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"WOO" 2003 Obituary


WOOD  WOODLEY  WOODROOFFE  WOODS  WOODSWORTH  WOODWARD  WOODYARD  WOOLAND  WOOLNOUGH  WOOLWORTH  WOOTTON 

WOOD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
Vera Ilene SHERING (née WOOD)
In loving memory of Vera Ilene SHERING who passed away peacefully at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie on Wednesday, January 29, 2003 in her 78th year. Beloved wife of the late Joseph ARMSTRONG and the late Monty SHERING. Loving mother of Harold ARMSTRONG and his wife Lynne, Bill ARMSTRONG and his wife Linda, Ken ARMSTRONG and his wife Andrea, Carolyn SMURTHWAITE and her husband Norm, Marlene WHEELER and her husband Steve, Cathie Gould and her husband Jack. Dear grandma of 11 grandchildren and four great grandchildren. Vera is survived by her sisters Myrtle WOOD, Marie TANN, Bernice SLOSS, and Edith BAYER and by her brother Lorne WOOD. Friends may call at the Innisfil Funeral Home, 7910 Yonge street, (Stroud) on Saturday, February 8th from 1: 00 pm until time of service at 3:00 pm. Cremation. Words of comfort may be forwarded to the family at verashering@funeralhome.on.ca

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WOOD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Elwood (Ted) MURRAY
Passed away peacefully on Manitoulin Island on Friday, May 2, 2003, Elwood William John (Ted), formerly of Brantford. Born February 12, 1915, son of the late Thomas and Ethel WORDEN MURRAY of St. Paul's. Beloved husband of the late Barbara Isabel WOOD MURRAY of Saint Mary's. Dear father of James (Mame) and the late Thomas, and grandfather of Michael and Adrian MURRAY of Manitoulin Island. Service and interment at Saint Mary's Cemetery, Saint Mary's, Ontario, Tuesday, May 6. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the local charity of your choice.

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WOOD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
Ina ADDISON
In loving memory of Ina ADDISON, August 27, 1914 to August 22, 2003.
Ina ADDISON, a resident of Gordon Township, passed away at Manitoulin Lodge on Friday, August 22, 2003 at the age of 88 years. She was born in Gordon Township, daughter of William and Ida (WOOD) LINLEY. Ina was predeceased by brothers William and Herbert and sisters Edith (CAMPBELL, WILSON) and May (MORDEN.) Ina enjoyed quilting, flowers and gardening. Her greatest love other than the cattle was her family and all the gatherings they enjoyed over the years. Ina married Joe WILSON on August 9, 1933 and they lived their married life on the farm in Gordon, where Ken and Beth GIBBS now reside. Joe died on April 27, 1981 and on May 4, 1985 Ina married Clarence ADDISON. Clarence died on March 18, 1995. Ina's daughter, and only child, Eldean GIBBS (Mrs. Jack,) died on March 29, 1995. Ina's faith in God got her through this sad time but she spent many lonely days. Clarence and Ina lived in Evansville where his daughter Sheila and her husband Frank HARLEY now spend their holidays. They then moved to Mill Site Apartments and in October 2002, Ina moved to Manitoulin Lodge. Ina leaves to mourn her son-in-law, Jack GIBBS (friend June,) grand_son Ken GIBBS (wife Beth) and her beloved great-grandchildren, Loren, John, and Krysten GIBBS, and her stepchildren, Chester ADDISON (wife Pat deceased,) Stan and Joan ADDISON, Sheila and Frank HARLEY and step-grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She will also be remembered by many nieces and nephews to whom she was a very special aunt. Friend called the Culgin Funeral Home on Sunday, August 24, 2003. The Funeral Service was held on Monday, August 25, 2003 with Pastor Erwin Thompson officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270

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WOOD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-22 published
Remembering Norman WOOD.
I often marvelled at the ingenuity that Norm showed in building pieces of equipment for use on the farm. Sometimes the material was picked up at the dump, stuff others had discarded. He built a small wagon of sorts for rough cartage, it wasn't much to look at but it lasted many years. Norm needed some fine sand and gravel. He had a small pit on the place but the bulk of the material was quite coarse, although there were fines in the pit. He built a frame out of cedar cut from the bush and set it up to mount a screen, a cast off from a pit operation. He parked his wagon under the screen and proceeded to load the screen using the bucket on the tractor. The operation just suited him fine. I often wonder what Norman might have done had he pursued an education. Whatever, he would have been good at it.
Don.

