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"YOU" 2003 Obituary


YOUNG 

YOUNG o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
Frank FOREMAN
In loving memory of Frank FOREMAN, who passed away at Manitoulin Health Centre, on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 at the age of 78 years.
Survived by wife Shirley (Nov. 9/2002)
predeceased by wife Bertha {YOUNG} (June 9/2001)
Step father of Larry, David and Diana
Remembered by sister Jean JABLANSKI of Selkirk, Manitoba and brother Stan FOREMAN of Kenora
predeceased by twin sister and three brothers
Visitation was 7-9 pm Wednesday. Funeral Service was held on Thursday, January 30, 2003, at Mindemoya Anglican Church.
Burial in Mindemoya Cemetery in the spring. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-09 published
Rose Eva DEBASSIGE
March 13 1920 to April 5 2003
Rose DEBASSIGE, a resident of the Wikwemikong Nursing Home, passed away at the Nursing Home on Saturday, April 5, 2003 at the age of 83 years.
She was born at West Bay, daughter of the late Jeremiah and Mary Jane (CORBIERE) MIGWANS, and had lived at M'Chigeeng all her life. She had worked as a housekeeper and cook at Lodges for many years. She enjoyed making blankets and knitting, but her favourite pastimes were watching hockey on television and watching her boys and grandchildren play hockey, playing bingo and gardening, and growing her flowers, which she planted up until 2 years ago. Rose was a loved and
loving mother, grandmother and friend and will be sadly missed by all.
She was predeceased by her beloved husband Andrew in 1984. Dearly loved mother of Helen CRAWFORD (Ivan predeceased,) Noël DEBASSIGE, wife Mary, Bertha SAIKKONEN (husband Ray predeceased,) Justin DEBASSIGE, wife Jean, Levina YOUNG (husband Jack) Edward DEBASSIGE (wife Tammy,) Tim DEBASSIGE (predeceased,) wife Eleanor, Nellie (predeceased), Elaine DEBASSIGE, Chris DEBASSIGE (wife Barb), Sally HARE (husband Glen,) Earl DEBASSIGE (wife Debbie) and Christy TAIBOSSIGAI (husband Ivan.) Proud grandmother of many grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren. Dear sister of Virginia, and predeceased by siblings Rosie, Simon, Charlotte, John, Israel, Margaret (Maggie), Rita, Saraphine, Mark and Stephen. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called at the M'Chigeeng Complex on Monday, April 7, 2003. The funeral mass was held on Tuesday, April 8, 2003 with Father Bert FOLIOT as celebrant. Interment in M'Chigeeng Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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YOUNG o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Annie Melissa GRAVELLE
In loving memory of Annie Melissa GRAVELLE, peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Monday, April 14, 2003 age 82 years.
Predeceased by husband Percy GRAVELLE. Predeceased by daughter Gail. Remembered by son-in-law Al McPHERSON. Cherished Grandmother of Perry and wife Rita CAMPBELL of Naughton, Sherry Lynn and husband Gilles, Cara and husband Henry. Loved Great Grandmother of Dustin, Sara and Nigel CAMPBELL, Danielle and Kristen. Remembered by sister Verna and husband Stewart MIDDAUGH, brothers Grant and wife Ethel BOWERMAN and Don and wife June BOWERMAN. Predeceased by Virgie Young, Cleve BOWERMAN, Clara BLACKBURN, Leonard BOWERMAN, Ruby YOUNG and Mildred MIDDAUGH.
There will be a gathering of Friends on Saturday, April 19, 2003 at 1: 30 to remember and celebrate Annie’s life at the family home in Whitefish Falls. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
YOUNG, Ira
Of West Vancouver, British Columbia and Malibu Beach, California died January 29th 2003 at his home in Malibu with family at his side.
Ira spent his life in pursuit of many passions. He was deeply loved and will be greatly missed by the many people he touched.
Born in 1926 in Edmonton, Alberta, Ira earned his B.Sc. at the University of Alberta and an M.A. in Clinical Psychology. He was an instructor in Psychology at Hobart and William Smith in Geneva, New York before starting a career in real estate. Ira founded the Western Realty Management group of companies in Edmonton in 1953 and embarked on a journey to create some of the most notable and ground breaking land development projects in Canada. He earned a reputation as one of Canada's leading private developers and builders. His vision evolved from suburban subdivision projects to apartments, office buildings, industrial building projects and shopping centers, spanning from western to eastern Canada, Los Angeles and Hawaii. Most notable was his award winning Coquitlam Center outside of Vancouver, British Columbia. 1980 Merit Award winner of the International Council of Shopping Centers and Governor General's Award for Architecture, the first two-level center in western Canada, this project was recognized for innovations in energy efficiency and the dedicated spaces and design elements furnished by local artists. It also became the catalyst for the massive development of the immediate area and realized the Town Center scheme originally proposed to the local district by Ira YOUNG's company.
