," wrote Colonel G.W.L. NICHOLSON in Seventy Years of Service, a history of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps.
Col. NICHOLSON described the routine of a typical Canadian hospital, in this case No. 4 Canadian General Hospital four days after D-Day: "A steady flow of patients to and from operating theatres continued all day and into the evening. Nursing sisters toiling in the wards for 18 hours on end lost all sense of self and often had to be reminded to eat. Except for a few difficult cases requiring assistance by a medical officer, sisters were starting all blood, plasma and saline infusions, taking blood pressure, and giving all serum and penicillin injections."
Treating men who were badly disfigured from facial burns particularly affected Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING, Ms. KENNEY said. "They lost their noses and ears. She said that if ever they could see, they couldn't even wear glasses. She called them 'my boys' [and] became very attached to them."
In the evening, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING escorted "her boys" to the local pub for a drink. She wrote letters for those who had lost their eyesight, and fed the men without hands. It was hard for her, but she was glad to help, Ms. KENNEY said. "A lot of them didn't want to go home, wanted to die because they were so disfigured. Their mental anguish really affected her, [but] she was modest about what she did."
Paradoxically, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING and her two Friends enjoyed a very active social life -- years later, she told her daughter her dance card was never empty -- at a time when people were determined to grab whatever pleasure they could.
One night, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING and her two sidekicks suffered a narrow escape when they returned home from a pub in the blackout. "It was really foggy, pitch black, they couldn't see their hands in front of their faces and they were walking their bikes when they heard a rifle bolt being cocked," said Ms. KENNEY.
Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING and her Friends had walked into a nervous Home Guard patrol. "We were really lucky not to have been killed. It was the most frightening night of my time there," she told her daughter years later.
After the Germans surrendered on May 7, 1945, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING was assigned to an army hospital in Bramshott, Hampshire. In March of 1946, she transferred to another in occupied Germany. For the next two months, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING saw at first hand a devastated Germany and attended a whirlwind round of going-home parties.
After obtaining a certificate in public-health nursing at the University of Toronto in 1948, Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING enlisted in the peacetime army on January 13, 1950. Posted to the big supply depot in Montreal's Longue Pointe, Evelyn MORIN -- as Ms. FLEMING/FLEMMING was known then met her future husband, Lieutenant Stephen FLEMING/FLEMMING of the Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.
A year later, on April 4, 1951, they were married in Fort Lewis, Washington. Mr. FLEMING/FLEMMING was on his way to the Korean War and he was in a hurry to marry his sweetheart. After a 10-day honeymoon, he shipped out and she returned to Montreal. They didn't see each other for a year.
Evelyn Inez FLEMING/FLEMMING (née MORIN) was born on December 17, 1918, in Cumberland, Ontario She died of a stroke on July 13 in Ottawa. She was 86. She leaves her husband, Stephen, her daughters Brenda, Joanne, Debbie, Lori, son Stephen, and her sisters Margaret and Cairine.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-10 published
Week Of Remembrance: Henryk JEDWAB, Commando (1918-2005)
Intrepid Polish Canadian fought the Germans all the way from his native land to the slopes of Monte Cassino
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, November 10, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Henryk JEDWAB and his machine-gun crew looked through the mist at the killing ground beyond their defensive position. It was 4: 45 a.m. on September 1, 1939, and 62 German divisions one million soldiers -- were poised to attack an apprehensive yet defiant Poland.
Suddenly, Mr. JEDWAB, an officer cadet with the 84th Polesie Rifles, saw enemy soldiers running toward him. He and his men were dug in on the River Warta, near Wielen, in southwestern Poland.
"Here [came] the mighty Germans in a moment that will be long in my memory as Henryk JEDWAB, looking at the enemy, forgot he had a tongue in his mouth. [My soldiers] looked at me and finally, almost [at] the last moment, I got one word out: Fire!" wrote Mr. JEDWAB 60 years later.
"I think the most surprised were the Germans, but it was too late for them. My machine gun fired and did a very good job. Ammunition was not wasted. When I met with my commanding officer [later] and was highly [praised] for 'coolness under fire,' I answered only, 'Sir, to the glory of the country.' It was the biggest lie of my life. Could I tell him I was so scared that I was speechless? Never again in my life [was] I so scared. Once you start the killing, you realize that it's either you or him so you decide to be fast and shoot first -- that is the secret of survival."
After his dramatic baptism of fire, things went rapidly from bad to worse for Mr. JEDWAB and the Polish army. The Germans were vastly superior in both numbers and firepower -- the Poles had only 40 divisions, including 100 antiquated tanks -- but Mr. JEDWAB and his regiment kept fighting, suffering heavy losses during the 30-day war.
