BERRYHILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-29 published
VAISEY- GENSER, Florence Marion (née BERRYHILL)
Marion passed away at the Riverview Health Centre on October 22, 2005 after a struggle with lung cancer. She was predeceased by her husbands Edgar VAISEY in 1961 and Lawrence GENSER in 1997 and her son Jacques VAISEY in 2003. She is survived by: her sister Dorinne THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and her family; daughter Jill VAISEY and her husband Peter DICKOF and their children Carla and Raymond DICKOF daughter-in-law Tasha NATHANSON and her children Saskia, Ariana, and Bronwyn VAISEY; step-daughter Irene CORNE, her husband Bob and their children Lesley and Jeff WOLMAN, Janet and Michael KATZ, Maureen and Avi SLAMA, and Eric and Aimee CORNE, and their children (Marion's great-grandchildren) Yale and Serena WOLMAN, Ariel, Liav and Neeve SLAMA, and Ira CORNE; and by her step-son Steven GENSER. Marion was born to Florence and Dolph BERRYHILL in Winnipeg on April 3, 1929. She graduated with a B.Sc. from the University of Manitoba in Home Economics in 1949 and an M.Sc. in Nutrition from McGill University in 1951. She went on to teach in Halifax, Corvallis and Guelph before joining the University of Manitoba's Home Economics Faculty (now Human Ecology) in 1965 where she taught and did research using sensory methods to evaluate foods such as canola oil. She joined the administration of the University in 1980 as Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and served as the Associate Vice President, Research from 1983-91. She published many papers and received a number of awards throughout her career. After her retirement in 1993, she was honoured with Senior Scholar and Professor Emeritus status. Elegant and erudite, sharp witted and well spoken, successful professionally and charming personally, Marion was an inspiration. She worked gladly to further causes as diverse as women in the sciences and Canadian food products. She served on national science committees and even appeared on Korean television to promote flax seeds for her beloved prairie provinces. She loved her family, playing cards, and ending the day with a nice bowl of vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce or - joy! - raspberries from the garden. We will all miss her terribly. A memorial service will be held in Winnipeg at 1: 00 p.m. on Saturday, October 29th at Saint John's College Chapel, 92 Dysart Rd. A reception is to follow in the Cross Common Room. Parking is available across the street. In lieu of flowers, and in recognition of the tremendous help provided to Marion by the W.R.H.A. Palliative Care Program, the family suggests that donations be made to the 'W.R.H.A. Palliative Care Fund' at A8024-409 Taché Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba, R2H 2A6.

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BERRYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-07 published
GRATTON, Rene
Suddenly, at Central Park Lodge, on Friday, February 4, 2005. He will be remembered by his nieces Phyllis SMITH and Leona GRATTON- BERRYMAN and grand-niece Beverley BERRYMAN.

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BERRYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-27 published
JEFFREY, Doris Emma (RIGBY)
At St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph, on Sunday, June 26, 2005. Doris Emma (RIGBY) JEFFREY, in her 91st year, was the beloved wife of the late Robert M. JEFFREY. She was the loving mother of Kenneth and his wife Ann of Guelph and Wayne and his wife Christine of Toronto. Doris was the proud grandmother of Laurin and his wife Natalie, Christine and Karen. Resting at the Gilbert MacIntyre and son Funeral Home, Dublin Chapel, 252 Dublin St. N., Guelph, where the family will receive Friends on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, June 29, 2005 with Reverend Stephen BERRYMAN officiating at 1: 30 p.m. Cremation to follow. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Alzheimer Society or the Parkinson Society Of Canada would be appreciated by the family. (Cards available at the funeral home 519-822-4731 or send condolences at www.gilbertmacintyreandson.com). Directions from Hwy 401. Exit Hwy 6 North (Hanlon Expressway), exit East on Paisley Rd., turn North on Dublin St.

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BERSEK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-09 published
BERSEK, Stjepan " Steve"
Passed away peacefully with his family by his side, on Monday, February 7, 2005 at the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga. Loving husband of Anne for 24 years. Adored father of Daniel and Nicole. Dear son of Stefica and the late Josip. Loving brother of Bozica, Josip and Mary. Stjepan will be dearly missed by his many family and Friends. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10 North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Thursday and Friday from 6-9 p.m. Prayers 8 p.m. Friday. Funeral Mass will be held at Croatian Martyrs Church, 4605 Mississauga Rd., on Saturday, February 12, 2005 at 10 a.m. Entombment Assumption Mausoleum.

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BERSENAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-30 published
MORKUNAS, Irena Marija
Peacefully on Monday, November 28, 2005 at the St. Joseph's Health Centre. Beloved wife of 51 years to Juozas. Mother of Arunas. Sister of Ona SVARINSKAS, Valentina SIMANAVICIUS, the late Napoleonas LESKAUSKAS and Jurgis LESKAUSKAS (Gerda.) Sister-in-law of Antanina LEPARSKAS, Elena BERSENAS, Zuzana STRAVINSKAS (Juozas,) and Jonas MORKUNAS (Barbara.) Will be missed by many nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane subway on Thursday, December 1, 2005 from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. Prayers 8 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Mass to be held at the Church of the Resurrection, 1 Resurrection Road on Friday, December 2, 2005 at 10 a.m. Interment Saint John's Lithuanian Cemetery.

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BERTA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-07 published
NABERT, BERTA
At 87, beloved mother of Claus and Heidi NABERT, mother-in-law of Rose NABERT and Danny GUSPIE. Passed away peacefully, in the presence of Heidi and Danny, after a brief period at St. Michael's Hospital, on Tuesday, May 3, 2005 at 5: 45 a.m. The family extends heart-felt thanks to hospital staff in Emergency, Respirology, 2 Queen, and Oncology for the extraordinary care they gave her in her last months. Her greatest love and ambition was her children, her second love was cooking. She excelled in the hospitality industry as a Chef, was Manager of the Austrian Club Edelweiss of Toronto and co-ordinated many special events. Her kind heart and love of giving - especially her cookies, formed lifelong Friendships with both young and old. She will be missed by thousands whose lives she touched in countless ways. A private cremation will be held on Tuesday, May 10. Friends and family are invited to visit at the Parish Church of St. Bartholomew, Apostle and Martyr in Regent Park, 509 Dundas St. E., Toronto, on Wednesday, May 11 and Thursday, May 12 between 2-4 p.m. and 6: 30-9 p.m. with a Requiem Mass at 2 p.m. Friday, May 13. A Commemorative Service is scheduled for Friday, May 20th at 2: 30 p.m. at the 100 Huntley Street - George A. Chambers Memorial Chapel located in the Crossroads Centre at 1295 North Service Rd. in Burlington (Queen Elizabeth Way, at Brant St.) A Celebration of her Life will be hosted at the Donau Schwaben Club at McCowan and Ellesmere, Scarborough, in late June 2005. For more information on any of these events please contact Heidi NABERT at 416-462-0421 or Claus NABERT at 416-283-0710. While flowers, especially orchids, were always appreciated by our mother, it is her wish that such expressions of care be directed in her name to her favourite charities: Maket-an (a small village in the Philippines), 100 Huntley Street, Canadian Cancer Society, or the Salvation Army. May she rest in peace in between polkas and baking cookies for the Heavenly Host.