It was at this time that his love and support for the arts began to eclipse his prominence in the real estate business. Starting as an avid collector of Eskimo art, Ira and his wife Lori developed a collection of art including major works of legendary American Artists; the likes of Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and perhaps the most important collection of Cy Twombly in North America. All the while they actively supported and befriended many emerging Canadian and American artists, displaying their works alongside the rest of their collection. Their collections have been shown in Vancouver, London, Montreal, Los Angeles and Halifax with over 90 pieces donated to the Vancouver Art Gallery. A member of The Vancouver Art Gallery's Board of Trustees since 1996, he was also active on the Gallery's Program, Acquisitions and Master Planning Committees, always arguing for world class standards through international and local perspectives.
In the 1980's Ira and Lori's interest in automotive racing led to the acquisition of Malibu Grand Prix in Canoga Park, California. A family entertainment company featuring 35 amusement parks across the United States showcasing ¾ scale Indy Type race cars, Ira threw his heart and soul into the venture eventually expanding into Canada, France, Portugal and Japan. True to form, he went all out and created a race team to compete in the International Motor Sports Association GTU class of racing in North America. Surprising to many, but not to him, his team won their first race out, their first season out, and earned Mazda the Manufacturers title. Ira backed this venture in more ways than one. He drove in both the Daytona 24 hour and Sebring 12 hour endurance races. Also true to form, he recognized promise and gave opportunities to then unknown drivers like Jack BALDWIN, Tommy KENDALL and crew chief Clayton CUNNINGHAM. His commitment to racing was rewarded with a team with four consecutive years as International Motor Sports Association GTU Champion and a car that now sits in an automotive museum as the most winning automobile in auto racing history.
Ira YOUNG, a real estate developer with a vision, an outspoken advocate of the arts, and a race car driver at heart, will be forever missed by wife Lori YOUNG, son Jason YOUNG of New York, son Clinton YOUNG and daughter-in-law Randi, daughters Jennifer and Susan YOUNG of Toronto, step-son Christopher WENSLEY and daughter-in-law Tatiana of West Vancouver, step-daughter Blair and son-in-law Paul DONALD of Edmonton and step-son Adam WENSLEY and daughter-in-law Laura of Upland, California and grand children Samantha, Jamie, Axel, Morgan, Miya, Dylan and Alejandro.
A celebration of his life with family and Friends will be held at the Capilano Golf and Country Club on Saturday, March 1st, 2003, 420 Southborough Drive, West Vancouver, British Columbia at 2: 00 pm.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made 'In memory of Ira YOUNG' to the Vancouver Art Gallery, 750 Hornby Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6Z 2H7 or to a charity of your choice.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-19 published
SMITH, Margaret Blakely (née BURNS)
Died peacefully at the Scarborough Hospital, Grace Division, of cancer, on February 16, 2003. Daughter of Charles BURNS and Sara Margaret BLAKELY. Sister of Katharine Steele (BURNS, YOUNG) PICKEN. Beloved wife of James Edwin (Ted) SMITH and a wonderful mother to Katharine Blakely SMITH and James Charles SMITH (Cheryl.) Grandmother of Althea ALISON and Michelle Meagan SMITH, and ''Grandma'' to Robin MILLER and Ciera and Ryan GAUTREAU. Born in Ottawa, she was a graduate of Glebe Collegiate and Queen's University where she was a member of the Senior Ladies hockey and basketball teams. For five years she enjoyed teaching high school in Manotick until her marriage to Ted in 1948. The family moved from Ottawa to Toronto in 1963. A memorial service will be held at the Trinity Presbyterian Church, 2737 Bayview Avenue (south of Hwy. 401), on Saturday, February 22, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Spring interment of cremated remains will be held in Norway Bay, Quebec. If you wish, in lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Trinity Memorial Fund, 2737 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M2L 1C5.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
Constance Patricia YOUNG (née BOND) Lieut. Nova Scotia, R.C.A.M.C.
Beloved wife of the late Roy YOUNG. Born in Worthing, England August 9, 1911 died in Toronto February 22, 2003.