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-27 published
Mary KEENBERG
By Jonina WOOD Monday, January 27, 2003, Page A16
Wife, mother, grandmother. Born July 4, 1913, on a train passing through Fort William, Ontario (now part of Thunder Bay). Died September 26, 2002, in Winnipeg, of natural causes, aged 89.
I first met Mary KEENBERG in 1999 at the Manitoba Club in Winnipeg. With its Edwardian oak-panelled walls, deep chairs and old-world ambience, it was the perfect setting for Mary. She half-rose from her fireside chair to greet me -- a tiny, elegant, perfectly coiffed woman who smiled a warm welcome. Sweet-hearted yet somewhat imperious, she was a master of the quick quip. "We're the long and short of it," she once pointed out to a crowd, getting a huge laugh as I stood a full foot taller than she. But the meeting at the Manitoba Club had a deeper significance.
Mary was born on a train. Her parents, newly arrived from the shtetls of Russia, were on their way to a whistle stop in Saskatchewan called Mikado. They were part of the waves of immigrants inspired by Prime Minister Wilfrid LAURIER's international appeal to come settle Canada.
So they did. Mary's father, Maurice Max BURTNICK, opened a general store. To a brood that already included Tony, Sasha and Mary were added Louis, Polly, Harry and Allan. The sudden departure of Mary's mother left Mary to care for her younger siblings. This she did with a fierce and protective love that would come to be one of her defining character traits.
Mary was younger than most when she graduated from Grade 12 with the highest grades in all Saskatchewan. She taught Grades 1 to 12 in a one-room country schoolhouse near Canora, Saskatchewan, biding her time until she was 18 and could enter nursing at the General Hospital in Winnipeg. Once again, she graduated with the highest marks in her class.
With little money and the tough, physical demands of nursing, life cannot have been easy for her and it was during this time that she lost her much-beloved sister Polly in a fire back home, a tragedy which created a lifelong wound in Mary's heart.
Meanwhile, on a happier note, there was a young, Jewish doctor in the small Manitoban town of Baldur named Abe KEENBERG. Dr. KEENBERG was very busy (and also perhaps a tad lonely, the story goes), so one day he called his younger brother Lou who lived in Winnipeg. "Lou," he said, "I need a wife. Do you know any nice Jewish nurses?"
Lou soon invited Abe to meet Mary. It was a match. In 1938, they were married at the Royal Alex in Winnipeg. They formed a loving and effective team, first taking up residence in Glenboro, Manitoba, and then in 1945 moving to Winnipeg with their new son. Here, Mary took on what would become her life's passion: the fledgling state of Israel.
With her own children, she was equally zealous. If Patty or Ron came home with an A, Mary wanted to know what happened to the "plus." If ever they were taunted as Jews, they were to fight back. In the KEENBERG home, there was honour in a bloodied nose won fighting against racial slurs of any kind.
Tiny, but with the constitution of an ox, Mary was awhirl with her work, her children, her travels with Abe, and her Friends. When Abe died in 1987, she bravely carried on although devastated by his passing. She filled her time with work, bridge (she was an ace), and she was a friend to her grandchildren -- Megan, Kathryn and Adam.
But she was often lonely. She missed her Abe and was anxious to join him. This determined woman, who had fought her way from poor beginnings to membership in the Manitoba Club, was weary toward the end. Yet she was ever ladylike, ever gracious, ever the warrior.
Jonina WOOD is Mary's daughter-in-law

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-11 published
REA, Olive Editha Wood Guthrie ''Eddie''
After a lengthy struggle with Alzheimer's, died peacefully, surrounded by her Friends at Maple Villa Nursing Home, on Friday, February 7th, 2003, at the age of 88 years. Beloved wife of the late James Harold GUTHRIE and Frederick Thompson REA. Loving mother of Peter, Linda and Diana, sister of William A. WOOD and Margaret WOOD, devoted Granny of Kathy, Geoff, Jim, Robert, Peter, James, Shauna and Jayson. Great grandmother of Hailyn, Caleb, Olivia and Dylan. Eddie loved young people and kept in touch over the years with many of her nieces and nephews and their young, in each of her three families, and maintained her relationship with her many, many Friends in Oakville and Montreal. A service will be held on Saturday, February 15, 2003, at St. Jude's Anglican Church (William Street at Thomas) at 2 p.m. Cremation. Peter, Linda and Diana wish to thank the nursing staff of Maple Villa Nursing Home most sincerely for all their tender, loving care to mother, over the past 11 years. Arrangements entrusted to Kopriva Taylor Community Funeral Home. 905-844-2600.