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BERTA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-19 published
BERTA, Louis P. (1932-2005)
Retired Employee of DeHavill and Passed away peacefully at the Ottawa Civic Hospital with his daughters by his side on August 11th, 2005 at the age of 73 years. Devoted husband and best friend of Mary Sue. Loving father of Dian Berta (Cory VERCH,) Louise (Kevin) BERTA- OLDHAM, Sheri (Russell) WILLIAMS. Proud grandfather of Todd, Beth, Tyler, Maggie and Abigail. Brother of Irene (Doug) CLARK, Nora VINCENT and the late Kay (Gabe) SINCLAIR. Lovingly remembered by his nieces and nephews. Many thanks to the wonderful nurses and palliative care staff at the Ottawa Civic Hospital whose support and guidance were greatly appreciated. He leaves behind many Friends in the Killaloe/Barry's Bay area where he enjoyed his retirement years. He was well known for his beautiful gardens, his special love of cats and his ceaseless energy for improving his much loved ranch/home. He was a man with a big heart that will be sadly missed. There will be a celebration of his life at his home, located at 3164 Letter Kenny Road, Brudnell, on Saturday, August 20th, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. to reflect upon his life and achievements. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Lou may direct them to the Valley Manor Nursing Home, Box 880, Barry's Bay, Ontario K0J 1B0.

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BERTA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-07 published
GUTKOWSKI, Wladyslaw
Sadly with his family at his side at the Rouge Valley Ajax Pickering Health Centre on Saturday, November 5, 2005, at the age of 85. Predeceased by his wife Clara and his granddaughter Tamara. Dear father of Friedrich (Helene,) Halina (Randy) BERTA, Walter (Krystyna NOWAK,) Leokadia (Jan) WLODARCZYK, Frank, and Henry (Jeanine LASON.) Proud grandfather of Sylvia, Suzanna, Natasha, Kevin, Curtis, Tara, Amanda, Kiana, Sean, and great-grandchildren. Resting at Collins Clarke MacGillivray White Funeral Homes, 222 Autoroute 20, Cartier - Exit 49 in Pointe-Claire. Funeral service Wednesday, November 9 at St. Michael's Parish, 105 St. Viateur Street, at 10: 00 a.m. Interment at Lakeview Memorial Gardens, Pointe-Claire. Visitation Monday 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Montreal Children's Hospital or the Children's Make A Wish Foundation.

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BERTEIT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-27 published
BERTEIT, Karen J.
At her home in Toronto, on Tuesday, January 25, 2005. Beloved mother of Peter, Nancy and Don (Patricia). Loved grandmother of Chris, Karen, Michelle, Craig and Kirsti and great-grandmother of Amanda, Alana, Christine, Rachel, Dustin, Joshua, Mary Elizabeth, Alban, Allenda and Emerson. Dear sister of Ellen and Arne. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), one hour prior to the service, which will be held in the chapel, on Friday, January 28th, at 7: 30 p.m. If desired, donations to the Providence Centre, 3276 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto M1L 1W1, would be appreciated.

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BERTELSEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-07 published
McFADDEN, Betty (née BERTELSEN)
Peacefully, on Saturday, March 5th, 2005, Betty McFADDEN (nee BERTELSEN) a life long resident of London, in her 86th year. Predeceased by her husband Ken McFADDEN and dear son Dallas. Cherished mother of Dale (Peter) CARDILLO of Toledo, Rick (Heather) McFADDEN of Victoria, British Columbia and Rob (Arlene) McFADDEN of London. Betty "lived for her children" and is survived and fondly remembered by seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Anna (Jack) OKE of London. A celebration of Betty's full and rewarding life will be held on Wednesday, March 9, 2005 from 1: 00 to 4:00 p.m. at Needham Funeral Service, 520 Dundas St, London. In lieu of flowers, the family requests any donations be made to the St. Joseph's Health Care (London) Foundation or the Lung Association.

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BERTHIAUME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-30 published
PALMER, Dave Ignatius
Died suddenly from cancer related complications on June 27th, 2005 at age 46. He will be greatly missed by his beloved wife Darcy and their children Max (3½) and Mia (7 weeks). Also left to mourn are his mother Edith MARTIN, siblings Cheryl PALMER (Danylo DZWONYK), Laurel Palmer GOODEN (Don), Colville PALMER, Gerald PALMER, Karene Palmer ROBINSON (Carl) and Susan Palmer GOODEN (Philip,) his parents-in-law Ruth and Dick BERTHIAUME, his brother-in-law Bill BERTHIAUME, his aunts Merle PAISLEY, Pam MARTIN and Joyce PALMER and his cousins Beverley, Ivan and Monica SCHROETER and his nine nieces and nephews. Dave's long-time business partner Fraser (Janet) MacDOUGALL and his many Friends are also left shocked and saddened at his death. Visitation will be at Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W., on Friday, July 1st, 6-8pm. The funeral will take place at St. Clement's Anglican Church, 59 Briar Hill Ave., July 2nd at 10 a.m. Reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to assist Dave's family may be made to the law firm of Jan Goddard and Associate in Trust, Suite 504, 1 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2V7.

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BERTHIAUME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-30 published
PALMER, Dave Ignatius
Died suddenly from cancer related complications on June 27th, 2005 at age 46. He will be greatly missed by his beloved wife Darcy and their children Max (3½) and Mia (7 weeks). Also left to mourn are his mother Edith MARTIN, siblings Cheryl PALMER (Danylo Dzwonyk), Laurel PALMER Gooden (Don), Colville PALMER, Gerald PALMER, Karene Palmer ROBINSON (Carl) and Susan Palmer GOODEN (Philip,) his parents-in-law Ruth and Dick BERTHIAUME, his brother-in-law Bill BERTHIAUME, his aunts Merle PAISLEY, Pam MARTIN and Joyce PALMER and his cousins Beverley, Ivan and Monica SCHROETER and his 9 nieces and nephews. Dave's long-time business partner Fraser (Janet) MacDOUGALL and his many Friends are also left shocked and saddened at his death. Visitation will be at Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W., on Friday, July 1st, 6-8 p.m. The funeral will take place at St. Clement's Anglican Church, 59 Briar Hill Ave., July 2nd at 10 a.m. Reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to assist Dave's family may be made to the law firm of Jan Goddard and Associate in Trust, Suite 504, 1 St. Clair Ave. E., Toronto, Ontario, M4T 2V7.

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BERTHON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-11 published
CLUNE, Donald Edgar Sr.
Passed away at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre on Sunday, January 9th, 2005 at the age of 76. Don beloved husband of Anne (nee BERTHON) and dear father of Donald (Kelly,) Patricia, Beth (Andrew McILROY), Frances (Paul FRAUMENI), Barbara (Brian COOK) Tom (Anne Marie,) and Sarah (Lenny DARROCH.) Much-loved 'Grampie' of Julie, Jacquie, Jeffrey, Jordon, Duncan, Cameron, Glenna, Nicholas, Sam, Brian, Carly, Richard, Matthew, Ben and William. Don was predeceased by his parents Agnes and William and brothers Paul, Bill, Walter and Arthur and is survived by brothers, Bishop Robert CLUNE and John (Audrey,) and by his many nieces and nephews. Don was a retired longtime employee of Sears Canada and was well-known in the furniture industry. He was a devoted parishioner for 49 years of St. Bonaventure's Parish in Don Mills and a committed and respected trustee for the Toronto Catholic District School Board for 30 years, including several terms as Chairman. He also served on the board of George Brown College. His warm and generous spirit will be missed by many people. Don was never happier than when he was with family and Friends (and 'organizing' them). Resting at the Paul O'Conner Funeral Home 1939 Lawrence Ave. E. (Between Warden and Pharmacy) from 7 - 9pm Tuesday, January 11 and 3 - 5 and 7 - 9 pm Wednesday, January 12. Mass of Christian Burial on Thursday morning at 10: 30am in St. Bonaventure Church, 1300 Leslie St. (on Leslie south of Lawrence). A reception will follow in the Parish Centre. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Safehaven Project for Community Living, 1173 Bloor St. W., Toronto, M6H 1M9 and St. Bernard's Residence, 685 Finch Ave. W., Toronto, M2R 1P2 would be appreciated.