In between she lived her life with joy, humour, love, and faith. Connie graduated from St. Michael's Hospital in 1932 as a registered nurse. She practiced as a Public Health nurse (St. Elizabeth) after graduation. From 1941-1945 Connie served her country as a Nursing Sister in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp., No. 2 C.C.S. Unit. After the war Connie worked as a Corporate nurse until her marriage to Roy YOUNG in 1954 when she began her second career as a wife and mother. Connie passed away peacefully after a lengthy battle with cancer. Connie is survived by her son Carl and Elizabeth YOUNG, Claremont, Ontario, and her daughter Mary and Keith LECKIE of Toronto and her much loved grandchildren Toban, Katelyn and Sean LECKIE. She was predeceased by siblings Courtney, Alban, Dorothy and Douglas all of whom together with Connie survived the Halifax Explosion of 1917. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. On Tuesday, February 25. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Gabriel's Church, 650 Sheppard Avenue East, Willowdale at 10 a.m. Wednesday, February 26. Interment will take place at St. Luke's Cemetery, Downeyville, Ontario. The family wish to thank their friend Mely and the staff at West Park Long Care Hospital.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
MAHONEY, Leo James, C.M., B.A., M.D., M.I., Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada, F.A.C.S.
It is with great sadness that the family of Dr. Leo MAHONEY announces his peaceful passing, surrounded by his family, on February 27, 2003, at Princess Margaret Hospital.
The son of Dr. James Leo and Esther MAHONEY (BEAUPRE,) Leo was born in Niagara Falls, New York, on September 17, 1920. Predeceased by his children Helen and Joseph, he is survived by his loving wife of 57 years, Dr. Margaret MAHONEY (née YOUNG) and his children: Dr. Jim (Mary Anne) of Toronto; Dr. Bill (Mary Margaret) of Dundas, Ontario; Tom (Jeanne) of Oakville; Mary of Toronto; Peggy (Byron) of Victoria, British Columbia; Anne of Toronto; Dr. John (Karen) of Ottawa; David (Camilla) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Katy (David) of Toronto; Jenny (Craig) of Toronto and his 21 grandchildren. He is also survived by his brothers and sisters Eileen MURRAY of Toronto; Hugh of St. Catharines; Jack of London, Ontario Earl of Castro Valley, California; Anne HALL of Renfrew, Ontario, and his many nephews and nieces.
Leo received his medical degree and his Master of Surgery, from the University of Toronto. He served during World War 2 as a Surgeon-Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve, and as Surgeon-Lieutenant Commander on the H.M.C.S. Micmac. A R.S. McLaughlin Fellowship gave him the opportunity to travel and study in England and Sweden in 1953 and 1954 respectively.
After returning to Canada in 1954, he joined St. Michael's Hospital as a staff surgeon and became head of the Division of General Surgery. For almost half a century, Leo has dedicated his career to improving the techniques of early detection and treatment of breast cancer as a surgeon, clinician, teacher and researcher.
He was the founder, director emeritus and senior consultant of the St. Michael's Hospital Breast Centre. Established in 1972 to improve the quality of life and the treatment for women with breast disease and breast cancer. The Breast Centre still maintains the gold standard for all such centres in Canada. He was also a consultant surgeon at Princess Margaret Hospital and associate professor of surgery at the University of Toronto and received the coveted Bruce Tovee award in 1992 for excellence in undergraduate teaching in the Department of Surgery.
One of his many great moments was receiving the Order of Canada in 2001 and the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002. He was also appointed a lifetime member of the O.M.A. and C.M.A. and was designated an honorary consultant of St. Michael's Hospital in 2003.
Leo was also a member of the Janes Surgical Society, the Breast Committee of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, the Canadian Oncology Society, Canadian Association of General Surgeons, Canadian Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, The Rocky Mountain Trauma Society and was a consultant with Canadian Trauma Consultant Inc.
He was also a member of the Franklin Club, The Badminton and Racquet Club of Toronto and the Hillsboro Club (Florida). Leo was a living example of one who lived each day to its fullest and shared his love for fishing, skiing, tennis and windsurfing with his children, grandchildren, colleagues and Friends.
Leo believed in striving for excellence in everything that he did. His love of life and pursuit of greater achievement is a legacy that will live on in those who love him and remember him as a husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle, physician, teacher and exceptional friend.
Visitation will take place at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home & Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (south of Wellesley), on Sunday, March 2nd from 2 to 9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held at Holy Rosary Church at 10 a.m. Monday, March 3rd with interment at Fairview Cemetery, Niagara Falls. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the St. Michael's Hospital Breast Centre Fund, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8.