To support Poland, France and Britain declared war on Germany on September 3, but, by September 9, Mr. JEDWAB and the 30th Division was finished. Ten days later, he arrived at the Romanian border and made for France with little or no food, papers or money. On May 10, 1940, he found himself fighting the German army a second time. After shooting down a Stuka dive-bomber and winning a Croix de Guerre with two stars, Mr. JEDWAB was in Paris when the Germans entered it on June 13, "they as conquerors and me again as a 'Polish tourist,' trying my luck somewhere else and wondering when the tide will turn, how long you may run and where to."
Mr. JEDWAB made his way over the Pyrenees to Spain, where he was beaten by police; he then returned to France. He and some Friends tried again. Their goal was to reach Britain and continue to fight. "This time, we decided to ride to Madrid by train, but hiding underneath it on the axles. Not very comfortable, but free and safe, with the exception of the inconvenience that over the axles are the toilets and they are used, and unpaying passengers have no right to complain."
After arriving in Britain, Mr. JEDWAB spent a few months drilling on the parade square and languished in an army prison for hitting a superior officer. He then volunteered for the Special Operations Executive, which was parachuting agents into German-occupied France to create havoc. For a year, he worked behind enemy lines and then escaped back to England and joined a commando force in early 1942.
Arek BANDZIERZ of Ottawa trained for almost a year with Mr. JEDWAB. "You couldn't miss him; he was boisterous, quite self-assured. You notice people like that. He was a good soldier, people looked up to him. He was bursting with all kinds of knowledge, but he couldn't talk about his exploits with Special Operations Executive."
Despite his overwhelming love for his country, Mr. JEDWAB often thought he was fighting not just the Germans, but Polish anti-Semitism as well. As a Polish citizen who happened to be Jewish -- his well-to-do family had lived in Poland for 200 years -- he suffered insults and fights on a regular basis.
After intensive training, his commando unit, which was completely Polish, was sent to Italy to join the British 8th Army in December of 1943. On January 17-18, 1944, they attacked across the Garigliano River. A few hours later, during a German counterattack, Mr. JEDWAB displayed characteristic leadership and valour when he grabbed a Bren gun and drove off the enemy, "managing to kill all the attacking Germans, including their sergeant, who, however, prior to dying, [threw] a grenade, which wounded me. My head wound is not too deep but caused a lot of bleeding."
For that action, Mr. JEDWAB received Poland's Cross of Valour.
On May 17, 1944, Mr. JEDWAB and his commandos, now part of the 2nd Polish Corps, were thrown into a five-month battle for Monte Cassino, a mountainous stronghold that dominated Highway 6 to Rome. The Poles were ordered to attack the adjacent Colle San Angelo, which had to be taken before the Allies could assault Monte Cassino itself.
Climbing up and down rocky ridges under fierce artillery and mortar fire, Mr. JEDWAB took command after his section suffered four casualties. The Germans counterattacked and regained the Colle, but the Poles took it back, except the summit. Two days later, the Germans finally withdrew.
Mr. JEDWAB never forgot Monte Cassino, one of the fiercest campaigns of the war. "[Bodies] were entangled in a deadly embrace everywhere. The air was full of the stench of rotting bodies. That was Monte Cassino, where today visitors have not the slightest idea of the feelings or thoughts or terror of those who lived through it."
During the Italian campaign, his troop lost 18 killed and 70 wounded, an 80-per-cent casualty rate. For their heroism, its soldiers were awarded 114 Polish decorations. Over all, nearly 200,000 Poles fought in the Polish armed forces in the West. But their enormous contribution to the war effort did not spare them from a cruel snub: No Polish representatives were invited to the victory parade held in London after the war in Europe ended.
In June of 1945, Mr. JEDWAB met his first wife, Irena, in Italy, where she was a Polish officer in the 317th Transport Company. They were married five months later after a "stormy" courtship. "Somehow, a bond developed instantly. I found that I am happy to be in her company. We lived... as the most happy couple," Mr. JEDWAB said. Irena died on August 9, 1978.
After earning a degree in textile engineering, Mr. JEDWAB brought his family to Canada from Britain in 1950. Over the next five decades, he became a prominent executive in the textile industry.
Henryk JEDWAB was born on April 15, 1918, in Kalisz, Poland. He died of a heart attack on September 14, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 87. He leaves his daughter Elizabeth and his second wife, Bozena. He was predeceased by his first wife, Irena, and his brother Jakob.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-11 published
Week Of Remembrance: George OFFLEY, Fleet Air Arm Pilot (1922-2005)
Flier was part of a group that attacked the Bismarck in antiquated biplanes
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, November 11, 2005, Page S7
Ottawa -- George OFFLEY climbed into his Fairey Swordfish torpedo bomber, strapped himself in and started his engine. Nearby, on the heaving deck of the aircraft carrier H.M.S. Victorious, eight other Swordfish crews from 825 Squadron of the Fleet Air Arm were preparing to launch their aircraft in pitch darkness.
