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"WOR" 2003 Obituary


WORDEN  WORKMAN  WORNER  WORRALL  WORTH  WORTHINGTON 

WORDEN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Elwood (Ted) MURRAY
Passed away peacefully on Manitoulin Island on Friday, May 2, 2003, Elwood William John (Ted), formerly of Brantford. Born February 12, 1915, son of the late Thomas and Ethel WORDEN MURRAY of St. Paul's. Beloved husband of the late Barbara Isabel WOOD MURRAY of Saint Mary's. Dear father of James (Mame) and the late Thomas, and grandfather of Michael and Adrian MURRAY of Manitoulin Island. Service and interment at Saint Mary's Cemetery, Saint Mary's, Ontario, Tuesday, May 6. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the local charity of your choice.

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WORKMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
STORMS, Peter Henderson
Died Saturday, June 7, 2003. Loving husband of Isabel STORMS. Father of Sandra, Peter Stewart, Wendy and Pamela. Grandfather of Charles and Nicole LEHOCZKY, Andrew and Sarah STORMS and Jennifer WORKMAN. Great grandfather of Nicholas and Alexander LEHOCZKY and Wendy Emma WORKMAN. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. West (2 lights west of Yonge Street)
Today, Wednesday June 11, from 7-9 p.m.
A memorial service will be held in Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge Street, Toronto (corner of Yonge and Heath St. West) Thursday, June 12, 2 p.m.

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WORNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-03 published
DYMOND, Elizabeth Jane (Betty)
Died peacefully after a brief illness on Sunday, June 1, 2003 a Briton House at age 77. Betty DYMOND the wife of the Late Desmond. Loving mother of Jan and her husband Romeo WORNER, Eric, Pat and her husband Gary IRVING. Beloved Grammie of Chris and his wife Jen, Erica, Graeme and Heather. Dear sister in law of Rosemary DYMOND. Resting at the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mt. Pleasant Road (at Eglinton) on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m.. Funeral and Committal Service in the chapel on Wednesday at 2 p.m. If desired donations may be made to The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada, 60 St. Clair Ave East, Suite 600, Toronto, Ontario M4T 1N5.