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BERTHON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-11 published
CLUNE, Donald Edgar Sr.
Passed away at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre on Sunday, January 9th, 2005, at the age of 76. Don, beloved husband of Anne (nee BERTHON) and dear father of Donald (Kelly,) Patricia, Beth (Andrew McILROY), Frances (Paul FRAUMENI), Barbara (Brian COOK), Tom (Anne Marie,) and Sarah (Lenny DARROCH.) Much-loved " Grampie" of Julie, Jacquie, Jeffrey, Jordon, Duncan, Cameron, Glenna, Nicholas, Sam, Brian, Carly, Richard, Matthew, Ben and William. Don was predeceased by his parents Agnes and William and brothers Paul, Bill, Walter and Arthur and is survived by brothers, Bishop Robert CLUNE and John (Audrey,) and by his many nieces and nephews. Don was a retired long-time employee of Sears Canada and was well-known in the furniture industry. He was a devoted parishioner for 49 years of St. Bonaventure's Parish in Don Mills and a committed and respected trustee for the Toronto Catholic District School Board for 30 years, including several terms as Chairman. He also served on the board of George Brown College. His warm and generous spirit will be missed by many people. Don was never happier than when he was with family and Friends (and "organizing" them). Resting at the Paul O'Conner Funeral Home, 1939 Lawrence Ave. E. (between Warden and Pharmacy) from 7-9 p.m. Tuesday, January 11 and 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, January 12. Mass of Christian Burial on Thursday morning at 10: 30 a.m. in St. Bonaventure Church, 1300 Leslie St. (on Leslie south of Lawrence). A reception will follow in the Parish Centre. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Safehaven Project for Community Living, 1173 Bloor St. W., Toronto M6H 1M9 and St. Bernard's Residence, 685 Finch Ave. W., Toronto, M2R 1P2 would be appreciated.

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BERTI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2005-03-23 published
June Irene (GOODE) BERTI
June 14, 1931 - March 22, 2005. In loving memory of June Irene (GOODE) BERTI who passed away on March 22, 2005 at the Mindemoya Hospital, at the age of 73.
Beloved wife of Arthur Attilio BERTI, new resident of Mindemoya, and formerly of Hillsdale and Orr Lake. June was born on June 14, 1931 in Toronto, daughter of William and Irene GOODE. Loving mother and deeply missed by daughter Linda WUNDERLICH of Eady, (late husband Michael,) daughter Carol JAMIESON of Lake Manitou (partner Dave HENDERSON,) son Ronald of Tehkummah (wife Joahnna,) and son Terry SILVIO of Tehkummah. Forever remembered and cherished by grandchildren Nicole (partner Jamie COWARD,) Melanie (partner Bruce NAOKWEGIJIG), Lucus, Sabrina, Dylan, Beckett and Emma, and by great-grandchildren Lauren, Kharesa, Nekoma and Naomi. Dearly missed by sisters Marion (husband Jack GRANGER,) Shirley (late husband William STODDART,) and brothers, Jack (wife Stella,) Robert (wife Margaret,) and Norman 'Bud' (wife Jean predeceased). Predeceased by two brothers William (wife Ruby predeceased), and Roy (wife Lorraine). Remembered by many, many nieces, nephews, in-laws, and family Friends.
Rested at the Island Funeral Home, 36 Worthington Street, Little Current (705-368-2490). Visitation was Friday and Saturday. Funeral Mass was celebrated on Monday, March 28, 2005 at 11 am at Our Lady of Canada Catholic Church, Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island with Father Robert FOLIOT SJ as celebrant. Interment at the Hilly Grove Cemetery at a later date.

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BERTI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-26 published
CONSTABLE, Anthony Lawrence
Anthony Lawrence CONSTABLE, suddenly at Kensington Village Nursing Home, London, on Thursday, February 24, 2005, in his 81st year. Dearly beloved husband of Jean M. CONSTABLE. Dear father of Susan CONSTABLE and her husband Al BERTI of Calgary, Alberta, Jane DUPERÉ and her husband Robert CUDDY of Waterloo, and Michael and his wife Shelley CONSTABLE of Barrie. Loving granddad of Rachelle, Christopher, Jeffery, Adam, Sean, Ryan and Lyndsey. Dear brother of Winnie SHEPHERD and her late husband Graham and Gwen and her late husband Raymond CONSTABLE of England. Anthony served proudly in the Royal Marines during World War 2. His last days were spent in the loving care at Kensington Village. Friends may call on Tuesday, March 1 from 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 St. James Street at Richmond, London. A memorial service will be conducted on Wednesday, March 2 at 2: 00 p.m. in the Church of Saint John the Evangelist, 280 St. James Street at Wellington by Canon David BOWYER. Memorial contributions to the Alzheimer Society or Kensington Village Chari table Foundation would be gratefully acknowledged.

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BERTI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-24 published
BERTI, June Irene (née GOODE) (June 14, 1931-March 22, 2005)
In loving memory of June Irene (GOODE) BERTI who passed away on March 22, 2005 at the Mindemoya Hospital, at the age of 73. Beloved wife of Arthur Attilio BERTI, new resident of Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island, and formerly of Hillsdale and Orr Lake, Ontario. Born June 14, 1931 in Toronto, daughter of William and Irene GOODE. Loving mother of Linda WUNDERLICH of Eady (husband Michael predeceased,) daughter Carol JAMIESON of Lake Manitou (partner David HENDERSON,) and sons Ronald (wife Joahnna) and Terry SILVIO of Tehkummah, Manitoulin Island. Forever cherished by grandchildren Nicole, Melanie, Lucus, Sabrina, Dylan, Beckett and Emma, and by great-grandchildren Lauren, Kharesa, Nekoma, and Naomi. Dearly missed by sisters Marion GRANGER and Shirley STODDART, and brothers Jack, Robert, and Norman. Predeceased by brothers William and Roy. Remembered by many nieces, nephews, in-laws, and family Friends. Resting at the Island Funeral Home, 36 Worthington Street, Little Current (705-368-2490). Visitation Friday, March 26 and Saturday, March 27 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated Monday, March 28, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. at Our Lady of Canada Catholic Church, Mindemoya, with Fr. Robert Foliot S.J. as celebrant. Interment at the Hilly Grove Cemetery, Manitoulin Island.

