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"McLA" 2003 Obituary


MCLACHLAN  MCLAREN  MCLARY  MCLAUGHIN  MCLAUGHLIN  MCLAY 

McLACHLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-21 published
Died This Day -- Alexander McLACHLAN, 1896
Friday, March 21, 2003 - Page R11
Poet born at Johnstone, Renfrewshire, Scotland, in 1818; in 1840, took up farming in Canada; in 1844, married his cousin and bought a series of bush farms in Perth County; in 1850, gave up farming and bought plot in Erin Township and retired to write poetry and lecture; in 1895, bought home in Orangeville, Ontario, to continue writing; known for nostalgic dialect poetry dealing with homesickness of Scots immigrants; remembered as the Robbie Burns of Canada.

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McLAREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-27 published
Died This Day -- Norman McLAREN, 1987
Monday, January 27, 2003, Page R7
Animator and filmmaker born on April 11, 1914, at Stirling, Scotland worked as a cameraman for a Spanish Civil War documentary; in 1937, joined staff of British GPO Film Unit under John GRIERSON in 1841, followed GRIERSON to National Film Board of Canada in 1941; won 147 awards for short films, including Pas de Deux (1968), Neighbours (1952) and Ballet Adagio (1971).

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McLAREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
PETERS, George
Formerly of London, Ontario, and longtime resident of Aylmer, Quebec, passed away on April 30th, 2003. His first wife, Patricia BELK, passed away in 1989. His second wife, Françoise (''Toto'') BACH- KOLLING, died in 2000. He is survived by his sister Dorothy McLAREN of London, Ontario, his stepdaughter Felicia HOUTMAN, by Gordene STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, and by his nieces and nephews. A gathering of Friends and family will take place at the Beauchamp Funeral Home, 47 Denise Friend Street, Aylmer, on Sunday, May 4th beginning at 2 o'clock. For more information, please call (819) 770-1300.