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WORRALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Black pride of Canadian track and field
First Canadian-born black athlete to win an Olympic medal was member of relay team at 1932 Los Angeles Games but could find work only as a railway porter
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page R9
Ray LEWIS's event in Olympic track and field was officially the 400-metre sprint, a flat race. His enduring place in Canadian sport history, however, was earned for hurdling a barrier.
Mr. LEWIS, who died in his native Hamilton at age 94 on the weekend, was the first Canadian born black athlete to stand upon the Olympic medals podium. He won a bronze medal as a member of the Canadian 4 x 400-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932.
At a time where racial discrimination was the way of the world, Mr. LEWIS didn't get to live a hero's life. Viewed today as a pathfinder for talented black athletes, in the 1930s Mr. LEWIS had to all but quit his athletics training because of the demands of his job as a railway porter with the Canadian Pacific Railways. He spent 22 years on the trains making 250 trips from Toronto to Vancouver. To try and stay fit, Mr. LEWIS would train by running alongside the rails when the train stopped on the prairies.
"He deserved so much more than he ever received," said Donovan BAILEY, who won two gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 100 metres and 4 x 100-metre relay. "I benefited from his going before.
"I had the honour and good fortune of having lunch with Ray LEWIS and talking with him. I couldn't imagine what it was like in his day. It was so different. Ultimately, he's one who inspired me."
Raymond Gray LEWIS was a Hamiltonian, cradle to grave. James WORRALL, honorary member of the International Olympic Committee and Canada's Olympic flag bearer in 1936, recalled the family roots in the area went back to the 1840s when his great grandparents escaped slavery in the United States and settled near Otterville, Ontario
The youngest child of Cornelius LEWIS and Emma GREEN, Ray LEWIS was born October 8, 1910, at 30 Clyde St. He began running races for fun at age 9 when he entered as contest at a local picnic. He began formal training in track and field at Central Collegiate where the autocratic John Richard (Cap) CORNELIUS was his coach. In 1929, he established a Canadian high-school track-and-field record of four championships in one day, taking the dashes at 100, 200, and 440 yards as they were measured then, and anchoring the one-mile relay. In 1928 and 1929, Mr. LEWIS was part of the Central relay team that won the United States national schoolboy title.
He briefly attended Marquette University in Milwaukee but returned to Canada during the Depression and joined the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Besides his Olympic medal performance with teammates Phil EDWARDS, Alex WILSON and Jimmy BALL, Mr. LEWIS was also a Canadian champion several times and competed in the inaugural British Empire Games in 1930 in Hamilton and the 1934 Empire Games in London. where he won a silver medal in the mile relay. Mr. EDWARDS was actually the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal for Canada in 1932, getting the 800-metre honour about a half-hour before the relay with Mr. LEWIS. Mr. EDWARDS, however, was native of British Guyana, while Ray LEWIS was a local.
Mr. LEWIS, who in 2001 was awarded the Order of Canada, had a life-long attachment to the Empire Games, later renamed the Commonwealth Games. He was an adviser to the bidders who recently sought the 2010 Games for Hamilton and vowed that if the Games were coming back, he'd be there to greet them at the official opening at age 100. The Hamilton bid lost out last week to one from New Delhi, India. He lit the torch during the opening ceremonies at the International Children's Games in Hamilton July 1, 2000.
Mr. LEWIS wrote an autobiography entitled Shadow Running in which he detailed his life "as porter and Olympian." He was featured in a 2002 TVOntario documentary series on racism, Journey to Justice. "It [racism] felt worse here, because it wasn't supposed to happen here," he recalled in the video.
Whereas white athletes had an opportunity for coaching jobs after their careers, Mr. LEWIS did not. His position as a porter was one of the few jobs open to men of his race.
"The first time I met him, the Canadian team was on its way to Fort William, Ontario, for the Canadian championships in 1933. They travelled by Pullman and Ray was the porter. He couldn't get the time off to compete. But he did make the 1934 Empire Games team and was presented to the Prince of Wales, something that was a point of honour for him. He felt it was something to rub into all those people who had kept him off teams and out of places because he was black," Mr. WORRALL said.
Mr. LEWIS married Vivienne JONES in 1941, and they adopted two children, sons Larry and Tony.