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BERTIE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-07-14 published
BERTIE, Hazel Regina
At Rockwood Terrace Nursing Home, Durham on Wednesday, July 13th, 2005, of Flesherton, in her 64th year. Beloved husband of John BERTIE. Loving mother of Dave (Nancy,) of Flesherton, Christine (Robert) HULME of, Sudbury, Darlene (Fred) VEINOTTE, Jacqueline (Murray) MILL, Cheryl JOHNS, all of Calgary and Theresa (Chris) VEINOTTE, of Nobleton. She will be loved and remembered by her fifteen grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Dear sister of Roy, Wally, Woodrow, Sadie Bruce and the late Bertie. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton (1-888-924-2810), on Thursday, July 14th from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. and Friday, July 15th, from 1: 00 p.m. until the time of service in the chapel at 2: 00 p.m. Cremation followed by interment, Flesherton Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Humane Society or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.
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BERTIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-14 published
BERTIE, Hazel Regina
At Rockwood Terrace Nursing Home, Durham on Wednesday, July 13, 2005, of Flesherton in her 64th year. Beloved wife of John BERTIE. Loving mother of Dave (Nancy) of Flesherton, Christine (Robert) HULME of Sudbury, Darlene (Fred) VEINOTTE, Jacqueline (Murray) MILL, Cheryl JOHNS all of Calgary and Theresa (Chris) VEINOTTE of Nobleton. She will be loved and remembered by her 15 grandchildren and 1 great-grandchild. Dear sister of Roy, Wally, Woodrow, Sadie Bruce and the late Bertie. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton (1-888-924-2810) on Thursday, July 14 from 7-9 p.m. and Friday, July 15 from 1: 00 p.m. until the time of service in the chapel at 2: 00 p.m. Cremation followed by interment Flesherton Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Humane Society or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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BERTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-20 published
KURTZ, Colleen Susan
Peacefully on Friday, June 17, 2005, Colleen Susan KURTZ passed away in her 45th year. Beloved wife of the late Raymond Alty. Loving mother of Pamela and Lacey. Loving daughter of Ruth BERTIN, the late Joe KURTZ and Bert BERTIN. Dear sister of Karen TONE (Donna ROACH) and Richard BERTIN (Sandy.) Colleen will be sadly missed by her cousins Judy (Jim CAMERON) and cousins in Regina. Loving niece of John KURTZ (Monica) and Nick KURTZ (Ruth). Also missed by her second set of daughters Jennifer and Tamara BARESICH. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), London for visitation on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. A Service of Remembrance will be held in the chapel on Wednesday, June 22, 2005 at 2 p.m. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Colleen are asked to consider a fund for her loving daughters Pamela and Lacey or the charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to Memorial Funeral Home 452-3770.

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BERTLING o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-20 published
BERTLING, Bernice Jessie (MUSSELL)
Mrs. Bernice BERTLING of Gilbert Avenue, Delhi passed away at the Norfolk General Hospital, Simcoe on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 in her 89th year. Member of Saint John Brebeuf Catholic Women's League and former member of the Ladies Optimist Club of Delhi. Former Bernice Jessie MUSSELL. Beloved wife of the Late Gordon L. BERTLING (1989.) Loving mother of Diane BERTLING, Delhi; David BERTLING (Linda,) Tillsonburg and Phillip BERTLING (Helen,) Delhi. Cherished grandmother of four grand_sons: Jason, Michael (Sarah), Paul and Bryan BERTLING. Special grandmother to Matthew and Peter MALCOLM, Tabitha ALWARD, Lance and Meeko. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by two brothers: Robert MUSSELL (2003) and his Late wife Patricia (1987,) William BOWYER (1981) and by her two nephews: James CHANDLER (1996) and Robert CHANDLER (1985). Friends may call at the Murphy Funeral Home, Delhi for visitation on Friday from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m and for C.W.L. Prayers at 3: 00 p.m. and Parish Prayers at 7:30 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held at Saint John Brebeuf and Companions Roman Cathol ic Church, Delhi on Saturday, May 21st at 2: 00 p.m. with Reverend Fr. Thomas A. DONOHUE officiating. Interment in Delhi Cemetery. Donations to the Delhi Community Health Centre or the Charity of your choice will be gratefully acknowledged by the family.

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BERTLING o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-29 published
LEATHONG, Florence (BERTLING)
Peacefully, at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Monday, June 27th, 2005, Florence (BERTLING) LEATHONG of Tillsonburg in her 86th year. Born in Middleton Twshp., April 7th, 1920 daughter of the late Francis (Frank) Leo BERTLING and the late former Myrtle (BARHAM) BERTLING.
(Member of the Saint John's Anglican Church, Tillsonburg and A.C.W., former member of the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital Board of Directors, Past President of Tillsonburg Golf and Country Club (Ladies Division). "Many will remember Florence for her warm and friendly personality with her nice welcoming smile". She was a dedicated Avon Salesperson who was recognized by Avon Canada.
Predeceased by her beloved husband of 60 years James A. LEATHONG (July 10, 2002). Much loved mother and mother-in-law of: Thomas LEATHONG and his wife Nancy of Burlington, Richard LEATHONG and his wife Lyn of Tillsonburg and Barbara and her husband Paul MUTTER of Brussels. Proud grandmother of: Jaime and Sean LEATHONG, Kristine ROMYN, Mehgan and Stacy LEATHONG and Curtis and Kevin Mutter. Survived by a sister Joan ADAM/ADAMS of Delhi, and two sisters-in-law Lois COOKE of Penticton, British Columbia, Marilyn PENNINGTON of London. Predeceased by two brothers: Max BERTLING and Ray BERTLING. Friends and relatives are welcome to meet with the family and share memories on Wednesday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg (519) 842-4238. Complete Memorial Service to celebrate the life of Florence LEATHONG to be conducted on Thursday morning at 11 a.m. at the Saint John's Anglican Church, Ridout Street (at Bidwell), Tillsonburg by Reverend Richard A. JONES. Inurnment in the Bertling Family Plot at the Delhi Cemetery at a later date. Memorial donations (payable by cheque only) to the "Saint John's Church - Kitchen Fund" or the "Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital Foundation" or the "Canadian Cancer Society" can be arranged through the Verhoeve Funeral Home.

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BERTMANS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-02 published
BERZITIS, Adolf
Age 89 years, passed away peacefully in his sleep on Thursday, March 31, 2005. Beloved husband of the late Lilija (née BERTMANS.) Loving father of Arija, Peter (Sheila) and Kristine. Dear vecais of John, Karl, Graham and Erik. Uncle of Aija and Birute, of Latvia. A private family service will be held at a later date.

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BERTOIA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-12 published
BERTOIA, Lodovica
Peacefully on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 at the Pinegrove Lodge, Woodbridge. Lodovica BERTOIA, in her 95th year. Survived by her only grand_son Robert of Ireland. Predeceased by her 10 brothers and sisters. She will be missed by her sister-in-law Valeria BERTOIA of Toronto, Elda BERTOIA of Arizona and her brother-in-law Gianni DEMARCHI of Trail, British Columbia. Lodovica will be lovingly remembered and sadly missed by her many nieces and nephews and their families. Friends and family will be received at the Demarco Funeral Home "Keele Chapel", 3725 Keele St. (between Sheppard and Finch, 416-636-7027) on Wednesday from 6: 30 to 9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Thursday, October 13, 2005 at 10: 30 a.m. at St. Norbert's Roman Catholic Church (100 Regent Rd.) with entombment to follow at Holy Cross Mausoleum. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Parkinson Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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BERTOL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-15 published
KRESS, Keith Grant
Keith passed away at age 61, on Wednesday, September 14th, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital after a brief battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Lorraine (BERTOL.) Loving and devoted father of daughter Karen and son Scott and his wife Susan. Proud grandfather to Amy and Colin. Survived by his loving sister Diane and her husband John O'CONNOR and their children Kelly, Carolyn, Suzanne and families. Dear son-in-law of Lydia and Nello BERTOL and brother-in-law to Diane HISCOX, Loretta BERTOL, Zora KRIZ and Anita SAUNDERS and their families. Keith appreciated the support of his Friends during his illness. Friends may call on Saturday, September 17th, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Funeral service will be held at the Chapel on Sunday September 18th, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice.
Condolences www.rskane.ca. R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

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BERTOL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-15 published
KRESS, Keith Grant
Keith passed away at age 61, on Wednesday, September 14th, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital after a brief battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Lorraine (BERTOL.) Loving and devoted father of daughter Karen and son Scott and his wife Susan. Proud grandfather to Amy and Colin. Survived by his loving sister Diane and her husband John O'CONNOR and their children Kelly, Carolyn, Suzanne and families. Dear son-in-law of Lydia and Nello BERTOL and brother-in-law to Diane HISCOX, Loretta BERTOL, Zora KRIZ and Anita SAUNDERS and their families. Keith appreciated the support of his Friends during his illness. Friends may call on Saturday, September 17th, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Funeral service will be held at the Chapel on Sunday, September 18th, 2005 at 11 o'clock. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Condolences www.rskane.ca.