Their mission? To find and sink the Bismarck, the pride of the German navy and one of the largest capital ships afloat. Earlier that day, on May 24, 1941, the Bismarck had sunk the battle cruiser H.M.S. Hood, itself the pride of the Royal Navy. Watching grimly from the Victorious, Mr. OFFLEY, who had turned 19 five days earlier, saw the Hood blow up. "We could see the huge fireball in the sky, a thousand feet high," he said six decades later. The loss of the Hood shocked the British Empire to its core.
The Bismarck, the biggest ship in the German Kriegsmarine, displaced 42,000 tons and boasted eight 15-inch guns. On May 21, she and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen tilted the balance of power in the North Atlantic when they set out from Bergen, Norway, to raid British convoys. At this time, 11 British convoys, including a troop convoy, were at sea.
After the Hood blew up, H.M.S. Prince of Wales scored two hits but was forced to break off the action after receiving seven hits from both enemy ships.
The Bismarck, her speed reduced by the battle damage, turned south and made for German-occupied France. Admiral Sir John Tovey, the commander of the Home Fleet, ordered the Victorious's Swordfish aircraft to attack her. The open cockpit biplane, acquired by the Fleet Air Arm in 1936, had a top speed of 132 miles and hour. Many thought it was obsolete for modern warfare.
At 10 p.m. on May 24, Mr. OFFLEY pushed his throttle forward and flew his Swordfish off the deck of the Victorious in what became the first carrier-borne air strike against a battleship in naval history. Ninety minutes later, at 11: 30 p.m., Mr. OFFLEY and the other eight crews, including their leader, Lieutenant-Commander Eugene Esmond, found their target and dived to the attack.
"In appalling weather we sighted the Bismarck and moved in to attack at about 200 feet above sea level, holding [our] torpedoes till we were approximately 500 feet from the Bismarck. A little further, with the open cockpit, we could have spit on [her]," said Mr. OFFLEY.
Ignoring heavy fire from the Bismarck's secondary armament, Mr. OFFLEY and his fellow pilots dropped their torpedoes. Only one pilot managed to hit the target after going around twice to get a better shot. His torpedo hit the Bismarck's armoured belt, causing little damage.
Two days later, Swordfish from the aircraft carrier H.M.S. Ark Royal caught up with the Bismarck, by now in the Bay of Biscay. A torpedo exploded in its steering compartment, jamming its rudder and sealing its fate. The next day, the Royal Navy sent the Bismarck to the bottom.
George OFFLEY had joined Rolls-Royce in 1936 at the age of 14 as an apprentice mechanical engineer. On February 20, 1940, he volunteered for the Fleet Air Arm and pilot training. A few months later, he flew air cover during the evacuation of 338,000 British and French troops from Dunkirk, France.
He never forgot "flying over all kinds of boats, fishing boats, sailboats, tug boats, navy ships, all filled with the living, the dying and the dead. I was 18 years old, trying not to look at the complete disarray, panic and confusion below me. From the ack-ack bursts, the aircraft and I received a number of shrapnel hits, one of which I still carry with me in the centre of my forehead."
After attacking the Bismarck, Mr. OFFLEY was sent to H.M.S. Howe, a 42,000-ton battleship assigned to escort convoys through the Barents Sea to the Russian port of Murmansk. Mr. OFFLEY's job was to fly a Walrus aircraft, which acted as the ship's eye in the sky, searching for enemy submarines.
It wasn't an easy job because taking off by catapult was a challenge. "The aircraft must reach flying speed while travelling across the deck from port to starboard, or vice versa. This is the trickiest moment, the aircraft is about to leave the trolley. Do we have flying speed or not? If we do not, then like a stone, we drop."
After completing his mission, Mr. OFFLEY had to land his ungainly Walrus in the sea. The gunner climbed out on the upper wing, opened the hatch, got out the ring and held it out at arm's length to await a hook from the ship. With luck, the crane operator then lifted the aircraft back on the ship. "There [was] no room for mistakes or second attempts," Mr. OFFLEY said.
Mr. OFFLEY met his future wife, Mary HUDSON, a member of the Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service, at a dance in Shearwater, Nova Scotia, near the end of the war. It didn't take long for him to sweep her off her feet, his daughter Diane recalled. "He came out of the blue and [informed her], 'The next dance is mine.' She thought that he was very bold, so she went with someone else. Then he cut in and that's all it took." They were married on October 9, 1946. Mrs. OFFLEY died on January 16 this year.
After emigrating to Canada with his wife in 1947, Mr. OFFLEY spent two years with the federal government's atomic energy facility at Chalk River, Ontario Moving to Canadair, he was in charge of the mobile training unit responsible for training pilots and ground crew at various Royal Canadian Air Force stations.