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
CURRIE, Alda Christina (née MAIR)
(1932-2003) We regret to announce the death of our mother and friend, she died peacefully at home surrounded by family and Friends. She was predeceased by her husband James CURRIE (1991.) Alda was a loving, caring, compassionate person and will be missed by many her children Bob (Charlotte YATES,) Andy (Rose CHAN,) Mary (John WOOD), Stewart, John (Elizabeth MASTROUTUCCI), and her seven much loved grand children, and her siblings, Arlington MAIR and Kathleen BURSEY, and much loved by her in-laws. During her illness Alda was cared for by her cousin Mary Ann DEACON and her sister Kathleen, and supported by her family and Friends. A Service to celebrate Alda's life will be held at the Beaconsfield United Church, 202 Woodside Road, Beaconsfield, Quebec at 1 p.m. on Monday, February 24, 2003. Donations in her name may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Victoria Order of Nurses, and Child Haven.

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-28 published
Elsie (KRUGE) WOOD
By Eric NOAKES Friday, February 28, 2003 - Page A18
Tennis player, gardener, crafter, Girl Guide leader, sister, mother. Born June 2, 1915, in London, England. Died January 3, in Ottawa, of natural causes, aged 87.
Elsie KRUGE was a child with brilliant blue eyes and a ready smile, born to Arthur KRUGE, a stage electrician, and Nellie Grimshaw. She was raised in Barnes, a suburb of London. When Elsie was 14, her mother died. In spite of the loss of Nellie, Elsie's life was joyful, highlighted by socializing with Friends and playing tennis. Nellie instilled in Elsie and her sister Joan her terrific sense of humour. Elsie would often embarrass her sister when they were commuting to London together by breaking into hoots of laughter at a book she was reading. She was a noted tennis player, winning local tournaments and defeating her cousin Eric regularly -- to his dismay.
Elsie's life was happy, but marked by tragedy. Her first husband, Wally HALIDAY, an army sergeant in the Second World War, was the victim of a shooting accident in 1941. During the war, there was little time for mourning. Elsie continued to work for Britain's General Nursing Council and met Garnet WOOD, a Canadian serviceman who was convalescing from a combat wound. A wartime romance ensued, culminating in marriage in 1946 in Kemptville, Ontario, and a move to Ottawa where Garnet worked for the defence department.
Adjusting to life in Canada was a challenge for Elsie. Ottawa was distant from family and Friends and, in 1946, was a small, straight-laced city with few of the amenities of London. However, because of her optimistic outlook and her sociable nature, Elsie was soon engaged in activities in Ottawa's Carlingwood area.
After the birth of her two children, Susan and Robert, Elsie became heavily involved in Guiding and was keenly engaged in helping her children get a good education. Garnet was plagued with health difficulties and as a result, Elsie had to raise the children on her own. She was very proud to see Susan become a PhD in literature and Robert working as a stage-lighting technician, continuing the family tradition. Elsie always extended a welcome to Friends of her children and relatives, especially if they were new to Canada. She was a founding member of the "Craft Girls, " a group of ladies who regularly gather to make crafts and partake in potluck lunches. In addition to this, Elsie demonstrated her green thumb by producing prolific gardens of flowers and vegetables.
Garnet died at age 55. Tragedy struck again in Elsie's life when her daughter Susan, who had become a renowned scholar of science fiction and professor of literature at Simon Fraser University, died from a brain aneurysm at 33. Several years later, Elsie's beloved niece, Jill, also died.
In spite of these heartbreaks, Elsie was able to soldier on, hosting the Craft Girls for crafting sessions, going to Ottawa's Byward Market for lunch and supplies and maintaining a regular correspondence with sister Joan. When Elsie was in her 80s and slowed down by rheumatism and osteoporosis, she overcame this by using a walker to work in the garden.
Two years ago, Elsie had to relocate to a nursing home. Typically, at the time, she was more concerned with the health of family members rather than herself. This move for her was a temporary measure, and her stated intention, once she was able, was to return home. She kept active by crocheting afghans for Friends of her son, keeping a small garden on her windowsill, reading and receiving visits from family and Friends with her ever-present smile and her plants as company. Lately, visitors noticed she was subject to extreme fatigue. She passed away in January, to see again missed loved ones.
Eric NOAKES is Elsie's cousin. He wrote this with help from her sister, Joan.