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BERTOLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-20 published
GIRARDO, Vittorio
It is with much sadness our family announces the passing of Vittorio, in his 72nd year, after a short but courageous battle with cancer. Vittorio, loving son of the late Lorenzo GIRARDO and Anna Maria BERTOLIN. He leaves behind his caring sisters Giovanna (Renato) GOTTARDO and Mary (the late Domenico) ROSSIT. Sadly missing Uncle Vick are his nephews and nieces Aldo, Marianne (Bruno), Nick (Mary), the late Bobby and great-niece and nephews Lori, Nicholas and Julian. Many thanks to the Doctors and Nurses at St. Michael's Hospital and the Palliative Care Unit at William Osler Hospital. Friends will be received at the "Woodbridge Chapel" of Scott Funeral Home, 7776 Kipling Avenue (at Hwy. 7) on Sunday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at St. Clare of Assisi Roman Catholic Church (150 St. Francis Way) on Monday, March 21, at 1 p.m. Entombment Glendale Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, donations to the charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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BERTOLLO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-13 published
BERTOLLO, Orlando " Bud" (November 22, 1921-June 12, 2005)

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BERTOLO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-23 published
BERTOLO, Aurelio
Suddenly at home on Monday, November 21st, 2005, in his 69th year. Aurelio, beloved husband of the late Franca. Loving father of Guido and his wife Christine. "Nunu" will be missed by Yvonne, Tyler and Gino. Lovingly remembered by many family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.), Weston on Wednesday 7-9 p.m. and Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Saint John the Evangelist Church, 49 George Street, Weston on Friday at 11 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to aurelio.bertolo@wardfh.com

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BERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-21 published
Douglas MARSHALL, Journalist 1937-2005
Toronto editor and writer was a co-founder of the journal Books In Canada and a sounding board for Margaret Atwood, Robert Fulford and Margaret Laurence
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Friday, January 21, 2005 - Page S7
Doug MARSHALL was a writer and editor who cut his teeth in the newspaper business in the 1950s while working on a university paper with the likes of broadcaster Peter GZOWSKI. As an undergraduate at the University of Toronto, Mr. MARSHALL worked on The Varsity with the late Mr. GZOWSKI, who was then the paper's editor, and long-time Globe reporter John GRAY/GREY. Considered one of its star writers, Mr. MARSHALL eventually became editor of the student newspaper in 1958-59 and embarked on his lifelong career in the business.
"He loved the English language," said Lynda HURST, a columnist at the Toronto Star, where Mr. MARSHALL spent 20 years of his career. "He was obsessed with its proper use in newspapers."
After graduation, Mr. MARSHALL headed back to England, where he had spent much of his childhood. Based in London, he worked for several years as a reporter for The Canadian Press. On his return to Canada, he became a staff writer at Maclean's, which was then a monthly magazine. In 1971, he co-founded the monthly review journal Books In Canada with the late Val Clery. It got started after the two men, along with a couple of others, contributed $55 each. With the help of a $250 grant from the Ontario government, they set out to fill a void in the Canadian book world.
Getting the magazine off the ground didn't happen without a few rocky moments. Readers, for instance, didn't see the first issue dated May, 1971, until a month later. When Mr. Clery left less than two years after it started, Mr. MARSHALL took over and was said to have injected his own cultural nationalism into the magazine.
"We weren't out necessarily to take an adversary position but to give attention to Canadian books," he told the Toronto Star in a 1986 interview.
"Our philosophical position was clear, which was to judge Canadian books on the highest possible standards. Good, professionally written reviews create a climate for good literature. I think we provided one of the tools that kept alive the renaissance of Canadian literature, with the result that Canada now has at least a half-dozen world-class writers."
Under Mr. MARSHALL, Books In Canada provided a forum for such authors and critics as Margaret Atwood, Robert Fulford, Margaret Laurence and Pierre BERTON. It also served as a training ground for up-and-coming writers.
"He loved to read," Mr. GRAY/GREY said. "He always had a book shoved into his jacket pocket."
Born not long before the Second World War, Mr. MARSHALL was the eldest of three children to Porte and Marion MARSHALL. His father, a family doctor in Colbourne, Ontario, was in England during the war; his job was to check on the health status of those wishing to immigrate to Canada. After the war, he brought his family to England to join him. Young Douglas later returned to Canada to attend the University of Toronto.
During his university years, his interest in journalism is said to have been sparked after he noticed that the students who most liked to drink happened to be the same ones who worked at the newspaper. "He began life when the newspaper business was a hard-drinking business and maintained the tradition," Mr. GRAY/GREY said.
"There was nothing he liked more than a feisty debate in the pub," said Sandra MARTIN, a Globe and Mail writer who worked with Mr. MARSHALL at Books In Canada.
In the early 1980s, Mr. MARSHALL joined the Toronto Star and remained there until his retirement two years ago. During his five years as the paper's entertainment editor, he is credited for having created the innovative What's On section. Departing from traditional newspaper design, the new section incorporated a magazine style. He later worked as the paper's science and environment editor.
"He could be difficult to work for," said Toronto Star editorial columnist Bob HEPBURN. "It would drive him nuts if he saw typos or mistakes in the paper."
Outside of the newspaper world, Mr. MARSHALL was a founding member of the Crime Writers of Canada and the Periodical Writers Association of Canada, and author of the crime fiction novel A Very Palpable Hit. He was at work on a mystery novel set in England.
Patrick Oliver Douglas MARSHALL was born on November 25, 1937, in Cobourg, Ontario He died of liver disease at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto on Wednesday. He was 67. He is survived by his wife, Sarah MURDOCH, and by Barnaby and Benjamin, sons from an earlier marriage to Deborah MARSHALL. Funeral arrangements have not been finalized.

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BERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-02 published
Harry J. BOYLE
By Robert BIES, Wednesday, February 2, 2005 - Page S7
Robert BIES of Pittsburgh, Pa., writes about Harry J. BOYLE, whose obituary appeared on January 24.
My memories of Harry J. BOYLE were in his role as Mayor of Mariposa while participating in Stephen Leacock award dinners in Orillia, Ontario It was on these occasions (as a boy and then a young man) that I experienced his wonderful humour, acumen and insight into the human condition. His ability to illuminate that condition with his humour and perspective was particularly striking to me - very much in the vein of Mr. Leacock's writing. His banter with the award winner or other luminaries (Pierre BERTON, among others) and his speeches were truly a pleasure to witness. And this past week, I have gained a new appreciation for his immense contribution to Canadian culture.