Forty years after the war, the Soviet Union decorated Mr. OFFLEY with the Murmansk Medal and the Arctic Circle Medal for his service on the Murmansk run. An active and vocal supporter of veterans' rights for 60 years, Mr. OFFLEY served on the federal government's Veterans' Advisory Committee. He was awarded the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002 for his work on behalf of veterans.
George William Clive OFFLEY was born on May 19, 1922, in Basford, Nottinghamshire, England. He died on September 1 in Ottawa, as the result of a car accident. He was 83. He leaves his daughters Diane, Margaret, Judith-Ann and Cathrine. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-19 published
Lockhart FULTON, Soldier And Farmer (1917-2005)
'Epitome of the citizen soldier' led his men from the beaches of D-Day to the deadly forests of Germany without a scratch, and then returned to his Manitoba farm
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, November 19, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Ignoring a hailstorm of bullets and shrapnel, Lockhart FULTON hopped off the ramp of his landing craft into the English Channel a few hundred metres from German-occupied France. It was 7: 49 a.m. on D-Day, June 6, 1944, and Mr. FULTON, a company commander with the 1st Battalion, Royal Winnipeg Rifles, was part of the first wave to go ashore.
A few minutes later, Mr. FULTON, a major from Birtle, Manitoba, who believed in leading the 130 men of 'D' Company from the front, ran up the beach and got to work directing his company. All around him, his men deployed like clockwork, assaulting heavily fortified positions. Decades later, Mr. FULTON remembered wading through the water under fire. "It's funny what you think about. It looked as if someone was skipping stones across the water, and we were trying to step over the skipping stones."
Over the next hour, the four infantry companies of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles, facing heavy fire from more than 15 German machine guns nests and five concrete emplacements, eliminated those positions one by one. By 9 a.m., Mr. FULTON and his company, now past the beach, headed for the town of Graye-sur-Mer. "Once you get past fixed defences, it's over," he said decades later.
After capturing Graye, 'D' Company, reached Cruelly by 6 p.m. and dug in for the night. It had been quite a day for Mr. FULTON and his riflemen. The biggest invasion force in history, including 15,000 Canadian soldiers, had established a second front. By the end of the month, the Allies had landed more than a million men.
After reaching the village of Putot-en-Bessin on June 7, Mr. FULTON and his battalion, part of the 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, faced their first really severe test when they were attacked by a much larger German force.
"Putot was a critical point on the bridgehead. Not only was it on the road to Carpiquet and Caen -- the pivot on which the entire Normandy campaign was hinged -- but it could control the road and rail lines from Caen westerly to Bayeux, on which British troops were advancing," said Bruce Tascona and Eric Wells in Little Black Devils: A History of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
Next morning, the notorious 12th SS Hitler Youth Panzer Division launched a furious attack. By the end of the afternoon, after intense hand-to-hand fighting, three of the Winnipeg Rifles' four companies had been overrun. For his part, Mr. FULTON and his company grimly hung on. "Although overrun, infiltrated and isolated, the stand by the Regiment gave the [Regina Rifle Regiment] enough time to stop Meyer's Panzers at Bretteville. Their stand allowed the division time to regroup. Putot became a symbol of courage and steadfastness," said Tascona and Wells.
The Winnipeg Rifles suffered 300 casualties at Putot, more than half its fighting strength. What happened next to 58 of their wounded, who could not be evacuated, plus eight other Canadians, constituted a war crime. Ignoring the Geneva Convention, the German soldiers executed them. After the war, SS commander Maj.-Gen. Kurt Meyer was condemned to death for the murders. He spent nine years in prison after his sentence was commuted.
For his battlefield gallantry, displayed June 6-8 at Juno Beach and Putot, Mr. FULTON was presented the Distinguished Service Order by Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery in November of 1944. "Major FULTON's personal bravery, his complete disregard for his own safety and his coolness and skill in leading his command are considered to be in keeping with the highest traditions of the service," the citation read.
Over the next 11 long and weary months, Mr. FULTON fought in all of his battalion's battles in Normandy and the Netherlands. Leading a seemingly charmed life, the 6-foot 2-inch major was a conspicuous figure on the battlefield. "He was a leader that led," said retired Lt.-Col. Norm DONOGH, who landed on D-Day with the Rifles. "People depended fully on him and they felt secure in what he planned and what he did."
On July 4, 1944, Mr. FULTON and his company advanced over a kilometre across an open field as the Rifles attacked the airfield at Carpiquet, defended by the 12th SS and 20 tanks. Meyer's Hitler Youth, many of who were still in their teens, fought like fanatics. At one point during the battle, Mr. FULTON was seen standing calmly upright, talking on his field telephone as bullets and shells flew around him, "as if he were back in Birtle."
