BIGAUSKAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-16 published
MITALAS, Gintautas " Gintas" Povilas
Friday, May 13, 2005, surrounded by his family. Gintautas Povilas MITALAS, age 77. Beloved husband of Sylvia SAKALINIS. Loving father of Paul (Julie Jeanne) and Julia (Erik JURGUTIS.) Cherished grandfather of Carolyn, Andy, Lisa, Matas, Aleksas, and Paulius. Dear brother of Laima BIGAUSKAS and the late Danute MANGLICAS. He will be sadly missed by many family and Friends. Friends may pay respects at the Kelly Funeral Home, 3000 Woodroffe Avenue, Ottawa, Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Tuesday to St. Elizabeth Church, Ottawa, for Mass of Christian Funeral at 10: 30 a.m. A Memorial Mass will be held at the Lithuanian Martyrs Church, Mississauga, Wednesday at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Saint John's Lithuanian Cemetery, Mississauga. In lieu of flowers, donations to the charity of your choice appreciated. Kelly Funeral Homes, Ottawa. (613) 235-6712, www.kellyfh.ca

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BIGELLI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-03 published
BIGELLI, Betty Janette (née GRAHAM)
Age 62 It is with profound sadness the family of Betty BIGELLI announces her passing on January 2, 2005. Beloved wife, constant companion and very best friend to her husband Carlo. Loving mother to Joseph, daughter-in-law Margaret, proud and loving grandmother to Joey Jr. and Angela. Predeceased by her parents Joseph and Florence GRAHAM, sister Florie, brothers James and Joe. Survived by brother George (Marjoerie,) sisters Joan DURETTE (Ray,) Margaret HANDLEY (Leo,) Barbara DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS (John) and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Betty proved to be a formidable warrior against her fight with cancer and she fought with all her might. She loved life and very much wanted to live life to the fullest especially for her family and Friends. Anyone who knew Betty loved her. Betty was a kind, enthusiastic, fun-loving person who had an infectious laugh and the ability to see humour in almost every situation. We all feel privileged to have been part of her all too short life. The family would like to thank the Sunnybrook Cancer Centre, Dr. Susan CHENG and all the nursing staff for their excellent care and attention to Betty during her difficult time. At Betty's specific request, cremation will take place. Friends and family will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston, on Thursday, January 6 from 2-5 and 7-9 p.m. An Anglican Mass will be celebrated at St. Philip's Anglican Church on Friday at 11 a.m. on January 7, 2005. Interment St. Philip's Church Yard Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, kindly make donations to the Canadian Lung Association.

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BIGELLI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-07 published
BIGELLI, Rose
The family of Rose are deeply saddened to announce her passing on Wednesday, July 6, 2005 in Mississauga, at the age of 88. Beloved wife of the late Philip. Devoted and adoring mother of Katherine (Peter HENDERSON,) and Teresa (Clint BAKER.) Proud grandma of Jeff, Kristin, Michael, Brian, Julie, and great-grandmother of Kent. Rose will be missed by all of her family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Neweduk Funeral Home "Mississauga Chapel", 1981 Dundas St. W. (1 block east of Erin Mills Pkwy.) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Thursday. A Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Friday, July 8 at 11 a.m. Cremation. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Credit Valley Hospital Foundation, "You are in the arms of the angels now, we love you." Neweduk Funeral Home 905-828-8000 www.neweduk.com

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2005-06-22 published
WILLIAMS, Glenn Frederick
Glenn Frederick WILLIAMS passed away on Wednesday, June 1, 2005 in the South Bruce Grey Health Centre in Kincardine in his 75th year. Fred was born in Eugenia, June 23, 1930, twin son of Albert WILLIAMS and Marguerite Pedlar SMITH. Fred spent his younger life in Eugenia on the 8th Line of Osprey Township, where his father and mother farmed.
Fred married Donna OSBORNE in 1952 and lived in Niagara Falls, where their two sons Wayne and Barton were born. They lived in different places where Fred worked with Ontario Hydro for 40 years and five days. He retired October 1, 1986 and made his home in Tiverton, Ontario. Fred belonged to the Bruce Masonic Lodge #341.
He was predeceased by his twin brother, Jack, Lois and step-brother Murray. He was the beloved husband of Donna (née OSBORNE,) dear father of Wayne (Carol) and Barton (Nancy) all of Kincardine, loving grandfather of Lindsay and Kyle WILLIAMS, Alissa (Ross) BIGELOW and Luke WILLIAMS and cherished great-grandfather of Cale BIGELOW.
The funeral service was held at Dovey-Linklater Funeral Home, Kincardine on Friday, June 30 with Wendy LAMPMAN officiating.
Flowerbearers were Lindsay and Joan WILLIAMS, Alissa BIGELOW, Lynda MUELLER and Brenda ACHESON. Pallbearers were Kyle, Luke, Arthur and Doug WILLIAMS, Doug and Stephen OSBORNE.
Honourary pallbearers were Dugald MacKENZIE, Gordon BROWN, John TAILOR/TAYLOR and Tom SCOTT.
Interment was in Tiverton Cemetery.
Page 3

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-06-03 published
WILLIAMS, Fred
of Tiverton, at South Bruce Grey Health Centre-Kincardine, on Wednesday, June 1st, 2005, in his 75th year. Beloved husband of Donna (née OSBORNE.) Dear father of Wayne (Carol) and Bart (Nancy) WILLIAMS all of Kincardine. Loving grandfather of Lindsay and Kyle WILLIAMS, Alyssa (Ross) BIGELOW, and Luke WILLIAMS. Cherished great-grandfather of Cole BIGELOW. Predeceased by one sister Lois BOVAIR and brothers Jack and Murray WILLIAMS. Visitation was held at Davey-Linklater Funeral Home, 757 Princes Street, Kincardine, Ontario N2Z 1Z5, (519)396-2701, on Thursday, June 2nd from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. and Friday, June 3rd, from 10:00 until the time of the service at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Tiverton Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Kincardine and Community Health Care Foundation or the Canadian Diabetes Association may be made as expressions of sympathy.
Page A2