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BERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-11 published
DAVIS, Fred, 1996 -- Died This Day
Broadcaster born in Toronto in 1921
Monday, July 11, 2005, Page S8
The son of a butcher, he attended Queen Victoria Public School. His father wanted him to become a doctor or a butcher; his mother hoped for a pianist. Instead, he took up the trumpet. After several musical gigs, including a summer with Howard Cable's orchestra, he joined the army in 1942 and was posted to England with the Army Show Orchestra. After the war, he returned to Toronto where he spent a year at Lorne GREENE's now-legendary Academy of Radio Arts. His first broadcasting jobs were in radio but after six years as a staff announcer at Ottawa station CFRA, he gravitated to television. He signed on as host of On the Spot and later moved to the afternoon show Open House. He also fronted the debate shows Under Attack and Crossfire. In 1957, he was made moderator of a new show called Front Page Challenge. The game-interview show was expected to last 13 weeks and instead it enjoyed a run of 38 years, making him a national celebrity along with regular panelists Gordon SINCLAIR, Pierre BERTON, and Betty KENNEDY.

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BERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-06 published
BERTON, Giuseppe
Passed away suddenly at home on Wednesday, May 4, 2005 at the age of 66. He leaves behind his loving wife of 41 years Pierina. Loving father of George (and his wife Marcella), Sonia (and her husband Tony). Cherished Nonno of Joseph and Olivia. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Bernardo Funeral Home, 2960 Dufferin St. (two streets south of Lawrence Ave.), on Thursday and Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Saturday, May 7, 2005 at 9 a.m. in Saint Mary of the Angels Catholic Church (1481 Dufferin Street, south of Davenport Rd.). Entombment to follow at Glendale Memorial Gardens (Albion Rd. and Hwy 27).

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BERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-23 published
BERTON, Marie Laura
Peacefully at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto on Sunday, August 21, 2005 at the age of 80 years. Marie BERTON (née McLEOD,) beloved wife of Edgar BERTON of Sutton. Loving mother of George and his wife Betty of Newmarket and Arthur and his wife Cindy of Keswick. Loving grandmother of Tori, Holly and Kendra. Dear sister of June TAILOR/TAYLOR, Betty CAMPBELL and David McLEOD and his wife Claire and sister-in-law of Dolly McLEOD and Joan McLEOD. Predeceased by her brothers Jim McLEOD and Bill McLEOD and brothers-in-law Ed TAILOR/TAYLOR and Bill CAMPBELL. Lovingly remembered by her nieces, nephews and Friends. Resting at the Taylor Funeral Home, 20846 Dalton Road, Sutton, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday. Funeral Service in the chapel Thursday at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated by the family.