Decades later, he was asked how he managed to keep his cool under enemy fire. "You just concentrate on what you have to do," he replied. "I survived many battles. I don't know why. They missed me, I guess."
Later that night, Mr. FULTON and his men were withdrawn, after capturing two airport hangars. The Rifles had suffered 132 casualties, including 40 dead. Their "performance in this hornet's nest can best be described as one of endurance. Few regiments could have succeeded," wrote Tascona and Wells.
Three months later, during the battle of the Leopold Canal, Mr. FULTON was promoted lieutenant-colonel and appointed commanding officer of his battalion during the battle of the Leopold Canal on the Belgian-Netherlands border. At 27, he was one of the youngest commanding officers in the Canadian army. He had little, if any, chance to celebrate, though, since his battalion was fighting to clear the Scheldt estuary, a confusion of dikes, flooded fields and islands. It cost the battalion 71 dead.
The battle of Moyland Wood, in the Rhineland the following February, claimed another 49 deaths amid a forest spiked by booby traps, mines, snipers and machine guns. It was there that Mr. FULTON displayed his characteristic style of leadership. After deciding that flamethrowers mounted in Bren gun carriers would provide much needed support in the forest, Mr. FULTON found he had to calm his nervous carrier officer, said Mr. Donogh.
"The carrier officer said, 'Sir, you can't take these tracked carriers into heavy woods,' " recalled Mr. Donogh. "Instead of arguing, he put his arm around him and said, 'this will work.' The flame carriers turned the tide."
Fear never troubled Mr. FULTON for long. "Everyone was scared, including me, but some men seemed to recover from fear faster. I was like that. I could get over it, quick. Some men never could," he said in 2004.
Lockhart 'Lockie' FULTON grew up on the family farm in Birtle, Manitoba, about 300 kilometres west of Winnipeg. After joining the 12th Manitoba Dragoons as a cavalryman -- the pre-war militia still rode horses during the 1930s -- Mr. FULTON was transferred to the Winnipeg Rifles.
After surviving the war without suffering a scratch, he considered staying in the army but decided instead to return to his farm and to his wife, Nellie. "My wife had a difficult time on her own. The last thing she was looking for was chasing a soldier around the country. I liked farming -- liked it a lot," he said in 2004.
Over the next four decades, Mr. FULTON raised wheat and barley, helped raise six children and played a prominent part in local affairs. Always a strong supporter of his old regiment, he returned several times to the European battlefields of his youth to explain what had happened to young officers. In 2004, Mr. FULTON received the Legion of Honour from France. He was awarded the Order of Canada the same year.
For Mr. Donogh, Mr. FULTON was the "epitome of the citizen soldier. He was a symbol of what a soldier should be -- he was quiet and gentle but authoritative when he needed to be. He was just a good guy, that's all."
Lockhart Ross FULTON was born on March 31, 1917, in Birtle, Manitoba He died there on October 21, 2005, of cancer of the gallbladder. He was 89. He is survived by his sons Bruce, Geoff and Peter, and by daughters Debbie, Jennifer and Abigail. He also leaves his brother Harvey and his sisters Eva and Margaret. He was predeceased by his wife Nellie.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-09 published
Robert ENDICOTT, Aviator: (1940-2005)
Fighter pilot who couldn't believe he was paid to fly 'was a classic Cold War warrior'
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, December 9, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Bob ENDICOTT was a stickler for procedure when he flew his CF-104 Starfighter jet as one of the most experienced fighter pilots of 441 Squadron, based at Canadian Forces Base Baden-Soellingen, in Germany. He knew there was absolutely no room for error flying at Mach 2, twice the speed of sound.
Mission planning, cockpit drills, pre-flight briefings, weather reports, gunnery practice -- there were a million and one vital details to apply. You couldn't let up for a moment, since disaster could be a split second away.
On July 11, 1978, Mr. ENDICOTT signed out a CT-133 Silver Star to take up a 14-year-old member of No. 800 (Black Forest) Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Cadets. At the time, Mr. ENDICOTT held the rank of major and was the commanding officer of 800 Squadron.
As it happened, the cadet was his son, Tom. Wearing a Canadian Forces flight suit, complete with harness and flying helmet, he followed his commanding officer out to the ramp. "When I returned a thumbs-up to the aircrew, I knew my dream was soon to come true."
A few moments later, father and son accelerated down the runway and lifted into the air. Twenty-seven years later, Tom ENDICOTT, now a lieutenant-colonel in the Canadian army, stills remembers the joy of flying with his father. "Once airborne, my dad [pointed] out the countryside to me, and many of the key features he routinely used to confirm his course -- towns, river valleys and castles."