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-18 published
D-Day vet one of the 'Two Jacks'
Story of two soldiers'daring escape from a German PoW camp inspired a book of 'amazing adventures'
By Allison LAWLOR Friday, July 18, 2003 - Page R13
Jack VENESS, a D-Day veteran whose dramatic account of capture and escape during the Second World War was chronicled in the book The Two Jacks, has died at his home in Fredericton. He was Maritime writer Will R. BIRD recounted Mr. VENESS's wartime heroism in his 1954 book The Two Jacks: The Amazing Adventures of Major Jack M. VENESS and Major Jack L. FAIRWEATHER.
When Canadians landed on the Normandy coast of France on D-Day, Mr. VENESS and Dr. FAIRWEATHER were there with the North Nova Scotia Highlanders. By June 7, the North Novas (as they were known) battled their way inland -- about 13 kilometres -- and had occupied the villages of Buron and Authie when they were met by German tanks and gunfire, led by the 12th SS Panzer Division.
A raging battle ensued that left dozens of North Novas dead and injured and led to the capture of both Mr. VENESS and Dr. FAIRWEATHER. They were among close to 100 who were taken prisoner by the Germans at the time.
"We thought it was bad luck that we were captured but on the other hand there were a lot of people who didn't survive," said Dr. FAIRWEATHER, a retired doctor living in Lewisburg, Pa.
After being forced to walk for close to a week with little food or rest, the two officers, along with the other prisoners, reached the gates of "Front Stalag." The German prison was a collection of worn-out army huts surrounded by three barbed wire fences.
Included in the book The Two Jacks is a card Mr. VENESS wrote dated June 16, 1944. "Dear Mother, I am in a German PoW camp. I am in good health and will write more later. Love, Jack."
The two Jacks would then spend the next six weeks in the prison camp before being loaded onto a railway boxcar. After spending at least five days jammed into the crowded car, with bombs dropping all around them, the two men decided if they were going to escape, now was the time.
"It was made pretty clear in training... an officer's first duty when captured is to escape," Dr. FAIRWEATHER said. "We had that in the back of our minds."
In the dark of the night, just outside the French city of Tours, the two terrified men escaped their imprisonment by jumping from a moving train through a hole in the boxcar.
"Jack said, 'This is our chance, we have to take it,' Dr. FAIRWEATHER recalled. "He said, 'Come on, we can do this.' " The two officers were hidden by a French priest in the belfry of a church (which Mr. VENESS would later visit in the 1970s with his son and first wife), and were soon after linked up with the French underground.
"I'm sure we wouldn't have survived without the underground," Dr. FAIRWEATHER said. "They hid us and protected us."
The two officers served with the French underground in the German-occupied Loire district of France for less than two months before they were able to make a safe return to their regiment in England.
After declining an offer to be re-posted to Canada, both Jacks rejoined their North Nova units in Europe. This next period would mark some of the most intense fighting Mr. VENESS took part in during the war.
"He was a very courageous and a very brave man," said his friend and fellow veteran, retired judge David DICKSON/DIXON of the New Brunswick Court of Queen's Bench. "He never lacked valour."
John (Jack) Mersereau VENESS was born on November 11, 1922, in Ottawa to John and Annie VENESS. After moving with his family to Fredericton in 1933, he attended Fredericton High School. He went on to complete one year at the University of New Brunswick before joining the Canadian Infantry Corps (North Nova Scotia Highlanders) in May, 1942, at the age of 19. A year later, he went overseas and not long after met Dr. FAIRWEATHER while in England with the North Novas.
Dr. FAIRWEATHER said he immediately liked his fellow Maritimer's directness. "He called a spade a spade."
Over the course of his storied military career, Mr. VENESS would go on to serve in England, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and France. After returning to his unit after his capture and escape, Mr. VENESS was engaged in fighting in the flooded Scheldt Estuary in Holland and Belgium, during which time he captured a German major-general at gunpoint.
In March, 1945, while leading his company in Germany, Mr. VENESS was seriously wounded by shrapnel from an exploding shell. After more than a month in hospital he recovered.
Mr. VENESS retired from the army in 1946 as a major with many medals, including the War Medal, being mentioned in dispatches, Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm, Chevalier of the Order of Leopold II with Palm (Belgium), The Defence Medal and the 1939-45 Star.
"He had a high respect for the veterans all his life," Mr. Dickson said. "I really [think] he felt he owed a debt to his fellow soldiers."
After returning home to New Brunswick after the war, Mr. VENESS returned to the University of New Brunswick and graduated in 1950 with a degree in civil engineering. He spent four years working in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, and Banff, Alberta., then returned to New Brunswick to work for the Department of Highways. He retired in 1983 as director of traffic engineering.
In 1948, Mr. VENESS married Jere WOOD from Saint Martin's, New Brunswick They had one son. In 1976, after almost 30 years of marriage, Mr. VENESS lost both his wife and mother in a tragic car accident, while the two women were driving home to Fredericton from St. Andrews, New Brunswick Two years later, Mr. VENESS married Freda LOCKHARD. The couple enjoyed travelling and visited Europe to pay homage to fallen soldiers at military cemeteries and to attend commemorative services.
In addition to travelling, Mr. VENESS was also an active member of the community. He volunteered with a number of organizations, including the Young Men's Christian Association, where he served on the board of directors; the Masons; the Canadian Legion; and the Fredericton Garrison Club, where he was president.
Mr. VENESS's strict, early military training stuck with him throughout his life. Mr. DICKSON/DIXON remembers that a telephone call to his friend meant a brisk talk to convey a message and no idle chitchat.
"He was a little gruff at times," Mr. DICKSON/DIXON said.
Mr. VENESS died of a heart attack on June 30 while playing snooker at his home in Fredericton.
He leaves his wife Freda, son Randy, daughter-in-law Angela and two grandchildren.