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-29 published
BIGELOW pioneered open-heart surgery
Canadian Press
Toronto -- Dr. Wilfred BIGELOW was the father of open-heart surgery in Canada and one of the pioneers in the world, say former students and admirers. The surgeon who invented the technique of hypothermia for open-heart surgery, and performed the world's first such procedure on a dog at the Banting Institute in 1949, was also a co-inventor of the pacemaker.
He died Sunday at age 91.
"Generations of doctors across Canada and the United States and around the world were trained by him," said Dr. Bernard GOLDMAN, who worked with BIGELOW at Toronto General Hospital for 20 years after training under him.
"He was a real mentor to me... a tremendous supporter," said GOLDMAN, now professor emeritus at the University of Toronto.
David NAYLOR, dean of medicine at the University of Toronto, called BIGELOW "a legendary figure in Canadian medicine and global cardiac surgery. "Dr. BIGELOW was... a pioneer in the use of hypothermia -- deliberately cooling the heart."

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-30 published
BIGELOW, Wilfred Gordon
After a life lived with caring, intellectual curiosity and a profound sense of spirituality, Bill died peacefully in Toronto on Easter Sunday 2005. Born in Brandon, Manitoba, Bill was the son of Dr. Wilfred BIGELOW, founder of the first medical clinic in Canada, and Grace GORDON, nurse and midwife. He was raised in an environment that encouraged a love of family, nature, music and education. Bill attended Brandon College in the early 1930's and graduated from medicine at the University of Toronto in 1938. Following this, he served overseas as a Captain in the Royal Canadian Medical Army Corps, performing battle surgery on the frontlines. Returning home from the war, he furthered his studies at John Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland specializing in cardiac surgery. His experiences in the war with amputations due to frostbite led him to explore the principle of hypothermia. He felt strongly that to make progress in cardiac surgery, surgeons needed to open the heart and operate directly. Building on his wartime experiences, he theorized that if you could cool the heart, you could reduce oxygen requirements, interrupt circulation and open the heart. In 1947, Bill returned to Toronto, and established a hypothermia research unit at The Banting Institute. There, he performed the world's first open heart surgery on a dog using the principal of hypothermia, paving the way for its use on humans. At his lab, Dr. BIGELOW and his colleagues Dr. John CALLAGHAN and Dr. John HOPPS also developed the cardiac pacemaker. Bill was recognized internationally as the father of Canadian heart surgery. He received the Gairdner Foundation Award in 1959, was inducted into the Canadian Medical Association's Hall of Fame in 1997 and into the Order of Canada in 1981. Bill published numerous medical articles in scientific journals, educated aspiring cardiac surgeons from around the world, and authored two books, Cold Hearts and Mysterious Heparin. Along with his passion for medicine, Bill will be remembered for his love of the outdoors and his work on environmental causes. He served as a director of the Audubon Society and the Nature Conservancy of Canada. He spent many happy hours on the islands of Georgian Bay, and at his farm in Collingwood with his beloved family, horses and dogs. He was an avid bird watcher who went on frequent field trips with his longtime friend Dr. Bruce CHARLES. In his latter years, he enjoyed many happy hours with his golf buddies at the Toronto Hunt Club. First and foremost, Bill was a family man and a devoted and loyal friend to many. He was predeceased by his beloved wife of almost 60 years, Ruth JENNINGS, who attracted his attention as a caring and efficient operating nurse at Toronto General Hospital. He was also predeceased by his infant brother Jack, and his sisters Mary GRANT (Millard,) and Toody McKINNON (Keith.) He is survived by his brother Dr. Dan BIGELOW and his wife Dr. Sonia SACEDA. As a loving father and grandfather, Bill led by example, demonstrating the importance of loyalty and the power of positive thinking and perseverance. He will be deeply missed by his daughter Pixie Bigelow CURRIE (Ian) of Toronto, and sons, John (Ellie) of Honolulu, Hawaii, Dan (Blanche) of Petersfield, Manitoba, and Bill of Toronto. He is remembered with affection by his grandchildren Scott CURRIE (Sarah,) Susanne COUTTS (Rob), Mathew BIGELOW, and Angela BEATTON (Don) and his nieces, nephews and their families. Bill adored children and was delighted with the birth of his three great grandchildren, Sophie and Chloe COUTTS and Stella CURRIE. The family recognizes with gratitude his caregivers Alma ABLONA, Beth LARA and Helen ABLONA and the staff of Belmont House. The funeral and interment will be private. A memorial service will be held at Rosedale United Church on Saturday, April 23, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. Donations in his memory may be made to establish The Bigelow Lectureship, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, The Banting Institute, 100 College Street, Room 311, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1L5, telephone (416) 978-5148; or to continue The Bigelow Book Prize, Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Program, 150 College Street, Room 83D, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, telephone (416) 978-7744.