Special thanks to the doctors and staff at Princess Margaret Hospital.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
NICHOLS, Onetta Irene (Ret'd Executive Secretary - Parliment Buildings, Toronto)
peacefully at the Grove Park Nursing Home, Barrie on Monday, March 3rd, 2003; in her 93rd year. Onetta NICHOLS, of Orillia, beloved daughter of the late Mrs. Nellie NICHOLS. Predeceased by her brother Orval. Lovingly remembered by Kathleen NICHOLS Roy NICHOLS (Barb); Helen LYNCH (Ross); Lynne WEIR (Don - her 'Favorite';) Susan YOUNG (Mark) and by her many great and great great nieces and nephews. The late Miss Onetta NICHOLS will rest at the Mundell Funeral Home, 79 West Street, N., Orillia on Wednesday evening from 7 - 9 p.m. Funeral and Committal Service in the chapel on Thursday morning, March 6th at 11 o'clock. Spring Interment: - St. Andrew's - St. James' Cemetery, Orillia. If desired, Memorial Donations to your choice of any Children's Charity would be gratefully appreciated. Messages of condolence are welcome at
www.mundellfuneralhome.com

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
Constance Patricia YOUNG
By Mary Patricia Young LECKIE
Mary Young LECKIE is Connie's daughter. Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page A20
Lieutenant, army medical corps; nurse, mother. Born August 9, 1911, in Worthing, England. Died February 22 in Toronto, of cancer, aged 91.
If a movie were to be made of Connie's life, it would be an epic. Born Constance Patricia BOND in a sleepy, seaside English town, her family moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1914. Her father Charles was a man of great ambition who traversed the Maritimes vending cash registers, while mother Blanche managed the staff. On December 6, 1917, their world came apart when the Mont Blanc collided with the Imo in Halifax Harbour, creating the largest explosion in pre-atomic history. Connie, in class at the Sacred Heart Convent, was blown onto the floor. Her brother Courtney made his way to Citadel Hill to fight the Germans he assumed had invaded the city. Charles, stranded in Saint John's, waited five excruciating days until word came that all of his "Victory Bonds" had survived.
For many Canadians, the end of the First World War war was the beginning of the most difficult time in that century. Charles moved the family to Toronto to begin anew. But the glory days of wartime prosperity gave way to a tumbling economy that crushed the ambitions, will and finally life out of Connie's beloved father. Connie dreamed of returning to Sacred Heart to take her vows as a nun but as she was by then a nurse, she was the only employed member of her family. Connie stayed to support her mother whose income would never again keep pace with her desires.
As her siblings found employment, Connie began to yearn for adventure. Once a shrinking violet, she longed to break free. The opportunity came: the Second World War was declared and Connie enlisted. In basic training at Camp Borden she met Lily CLEGG, an irreverent counterpoint who taught her the fine art of having fun. Combat field-training came next, then they were bound for England. Also aboard were the men of Essex Regiment, fellow recruits and Friends. It was Connie's great sorrow to receive those boys back in England when a pitiful handful of survivors returned from Dieppe.
General Hospital in Sussex was a safe refuge but Connie wanted more and in 1944 she got it when she and Lily embarked for France. In the early hours of D-Day-plus-four, they were among the first Canadian nurses to set foot on Juno Beach. They followed the action through France, Belgium and the Netherlands.
Connie celebrated Victory-in-Europe Day in Trafalgar Square. After decommissioning, she returned to Toronto to discover that the pay she had sent home had been squandered by her mother. So once again, she started over, studying Public Health at the University of Toronto; she practised as a public health nurse until 1954.
An unexpected whirlwind courtship was followed by marriage to Roy YOUNG, a widower with a son. Then, at the age of 45, Connie gave birth to a daughter.
Even in retirement in Omemee, Ontario, Connie continued to touch lives: administering meds, bandaging sprains and dispensing love and humour to all. She never lost her zest for life and in her 70s, Connie drove a fishing boat to town for supplies and in winter, a snowmobile to visit shut-ins. And she tended the ever-present live-in, Blanche, until her mother died in 1981.
Widowed at 89, Connie was soon after diagnosed with cancer. She moved to Toronto to be close to her children and was blessed with another two years. After a fall, Connie, wheelchair bound, almost gave up. Then the family discovered her old friend Lily was alive in a Toronto nursing home. The two were reunited and shared a month of memories. But on Christmas morning, Lily died and two months later, cancer took Connie.