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McLAREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
He had a passion for big cats
Canadian wildlife biologist pioneered long-running cougar project, radio-tracked lions in East Africa
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, July 28, 2003 - Page R7
Ian ROSS, a Canadian wildlife biologist whose love of big cats took him deep into the bush in East Africa, has died after his small plane crashed in central Kenya. He was 44.
Mr. ROSS was radio-tracking lions in Kenya's Laikipia district as part of a research study aimed at improving the conservation of large carnivores in Africa, when the two-seater Husky aircraft he was a passenger in crashed and burned.
The plane, which was flying at a low altitude in order to allow him to track the animals, crashed in the early evening of June 29. Mr. ROSS and the American pilot who was flying the plane were killed instantly, said Laurence FRANK, director of the Laikipia Predator Project and a research associate at the University of California at Berkeley.
Mr. ROSS, who arrived in Kenya from Calgary in January, had intended to stay there working on the project for at least a year.
"He had this real passion for big cats. He wanted to study them around the world," said Vivian PHARIS, who sits on the board of directors at the Alberta Wilderness Association, of which Mr. ROSS was a member for close to 20 years.
"Large carnivores are interesting because their populations tend to be the first to suffer from human activities," Mr. ROSS said a few years ago in a short article written on the occasion of a high-school reunion. "They require huge land areas and some of their characteristics are very similar to and conflict with our own."
Although Mr. ROSS had spent considerable time in the field researching several wild animals, including lions, grizzly bears and moose, Mr. ROSS was best known for his expertise on cougars.
In the mid-1990s, he and colleague Martin JALKOTZY, with whom he ran a small Calgary-based consulting firm called Arc Wildlife Services, completed a 14-year study on cougars.
The study, considered the longest-running cougar project and the most intensive of its kind, looked at everything from cougar population dynamics, to the effects of hunting, to food and habitat use.
The intensive fieldwork took place in the winter in the foothills of Alberta. Winter allowed the researchers to follow a cougar's tracks in the snow. Once a cat was tracked, with the help of dogs, the animal would be tranquillized before it was radio-collared and its measurements were taken.
"We worked really well as a team," Mr. JALKOTZY said. "It was something Ian did quite well."
The cougar project received wide public attention when Mr. ROSS appeared on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's Morningside with Peter GZOWSKI and Arthur BLACK, the former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio host, followed along with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY while they radio-collared a cougar. Mr. BLACK recorded the event for his program Basic Black.
In the mid-1980s, not long after Mr. ROSS became involved in the study, he lost his friend and mentor Orvall PALL. Mr. PALL was killed in a plane crash while tracking bighorn sheep in Alberta. At the time of his death he was working with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY on the cougar project.
Over the years, Mr. ROSS, who was described as quiet and unassuming, made a number of public presentations on the cougar study. He was especially in demand in 2001 after a woman was killed by a cougar while cross-country skiing near Banff, Alberta.
"Ian really believed in public education," believing it was the first step toward conservation, Mr. JALKOTZY said. Speaking publicly also helped to raise money, from individual donors, corporations and other sources, for the independent study.
Mr. ROSS also did a lot of work with Alberta Fish and Wildlife and was instrumental, along with Mr. JALKOTZY, in getting the province to adopt a new cougar wildlife management plan to control hunting.
Ian ROSS was born on December 16, 1958, in Goderich, Ontario He was the third of four children born to Burns and Ruth ROSS. Childhood was spent in the fields of Huron County near his home, climbing through muskrat swamps and collecting pelts and animal skulls.
After high school, Mr. ROSS left Goderich for Guelph, Ontario, where he studied wildlife biology. In 1982, he graduated from the University of Guelph with an honours degree. Soon after, he packed up his pickup truck with all his possessions and drove west to Alberta. After a short stint working as a beekeeper in the Peace River area, he was hired by a small private consulting firm in Calgary as a wildlife biologist and started studying grizzly bears and moose.
In 1984, he married Sheri MacLAREN, also from Goderich. The couple separated in January, 2002.
Over the course of his career, Mr. ROSS figured he had captured and released more than 1,000 large mammals including bighorn sheep, cougars and grizzlies, for research. Not afraid of large animals, he captured and collared his first leopard two days before he died.
Andrew ROSS recalls one time his older brother was injured by a moose when it kicked him in the face after being sedated. He was left bruised and with a cracked cheekbone.
"He was extremely meticulous and careful," Dr. FRANK said, referring to Mr. ROSS's work.
Through his consulting firm, Mr. ROSS conducted numerous environmental impact studies in western and northern Canada for the oil industry and government. The work required Mr. ROSS to spend a lot more time at his office desk instead of in the field where he felt his true talent was.
"Working with these large animals is very exciting and also very dangerous," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS loved being in the field but hated what he had to do to the animals. He knew that by capturing the large predators he was causing them trauma, but he strongly believed that what he was doing was for the benefit of research and in the end the benefit of the animals, Dr. FRANK said.
"He was just so aware of the animal's experience, the animal's dignity, if you can put it that way," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS spent the spring of 2002 working in northern British Columbia capturing grizzly bears for research. The job meant Mr. ROSS, a man small in stature but strong and wiry, and a pilot would fly low over an area in a helicopter trying to spot bears. Once they had, Mr. ROSS's job was to lean out of the plane, secure in his harness and dart the animal with a tranquillizer. After the animal was sedated, they would circle back, land the plane and eventually radio collar the animal.
"He had great capture skills," Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Aside from being a committed conservationist, Mr. ROSS was also an avid hunter and enjoyed hunting elk, moose and deer. But he vigorously opposed the trophy killing of wolves, bears and cougars.
Andrew ROSS recalls that when his brother went moose hunting, deep in the woods, he would only bring three bullets with him. He figured that if he couldn't kill an animal with those, he didn't deserve to get one.
"He would often get the moose with one bullet," Andrew ROSS said.
While he loved to hunt, he never went out in an area he was studying, considering that to be a conflict of interest, his brother said.
"Ian cared passionately about wildlife and wild country," and tried to do what he could to conserve it, Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Next month, Mr. ROSS's ashes will be dispersed in Alberta's Kananaskis country, where he had spent so much time with the cougars.