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-30 published
Wilfred BIGELOW, Heart Surgeon: 1913-2005
Canadian doctor who was the first person to look inside a beating, human heart developed the pacemaker and pioneered the use of hypothermia in heart surgery
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, March 30, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- The frigid Canadian winter of 1941, a Toronto hospital and a 28-year-old surgical intern who had just helped amputate a man's frostbitten fingers. Wilfred (Bill) BIGELOW's curiosity was piqued: How and why did extreme cold destroy human tissue?
The Manitoba-born University of Toronto graduate searched the available medical literature and, surprisingly in a country where winters are cold enough to kill, found little about frostbite.
Spurred by his surgery professor's challenge, Dr. BIGELOW finally found sources who knew something about frostbite. He learned that cold alone doesn't cause gangrene. Rather, tissue dies when blood stops moving, and people can tolerate extreme cold without damage as long as some blood continues to course through their veins.
But the Second World War intervened, and Dr. BIGELOW was soon off to serve as a front-line surgeon with the Canadian army in England and northwest Europe. On his return, he spent a year studying in Maryland at Johns Hopkins University Hospital, where pioneer heart operations on "blue babies" born with defective hearts were being performed, with mixed results. This prompted Dr. BIGELOW, with his prewar studies in localized hypothermia, to investigate whether it might be possible, as he would later write, to cool "the whole body, reduce the oxygen requirements, interrupt the circulation, and open the heart." If cold itself is not harmful to flesh and organs, he reasoned, then it would be safe to slow circulation to a near standstill so that surgeons could operate on nearly empty blood vessels.
Back at Toronto General Hospital in 1947, he and a small team obtained a room in the basement of the Banting Institute to carry on the research. Approval for the project had been granted in an atmosphere of some skepticism. At the time, a drop in body temperature was considered dangerous, if not lethal. As a first step, the team discovered that lowering the temperature of an extremity reduced its metabolism and oxygen requirements.
Then, in 1949, they made their first open-heart attempt. A dog was immersed in cold water inside a cut-down oil drum, and the temperature of its body lowered to 20 degrees. The animal's heart was pink and healthy, but it wasn't beating and its circulation was stopped for 15 minutes. Dr. BIGELOW tapped the heart tentatively with an electrical probe. All four chambers responded with one convulsive throb. He tapped it again. Another beat. The organ then continued beating without blood -- a first -- and then with blood. The dog was rewarmed and survived.
The episode led him to think that a device that could deliver a gentle jolt of some sort, without damaging the muscle, would enhance the hypothermia experiments.
That's how Dr. BIGELOW became known as one of the world's leading pioneers in the use of hypothermia in heart surgery and in the development of the pacemaker, which he co-invented with fellow Canadian cardiovascular superstar John Carter CALLAGHAN, and an electrical engineer, Jack HOPPS, found through the National Research Council in Ottawa.
In 1950, Dr. BIGELOW was the first person to look inside a living, beating human heart. He was astonished. The organ bore little resemblance to the diagrams and descriptions of his medical school lectures. "We knew there would be a valve flapping back and forth, but we weren't prepared for the dynamic ring that contracts forcefully in co-ordination with the valve. And the valve itself was far different from what we expected," he told journalist June CALLWOOD in 1985.
Dr. BIGELOW and Dr. CALLAGHAN electrified their colleagues when they presented their findings in 1950 at a meeting in Denver of the American Surgical Association. "There was no discussion," Dr. BIGELOW recalled years later. "It was one of the very few basic medical discoveries where no one stood up to say they'd done something similar."
Their presentation stimulated worldwide research and, two years later, a successful operation using hypothermia was performed in the United States. After this, "a steady stream of surgeons and scientists from around the world came to see our first Canadian open-heart surgery and to visit our Banting and Best Institute laboratory," Dr. BIGELOW reported, including 19 of Japan's top heart surgeons.
The first thing the Japanese doctors wanted to see was the old 25-gallon oil drum sawed in two that had served as the crucible for the canine experiment.
The next thing the visitors wanted to see was the world's first heart pacer -- a table-top contraption that weighed about 15 pounds and measured a foot long and several inches wide. The pacer, too, was co-developed by Dr. BIGELOW -- to stimulate the hearts of his experimental dogs when they were slowed down by the cooling.
By 1959, a Swedish doctor had used transistor circuitry and successfully implanted a pacemaker the size of a hockey puck beneath a patient's skin. But, for years, pacemakers were known everywhere as "Toronto machines."
(The invention of a lithium battery by a Buffalo electrical engineer in 1972 launched the pacemaker as a modern medical and technical miracle for countless thousands of people around the world. Today's pacemakers measure about four centimetres by three centimetres by half-a-centimetre thick and can be implanted in 30 minutes.)
About 1960, the two prevalent techniques of the day -- operations using heart-lung pumps and hypothermia -- were combined and used by surgeons around the world on a daily basis. In 1967, both methods were used by South African surgeon Christiaan Barnard, who performed the world's first transplant.
Today, ultra-cold chemical solutions are injected into the coronary arteries during surgery to protect the heart further.
Dr. BIGELOW pioneered several other cardiac surgical procedures and, in 1956, established the first complete three-year to four-year training program for cardiac surgeons. He headed the renowned cardiovascular surgical team at Toronto General Hospital for 20 years. He received two dozen major honours and awards, including the Order of Canada in 1981, and was named to the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame in 1997. He authored two books, Cold Hearts and Mysterious Heparin, and wrote more than 100 medical papers.
A self-effacing man, Dr. BIGELOW insisted that some of his early experiments failed dismally. For instance, he spent 10 years trying to discover how groundhogs were able to hibernate, but gained little except a deep respect for groundhogs. He called the invention of the pacemaker a "spinoff" from the hypothermia experiments.
All the same, he was a walking, talking hero to young Canadian doctors. To Anthony GRAHAM, now a cardiologist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto and a professor of medicine at the University of Toronto, Bill BIGELOW was always a giant among surgeons. In the early 1970s, Dr. BIGELOW made it his business to quietly persuade potential recruits to sign on to the surgical staff at Toronto General Hospital and had invited Dr. GRAHAM, who had recently returned from studying in California, to drop by his office. The visit turned out to be a tour of Dr. BIGELOW's "collection" that he had laid out in hopes of sparking interest in young doctors.
"He had built a little museum in his office that was full of the gadgets he had made over the years," said Dr. GRAHAM. There, all lined up and neatly presented, were pacemakers in various stages of developments, early dilators and other devices that had played their part in medical history. "All of it was really neat to see. As a Canadian, he made a staggering contribution to his field. The things we see as commonplace today were revolutionary then."
As it turned out, Dr. GRAHAM did not join Dr. BIGELOW's staff, but the two men came to know each other through their involvement in the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. "He was a gentle, caring man," said Dr. GRAHAM. " Not at all like the surgical personality we often think of as stereotypical."
For his part, Dr. BIGELOW was aware of a larger picture that lay beyond the day-to-day demands of a busy surgeon. "The moral responsibility of introducing a new operation is real," he wrote in Cold Hearts, the medical history of his work that was published in 1984. "I sometimes look back with a shudder. Working beyond the accepted limits of conventional medicine with few guidelines and no one to share responsibility or offer counsel was a very lonely feeling."
Wilfred Gordon BIGELOW was born in Brandon, Manitoba, on June 18, 1913. He died in Toronto on March 27, 2005, at 91. He leaves a daughter and three sons. He was predeceased by his wife, Ruth.
A memorial service is scheduled for April 23 at 2 p.m. at Toronto's Rosedale United Church.