Constance Patricia was a remarkable woman. For those she touched she will never die. Her spirit is irrepressible.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-15 published
CROMPTON, Peter Gordon
Peter died tragically early Sunday July 13, 2003 in his 28th year. Survived by his parents Judy and Ken, older brother Jeff and grandmother Lillian YOUNG all of Collingwood, Uncles and Aunts Gordon and Joan CROMPTON, Peter and Sophie YOUNG and their families of Thunder Bay, Ontario. Born in Toronto, Peter moved to Collingwood to attend the National Ski Academy. He was a former member of the Ontario Ski Team competing nationally and internationally in the Nor-Am Race Series, the U.S.A. Junior Championships and the World University Games. Peter graduated from the University of Guelph Ontario with a Degree in Economics. He was employed in Toronto with CB. Richard Ellis as a Sales Representative Investment Properties. Peter was a member of The Osler Bluff Ski Club and the Blue Mountain Golf and Country Club where he was an accomplished golfer. Peter had a passion for windsurfing and surfing taking him to Australia, Hawaii, Oregon and Cape Hatteras. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home ''Collingwood Chapel'', 82 Pine Street from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 16, 2003. The funeral service will be held at the Trinity United Church, 140 Maple Street, Collingwood, July 17, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment to follow at Trinity United Cemetery, Poplar Sideroad, Collingwood. If desired, donations may be made to the Smart Risk Snow Smart Program, 790 Bay Street, Suite 401, Toronto, Ontario M5E 1N8 or a Charity of Choice.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
HORN, Helen Joyce (née WHITING)
Born on October 16, 1925 in Aurora. Died on Saturday, July 26, 2003 at the Willet Hospital in Paris, Ontario of complications from Parkinson's Disease. Beloved wife of James, devoted mother of Brian and Pauline HORN and Brenda and Mike HILLABY. Cherished Nana of Kevin and Peter HORN and Kiera HILLABY; Survived by her sister Doris KNAPP and predeceased by her sister Grace YOUNG. Resident of St. George, Ontario and member of Holy Trinity Anglican Church. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, St. George on Saturday, August 9 at 2: 00 p.m. Reception to follow at the family home. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Parkinson's Foundation would be appreciated. Arrangements by Wm. Kipp Funeral Home, Paris 519-4423061.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-18 published
YOUNG, Bruce Malcolm
Died in Perth on Friday, August 15, 2003, in his 77th year. Bruce was Chairman of the Board and formerly President of Young-Shannon Gold Mines, Limited. Bruce was born and educated in Toronto. He was a commercial photographer and then owner of a Securities Dealer firm. He was a Director of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada. He was on the Board of Stewards of Deer Park United Church. Following his move to Perth, he was a member of the Board of Stewards of St. Paul's United Church and a representative to Renfrew Presbytery. He was a director of the Kiwanis Club and recipient of the Mel Osbourne Award. He will be greatly missed by his wife, Mary, and his extended family. Bruce is also survived by his first wife, Lee, and their daughter, Gail. In lieu of flowers, please remember Bruce with the charity of your choice or The Lanark Animal Welfare Society or The Great War Memorial Hospital Foundation in Perth. Services at Perth and District Funeral Home, 15 Victoria Street, Perth, Ontario K7H 2H7, on Tuesday, August 19 at 11 a.m. Private interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
Neighbours grieve power-outage victim
15-year-old who died in Ottawa-area house fire remembered for 'a big heart.
He was a good boy.'
By Jordan HEATH- RAWLINGS and Kim LUNMAN Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - Page A3
The house where Michael THOMAS lived remains dark, burned-out and deserted. The power has been restored to the a small Gloucester, Ontario, neighbourhood, but the mood remains black.
"It shocked the community. It shocked everyone," said Tracy YOUNG, who lives beside the THOMASes' house. "It's pretty tense around here."
Michael's grieving family are staying in a motel while they recover from the trauma. The 15-year-old boy died during last Thursday's blackout, when a candle he took to ward off the darkness for his frightened sister ignited a fire when he fell asleep.
"He went to comfort her because she was afraid of the dark," said neighbour Jim SCRIVENER, who has set up a trust fund, along with other members of the community, to help Michael's family get back on their feet. "He had a big heart. He was a good boy.
"Michael was close to his sister and very protective of her," Mr. SCRIVENER said.
Michael, 15, was autistic and appeared much younger, he said, and was more like an eight-year-old in his demeanour.
The fire started after Michael's sister, Jennifer, left the room to join their mother, Erika, who was sitting outside. One of the candles Michael had taken to her room ignited a stuffed animal.
Ms. THOMAS was sitting outside with various neighbours, including Ms. YOUNG who lives next door, when the fire started.
Ms. YOUNG said that Ms. THOMAS noticed the smoke when she went in the house to put Jennifer back to bed.
"She ran back to my house and asked if I had a flashlight," Ms. YOUNG said. "I asked her what was wrong and she said 'I smell smoke,' so I grabbed the candle and ran up her stairs and you couldn't get up. It was just filled with smoke.
"But we never heard a smoke alarm, we never even smelled anything," she said.
The house was equipped with three fire alarms, but all of them were powered by alternating current electricity -- not batteries and were not operating during the blackout.
Ms. YOUNG and Ms. THOMAS ran to another neighbour's house, and when he couldn't find a way in, some of those outside hooked up Ms. YOUNG's garden hose and tried quench the flames in order to rush up the stairs to Michael's aid.
"They were yelling his name inside, when they brought the hose up, and they were screaming, really screaming, but there was no answer, no nothing from him," she said. "Then they tried to go on the roof and they broke the window and that's when the fire department showed up."