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McLAREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
TENNANT, John Holmsted, Q.C.
Died peacefully on Wednesday, December 24, 2003, in Burlington, Ontario. A devoted father and grandfather he leaves behind daughters Peggy (WENGLE) and Barbara (and Malcolm MacKAY;) grandchildren Christopher, Sandy and Robert McLAREN, Heather (OUELLETTE;) Lisa and Malcolm MacKAY, and great-grandchildren Amelia, Skye and Natalie. He was predeceased by his wife Airdrie (BROWN) in 1977. Born September 10, 1915 in Yorkton, Saskatchewan, he moved to Montreal, Quebec at age 14 and graduated from Université de Montréal with a law degree in 1940, winning the Bar of Montreal prize for commercial law. During the war, he served on corvettes with the R.C.N.V.R. 1941-1945. He worked for the legal department of the Industrial Development Bank and then for the law firm Howard, Cate, Ogilvy, Bishop, Cope, Porteous and Hansard. He retired in 1979 to Oakville, Ontario to be closer to his grandchildren. His family was the joy of his life and he will be sorely missed by them. A private service will be held. Calls and visits will be welcomed at the homes of his daughters. Donations in lieu of flowers can be made to his favourite charities: The Salvation Army and Covenant House.

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McCLARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-27 published
Haldane Ellis McCLARY
By Glenda DAY Tuesday, May 27, 2003 - Page A22
Veteran, wood carver, husband, father, stepfather, grandfather. Born April 18, 1924, in Tracey, New Brunswick Died March 27 in London, Ontario, of esophageal cancer, aged 79.
'I know where I am, and I know who you are. But, I prefer the quiet." These were the last words Hal uttered to me before falling into unconsciousness. While his body slowly collapsed under myriad stresses, his mind had remained lucid.
Born on a farm, Hal was the youngest of eight children. His father was a surveyor who travelled extensively and this left Hal, the only remaining male, responsible for the farm.
At 17, Hal lied about his age and enlisted in the Canadian army. He was a proud soldier and the recipient of four medals. Normally a spirited storyteller, Hal was reluctant to talk about the war, saying the horrors of war were too much to bear and that a civilian would neither understand, nor be able to cope with, hearing about such atrocities. Near the end of his life, however, Hal opened up slightly and told of a particularly brutal battle where he and two other privates were the only ones to survive. After the war, Hal visited some of the families of the lost soldiers.
Upon returning to civilian life, Hal relocated to London, Ontario, where he met Mae. They married in 1946 and had two daughters, Sharon and Lynn.
Hal was employed for 20 years at Eaton Automotive, and then at Proto Tools for 11 years. He took early leave, but finding retirement too quiescent, Hal became a security guard at Fanshawe College. A member of the Canadian Auto Workers for more than 30 years, Hal was a staunch union supporter and often visited the union hall to share stories over beer.
Following Mae's death, Hal met Vera in 1984. They married and purchased a house together, where Hal spent the balance of his years.
The fighting instinct that helped Hal survive the Second World War was the same force that carried him through life. Upon returning from holiday in Puerto Vallarta in 1985, he told of a monkey that had been trained to entertain tourists. It soon became apparent the monkey had also been trained to steal wallets; when it took Hal's wallet, Hal chased it along the beach. Grabbing its tail, Hal retrieved his wallet and dragged the monkey back down the beach where he apprehended the trainer and told him off in a most threatening manner. Hal went on to enjoy his holiday (with the exception of Montezuma's revenge!)
Hal was a voracious reader and a passionately opinionated man. His interests included Native peoples, and Canadian and American history. He was a self-professed war-trivia expert, and he loved hunting, fishing, and playing cards. His annual hunting and fishing expedition lasted a month, but Hal would spend the ensuing 11 months discussing the ones that got away. While family members knew of his adventures almost well enough to tell the stories themselves, Hal always found a receptive ear in his grandchildren. His most memorable vacation was the one that he and Vera spent driving through the mountain passes and pristine wilderness of Yukon and Alaska.
Hal was also an avid wood carver. Decked out in a plaid shirt, work pants, suspenders, and a baseball cap (his lifelong uniform), he whittled away in the garage on his latest creation. Everyone who knew him was the recipient of a birdhouse, wishing well, animal carving or garden cart, cut from fir or poplar.
He kept a fire going in the garage wood stove almost year-round, and this became Hal's haven from the rest of the world. I came to realize that, like the rest of us, Hal was searching for a personal world of peace as he travelled the journey of life.
Glenda DAY is Hal's stepdaughter.