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-01 published
I Remember -- Wilfred "Bill" BIGELOW
By Kittie-Marie FELLS, Friday, April 1, 2005, Page S7
Kittie-Marie FELLS of Toronto writes about heart surgeon Wilfred (Bill) BIGELOW, whose obituary appeared on Wednesday.
I often met Dr. Bill, who was a neighbour and friend, when we were walking our dogs in the park and in Rosedale ravine in Toronto. He was crazy about his black lab. He was informed and sensitive about all things natural and it was a privilege to birdwatch with him.
Sometimes, after trekking back up the hill, he would check out my pulse. He told me, as we watched joggers going by, that he felt walking and then gradually running uphill was a much more effective way to condition the body than the jolting movements of jogging. My white dog and I follow his advice.

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-02 published
I Remember -- Wilfred "Bill" BIGELOW
By Richard SCHWINDT, Saturday, April 2, 2005, Page S9
Richard SCHWINDT of Sioux Lookout, Ontario, writes about heart surgeon Wilfred (Bill) BIGELOW, whose obituary appeared on Wednesday.
I only met him once over 20 years ago, but I well recall that day. Dr. BIGELOW started his presentation to the Toronto General Hospital pacemaker club with a slide show on the development of the pacemaker. I felt squeamish when he showed a picture of the dog unlucky enough to try out the prototype but he spoke with such kindness and respect for the dog that, by the time he finished, I felt like the dog had been part of the team.
Afterward, I was asked to pose for a picture with him and the first pacemaker. I thought it was just a photo op, but he began to speak and I realized that he was really going to take the opportunity to explain to me how the thing worked. I was probably the youngest person in attendance, and he wanted me to know how the device in my chest had evolved.
Dr BIGELOW left a very concrete legacy, but the pacemaker clinic at Toronto General Hospital is still a humane and caring place. I can't help but wonder whether his legacy transcends machines and techniques. He alluded in his talk to family and a church community that sustained him. And I have no doubt that his kindness and humility earned the love of those who surrounded him. Still, it moves me to think that he went through periods of professional isolation and risk on behalf of people like myself.

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-06 published
I Remember -- Wilfred BIGELOW
By Brenda KANE, Wednesday, April 6, 2005, Page S9
Dr. Brenda KANE of Toronto writes about Wilfred BIGELOW, whose obituary appeared on March 30.
In 1961, as an uncertain teenager, I met him with my parents in preparation for my own surgery. He was gentle and reassuring to all of us before and afterwards. The care from his team at Toronto General Hospital was also great.
He was interested in me as a person and was very supportive in my desire to enter medical school in Toronto. At a time when doctor's services were not covered by government-sponsored insurance, I believe that he didn't charge his full fee to me. I hope that some of his caring has rubbed off on me and that I have given to my patients something of him over the last 35 years of my medical practice.

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-07 published
I Remember -- Wilfred BIGELOW
By Edward NAJGEBAUER, Thursday, April 7, 2005, Page S9
Dr. Edward NAJGEBAUER of Sudbury writes about Wilfred BIGELOW, whose obituary appeared on March 30.
I met Wilfred BIGELOW as a third-year medical student. I could not believe that this kind, soft-spoken, intelligent gentleman would not only have the time for undergraduates but also treat them with respect and courtesy -- it did not seem possible that this was the man who had made open-heart surgery possible. As medical students, we were considered the "lowest of the low," yet there he was instructing us. More important, he listened to what we had to say. Arrogance and aloofness were foreign to him.

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-13 published
I Remember -- Wilfred BIGELOW
By Theda WARNER, Wednesday, April 13, 2005, Page S7
Theda WARNER of Toronto writes about Dr. Wilfred Bigelow whose obituary appeared on March 30.
In 1949, when I was 14 years old, I was hit by a car and taken to Toronto General Hospital. After I was cleaned up it was discovered that, along with a concussion, my injuries consisted of a very badly cut face which would require 42 stitches. The attending resident doctor on call that particular day was Dr. Wilfred BIGELOW. He sewed up my face. His work was practically invisible from the very beginning, and may be somehow related to his later career spent doing cardiac surgery. He begged my parents not to go to court for the ensuing law suit "because this is a very young girl and the opposing lawyers will never stop mauling her face until they can account for each one of those stitches." Because of his advice, the case was settled out of court. They don't come any kinder or more talented than Bill BIGELOW.

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-20 published
BIGELOW, Doctor Wilfred Gordon " Bill"
The family would be pleased to receive Friends and colleagues for a Memorial Service on Saturday, April 23, 2005 at 2 p.m. Rosedale United Church, 159 Roxborough Drive (Glen Road).

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-27 published
HILL, Myrtle L.
John and Elaine HILL and daughters Vanessa and Allegra, are saddened to announce the passing of Myrtle L. HILL, at the Empress Gardens Retirement Residence, Peterborough at the age of 103. Myrtle was born in Cavan and lived on Gilmour Street, Peterborough for 72 years. Myrtle is predeceased by her husband, John Gordon HILL, her brothers Clarke SWAIN, Toronto, William SWAIN, Cavan and her sister Margaret BIGELOW, Port Hope. She is survived by her younger brother Frederick SWAIN, Kingston and sister Helen SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, Peterborough, and the younger descendants of the original SWAIN family. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Comstock Funeral Home, 356 Rubidge Street, Peterborough, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Friday. The Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday, April 30, 2005 at 12: 00 p.m. The Reverend George TURNER will be officiating. In memory of Mrs. HILL, donations to Brock (Men's) Mission would be appreciated by the family.