Soon afterward, Mr. ENDICOTT asked his son whether he would like to take the controls and do a roll or two, demonstrating how it was done. "[Then] it was my turn to have a go. Nose up a few degrees, a hard jerk to the left, 360 degrees, then even out. Awesome, and easier than expected."
Some minutes later, father and son returned to earth after an hour in the air. "My dad was always proud of his ability to land smoothly -- he definitely 'greased' this one. It was moments like this during my childhood that confirmed my will to follow in my father's footsteps, perhaps as a pilot, definitely as a person. I sensed he was proud to have me on board with him."
Bob ENDICOTT joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1959. After qualifying on the Avro CF-100 interceptor, he spent the next four years in Europe with the Royal Canadian Air Force's No. 1 Air Division, starting with two years flying CF-100s with 419 Squadron in Baden.
It was a wonderful time to be a fighter jock, defending the West from the Soviet Union and its vassal states, said his daughter, Christine. "He was a classic Cold War warrior. He loved to fly and he loved the lifestyle that went with it, the other pilots, ski vacations in Austria and Switzerland, the beaches of Spain and Italy."
He met his future wife, Ursula, who worked as a secretary for the base chaplains, soon after he arrived in Baden in 1961. Two months later, he asked her out. "I thought he looked pretty nice, so I said yes," she said. They were married a year later, on November 23, 1964. During the next 22 years, she followed her husband all over the world, moving 19 times.
In 1986, he retired from the Canadian Forces after clocking 7,801 flying hours in 27 years. Over the next 11 years, he flew for the airline City Express and for Execaire, a corporate charter operator based in Montreal, and accumulated another 4,479 hours.
He often declared he couldn't believe he was being paid to fly," said Tom ENDICOTT. "He once told me that, regarding employment, a person's goal should be to find a job that you would do for free."
Robert James ENDICOTT was born on March 29, 1940, in Lindsay, Ontario He died of cancer on October 6, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 65. He leaves his wife, Ursula, son Tom, and daughter Christine.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-28 published
Duncan SHAW, Air Force Officer: (1912-2005)
Boy Airman joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1929 to learn a trade. He served in Bomber Command and later became a wing commander
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Wednesday, December 28, 2005, Page S7
Ottawa -- When the Royal Canadian Air Force accepted Duncan SHAW for enlistment at the tender age of 16½, he knew his luck had changed for the better. After taking the oath of allegiance in April, 1929, he entered the Royal Canadian Air Force with the rank of "boy airman" as part of a short-lived scheme to train teenagers as skilled tradesmen. He thought he had it pretty good. Three meals a day and a roof over his head was a lot more than some people were getting at the beginning of the Depression. Not only that, the air force was even paying him.
The Royal Canadian Air Force Mr. SHAW was so proud to join had been formed just five years earlier with 62 officers and 262 airmen scattered across Canada. For 10 years it was a federal service that provided mercy flights, photo surveys, fire spotting, fishery and smuggling patrols -- anything instead of prepare for a war most thought would never come.
Life in the Royal Canadian Air Force at that time meant coping with low pay and slow promotion. Despite the disadvantages, Mr. SHAW enjoyed a good social life. In 1937, he and his unit, No. 2 (Army Cooperation) Squadron moved to Ottawa, along with No. 3 (Bomber) Squadron. "A group of Friends had sprung up who did many things together, sort of like 'that old gang of mine.' [There were] no steady girlfriends to siphon away the little money we got," he wrote in a memoir.
In 1935, things slowly improved when Ottawa finally woke up to the possibility that there might be a European war in the future and gradually increased its defence budget. A few new squadrons were formed and eventually the Royal Canadian Air Force had 4,000 men and 270 aircraft.
Everything changed when Canada declared war on Germany on September 10, 1939. Nine days earlier, Mr. SHAW had been promoted flight sergeant. Six months later, he was commissioned as an officer. The Royal Canadian Air Force needed thousands of new officers as it expanded to 215,200 men and women; as for the prospects of those who had joined before the war, the sky was the limit. By September 1, 1941, Mr. SHAW was promoted to squadron leader.
The following year, he was in Britain as the senior armament officer at Royal Canadian Air Force Overseas Headquarters before being posted to the newly-formed No. 6 (Royal Canadian Air Force) Group, part of the Royal Air Force's Bomber Command.
Mr. SHAW was now responsible for the bewildering array of bombs and munitions required by the 14 Lancaster and Halifax squadrons of No. 6 Group to attack German-occupied Europe in the Royal Air Force's intensive bombing campaign. Starting in January, 1943, No. 6 Group dropped a total of 126,122 tons of bombs on the Reich, losing 814 aircraft and 3,500-plus aircrew.