Michael's parents and sister have been left homeless by the fire and are living in an Ottawa motel while they grieve. The family who were living in subsidized housing -- did not have insurance. Michael's father, Dan, a security guard, was at work when the fire occurred.
"They're still in shock," said Mr. SCRIVENER, who started a fund in Michael's name yesterday at the Gloucester Centre branch of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in Ottawa. He said all other Ottawa Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce branches will also accept donations and that he is hoping Canadians across the country will also help the family.
"They didn't have much to begin with," Mr. SCRIVENER said. Michael's sister "is taking it very, very hard," he said. The boy will be buried after a funeral Friday.
His death was one of the few attributed to the blackout in most of Ontario that left 10 million Canadians without electricity. Another 40 million people in the northeastern United States, from New York City to Ohio and Michigan, were also affected.
Another neighbour tried to save the teenager from the blaze at the townhouse complex but was too late. He was pronounced dead at hospital.
Mr. SCRIVENER remembered Michael during a happier time in the neighbourhood when people gathered outside to gaze at the sky during a lunar eclipse. Michael was there.
"He had a big smile that night," Mr. SCRIVENER said. "He was a nice kid."
Michael's young demeanour made him a perfect playmate for her four-year-old son, Nathan, Ms. YOUNG said.
"They got along so well. It was excellent," she said. "My son would always ask me, 'Can I go play with Michael now?' "
"Michael would come over and see if Nathan could come out. They would always play together. He was a beautiful kid. Very nice, very shy, very polite. I never saw him hurt a fly... He was just so funny. An excellent boy."
In addition to the trust fund set up by Mr. SCRIVENER to help the family get back on its feet, the neighbourhood is soliciting donations to help pay for for flowers for Michael's funeral.
"Any extra money we get will go to help the family buy whatever they need," Ms. YOUNG said. "We want to do something, whatever we can."

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Wilma Ruth KYLE
By Patricia HUNTER Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page A28
Wife, mother, grandmother, volunteer, world traveller. Born November 12, 1915, in Toronto. Died March 28 in Niagara Falls, Ontario, of congestive heart failure, aged 87.
Wilma sounds like such a plain name and my mother was anything but: she was a beautiful woman who was intelligent, kind, loving, and fun-loving. She often said that she was supposed to be a boy and be named after her Uncle Bill, Wilfred Reese BINCH. However, my dad, her family and her Friends called her "Willie."
Willie and her parents, Ernie and Ella YOUNG, and her brother, Jerry, lived in the west end of Toronto. Mom attended Keele Street Public School and she made some lifelong Friends there. She and her Friends at Humberside Collegiate started a bridge club, calling themselves The Lucky Thirteen. They had great fun together and one summer they rented a cottage at Grand Bend, Ontario.
One evening six medical students crashed a dance at University College at the University of Toronto. Cam KYLE asked Willie YOUNG to dance and then he asked if he could drive her home and she said yes. When he took her home, she told him that she should write down her phone number for him because there were a lot of Youngs in the phone book. Cam didn't call for about two weeks and Willie was starting to wonder if he was ever going to phone her. When he finally did call and asked if he could come and see her, he brought along his best friend for moral support. This was the beginning of a four-year courtship and 62 years of marriage.
After completing her B.A., Mom worked for six weeks at Eaton's in the accounting department. She made $13 a week and before she left to get married, she was offered a promotion and a raise to $18 a week.
Dad completed his junior internship at St. Michael's Hospital and joined the newly formed medical corps in the Royal Canadian Air Force. This was July, 1940. Dad couldn't get leave to come to Toronto to get married, so my parents were married in Winnipeg on Valentine's Day, 1941.
After being raised a city girl in Toronto, Mom's life changed dramatically, living in the wild west called Manitoba. She learned how to cook on a wood stove and shoot prairie chickens with a shotgun. Mom would drive the car and dad would stand on the running board and shoot. When they reversed roles, my mother broke her collarbone as the gun discharged.
The next several years tested my mother's inner strength. Dad was posted overseas for three years when my brother, Bill, was an infant. This meant that Mom was a single mother like many women during the war. As well, her father died of heart disease at the early age of 52. After the war, Dad completed his surgical training and my brothers, Bob and Peter, and I arrived on the scene.
Jumping ahead to life in Niagara Falls, Mom worked hard on the home front while dad established his medical practice. Mom enjoyed gardening and grew beautiful flowers, especially roses and African violets. Other activities included reading, curling, theatre, and volunteer work. But mostly, she looked after dad and us and this was a full-time job, especially when we were young. I didn't realize until I was much older that everyone's mother didn't stay up late at night sewing ballet and skating costumes after putting in a full day.
Travel was a big part of my parents' life together. Not only did it enrich their lives, teaching them about other cultures around the world, but my mother often had some funny stories to tell. She certainly was able to laugh at herself.