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BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-30 published
BIGELOW, Wilfred Gordon
After a life lived with caring, intellectual curiosity and a profound sense of spirituality, Bill died peacefully in Toronto on Easter Sunday 2005. Born in Brandon, Manitoba, Bill was the son of Dr. Wilfred BIGELOW, founder of the first medical clinic in Canada, and Grace GORDON, nurse and midwife. He was raised in an environment that encouraged a love of family, nature, music and education. Bill attended Brandon College in the early 1930's and graduated from medicine at the University of Toronto in 1938. Following this, he served overseas as a Captain in the Royal Canadian Medical Army Corps, performing battle surgery on the frontlines. Returning home from the war, he furthered his studies at John Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland specializing in cardiac surgery. His experiences in the war with amputations due to frostbite led him to explore the principle of hypothermia. He felt strongly that to make progress in cardiac surgery, surgeons needed to open the heart and operate directly. Building on his wartime experiences, he theorized that if you could cool the heart, you could reduce oxygen requirements, interrupt circulation and open the heart. In 1947, Bill returned to Toronto, and established a hypothermia research unit at The Banting Institute. There, he performed the world's first open heart surgery on a dog using the principal of hypothermia, paving the way for its use on humans. At his lab, Dr. BIGELOW and his colleagues Dr. John CALLAGHAN and Dr. John HOPPS also developed the cardiac pacemaker. Bill was recognized internationally as the father of Canadian heart surgery. He received the Gairdner Foundation Award in 1959, was inducted into the Canadian Medical Association's Hall of Fame in 1997 and into the Order of Canada in 1981. Bill published numerous medical articles in scientific journals, educated aspiring cardiac surgeons from around the world, and authored two books, Cold Hearts and Mysterious Heparin. Along with his passion for medicine, Bill will be remembered for his love of the outdoors and his work on environmental causes. He served as a director of the Audubon Society and the Nature Conservancy of Canada. He spent many happy hours on the islands of Georgian Bay, and at his farm in Collingwood with his beloved family, horses and dogs. He was an avid bird watcher who went on frequent field trips with his longtime friend Dr. Bruce CHARLES. In his latter years, he enjoyed many happy hours with his golf buddies at the Toronto Hunt Club. First and foremost, Bill was a family man and a devoted and loyal friend to many. He was predeceased by his beloved wife of almost 60 years, Ruth JENNINGS, who attracted his attention as a caring and efficient operating nurse at Toronto General Hospital. He was also predeceased by his infant brother Jack, and his sisters Mary GRANT (Millard,) and Toody McKINNON (Keith.) He is survived by his brother Dr. Dan BIGELOW and his wife Dr. Sonia SACEDA. As a loving father and grandfather, Bill led by example, demonstrating the importance of loyalty and the power of positive thinking and perseverance. He will be deeply missed by his daughter Pixie Bigelow CURRIE (Ian) of Toronto, and sons, John (Ellie) of Honolulu, Hawaii, Dan (Blanche) of Petersfield, Manitoba, and Bill of Toronto. He is remembered with affection by his grandchildren Scott CURRIE (Sarah,) Susanne COUTTS (Rob), Mathew BIGELOW, and Angela BEATTON (Don) and his nieces, nephews and their families. Bill adored children and was delighted with the birth of his three great-grandchildren, Sophie and Chloe COUTTS and Stella CURRIE. The family recognizes with gratitude his caregivers Alma ABLONA, Beth LARA and Helen ABLONA and the staff of Belmont House. The funeral and interment will be private. A memorial service will be held at Rosedale United Church on Saturday, April 23, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. Donations in his memory may be made to establish The Bigelow Lectureship, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, T

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BIGENWALD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-12 published
DEKOVEN, Marion
On Sunday, May 8, 2005 in Toronto, after a brief illness. Marion DEKOVEN, beloved wife for 62 years of the late Dr. Maurice DEKOVEN. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Maxwell and Carol DEKOVEN of Montreal, Howard DEKOVEN of Nova Scotia, Harriet DEKOVEN and Charles BIGENWALD of Toronto, and Dr. Joel and Elan DEKOVEN of Toronto. Predeceased by her six sisters. Devoted grandmother of Robin (Mike), Alan (Naomi), Kathryn, Rachel, Ian, Sam, Mark, and Benjamin. Great-grandmother of five. Marion will always be remembered for her love of the arts; her strength, resilience and fighting spirit; her love of family; her generosity, optimism and unceasing zest for life. Special thanks to Tessie ACEVEDO and Rose Cipriano BRIONES for their care and compassion. Services were held on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or to a charity of your choice.

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BIGFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-08 published
WIGGINS, Donna Glenore (née BIGFORD)
Surrounded by her family, at Headwaters Healthcare Centre, Orangeville on Thursday, July 7, 2005, in her 60th year; beloved wife of David WIGGINS; loved mother of Dean MORRISON and his wife Sarah, Jennifer BUTTREY and her husband Grant, Michael and his wife Tobi, Darlene NODOLF (Al;) dear grandmother of Nicholas, Nolan, Amanda, Rachel, John, Jordan and Jacob; also sadly missed by her brothers Chuck BIGFORD (Shirley) and Ivan BIGFORD and her sister Lois O'SHAUGHNESSY (Clifford,) her extended family and many Friends; predeceased by her brother Douglas BIGFORD. Friends may call at the Dods and McNair Funeral Home and Chapel, 21 First Street, Orangeville on Sunday, July 10, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Monday, July 11, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Greenwood Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Hospice Dufferin (Circles Group) or Princess Margaret Hospital would be appreciated.(Condolences may be offered to the family at www.dodsandmcnair.com)

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BIGG o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-17 published
BIGG, Stanley
Quietly on August 11, 2005, Stanley BIGG, of London, in his 79th year. Dear brother of Marg BLISS and her family in Florida and California. Loving father of Cal BIGG and his family in London, Randy BIGG and his family in Oakville, Rick BIGG and his family of London, Lise BIGG of London, Alison FULTON and her family of London. He will be sadly missed by sister-in-law Kay BIGG and her family of Georgetown. A memorial service will be held at Westmount Presbyterian Church (521 Village Green Ave.) on Friday, August 26th, 2005 at 11 a.m. Donations to the Westmount Presbyterian Memorial Fund or Sunday School Program would be appreciated. Needham Funeral Services entrusted with arrangements.