Mr. SHAW remained in the Royal Canadian Air Force after the war. In 1957, he was posted to Metz, France, as the chief armament officer at No. 1 Air Division headquarters. It was an exciting time to be there, as the air division played an important part in keeping the peace during the height of the Cold War with its 12 F-86 Sabre jet squadrons. Mr. SHAW had overall responsibility for the maintenance and servicing of the Sabres' weapons systems.
Retired group captain Douglas WURTELE of Ottawa, Mr. SHAW's boss in Metz, recalled: "He was a very reliable officer, very calm. You could count on him to do an excellent job. He never got excited."
During his 29-year career, Mr. SHAW served in all three of the Royal Canadian Air Force's eras: the pre-war period, when the force that had trouble just surviving; the war, when the Royal Canadian Air Force grew dramatically as the fourth-biggest Allied air force; and the post-war years that saw it expand by 1958 to 56,000 men and women, with 41 regular and auxiliary squadrons.
After retiring in 1964 as a wing commander, Mr. SHAW owned a company that sold and repaired scientific instruments. But he "loved the air force, it was his life," said his son, Douglas.
Duncan Oliver SHAW was born on October 18, 1912, in Toronto. He died in Ottawa on December 6, 2005, of natural causes. He was 93. He is survived his sons Douglas and David. He was predeceased by his wife Marjorie, his son John, his brother Archibald and his sister Mima.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-29 published
Ralph GORDON, Air Force Brigadier-General (1917-2005)
As a 28-year-old, he commanded a Second World War Royal Canadian Air Force supply squadron under monsoon conditions in the Far East and went on to become a high-ranking officer
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Thursday, December 29, 2005, Page S9
Ottawa -- Fighting the Japanese in the Far East during the Second World was one thing but fighting monsoons at the same time was quite another. When heavy rainfall struck in June of 1945, Ralph GORDON, the 28-year-old commanding officer of the Royal Canadian Air Force's 436 Squadron, knew he had a problem.
Not only did his squadron have to supply the British Army with fuel, food, medical supplies, cargo and men in its struggle to dislodge the Japanese from Burma, but it had to fly around the clock in a region that experienced about as much rain in one month as Vancouver received in a whole year.
Five months earlier, the newly-formed squadron had moved to Kangla, in India's Imphal Valley, to support Field Marshal Sir William Slim and his 14th Army. With Mr. GORDON commanding hundreds of pilots, navigators, ground crew, cooks and other tradesmen, the squadron shared in the fall of Mandalay and Rangoon but found the monsoon to be as daunting an enemy as the Japanese.
That June, meteorologists recorded a rainfall of 47 inches. According to Canucks Unlimited, a history of the squadron, "only the most limited of radio facilities were available and forecasting services just did not exist. Each airman was on his own and could count on little practical help."
Instead, Mr. GORDON, then a wing commander, came up with the idea of using one aircraft at a time, in rotation, to go into the air and report on meteorological conditions in a kind of informal weather network he dubbed "Watchbird." In this way, the squadron beat the monsoon and flew 1,000 hours in the "wettest and most difficult base in all of India and Burma." It was also the only air force unit that made it through the monsoon without casualties.
The heavy rain meant Mr. GORDON and his men continually improvised. "No one had operated under monsoon conditions before," he once recounted. "We didn't have proper equipment for changing engines on aircraft, or for doing laundry, or for lighting lamps, so we had to scrounge a lot.
"The technicians cut bamboo and made tripods and chain blocks to lift engines out of aircraft. They had no hangars and had to work in the rain. The runways were simply made of heavy tar paper, with steel mesh laid over them, so when it rained, the runway floated on the water. You got water over the windshield, and everywhere, when you took off.
"The Royal Canadian Air Force sent us stoves that burned wood to cook with [but] there was no wood to burn because bamboo is full of water. So we had to design stoves that burned aviation fuel."
Mr. GORDON's methods earned the respect of former airframe mechanic Art ADAM/ADAMS of Hamilton, Ontario "We all thought he was a tremendous commanding officer."
Mr. ADAM/ADAMS, currently the squadron's honorary colonel, said Mr. GORDON flouted tradition and allowed officers and men to eat together, which, in the stuffy view of neighbouring Royal Air Force squadrons, violated protocol.
"He said, 'If our squadron is going to work together and fly together, then by God, we will eat together!' [That is] one of the reasons we had such a happy and determined squadron."
Art IRWIN of Ottawa also admired his commanding officer's can-do ability. "We had a high disability rate from dysentery and other gastric disturbances, which had to do with a lack of hygiene. One of the first things he did was remove the native cooks as food handlers and have only Canadians working [in the kitchen]. His move quickly reduced our [health] problems. That was a big, big step."