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WORTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
Kathleen Innes Stewart Roland CROWE
By C.N.R. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - Page A26
Sister, friend, actor, social worker. Born April 9, 1908, in London, England. Died August 26, 2003 in New York City, aged Although born in England, Kitty -- or The Doy, as she was called en famille -- spent her early life in Cleveland, Ohio, where our father headed the H.K. Cushing Laboratory for Experimental Medicine at Western Reserve University. Her three brothers (I am the youngest) were born there. Our father, in 1922, moved our mother and the four children to Toronto where we were enrolled in those private schools that met his high standards. My sister went to Havergal College on Jarvis Street in Toronto and hated it. She stuck it out, though, and, on graduation, was accepted into the arts program at University College at the University of Toronto. After graduation, she and a girlfriend went to Europe where, among other adventures, they bicycled through Normandy and Brittany, an unusual escapade for two young women in the late 1920s. It was a life-enhancing experience as the journals she so meticulously kept attest.
Hers was indeed a privileged upbringing but throughout her long life she identified more with the downtrodden. After our father died in 1930, she returned to the family home in Toronto's Lawrence Park where, after our mother died in 1933, she, 10 years my elder, became my surrogate mother.
Next door to us was a family by the name of CROWE and, in 1935, she married the boy next door who went by the imposing moniker of James Fitz-Randolph. Both were aspiring actors and singers and moved to New York. Under their stage names, Kathleen and Norman ROLAND, for the next 30 years or so they appeared in theatres all over the eastern United States and Canada. In 1953, they appeared together at the first Stratford Festival in the famous tent. (Kitty understudied Irene WORTH who was playing Queen Margaret in Richard III. She told me she was terrified that one day Ms. WORTH would be unable to appear because she felt she could not play the part. Ms. WORTH was in robust good health and Kitty's fears were never tested.) Brendan Behan's The Hostage was another vehicle for their talents, as it ran for years off Broadway.
When without a part she augmented her income by writing cookbooks for a major American publisher. Shamelessly, she cribbed recipes from other cookbooks to supplement her own creations (she was a great cook). Proudly she retained her Canadian citizenship and worked for the National Film Board during the Second World War.
Sadly, married life became a hell for Kitty. Eventually, she sued successfully for divorce.
She followed her stage career until well into her 60s, appearing last in Toronto in 1975 in NoŽl Coward's Present Laughter, which starred Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
As parts dried up she started another career as a social worker for New York City where her ability to speak Spanish (she also spoke French, German and a smattering of other languages), proved to be a valuable tool. For many years she was also active in the West Side Tenants Association. She hated grasping landlords with a passion and at one time she herself successfully sued her landlord for wrongful eviction. She was not all sugar candy.
During 2001 and 2002 she suffered a series of falls that resulted in fractured bones; she was forced to give up her independence. She moved into the Jewish Home and Hospital which is a fine place but a place to which she could not adapt. Finally, I think, she decided that life was no longer worth living. At 3 a.m. on August 26 last, she died, apparently peacefully.
C.N.R. (Jock) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART is Kathleen CROWE's kid brother.

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WORTHINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-18 published
Former Member of Provincial Parliament, journalist Frank DREA dead at 69
By Jonathan FOWLIE Saturday, January 18, 2003, Page A25
Frank DREA, Progressive Conservative Member of Provincial Parliament of 14 years and a journalist best known for his consumer advocacy column in the Telegram, died Wednesday.
He was 69.
"He accomplished a great deal and was very tenacious," his wife Jeanne said last night.
"He used to say, 'What's the use of having power if you don't use it to help people?' He did, and I think that's how he'd like to be remembered."
First elected to office in 1971 as the Member of Provincial Parliament for Scarborough Centre, Mr. DREA was known as a crusader who often fought for the underdog.
In 1977, Mr. DREA was appointed to the cabinet of then premier Bill DAVIS, where he served as Minister of Correctional Services, of Consumer and Commercial Relations and of Community and Social Services.
During his time in politics, he worked to reform Ontario's prison system, introduced legislation to protect workers and tradespeople and helped to modernize the insurance industry.
Mr. DREA opted to leave politics in 1985 after Frank MILLER took over as premier and shuffled him out of the cabinet.
An avid horse-racing fan, Mr. DREA was named chairman of the Ontario Racing Commission later that year.
"Frank was tough, but he was fair," Premier Ernie EVES said in a statement yesterday.
"He will be missed by colleagues from both sides of the house," added Mr. EVES, who worked with Mr. DREA for a number of years during the early 1980s.
Toronto Sun columnist Peter WORTHINGTON, who worked with Mr. DREA at the Telegram before it folded, remembered Mr. DREA last night as an aggressive and driven reporter.
"He was certainly one of the Telegram's strongest street reporters," Mr. WORTHINGTON said.

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WORTHINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-08 published
Died This Day -- Frederic WORTHINGTON, 1967
Monday, December 8, 2003 - Page R7
Army officer, engineer and adventurer born in Scotland in 1890 in 1907, commanded the tiny Nicaraguan navy; later, in Mexico, fought on side of the revolutionary Francisco Madero; in First World War, commanded Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade; in Second World War, founded Canadian Armoured Corps and designed the prototype for the Sherman tank; 1947, became Canada's first civil-defence co-ordinator; 1957, stepped down to go into business.

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