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BIGGAR o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-22 published
MacDONALD, Norienne (née RANAHAN)
(February 24, 1915-September 20, 2005)
The old legs, have gotten weary and I felt it was time to join Mac. After all, it's been 3 years since he left my side after 60 years together. John and I were blessed with 3 wonderful children and their families, Mary and Dennis (STARKEY,) in Durham, John and Debra (recently deceased), in Goderich and Rick and Barbara (BIGGAR) in Tecumseh. I was privileged to watch my grandchildren, Brianne, Kyle and Sean grow into young adults. We moved from London to Saint Thomas where we lived for close to 55 years and the majority of those years were in our home we built in Lynhurst. My life was a fulfilling one, raising our 3 children and embarking on a teaching career when they were older, teaching at Holy Angels Elementary School and at St. Joseph's High School. Being elected as a trustee for the Elgin County Roman Catholic Separate School Board and being the only woman on the Board was quite an experience. Three years ago, I moved to Windsor, a sudden move with little time for goodbyes. So it was quite a treat to return to Saint Thomas to celebrate my 90th birthday with all my old Friends in February. Thanks to the "pot luck" group who kept in touch and a special thanks to my close friend, Norma ROCHE, who sent me weekly notes keeping me up on the news in Saint Thomas. Mom was very active in the community over the years with a long standing involvement in the Cancer Society, (serving two terms as president of the Elgin County Unit), the Saint Thomas Golf and Country Club both as a golfer (serving a term as President of the Ladies Division) and as a Bridge Club member. She was a committed volunteer for the Rotary Music Festival for decades, and served a term as President of the local chapter of the Heart and Stroke Foundation. One of Mom's favourite activities was the bike ride for cancer, which she did into her 80's. For her commitment to the community, she received the "Saint Thomas Citizen of the year award" with Dad, an unexpected but well deserved honour. She was an amazing mother and we will miss her terribly. Thanks to those care workers at Sunrise Assisted Living who went beyond the call of duty and a special thanks to the staff at Extendicare Tecumseh and Dr. Ian McLEOD, who took such terrific care of mom and allowed her to keep her dignity as her health failed over the past 9 months. The family will receive their Friends at the R.E. Allen Funeral Chapel, 31 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Friday afternoon and evening. Funeral service will be held at Holy Angels Church, 502 Talbot Street, Saint Thomas, Saturday morning at 10 a.m. After cremation, interment will be made in St. Peter's Cemetery, London. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Ontario Heart Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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BIGGAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-04 published
ZANUSSI, Yvonne (GRIEVES)
After a "full and wonderful life" (in her own words), Yvonne passed away peacefully at G.N.G.H. on January 31, 2005. She was predeceased by her best friend and husband, Al. Yvonne is survived by her loving children; Rob (Louise), Rick (Terry) and Lauren (Jim Hartt). "Grandvon" was cherished by Alexandra and Zachary ZANUSSI, Rebecca and Darren ZANUSSI, and Rachel and Mallory HARTT. She was the beloved sister of Muriel BIGGAR. Also predeceasing her were her special brother-in-law, Cliff BIGGAR, and her sister Mardi (Eric) LILLEY. Yvonne was a dear aunt to Mardi CANTIN, Tracy BIGGAR, Robin ARGENTA and Toby LAUGHER and will also be sadly missed for her spirit, intelligence and compassion by many Friends, past colleagues and extended family members. Friends are invited to share the celebration of her life at a reception immediately following a Memorial Service at the Church of St. John the Evangelist, Stamford, 3428 Portage Road, on Monday, February 7 at 12: 00 noon. As an expression of sympathy, those who wish may make a donation in Yvonne's memory to the Canadian Cancer Society, Saint John's Church, or their chosen charity through the Morse and son Chapel of the Morgan Funeral Homes, 5917 Main Street, Niagara Falls
Online guest register at www.morganfuneral.com

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BIGGAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-18 published
MacDONALD, Francis Joseph " Frank" B.A., B.Sc., P.Eng.
Passed away peacefully at Trillium Health Centre in Mississauga on March 17, 2005, at the age of 89, after a courageous battle with cancer. He is now reunited with his beloved wife Renée (2004), whom he dearly missed. Loving father of Paul, Teresa, Nancy and her husband Keith BAINES, and Christine and her husband Bill BIGGAR. Will be sadly missed by his grandchildren, Celine and her husband Antonio TADRISSI, Julie, Katie, Caroline, Jeffrey, Scott, and David. While born in Ottawa, Frank was always proud of his roots in Prince Edward Island. A graduate of the University of Ottawa and McGill University, Frank spent most of his career with Trans Northern Pipeline as a chemical engineer. A devout Roman Catholic, he was very active in his Church as a Eucharistic Minister, served for more than 40 years as a member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, at both Conference and Council levels, and was an active member of the Serra Club (Toronto). Frank will be remembered for his strong faith, his sharp mind, and genuine interest in people. The family would like to thank the staff at the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga for their kind support and compassionate care. The family will receive Friends at the Newediuk Funeral Home, Kipling Chapel, 2104 Kipling Avenue (two blocks north of Rexdale Boulevard), Monday, March 21st from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Tuesday, March 22nd at Transfiguration of Our Lord Church, 45 Ludstone Drive (off Celestine Drive at Dixon Road, west of Kipling), at 10 a.m. Interment will be held in Ottawa at the Notre Dame Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Serra Club (Toronto), the St. Vincent de Paul Society or the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga.