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
BIGGAR, James Russel
Died July 30, 2003, peacefully at home. Former Communications Director for the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Transport and General Workers. Born July 6, 1942. son of the late James Hamilton BIGGAR and the late Elspeth Holland BRITTON. Beloved brother of George BIGGAR and sisters Elspeth Wood and Patricia BIGGAR. Leaves brother-in-law Thomas WOOD and sister-in-law Mary CORNISH, nieces Catherine WOOD, Gillian WOOD, and Laura CORNISH and nephew James BIGGAR. Funeral service will be held at St. James-the-Less, 635 Parliament Street, Toronto, at 2 p.m. Friday, August 8. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Mood Disorders Foundation of Ontario.

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-14 published
Body in Ottawa identified as missing woman, 27
Thursday, August 14, 2003 - Page A6
Ottawa -- A woman's body found near a bicycle path has been confirmed to be that of 27-year-old Ardeth WOOD, police said yesterday.
Forensic testing positively confirmed that the decomposing body found near Green's Creek Monday was that of WOOD, who went missing last Wednesday after going on a bike ride.
Brother Colum WOOD said the family had expected the confirmation, after police found a body not far from where the bicycle his sister was riding was located.
Canadian Press

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
Woman drowned, autopsy indicates
Wednesday, August 20, 2003 - Page A7
Ottawa -- Autopsy results released yesterday indicate an Ottawa woman who disappeared while riding her bike along a public pathway died by drowning.
Police are also looking for the clothes Ardeth WOOD was wearing when she disappeared on August 6, and are awaiting the results of forensic testing to determine whether the 27-year-old graduate student from the University of Waterloo had been sexually assaulted. Ms. WOOD went missing while visiting her parents in Ottawa, and did not return after cycling alone on a pathway in the city's east end. Her body was found five days later in a creek near the Ottawa River. Canadian Press