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BERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-09 published
He made his mark on city and nation
By WARREN Gerard, Special To The Star
Beland HONDERICH rose from plain beginnings to become one of the most influential Canadians of his day, using his power as publisher of Canada's largest newspaper to influence the agenda in politics and business at every level.
At the same time he set new standards for informed, in-depth, responsible reporting.
HONDERICH, publisher of the Toronto Star for 22 of his 52 years at the paper, died in Vancouver at 86 yesterday following a stroke.
HONDERICH was a fiercely private man, almost reclusive, but that didn't keep him from being an impatient perfectionist, a leader whose principal ethic was work.
The Star was his life, his passion.
Among his many honours, and one he treasured, was his election in 1986 to the News Hall of Fame by journalists across Canada for leading "Canadian newspapers into a new direction, taking readers backstage to explore and explain the current events that shaped their lives."
HONDERICH left the publisher's office in 1988, going on to become board chairman of the newspaper and its parent company, Torstar Corp. He retired from that position in 1994, but maintained an office across from the newsroom on the fifth floor at One Yonge St. until 1999.
Beland Hugh HONDERICH was born in Kitchener on November 25, 1918, and grew up in the nearby village of Baden. He was proud of his pioneer roots -- Mennonites from Germany who found religious freedom in Waterloo County in the early 1800s.
"My father was a man who stood for religious freedom, and I am proud to follow in his footsteps," HONDERICH once said.
His father, John HONDERICH, was ostracized in the staunchly traditional Mennonite community because he and young Beland went to hear a speaker from another Amish sect. The shunning, as it was called, meant that other Reform Mennonites were forbidden to sit down to eat with them or to shake their hands.
Nor did his father quite fit in with his thrifty, hard-working neighbours in other ways. A sometime beekeeper, homespun village philosopher, printer and pamphleteer for liberal causes, he was "not a very good provider" in a community where work was next to godliness.
His mother, Rae, was the family's main breadwinner. She was the local telephone operator, a job that included the use of a train station in Baden which served as a home for the HONDERICHs and their six children. HONDERICH recalled that the family never went hungry, but there was little money for anything but food.
He gathered coal along the railway tracks to heat their home and carried water in summer to gangs of workers repairing the roads. In the mornings, he worked around the Canadian National Railway station, sweeping and cleaning up for 40 cents a day.
Despite winning a regional debating championship with his sister Ruth -- they defended the proposition that the Soviet way of life was superior to the American way -- he struggled to pass high school entrance examinations.
HONDERICH didn't do well in high school. And it didn't help that he had to hitchhike 16 kilometres to and from school in Kitchener. As a result, his attendance was spotty and his marks were poor. He was demoted in his second year to a commercial course "where at least I learned to type."
Discouraged, he dropped out of school and got a job as a farmhand at the beginning of the Great Depression, much to his mother's displeasure. "You can do better than that," he recalled her saying on more than one occasion.
The farm job didn't last. His introduction to reporting came about because his father was hard of hearing and took his son to public meetings and political rallies to take notes. It taught the young HONDERICH, who was later to battle deafness himself, to write quickly and accurately.
He inherited a Kitchener-Waterloo Record paper route from one of his brothers, which led him to become the paper's correspondent for Baden at 10 cents a column inch. He created news by organizing a softball team and covering its games for the paper.
When he was 17, fires on successive nights destroyed two barns owned by a prominent Baden farmer. Arson was suspected and the young HONDERICH's coverage so impressed his editors that they offered him a tryout as a cub reporter in Kitchener at $15 a week.
He showed up for work in a mismatched jacket and pants and with his two front teeth missing from a tough hockey game the night before. He didn't shine as a reporter.
The publisher, W.J. MOTZ, concluded after a week that HONDERICH was in the wrong line of work and told city editor Art LOW/LOWE/LOUGH to fire him. But LOW/LOWE/LOUGH saw something in the youngster and persuaded MOTZ to give him a second chance.
LOW/LOWE/LOUGH worked HONDERICH hard. He gave him an assignment each evening to go along with his day job. Ed HAYES, who worked at the Record in those days, recalled in an interview that HONDERICH (or "Bee" as he was nicknamed) was determined to succeed.
"Each reporter was supposed to turn in a story every afternoon at the end of his shift. Bee wasn't satisfied with that. He'd turn in two, three or more.
"He was the darling of the city desk."
As time went by, he improved, becoming more and more confident. He was also developing into a perfectionist. So much so, in fact, that he'd bet an ice cream with an assistant city editor that he would find nothing that needed to be changed in a HONDERICH story.
At first, he recalled, it cost him a lot of ice cream cones, but later he rarely had to pay off.
In those early days at the Record, HONDERICH knew he had a country bumpkin image. So when he had saved enough money, he went to a quality menswear store and asked the manager to show him how to dress. He bought a dark pin-striped suit, complete with vest, and that look became his uniform in life.
A fellow staffer at the Record recalled HONDERICH borrowing a bike from a delivery boy and speeding off to an assignment in his pin-striped suit.
And co-workers described him as a loner who rarely headed for the beer parlour with the boys after work, though he was known to sip a scotch on special occasions. Mostly, he went to Norm Jones' restaurant for a milkshake.
Though he spent most of his time working, he taught Sunday school at a Presbyterian church, and served as secretary for a minor hockey league.
This involvement brought him into contact with Milt DUNNELL, the legendary Star sports columnist, who had made a name for himself at the Stratford Beacon Herald before heading for Toronto. He told HONDERICH that the Star was looking for reporters to replace those who had enlisted to serve in World War 2. HONDERICH, who had been rejected by the Royal Canadian Air Force and merchant marine because of poor eyesight and hearing, applied to the Star in 1943 and was hired as a reporter for $35 a week.
He was proud that the Kitchener city council gave him a vote of thanks for his fair reporting. And MOTZ, the publisher who thought he would never make it in the newspaper business, begged him not to go.
Stepping into the grandly marbled lobby of the Star's building at 80 King St. W., HONDERICH recalled that he was "scared as hell." But he was in the right place. This was the world of Joe ATKINSON.
As publisher, Joseph E. ATKINSON had guided the paper through most of the first half-century and was seen by friend and foe alike as one of the country's leading reformers. It turned out that the publisher and his new employee had some things in common.
Both had come from large, impoverished, God-fearing families in small-town Ontario, and quit school early to put food on the table. "One thing I had in common with Joe ATKINSON," HONDERICH recalled, "is that I knew need."
There was a major difference, however. ATKINSON was a star of Canadian journalism in 1899 when the new owners of the Toronto Evening Star hired him at 34 to run the paper. HONDERICH was 24 when he arrived at the paper, an unproven asset at the time.
But he didn't take long to prove himself. His work was soon noticed by Harry C. HINDMARSH, ATKINSON's son-in-law and the man who ran the newsroom.
HINDMARSH sent HONDERICH to Saskatchewan for the election that brought Tommy Douglas and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (later to become the New Democratic Party) to power in 1944.
The next year he was sent back to do a progress report on North America's first socialist government. His stories were so enthusiastically some thought naively -- positive that the Saskatchewan government asked permission to reprint them.
They also caught the eye of Joe ATKINSON, whose reform ideas were at home with the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation's, although he never endorsed the party at election time. HONDERICH was marked as someone worth watching. He was asked to fill in as an editorial writer, the newspaper job he enjoyed most of all.
Some critics said HONDERICH's writing lacked flair or style. But it was clear. He explained complicated matters in simple, accurate terms. His idea was to dive right into a story, delivering the promise of the headline in the first paragraph.
In his reporting career, HONDERICH covered a wide variety of assignments, collecting his share of scoops, enough to impress HINDMARSH. In 1946, he called in HONDERICH, congratulated him on a story, then remarked, "Oh, by the way, the financial editor left today. I'd like you to start as financial editor on Monday."
"But I don't know the difference between a stock and a bond," HONDERICH replied.
"You'll learn," HINDMARSH said.
HONDERICH told HINDMARSH he would take the job on the condition that he be allowed to go back to feature writing if it didn't work out.
"If you don't make a go of it, you'll go out the door," HINDMARSH said in a menacing way.
It goes without saying that HONDERICH made a go of it.
One of the first things he noticed from his new desk was a tailor at work in a building across King St. He decided his business section would write for that tailor, for the ordinary person.
His News Hall of Fame citation noted: "He led in turning the writing and presentation of financial news into a readable subject in terms that interest the average reader." He criticized the stock exchange, questioned banking methods, recommended profit sharing, and supported credit unions and other co-operatives.
But when there were major stories to be covered, HINDMARSH often took HONDERICH out of his financial department and sent him all over the globe -- to Newfoundland on the eve of its joining Canada, to Argentina where press freedom was under attack, to Asia with Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent for the first round-the-world trip taken by a Canadian prime minister, and to Britain for the funeral of George VI.
In 1948, HONDERICH, along with 12 other employees, chartered the first Canadian local of the American Newspaper Guild. As president of the union, he signed the first contract with the Star.
Some members of the union were suspicious, however, thinking that as financial editor he was "a company stooge" trying to make sure the Guild didn't fall into the hands of disgruntled left-wingers.
They weren't aware, however, that he knew all about bad working conditions because he had done both day and night assignments as a young reporter in Kitchener.
He served three terms as Guild president and helped win better pay and working conditions. Later, on the other side of the negotiating table, he continued to believe in the need for an organized newsroom, although that view was severely tested in a bitter strike in HONDERICH had become a major force in the newsroom when ATKINSON died in 1948 after nearly 50 years as publisher of a racy paper with principles.
His death, however, created a crisis at the paper. ATKINSON's will had left the Star to a charitable foundation to be administered by his trustees. However, the Ontario Conservative government passed the Charitable Gifts Act, which said no charity could own more than 10 per cent of a business.