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BIGGAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-18 published
MacDONALD, Francis Joseph " Frank," B.A., B.Sc., P.Eng.
Passed away peacefully at Trillium Health Centre in Mississauga on March 17, 2005 at the age of 89, after a courageous battle with cancer. He is now reunited with his beloved wife Renée (2004) whom he dearly missed. Loving father of Paul, Teresa, Nancy and her husband Keith BAINES, and Christine and her husband Bill BIGGAR. Will be sadly missed by his grandchildren Celine and her husband Antonio TADRISSI, Julie, Katie, Caroline, Jeffrey, Scott and David. While born in Ottawa, Frank was always proud of his roots in Prince Edward Island. A graduate of the University of Ottawa and McGill University, Frank spent most of his career with Trans Northern Pipeline as a chemical engineer. A devout Roman Catholic, he was very active in his Church as a Eucharistic Minister, served for more than 40 years as a member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, at both Conference and Council levels and was an active member of the Serra Club (Toronto). Frank will be remembered for his strong faith, his sharp mind and genuine interest in people. The family would like to thank the staff at the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga for their kind support and compassionate care. The family will receive their Friends at the Newediuk Funeral Home, Kipling Chapel, 2104 Kipling Ave., Etobicoke (two blocks north of Rexdale Blvd.) from Monday, March 21, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Tuesday, March 22 at Transfiguration of Our Lord Church, 45 Ludstone Dr. (off Celestine Dr., at Dixon Rd., west of Kipling) at 10 a.m. Interment will be in Ottawa at the Notre Dame Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Serra Club (Toronto), the St. Vincent de Paul Society or the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga.

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BIGGAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-21 published
BIGGAR, Isabel M.
Peacefully on Friday, August 19, 2005 at Northridge Long Term Care, Oakville in her 87th year. Predeceased by her loving husband Harold, married for 66 years. Special mother of Barbara McGILL (husband Wayne,) Marian MILLER (husband Lloyd,) Nancy GOLDIE- MILES (husband Gord) and Norman (wife Sandi). Predeceased by son Clair (1945). Cherished grandmother of Barbara Jean, Shane and Kathy (McGILL), Mary Jane, Marlene and Alex (MILLER), Morgan and Gregory (GOLDIE) and Stacey, Lianne and Natalie (BIGGAR.) Proud great grandmother of 5. Predeceased by her sisters Dora HASTINGS and Olga LIDSTEN. Survived by her niece Penny LOBBEZOO (husband John.) The family will receive Friends at the Oakview Funeral Home, 56 Lakeshore Rd. W., Oakville (one block east of Kerr St.), on Sunday August 21, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held in the Oakview Chapel on Monday August 22, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment to follow at St. Jude's Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Foundation.