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McLAUGHIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
Dorothy Jean SMITH
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Jean SMITH (née McLAUGHIN) age 67 of Saskatoon, which occurred on July 6, 2003. A private graveside service was held at Woodlawn Cemetery in Saskatoon on July 11, conducted by the Rev. Henry COMERFORD with only family members in attendance in accordance with Dorothy's wishes. Arrangements were entrusted to Saskatoon Funeral Home.
Surviving are her loving husband Frederick, daughter Kim SMITH- CHAMBERLAIN (David) of Herefordshire, England, son of Terry of Martensville, Saskatchewan, sister Roberta McMULLEN (Doug) of Sudbury, brother Hugh McLAUGHLIN (Mollyanne) of Gore Bay, numerous nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. Dorothy was predeceased by her father Wm. Burt McLAUGHLIN in 1956 and her mother Laura McLAUGHLIN in 1989. Dorothy was born in Manitowaning, on September 19th, 1935 where she grew up and completed her education at the Continuation School. She graduated from Ottawa Civic Hospital School of Nursing in 1957 and was a life member of the alumnae. She did private duty nursing in Ottawa and obstetrical nursing at the Sudbury General Hospital. She served in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a Nursing Sister with the rank of Flying Officer. She married Fred SMITH on September 9, 1961 at St. George's Anglican Church, Saskatoon. Dorothy enjoyed the arts and entertainment and was a huge "movie buff." She loved gardening, music and nature and was employed in the family business until the business was sold in 2001. She was also gifted with a remarkable decorating flare which was demonstrated during all the festive seasons. Dorothy was always active in her family's lives, a devoted wife, mother and friend and will be very sadly missed by all.

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McLAUGHLIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
Dorothy Jean SMITH
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Jean SMITH (née McLAUGHIN) age 67 of Saskatoon, which occurred on July 6, 2003. A private graveside service was held at Woodlawn Cemetery in Saskatoon on July 11, conducted by the Rev. Henry COMERFORD with only family members in attendance in accordance with Dorothy's wishes. Arrangements were entrusted to Saskatoon Funeral Home.
Surviving are her loving husband Frederick, daughter Kim SMITH- CHAMBERLAIN (David) of Herefordshire, England, son of Terry of Martensville, Saskatchewan, sister Roberta McMULLEN (Doug) of Sudbury, brother Hugh McLAUGHLIN (Mollyanne) of Gore Bay, numerous nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. Dorothy was predeceased by her father Wm. Burt McLAUGHLIN in 1956 and her mother Laura McLAUGHLIN in 1989. Dorothy was born in Manitowaning, on September 19th, 1935 where she grew up and completed her education at the Continuation School. She graduated from Ottawa Civic Hospital School of Nursing in 1957 and was a life member of the alumnae. She did private duty nursing in Ottawa and obstetrical nursing at the Sudbury General Hospital. She served in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a Nursing Sister with the rank of Flying Officer. She married Fred SMITH on September 9, 1961 at St. George's Anglican Church, Saskatoon. Dorothy enjoyed the arts and entertainment and was a huge "movie buff." She loved gardening, music and nature and was employed in the family business until the business was sold in 2001. She was also gifted with a remarkable decorating flare which was demonstrated during all the festive seasons. Dorothy was always active in her family's lives, a devoted wife, mother and friend and will be very sadly missed by all.

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McLAUGHLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JAMIESON, Joseph Thoburn
Died suddenly, February 25, 2003, in hospital, at Cranbrook, British Columbia. Beloved and loving husband of Ellen Cameron (McFARLANE,) his wife of 45 years. Sadly missed by his two sons, Joseph Alexander (Alec); and Michael Douglas (Laura SALEM), cherished ''Papa'' of Kathleen all of Calgary. Lovingly remembered by his sister Norah (wife of the late Don CARR,) Manotick, Ontario brother, William R. (Pamela MacDOWELL,) Rideau Ferry, Ontario. Predeceased by his sister Catherine E. DAVIDSON, Aberdeen, Scotland. ''Uncle Joe'' will be forever loved and never forgotten by his nieces and nephews Susan WINTER (Bill;) Mary McLAUGHLIN (Peter) and Shannon; Scott (Joanne), Jacqueline and William; Jane Jamieson and other nieces and nephews. Predeceased by very special grandniece Lindsey WINTER. Born at Almonte, Ontario, January 24, 1927, son of the late William Algernon and Catherine Isobel (COCHRAN) JAMIESON. Primary and secondary education at Almonte. Graduated, as a Textile Engineer, from Philadelphia Institute of Technology, 1949. Moved west to British Columbia upon his retirement, in 1991. Following a productive 26 year career, with Canadian General Tower Ltd. of Cambridge Ontario, Joe and Ellen spent many happy years at Nelson, Marysville and Cranbrook, British Columbia. Traveling with Ellen he enjoyed frequent trips back to visit their special Friends in Ontario. Joe seemed to particularly look forward to his fall hunting excursions to visit the Happy Hopeful Hunt Club on Pakenham Mountain. Family members and close Friends have been recipient of the product of his sculpted wood bird carving endeavors of his retirement years. Joe will live forever within the hearts of those of us who loved him. Missed by many.