The government may have viewed the will as an attempt to escape death duties, but more likely the legislation was an attempt to muzzle the Star, a liberal thorn in the Tory side.
Nevertheless, it became a distinct possibility the paper might be sold to outside interests. Bidders, including beer baron E.P. TAILOR/TAYLOR, were lining up for a chance to buy what had become Canada's most profitable daily.
The Star was granted stays of execution however, and HINDMARSH, the founder's son-in-law, succeeded ATKINSON until his own death in 1956. In the HINDMARSH years, the paper seemed to lose direction and much of its fairness, particularly in the reporting of politics. The paper's reputation was going downhill.
Meanwhile, HONDERICH had been appointed editor-in-chief in 1955 and a couple of years later he was appointed to the board, after HINDMARSH's sudden death. It put him in the position of becoming an owner of the paper.
Walter GORDON, an accountant who was to become finance minister in Lester Pearson's Liberal government, worked out a plan for the trustees to buy the Star by putting up $1 million among the six of them, including HONDERICH. The paper was valued at $25.5 million.
At the time, the sale price was the most ever paid in Canada for a newspaper, and it turned out to be a steal. Under HONDERICH's leadership, Torstar, the Star's parent company, would become a more than $1 billion enterprise over the next 30-plus years.
For readers and the staff, the HONDERICH years had begun, although he didn't take over as publisher until 1966. Immediately, however, he went about remaking the paper. Headlines didn't scream any more, and the silly and the sensational disappeared from the paper.
HONDERICH was putting his stamp on the Star. Reporting only the facts wasn't good enough. He demanded thorough backgrounding of stories to make them understandable to the average reader. Or, as he said, for "my barber."
He created a great newsroom that included sports columnist DUNNELL and leading Canadian writers such as Pierre BERTON, Peter NEWMAN, Charles TEMPLETON and Nathan COHEN, as well as award-winning cartoonist Duncan MacPHERSON.
HONDERICH returned the Star to the principles of Joseph E. ATKINSON, including a reform-centred editorial policy. Unemployment, affordable housing, adequate welfare benefits, medicare, pensions, minority rights, the need for an independent Canada -- these became subjects he demanded be dealt with on a daily basis.
In one of his rare public appearances, he told a group of editors in 1961 that "the basic function of a newspaper is to inform, to tell the public what is happening in the community, in the nation and in the world. You will notice I did not use the word, entertain." He felt that television had made entertainment a secondary function for newspapers. "How much better then, to concentrate on what we can do best, and that is to inform the public."
The change was most evident in the Star's treatment of politics and economics. The background feature gradually became commonplace in North American journalism, and a poll of U.S. editors rated the Star one of the world's 10 top foreign papers.
Critics of the HONDERICH way -- many of them highly placed in the paper -- couldn't wait for HONDERICH's grey, humourless Star to fail, but they were doomed to disappointment, just as surely as the Star's competitor -- the unchanging Telegram -- was doomed to extinction.
Not only did the Star's circulation grow, so did its profits.
Honesty and integrity were words that most people associated with HONDERICH. But many on his staff found him a demanding taskmaster, an uncompromising and often difficult man to deal with. There was never any doubt that Beland HONDERICH was the boss. He wasn't one for chit-chat.
Early in his career as publisher, he all but cut himself off from the social whirl of movers and shakers. He admitted to becoming almost reclusive after finding himself challenged at social functions and parties to defend Star policies he felt needed no defence, especially since he had put them into place.
But he never felt that way about the public at large. The so-called Little Guy could get him on the phone more easily than a celebrity could. His home number was in the book. And in the days when the Star was an afternoon paper, it wasn't unusual for an evening editor to get a call from HONDERICH, who in turn had received an irate call at home from a reader whose paper hadn't been delivered.
The paper would be delivered by taxi, and the taxi company was instructed to report to the editor the moment the paper had arrived. Then HONDERICH would phone the reader to make sure he was satisfied.
The first part of his 12-hour working day was spent poring over page proofs, quarrelling about leads of stories, questioning something in the 25th paragraph, asking for more background, and demanding follow-ups.
He was articulate, often painfully so for the person at the other end of his complaints. His editors took great pleasure when he demanded "antidotal" leads. He meant anecdotal leads.
Notes with the heavy-handed BHH signature on them rained from his office.
The difficulty everyone had in pleasing him and the way he prowled the newsroom won him the nickname "The Beast." And he was called "Drac" by some editors who thought he, like the vampire, sucked the staff dry.
When the paper departed from what the reader had come to believe was a Star tradition, he took to the typewriter to explain the reasons himself. In 1972, for example, he put his initials on an editorial that explained why the Star was supporting Progressive Conservative Robert Stanfield over Liberal Pierre Trudeau in the federal election.
In his rare public appearances, the nasal flatness of his voice often disguised the passion he felt for a subject. However, he was an effective spokesman for the causes he championed. In defending the Star's strong stand on economic nationalism, he told the Canadian Club it was based on the need to preserve the differences between Canada and the United States.
"I think our society tends to be more compassionate, somewhat less extreme and certainly less violent," he said. "We put more emphasis on basic human needs such as health insurance and pensions."
He warned that increased U.S. ownership of Canadian resources would endanger our ability to maintain those differences.
In a 1989 speech at Carleton University in Ottawa, he caused a stir when he argued that objectivity in newspapers was neither possible nor desirable.
"No self-respecting newspaper deliberately distorts or slants the news to make it conform to its own point of view," he said. "But you cannot publish a newspaper without making value judgments on what news you select to publish and how you present it in the paper.
"And these value judgments reflect a view of society -- a point of view if you will -- that carries as much weight, if not more, than what is said on the editorial page."
Just as ATKINSON used the news pages to popularize reform ideas, HONDERICH used them as a weapon in his own causes.
One example was his reaction to a document leaked to him outlining then-prime minister Brian Mulroney's government strategy on free trade. It said the communications strategy "should rely less on educating the public than getting across the message that the free trade initiative is a good idea -- in other words a selling job."
HONDERICH made sure all aspects of free trade were put under the kind of scrutiny the government wanted to avoid, particularly the possible effects on employment and social benefits.
Simon REISMAN, the bellicose chief trade negotiator, accused HONDERICH of personally waging a vendetta against free trade. He said HONDERICH used the Star "in a manner that contradicts every sense of fairness and decency in the newspaper business."
In reply, the unrepentant publisher said: "The role of a newspaper, as I see it, is to engage in the full and frank dissemination of the news and opinion from the perspective of its values and particular view of society. It should report the news fairly and accurately, reflect all pertinent facts and opinions and not only what the official establishment thinks and says."
As publisher, he demonstrated an impressive business savvy for a man who once said he hardly knew the difference between a stock and a bond. In 1972, he moved the paper to new quarters at One Yonge St.
And later, in his position as chief executive officer of the parent company, Torstar Corp., he acquired Harlequin Enterprises, the world's largest publisher of romance books, and 15 community newspapers to add to the 14 the Star already owned in the Toronto area.
At the same time, HONDERICH still was very much making his mark in journalism. He was the first in Canada to introduce a bureau of accuracy and to appoint an ombudsman to represent the reader in the newsroom. In a wider sense, he was the main force behind the establishment of the Ontario Press Council, where readers can take their complaints to an independent body.
As well as his election to the News Hall of Fame, he was honoured in other ways, receiving doctors of law degrees from Wilfrid Laurier and York universities, and the Order of Canada in 1987.
HONDERICH was married three times, the last time on New Year's Day 2000 to Rina WHELAN of Vancouver, the city where he lived until his death. He had two sons: John, who followed in his father's footsteps to become publisher of the Star, and David, an entrepreneur and one daughter, Mary, a philosophy and English teacher. He also had six grandchildren.
Even into his eighties, HONDERICH exercised daily and loved to play bridge, golf and fish.
Charles E. PASCAL, executive director of the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, recalled golfing with HONDERICH after he had entered his eighties. PASCAL was in his mid-fifties.
"I expected to be slowed down by playing with a couple of guys in their seventies and one in his eighties," PASCAL said. "Bee, as with everything else, played golf with determination, focus and tenacity. I was quite impressed with his golfing. He was very competitive."
After HONDERICH stepped down as publisher in 1988, and as a director of Torstar in 1995, he lost none of his zeal for pursuing causes. He did this through the Atkinson Charitable Foundation and his own personal philanthropy.
"His role on our board was absolutely essential, forceful, radical," PASCAL said.
"I had the sense that the older he got he became more and more impatient. He was impatient, just impatient, about all that is yet to be done by governments and others to reduce the inequities for those who are disadvantaged through no fault of their own."
He was generous in his giving and, as was his character, he had no interest in public recognition or praise.
"He just had no time whatsoever for personal recognition," PASCAL recalled.
"I think he would have liked to have been around forever if for no other reason than to contribute more."
At HONDERICH's request, there will be a cremation, after which the family will hold a small private gathering to celebrate his life.

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BERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-31 published
BERTON, Edgar Addy
Peacefully at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto on Wednesday December 28, 2005 at the age of 78 years. Edgar BERTON of Keswick, formerly of Sutton by the Lake, predeceased by his wife Marie BERTON (nee McLEOD.) Loving father of George and his wife Betty of Newmarket and Arthur and his wife Cindy of Keswick. Loving grandfather of Tori, Holly and Kendra. Predeceased by his sister Doris. Dear brother-in-law of June TAILOR/TAYLOR, Betty CAMPBELL, David McLEOD and his wife Claire, Dolly McLEOD and Joan McLEOD. Lovingly remembered by his nieces, nephews and Friends. Resting at the Taylor Funeral Home, 20846 Dalton Road, Sutton, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Tuesday. Funeral Service in the chapel Wednesday January 4, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Donations to the Alzheimer Association would be appreciated by the family.

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