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WOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-19 published
The voice of Ontario horse racing
For three decades, the announcer added detail and drama to his calls at Woodbine, Fort Erie and Greenwood tracks
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 19, 2003 - Page R13
When the great Secretariat burst out of the starting gate at Toronto's Woodbine Race Track on that dark and miserable day in late October, 1973, in what would be his final race, Daryl WELLS was behind the microphone calling the race for fans.
"In a blaze of glory, ladies and gentlemen, he's all yours," Mr. WELLS cried as the Triple Crown-winner won the Canadian International by 12 lengths.
Daryl WELLS Jr. was there that day in the announcer's booth to hear what would be his father's most famous call and share his excitement of seeing the last career race of the horse, considered by many to be the greatest thoroughbred of all time.
"I thought it was the greatest thing that ever happened," said Daryl WELLS Jr., who carried on the tradition and now calls races at Ontario's Fort Erie track.
Mr. WELLS, the voice of Ontario thoroughbred racing for more 30 years, from just after the new Woodbine Race Track opened in the spring of 1956 to the summer of 1986, died last Friday of heart disease in Niagara Falls, Ontario He was 81.
For three decades, Mr. WELLS was at the Ontario Jockey Club microphone, describing the thoroughbred races at Woodbine, Fort Erie and Greenwood, entertaining fans with his calls that were both accurate and exciting. When the gates opened, fans could often be heard imitating his familiar, trademark call: "They're off."
Whether it was a small, weekday afternoon race or the prestigious Queen's Plate, Mr. WELLS made every call dramatic and detailed. "Every horse got his call," said his long-time friend Gary ALLES.
Behind the microphone, Mr. WELLS was a pro who also had a mischievous streak that could sometimes be seen in the announcer's booth. Mr. ALLES remembers one day sitting next to his friend while he was calling a race at Woodbine. A second after telling fans where their horses were in the race, he switched off his microphone and asked Mr. ALLES which horse he had betted on that day. Back to the microphone, he gave fans a quick update before turning off the microphone again. This time with the microphone off, he started giving Mr. ALLES the call he really wanted to hear that his horse looked poised to win. But before Mr. ALLES could get too excited the microphone was back on again and Mr. WELLS was giving fans the true account of the race.
"He had a mischievousness that emanated from his eyes," Mr. ALLES said.
Daryl Frederick WELLS was born on December 10, 1922, in Victoria. As a young boy, he would tag along when his parents went to the races. "That's what got him interested," said his wife, Marian WELLS.
By the age of 15, he had entered the broadcasting world as a disc jockey, after a local radio station allowed him to play a few records. "It [his career] took off from there," Daryl WELLS Jr. said.
Several years later, he headed east and got a job in the sports department of radio station CHML in Hamilton, where he worked in the 1940s and 1950s and later as a sports director for CHCH-TV. During the Second World War, he served for a time in Britain with the Canadian Army.
Ed BRADLEY, a former general manager of Greenwood, Mohawk and Garden City Raceways, can remember his first introduction to Mr. WELLS in 1955. Working then as an announcer at Long Branch track in Toronto's west end, Mr. BRADLEY recalls one day seeing a man standing around outside his announcer's booth watching while he worked.
The next day he saw the same man again. Mr. BRADLEY was curious about this mysterious man but thought nothing of him again until the following spring when the track opened in Fort Erie. He was in the announcing booth when his manager came to him to tell him he had a new guy for him to break in.
"The guy walked in and it was Daryl WELLS," Mr. BRADLEY said.
They got down to work and, right away, Mr. BRADLEY recognized Mr. WELLS's voice from his broadcasting work. After three days of training, Mr. WELLS was ready to call a race on his own.
"He turned out to be a real pro," Mr. BRADLEY said, adding that Mr. WELLS was very descriptive in his calls and got to know what the jockeys were doing during a race.
During a time when horse racing was among the country's favourite sports, and fans would regularly stream out of work to head to the bar to watch a race, Mr. WELLS was its voice, said Wally WOOD, a former long-time racing columnist. "He was the poster boy for the sport," Mr. Wood said. "He was willing to do anything to promote racing....
"He was very good for racing," Mr. WOOD added.
A true showman, Mr. WELLS not only had the voice, but he looked as though he had just stepped out of an Armani commercial. "Daryl was show business and he dressed like it," Mr. ALLES said.
After 30 years as a well-loved fixture in the announcing booth, Mr. WELLS left Woodbine in July of 1986 amid controversy. His employers suspended him after the Ontario Racing Commission fined him for his part in a 1983 wager that returned a $237,598 payoff. "Touting" (volunteering an opinion on the outcome of a race for profit) was the official description and is strictly against the rules. While it was never a case of Mr. WELLS affecting the outcome of a race, he was suspended and his career as a horse-race announcer was over.
"He missed the excitement of the track," Ms. WELLS said, adding that it was the people he missed most of all. After he left Woodbine, he seldom went to the track except on special occasions.
"He always wanted to be surrounded by people," said Ms. WELLS, who never knew when she would come home to find her husband throwing an impromptu party.
Mr. WELLS, who had been living in Lewiston, New York since the late 1980s, died on December 12 at the Greater Niagara General Hospital in Niagara Falls. He leaves his wife; children Dana, Daryl Jr. and Wendy; sister Velda SCOBIE; and stepchildren Michael, Kelly and Jeffrey.

