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"MET" 2004 Obituary


METIVIER 

METIVIER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2004-12-28 published
First World War veteran dies at 104
Canadian Press
Ottawa -- The smell of warm blood oozing across the fields and roadways of battlefields was Paul METIVIER's most vivid -- and horrifying -- memory of the First World War. He was just 16 when he enlisted but he, and many others, lied about his age, telling officials he was 19.
METIVIER, who lived long enough to be among Canada's handful of surviving Great War veterans, died last Wednesday at age 104.
With his death, Canada has only six surviving World War One veterans.
METIVIER had been in failing health over the past several months, said his daughter Monique METIVIER of Ottawa.
"But he still insisted on going to the cenotaph at the National War Memorial for the celebration of November 11, then insisted on accepting an invitation to the Governor General's for tea afterwards," she said.
METIVIER lived his final days in a suite at an Ottawa retirement home, not far from where he raised his family in the city's Sandy Hill area.
METIVIER grew up in Montreal and enlisted there.
He joined the 4th Division Ammunition column and used mules to carry ammunition to the guns behind the front lines.
"I did the things you can do with horses," he once recalled, adding that he earned $1.10 a day in the army and sent $20 a month home to his mother in Montreal.

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METIVIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2004-12-28 published
First World War veteran enlisted at 16
Canadian Press, Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - Page S9
Ottawa -- The smell of warm blood oozing across the fields and roadways of battlefields was Paul METIVIER's most vivid -- and horrifying -- memory of the First World War. He was just 16 when he enlisted but he, along with so many others, lied about his age, telling authorities he was 19.
Mr. METIVIER, who lived long enough to be among Canada's handful of surviving Great War veterans, died December 22 at 104. With his death, Canada has only six surviving First World War veterans.
He had been in failing health over the past several months, said his daughter, Monique METIVIER of Ottawa. "But he still insisted on going to the cenotaph at the National War Memorial for the celebration of November 11, then insisted on accepting an invitation to the Governor-General's for tea afterwards."
Mr. METIVIER grew up in Montreal and enlisted there. He joined the 4th Division Ammunition column and used mules to carry ammunition to the guns at the front lines.
"I did the things you can do with horses," he once recalled, adding that he earned $1.10 a day in the army and sent $20 a month home to his mother in Montreal.
Veterans Affairs officials said Mr. METIVIER, whose son Roland was killed in action in 1942, never refused an invitation to represent the veterans of his war. He showed up every year for Remembrance Day ceremonies at Ottawa's War Museum and the National War Memorial and regularly made appearances in the House of Commons.
"When I'm there, I think of my son, I think of my past and I hope that the care we take for veterans and the remembrance will continue," Mr. METIVIER once said "They deserve to be remembered."

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MÉTIVIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2004-12-28 published
World War I vet Paul MÉTIVIER, 104, carted shells to front
Lied about age to enlist and earned $1.10 a day
Only six Great War veterans left in Canada
Canadian Press
Ottawa -- The smell of warm blood oozing across the battlefields and roadways was Paul MÉTIVIER's most vivid -- and horrifying memory of World War I.
He was 16 when he enlisted but he, along with so many others, lied about his age, telling authorities he was 19.
MÉTIVIER, one of Canada's seven surviving World War I veterans, died Wednesday at 104.
He had been in failing health over the past several months, said his daughter Monique MÉTIVIER, a judge on the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.
"But he still insisted on going to the cenotaph at the National War Memorial for the celebration of November 11, then insisted on accepting an invitation to the Governor-General's for tea afterwards," she said.
MÉTIVIER lived his final days in a suite at an Ottawa retirement home. He was born on July 6, 1900, in Montreal and enlisted in March, 1917, two years short of legal service age.
"He was poor, he'd been fired from a foundry he'd been working at because he passed out from the heat," his daughter said.
MÉTIVIER joined the 4th Division Ammunition column, and as a gunner led horse- and mule-drawn ordnance wagons to front-line batteries in Belgium and France, spending 15 months carting shells.
"I did the things you can do with horses," he once recalled, adding that he earned $1.10 a day in the army and sent $20 a month home to his mother in Montreal.
He was assigned to the Canadian Boys' Battalion in 1918 after his mother informed officials of his true age, and was sent home from his 10-month Boys' Brigade assignment in England in October, 1918, a month before hostilities ended.
MÉTIVIER moved to Ottawa in 1921 where he got a job as an apprentice photographer.
He worked the rest of his career in the map-making branch of the Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, rising to chief of reproduction before his 1965 retirement.
"He was a wonderful father and really an extraordinary man," his daughter told the Toronto Star's Joseph HALL earlier this year. He was dedicated to his children and "madly in love" with his wife Flore -- who died in 1992 after 72 years of marriage, she said.
As well as being awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal, MÉTIVIER was awarded the French Légion d'honneur for his service in France.
Like all of the surviving vets from that war, MÉTIVIER possessed a "remarkably positive attitude on life" that precluded much dwelling on horror and carnage, his daughter said.
It wasn't until she began looking for records of his service in 1998 that he was seized upon by Veterans Affairs to participate in their various ceremonies -- including a repatriation of Canada's World War I "unknown soldier" from Europe six years ago.
Veterans Affairs officials said MÉTIVIER, whose son Roland was killed in action in 1942 during World War 2, never refused an invitation to represent veterans of the first war.
He showed up every year for Remembrance Day ceremonies at Ottawa's War Museum and the National War Memorial and regularly made appearances in the House of Commons.
Speaking about his role in countless November 11 ceremonies, MÉTIVIER once said: "When I'm there, I think of my son, I think of my past and I hope that the care we take for veterans and the remembrance will continue.
"They gave their lives for Canada so it seems to me that they deserve to be remembered."
MÉTIVIER leaves four children, 11 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

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