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BIGGAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-22 published
MacDONALD, Norienne (née RANAHAN)
(February 24, 1915-September 20, 2005)
The old legs have gotten weary and I felt it was time to join Mac. After all, it's been 3 years since he left my side after 60 years together. John and I were blessed with 3 wonderful children and their families, Mary and Dennis (STARKEY,) in Durham, John, and Debra (recently deceased), in Goderich and Rick and Barbara (BIGGAR,) in Tecumseh. I was privileged to watch my grandchildren, Brianne, Kyle and Sean grow into young adults. We moved from London to Saint Thomas where we lived for close to 55 years and the majority of those years were in our home we built in Lynhurst. My life was a fulfilling one, raising our 3 children and embarking on a teaching career when they were older, teaching at Holy Angels Elementary School and at St. Joseph's High School. Being elected as a trustee for the Eight County Roman Catholic Separate School Board and being the only woman on the Board was quite an experience. Three years ago, I moved to Windsor, a sudden move with litte time for goodbyes. So it was quite a treat to return to Saint Thomas to celebrate my 90th birthday with all my old Friends in February. Thanks to the "pot luck" group who kept in touch and a special thanks to my close friend, Norma ROCHE, who sent me weekly notes keeping me up on the news in Saint Thomas. Mom was very active in the community over the years with a long standing involvement in the Cancer Society (serving two terms as President of the Elgin County Unit), the Saint Thomas Golf and Country Club both as a golfer (serving a term as President of the Ladies Division) and as a Bridge Club member. She was a committed volunteer for the Rotary Music Festival for decades, and served a term as President of the local chapter of the Heart and Stroke Foundation. One of Mom's favourite activities was the bike ride for cancer, which she did into her 80's. For her commitment to the community, she received the "Saint Thomas Citizen of the Year Award" with Dad, an unexpected but well deserved honour. She was an amazing mother and we will miss her terribly. Thanks to those care workers at Sunrise Assisted Living who went beyond the call of duty and a special thanks to the staff at Extendicare Tecumseh and Dr. Ian McLEOD, who took such terrific care of Mom and allowed her to keep her dignity as her health failed over the past 9 months. The family will receive their Friends at the R.E. Allen Funeral Chapel, 31 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Friday afternoon and evening. Funeral service will be held at Holy Angels Church, 502 Talbot Street, Saint Thomas, Saturday morning at 10 a.m. After cremation, interment will be made in St. Peter Cemetery, London. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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BIGGART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-11 published
STIRLING, John Duncan
Peacefully, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, on Thursday, June 9, 2005, in his 71st year. Beloved husband and best friend of Karen for 48 years. Loving father of Stewart (Sylvia), Tom (Sandy,) Susan BIGGART (Matthew,) Gail LESSOR (Charles,) and Sheila (John MacPHERSON.) Dear Grandpa of Megan, Anthony, Justin, Tiffany, Jonathan, Emily, William, Melissa, Jason, Christopher, Blake, Matthew and Cameron. Lovingly remembered by his brother Bill (Dorothy) and sister Ellen JOHNSON (Harry.) Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10, N. of the Queen Elizabeth Way), from 2-5 p.m. Sunday. Funeral Service will be held at St. Andrew's United Church, 117 Bloor St. E., Toronto, on Tuesday, June 14, 2005. Time to be confirmed. If desired, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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BIGGART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-13 published
STIRLING, John Duncan
Peacefully, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, on Thursday, June 9, 2005, in his 71st year. Beloved husband and best friend of Karen for 48 years. Loving father of Stewart (Sylvia), Tom (Sandy,) Susan BIGGART (Matthew,) Gail LESSOR (Charles,) and Sheila (John MacPHERSON.) Dear Grandpa of Megan, Anthony, Justin, Tiffany, Jonathan, Emily, William, Melissa, Jason, Christopher, Blake, Matthew and Cameron. Lovingly remembered by his brother Bill (Dorothy) and sister Ellen JOHNSON (Harry.) Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10, N. of the Queen Elizabeth Way), from 2-5 p.m. Sunday. Funeral Service will be held at St. Andrew's United Church, 117 Bloor St. E., Toronto, on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 at 10: 30 a.m. If desired, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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BIGGERSTAFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-27 published
Two versions of a murder victim
DARING 'a wonderful, wonderful guy'
Not 'completely upstanding,' police say
By Linda DIEBEL and Isabel TEOTONIO, Staff Reporters, With files from Vanessa LU, Page A1
There are two versions of Delroy George DARING, the father of 10 shot dead in the courtyard of a Scarborough housing complex Thursday night, and one is not so pretty.
The first, from people who knew him, is that he was a good man who pulled a troubled life together to organize "No drugs, No violence" summer barbecues for low-income kids. The group called itself the "out-of-pocket club" because nobody would help them raise money.
There are variations on this version, including the rumour that DARING was a paid police informant in the last months of his life.
Toronto police detectives, while denying the informant story, have a different take on the unemployed furniture mover who emigrated from Kingston, Jamaica, 20 years ago and had convictions for drug possession and trafficking dating back to 1986.
"I have reason to believe that the idea he was, say, a completely upstanding person promoting non-violence, non-drugs and non-guns is not fair," said Det. John BIGGERSTAFF, at the crime scene yesterday. "The activities which brought him to this courtyard are inconsistent with someone promoting (such ideals)."
Added his partner, Det. Greg GROVES: "I have no doubt that this man was the target of this murder."
Whichever version turns out to be true, there is one indisputable fact: he was gunned down in front of 20 to 30 people, many of them children, who later couldn't sleep through the night and are more terrified than ever of living in an increasingly violent part of the city.
"A little girl said to me today, 'Did you see what happened? I did. I saw it,'" said one woman yesterday. "Now that's not right. No child should have that memory."
Residents at 3181 Eglinton, where DARING was shot, didn't want to give their names. People are angry about more than the murder. They say their complaints about their living conditions and violence are ignored.
Yesterday, the building's stairways were littered with burnt newspapers and garbage. They smelled of urine and, in the hallways, light fixtures dangled and carpets were stained with cigarette butts. Locks on the building's doors were broken and mice and roaches scurried about.
Out front, young men milled about the entrance, smoking, listening to music and watching passersby.
"Look, nobody cares until somebody is shot dead, not the police, not the media," said one man, 22. "We never talk to them and it's not about people being scared to talk. It's that when they do, nothing ever happens so why open your mouth."
Before walking away, another man muttered, "Nobody interviewed Delroy when he was trying to do something. Not even the other ghettos cared a f -- -."
These men said DARING was trying to make a difference, especially for the kids. He organized barbecues, which began four years ago and which offered kids a day of bliss with "bouncey-houses" for them to play, along with raffles, soccer and dance contests.
"He was living proof that someone could turn their life around, that somebody could make a change and be a role model," said one man.
A few weeks ago, on August 7, the late-night good mood of a barbecue was shattered when a man was shot in the neck near the Hasty Market across the street. The man survived and nobody has been charged.
Police couldn't confirm reports he was found with 10 bags of marijuana
BIGGERSTAFF said he believes there may have been a connection between DARING's murder and the Hasty Market shooting.
"I'm a believer that things aren't a mere coincidence," he said.
While the autopsy won't be conducted until today, police said that DARING was shot "at least once" in the chest and was pronounced dead an hour later at Sunnybrook hospital.
BIGGERSTAFF said police canvassed the apartment buildings Thursday night after the murder, which occurred around 7 p.m., but were unable to secure eyewitness accounts from anyone in the courtyard.
BIGGERSTAFF said there was concern yesterday at police headquarters, beginning with Chief Bill Blair, about initial reports of the murder describing DARING in glowing terms as a community organizer who was an innocent victim of crime.
"Whether I like it or not, (that version) has gotten some attention," he said, adding that his worry is that Torontonians feel unsafe because they think "a person promoted as a fine, upstanding citizen is killed in broad daylight."
That version, he said, may not be true.
It could be, he explained, that "he was a bad person in a bad position and it had nothing to do with safety in any public area."
Asked if DARING was a drug dealer, the detective said he didn't know.
One young man who worked with DARING to organize the barbecues for children said he was frustrated with the insinuation that DARING was still involved in illegal activities. "They'll say the typical thing, it's what you say in every 'hood: 'He was a drug dealer, he was moving into someone's 'hood.' There's no (hard) drug activity here. If you were a drug dealer selling crack cocaine you'd go broke here."
Rumours are swirling about DARING's murder. Last night Global television reported he was found with 10 dime-sized bags of marijuana, but police couldn't confirm the report.
But at 3181 Eglinton, people didn't want to talk about that. They just wanted to remember the George DARING they knew. For years he lived in their building before moving out about a decade ago.
"He was a wonderful, wonderful guy and he was like a brother to me," said one young man.
In the courtyard where DARING died, a woman looked at the bloodstain on the ground and said: "He didn't represent 'hood life, but he died representing the worst part of it."
He had 10 children with at least three different mothers and apparently looked after all his kids. At the time of his death he lived with his two youngest and his mother in Pickering.
"He was a ladies' man," said one woman. "He liked to take care of business."
Last night, after police removed the yellow tape from the crime scene, two little teddy bears marked the spot where DARING died in the courtyard. And a single bunch of artificial red roses.
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