At her funeral, granddaughter Shannon described Willie as being loving, adventurous, intelligent, and a bit of a worrywart. After years of training from my mother, we all say to our own children, "Call when you get there."
Patricia is Wilma's daughter.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
MARSHALL, Margaret Elizabeth, R.N.
Died peacefully on September 2, 2003 in her 93rd year. Beloved aunt of Thomas and Patricia MARSHALL, Toronto and Robin YOUNG, Scituate, Massachusetts. Loving great aunt of Heather and Andrew YOUNG and Jennifer, Sarah and Christopher MARSHALL. Great grand aunt of Madison and Mackenzie YOUNG. Predeceased by her brothers Thomas and Robert and her sister Helen. A memorial service of thanksgiving for Margaret's life will be held at 2 p.m. on Monday, September 22, 2003 at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (two lights west of Yonge St.) Donations to K- Wing, Sunnybrook Hospital, where Margaret received such wonderful care during the last years of her life would be appreciated by the family.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
Florence Mary Armstrong YOUNG
By Cameron YOUNG Friday, September 19, 2003 - Page A20
Mother, grandmother. Born February 20, 1908, in Lachute, Quebec Died July 30 in Ottawa, of natural causes, aged 95.
Florence YOUNG was an ordinary women for her century.
Her birth, at home at the ARMSTRONG dairy farm in Lachute, according to her father's daily ledger, cost $6. The oldest daughter in the family of 10, she helped raise the children. She also drove the dump rake with a team of horses that once bolted from a swarm of bees and sent her careening into the hay stubble. Today, the super-highway to Mirabel Airport knifes its way through the expropriated hay fields and cow paths of this once-thriving family farm. No one talks about the sad state of the old house.
As a teenager, in the winter, if she couldn't hitch a ride on her father's early-morning milk run to town, Florence drove her own one-horse sleigh to school in Lachute. The dairy stands beside the Lachute Protestant Cemetery, where Florence now lies buried beside her husband Harold. After visiting the grave you can stop by the dairy for some really good ice cream.
Florence was a graduate of MacDonald College and as a young woman taught elementary school in various rural Quebec communities. In winter, the wash basin in her bedroom would freeze over and she nearly died from diphtheria.
While teaching in Arvida she was swept off her feet by the handsome young principal from Shawville, Harold YOUNG. Florence and Harold were married on the front lawn of her Lachute home on June 29, 1935. In time they would move to Quebec City, where Harold worked as a school inspector and Florence raised two towheaded boys.
On hot summer days Florence piled the neighbourhood kids into the family car for a ride to the beach on the St. Lawrence River, at the base of the Plains of Abraham. Florence is well-remembered for the foot-high meringue on her lemon pies and for her immaculately decorated birthday cakes, which, in later years, took two days to complete. Her kitchen table was always like a homemaker's workshop: a shiny meat-grinder over here, wooden sock-stretchers piled up over there. Come suppertime, everything was back in its allotted place. She would spend what seemed like hours ironing bed sheets.
Regular attendees of Chalmers Wesley United Church, during wartime, Florence and Harold helped entertain the troops heading overseas, especially the young pilots. "You knew they weren't coming back," she said. Some time after Harold died in 1979, she became a church elder.
In the 1950s, when a school inspector's income stopped keeping pace with inflation, Florence went back to teaching elementary school. In the end they gave her all the so-called hard-to-handle kids. "You just had to love them," she said. Over all, she put in 20 years of teaching before retiring in 1968.
Florence had been a widow for 24 years, having moved from her house in Quebec City to an Ottawa apartment, where she continued to live independently (very independently) to the end. Florence outlived her nine siblings, save for youngest sister Ruth.
Two months before Florence died, her granddaughter Jenny asked her for some advice on becoming a teacher. "Always make Friends," she counselled. "And always be a lady."
When she died, she was laid out in the coffin of her choice, the replica of the one containing the unknown soldier. The prearranged funeral service at one of Ottawa's fine funeral homes was just what she had ordered (and paid for). It was a closed coffin, as she requested. That was the dignified way. As she lived her life, she passed on with grace.