For all his success, being the boss was a lonely job, Mr. GORDON told his granddaughter Heather GORDON in 1996. Commanding men in battle meant he dealt with his responsibilities in isolation from everyone else. "You couldn't be Friends and still be their boss at the same time," he said. "You knew that what you did impacted all those who served under you."
For the leadership he displayed during the nine months he commanded 436 Squadron, along with the operational missions he flew with 415 Squadron over Europe in 1944, Mr. GORDON was awarded the Distinguished Service Order on January 15, 1946. Three months earlier, he had been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for "showing outstanding devotion to duty and efficiency. Most of [his] flights have been in unarmed aircraft across mountainous jungle country within range of enemy fighters. His operational flying has always been of the highest standard."
Mr. GORDON had also been mentioned in dispatches on June 14, Ralph GORDON grew up in Bobcaygeon, in Ontario's Kawartha Lakes cottage region, where his father Charles owned a boating business. After joining the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1939, he was awarded his pilot's wings in June, 1940. Two years of instructing followed before he went to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, to fly Canso maritime patrol aircraft for No. 162 (Bomber/Reconnaissance) Squadron. In May, 1944, he was sent to Britain to fly Wellington bombers against enemy shipping.
After the war, Mr. GORDON remained in the Royal Canadian Air Force and experienced first its reduction and then its dramatic Cold War expansion. By the end of the 1950s, the Royal Canadian Air Force flew 2,000 aircraft and counted 55,000 men and woman among its ranks. From 1961-65, as a group captain, he commanded Royal Canadian Air Force Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia, a key Maritime Air Command base. In August of 1965, he was promoted air commodore and given command of Maritime Air Command, making him responsible for the security of both East and West Coasts. As it turned out, he was its last commander.
In January of 1966, Maritime Air Command was amalgamated into the new Maritime Command as part of the integration of the army, navy and air force, a scheme that caused enormous controversy. When four senior admirals resigned in protest, Mr. GORDON found himself in temporary command, on July 19, 1966, of Maritime Command, which included the Atlantic fleet and Royal Canadian Air Force maritime units. His command lasted all of eight hours. The sight of Mr. GORDON's personal Royal Canadian Air Force flag flying at the heart of the navy's headquarters in Halifax caused one salty chief petty officer to growl, "It's a disgrace!"
During his career, Mr. GORDON spent more than 3,000 hours flying about 25 different types of aircraft. After retiring as a brigadier-general in 1968, he worked for the federal public service.
Ralph Alan GORDON was born on November 16, 1917, in Toronto. He died of cancer on November 8, in Ottawa. He was 87. He leaves his sons, Larry and Bruce, and his companion, Nancy GUTHRIE. He was predeceased by his wife Esther.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-05 published
FRY, William
(Veteran of World War 2) Passed away peacefully on February 3, 2005 at the Aurora Resthaven Nursing Home at the age of 85. Longtime resident of Rexdale, he will be sadly missed by Beryl and their children Patricia (Ray) HAINES, Bob (Maureen) FRY, and Nancy BOURDON (Nigel.) Grandfather to Derek HAINES, Darren (Tammy) HAINES, Kristi (Chris) CHANG, Carrie (Jamie) INNES, and Beth BOURDON. Great-grandfather to Ella HAINES. A retired Canadian Pacific Railway sales representative, Bill's main passions were sports and officiating. After being a longtime official administrator in the Toronto Hockey League, he turned to football. Bill joined the Canadian Football League in 1957 to man the yardsticks and by 1977 was named the league's director of officiating, which post he held until 1985. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston, on Monday, February 7 from 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday, February 8 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A private family service will be held in the Field of Honour, Montreal at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated. Condolences to the family may be sent to william.fry@wardfh.com "We will miss you Buddy"

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-27 published
McKAY, Catherine (DOYLE)
Passed away at Stevenson Memorial Hospital, Alliston, Ontario on Monday, September 26, 2005, in her 81st year. Beloved wife of the late Bob McKAY. Loved mother of John and Marjorie POTTIE of Barrie and Brenda SHORT of Alliston. Loving grandma of Caroline POTTIE, William SHORT and his fiance Doreen KIRKHAM, John and Liz BOURDON, Robert and Eile SHORT, Jennifer and Denis BOURDON. Loved great-grandma of Kiera SHORT, Dennis and Justin BOURDON. Dear sister of Allan and Peggy DOYLE of Scotland and predeceased by her sister Joyce DOYLE. A Memorial Service will be held at W. John Thomas Funeral Home, 244 Victoria Street East, Alliston, Ontario on Saturday, October 1, 2005 at 12 noon. The family will receive Friends at the Funeral Home from 11: 00 a.m. until time of service. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Stevenson Memorial Hospital Foundation, 200 Fletcher Crescent, Alliston, Ontario L9R 1W7 would be appreciated.

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