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McLAUGHLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
CHANDRAN, Beverley Anne
On Friday, March 7, 2003, in her 50th year, Beverley was called to, once again, be one with the Creator of Creation. She went with a blazing smile of glory in her soul, while giving her unselfish, unstoppable gratitude in peace, tranquility, and a twinkle in her eye. At home in Erin, Ontario with her loved ones. In their 29th year of marriage, ever beloved part of Clarence; eternally loving mother of sons Justin (23) and his wife Jennifer; Liam (21) and Keddy (19.) Only daughter of Ambrose and Theresa CARROLL and sister of Gary (Marlene), D'Arcy (Pam) and Paul (Harriet). Only daughter-in-law of Geoff and Lena CHANDRAN and sister-in-law of Brinda McLAUGHLIN (John.) Permanent thanks to dearest and giving Friends, old and new. And special thanks to: Dr. Alan FRIEDMAN and staff, Dr. Henry FRIEDMAN of Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Stephen TREMONT and staff of Rex Hospital Cancer Clinic Dr. Julian ROSENMAN and staff of University of North Carolina Radiation Oncology Clinic; Dr. Lew STOCKS and staff, Dr. Mike DELISSIO and staff, Dr. Robert ALLEN and staff, Dr. Donald BROWN, all of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Dr. Peter COLE of Orangeville, Ontario, and the nursing staff of Robertson and Brown of Kitchener, Ontario. Visitation and a Celebration of Beverley's life will take place at her home: #4998, 10th Sideroad of Erin, Ontario (north of Ballinafad Road, south of 5th Sideroad). Visitation for family and Friends will be held on Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 pm to 8 pm. On Monday, March 10, 2003, there will be a private family Funeral Mass, after which, Friends and family are invited to participate in a Celebration of Beverley's life from 3 pm. to 8 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society (P.O. Box 102454, Atlanta, Georgia 303068-2454) or The Canadian Cancer Society (Wellington County Unit, 214 Speedvale Avenue, W. Unit 4A, Guelph, Ontario N1H 1C4) Arrangements entrusted to Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main Street, South, Erin, Ontario, Canada. For more information call 519-833-2231.

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McCLAY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-30 published
Allan Robert HAGGERT
January 8, 1939 to July 21, 2003.
On July 21, 2003, after a valiant battle with pancreatic cancer, Allan passed away at the Mindemoya Hospital.
He was 64. He leaves behind his wife Carolyn, his two sons, Kenneth (Roma) and Korwin (Danielle), of whom he was so proud, his brothers Gordon (Eleanor) and Ross (Dorothy,) brother-in-law Marlowe MORRIS (Wendy,) mother-in-law Vera MORRIS and many nephews and nieces both in Canada and Australia. Allan was born and lived in Toronto, retiring to Manitoulin in 1999. He began his working career as a silkscreen printer for McCLAY Brothers and then as a silkscreen cutter and printer for the Dylex Corporation. He left Dylex to set up a partnership called Retail Environments which designed and built retail stores. Finally, he branched out on his own and developed a business that he ran with Carolyn which supplied and installed signage. Allan was never happier than when he was on his boat and he truly enjoyed the time he spent sailing alone and with Friends on the North Channel. In Toronto he had been a long-time member of Ashbridges Bay Yacht Club. When he was not sailing he enjoyed woodworking, ice skating and although he was not a gardener, in Toronto he loved being in the garden that Carolyn created. During the early stages of his illness he began building model sailboats as well as working on the plans for the new house that he and Carolyn are building. He was a good man and is sadly missed by Carolyn, his family and Friends. It was his wish that there be no funeral service.

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