Cameron YOUNG is Florence's son.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-04 published
YOUNG, Don
Beloved husband of Jennifer, died on Wednesday, October 1, after a brief illness. Don had been in poor health for some time. Don was born on October 24, 1914 in Saint Thomas, Ontario. He spent two years of his early childhood in the wilds of Montana, avoiding rattlesnakes, and listening to coyotes howl. During his early adult life he had a short career playing the guitar for The Royal Canucks, a dance band in London, Ontario. He received his post secondary education at the Universities of Western Ontario, and Toronto. After serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War 2, Don began his teaching career, working in Dutton, Haldim and County, Forest Hill, and in the Ministry of Education, where he held several senior positions. Throughout his life Don was especially interested in natural science, birding in particular, and enthusiastically shared these interests with Friends and associates. He was a member of several science clubs, including the Brodie Club. Don loved the challenge of learning both practical and intellectual subjects, and became skillful at photography, fly fishing, furniture making as well as achieving considerable fluency in French, German and Spanish. His love of adventure took him to five continents where, among other things, he rode on the back of both an elephant, and an ostrich. He and Jennifer traveled widely pursuing their interest in the visual arts. Don leaves behind his wife Jennifer, brother-in-law David LENNOX and wife Virginia, and their sons, Chris and his wife Leola, and Andrew ROACH of Barrie, his sister-in law Tina LENNOX, her two sons, Jason and Joshua and their families, and his cousin Edna BATE and her family of Brantford. During his long and happy life Don won many cherished Friends, who will miss his loyalty, and wisdom. During his declining health, Don exhibited grace and fortitude, always the gentleman. His last three years were made easier due to the fine care he received at Carefree Lodge, for which Debbie ARAUJO and her fine staff deserve special praise. The family will receive Friends at the Kane Funeral Home at 6150 Yonge Street, Toronto, on Sunday, October 5, from 2-4, followed by a reception. According to Don¹s wishes, there will be no funeral. If desired, donations may be made in Don¹s memory to Birdstudies Canada, P.O. Box 150, Port Rowan, Ontario, N0E 1M0, or a charity of your choice.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

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YOUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
CADOGAN, Elda Magill (née MAGILL)
of Mount Saint Joseph Nursing Home, Miramichi, New Brunswick, a journalist, poet, playwright and short story writer, died Tuesday, November 18, 2003, at 7: 47 a.m. at the age of 86. As a playwright, she was best known for her one-act-play, Rise and Shine, which has the distinction of being one of the most frequently-performed Canadian plays ever written. It has been performed in every province in Canada, in 47 states in the U.S., and in England, Ireland, Australia and South Africa. A German translation was Canada's representation in a worldwide cultural exchange in Bonn, Germay.
In 1992, the University of Guelph added the Elda Magill Cadogan Collection to its extensive theatre archives. The collection included correspondence, manuscripts, printed editions, advertisements, review and programs related to the play. In 1993, the university obtained her voluminous collection of memorabilia on the Stratford Festival She attended the theatre's premier performance in 1953 and took a special interest in the organization after moving to Strfatford in 1985. Born December 17, 1916 at Mount Forest, Ontario, she was the only daughter of Robert, a lay minister at Conn, and Katherine Herron MAGILL. She grew up in Woodstock, where her writing was first published - a story and poem in the Woodstock Sentinel Review - when she was 8. She graduated from Woodstock Collegiate Institute, where she was valedictorian for her class and, after completing a business course, was employed at the Woodstock Sentinel Review. In 1939, she married George CADOGAN, of Woodstock.
The couple later purchased newpapers in Durham, Ontario, Pictou, Nova Scotia and Oromocto and Newcastle, New Brunswick. George CADOGAN died in February, 1996. Mrs CADOGAN won several awards for her newspaper articles and she and her husband were the first husband and wife team to be named honourary life members of both the Atlantic and the Canadian Community Newspaper Associations. While in Stratford, Mrs. CADOGAN was an honourary member of the Writers Club of Stratford and a member of the Canadian Authors Association, the Noon Book Club and the Good Book Club. She was a member of Saint John's United Church, Stratford. She was also a contributor to The Beacon Herald for several years. In September, 1999, she moved to a retirement residence in Frederiction, New Brunswick, where she could be closer to some of her family members, and recently moved again, to Mount Saint Joseph Nursing Home in Miramichi.
An animal lover, Mrs. CADOGAN usually had at least one cat in her life, and once a dog as well.
She is survived by two sons, David (Michelle), of Miramichi, New Brunswick, and Michael, of Scarborough; daughter Katherine HILDER (Stephen,) of Prince George, British Columbia, and Elizabeth Jean MORGAN (Dan,) of Fredericton, New Brunswick. Also surviving are six grandchildren, Joanne (Allen IRVING) and Colin CADOGAN, Craig CADOGAN and Sheryl UDEH (Obi) and Kristin and Leslie HILDER, and one great grandchild, Benjamin UDEH. In addition to her husband, she was predeceased by four brothers, Max, Rex, Weston and Robert, and a daughter-in-law, Susan (YOUNG) CADOGAN. Friends will be received and the Stratford, Ontario W.G. Young Funeral Home for visitation Friday evening November 21st from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. and for the funeral service Saturday morning, November 22nd at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend Greg WHITE/WHYTE of Saint John's United Church will officiate.

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