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WOODLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-27 published
GAMMON, Elizabeth Catherine
Died quietly at Beechwood Court in Mississauga, on Thursday, September 25th, 2003 at the age of 88. Beloved wife of the late Richard ''Dick'' GAMMON. Loving mother of Ted and his wife Mary Alice, Nancy and Susan and her husband John McDONALD. Dear grandmother of Michael and David RYAN. Sister of the late William WOODLEY and Barbara LAILEY. Sister-in-law of Betty WOODLEY and Joseph LAILEY. Fondly remembered by Geoff BEYER, Doris PATTERSON, her niece Alison and nephews Lawrence, Bill and Brian. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (between Islington and Kipling Avenues), from 1-4 p.m. on Sunday. Funeral Service will be held at St. Matthew's Anglican Church, 3962 Bloor Street West, Etobicoke, on Monday, September 29, 2003 at 2 o'clock. Cremation.

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WOODROOFFE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
SHIRRIFF, Barbara Jean (née SLOAN)
Died peacefully at home in Toronto, on Tuesday, May 27, 2003, having recently turned 81. Predeceased by her beloved husband Francis Colin SHIRRIFF. Dear mother of Susan, Cathie Shirriff FORSTMANN, Janet, Joan VAUGHAN (the late Steven VAUGHAN) and Barbara. Loving grandmother of Diana CABLE (Warren), Allyson WOODROOFFE (Roger PEPLER) and Kelly FORSTMANN. Great-grandmother of Kate and Julia PEPLER and Hayley, Stephanie and Scott CABLE. Survived by brothers Manson and Frank, and sisters Neva PAUL and Mary PARKER. Barbara's love, encouragement, strength and ''joie de vivre'' will be cherished always. Our very special thanks to Dr. Wendy BROWN, Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and The Temmy Latner Palliative Care Team, Ella CASE and the Victorian Order of Nurses, and caregivers Ramona and Helen. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 3-6 p.m. on Thursday, May 29. A celebration of Barbara's life will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church York Mills, 19 Don Ridge Drive at 2 p.m. on Friday, May 30. If desired, donations to The Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, 700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Suite 3000 Toronto M5G 1Z5 will be much appreciated by the family.

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WOODS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
Charles "Rodney" SALLOWS
In loving memory of Charles "Rodney" SALLOWS at his residence in Tehkummah on Thursday, August 14, 2003 at the age of 55 years.
Loving husband of Dianne SALLOWS. Cherished son of Rene and Charlie (predeceased) SALLOWS. Will be missed by siblings, Sharon (Carl) WOODS, Karen (Ollie) RIPLEY, Jamie (Shirley) SALLOWS, Heather (Robert) MARION, Holly SALLOWS, Cindy SALLOWS, Shane SALLOWS. Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Will be missed also by cousins of the CRONIN Family in Sudbury. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home

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WOODS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Howard HOAG
By Steven DENURE, Julia WOODS, Michael HOMER, Marty SILVERSTONE Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page A28
Friend, husband, father, rugby player. Born September 17, 1952, in Ottawa. Died June 15, in Toronto, of cancer, aged 50.
Friends experienced a quintessential Howard HOAG moment a few years ago on the dock at a friend's cottage at a remote spot in Georgian Bay. They had an old recurve bow and a quiver full of new arrows, and were taking turns shooting at -- and missing a floating target anchored far out in the bay. As was his lifelong habit, Howard arrived much later than anticipated. He stepped out of the boat with a nautical flourish, and, after being roundly berated for being late and bringing what looked to be only six (warm) beer, he picked up the bow and tested its pull. Then he turned and fired an arrow and hit the previously unthreatened target the first time, with a satisfying thunk, like an exclamation mark at the end of a sentence. In the moment of stunned silence that followed, he gave a withering Hoagian look. "That's how it's done," he said, and picked up his six-pack and his knapsack, which turned out to be full of wine, and headed up the hill, leaving the merry band on the dock properly put in its place.
His Friends spent so much time waiting for him that they dubbed it "Howard time." The wait was always worth it. At every party there was "before Howie" and "after Howie." With his arrival, the conversation always sparkled a little more, the wine tasted better, the room seemed to grow bigger -- plus there was his unique ability to infuriate and/or entertain everybody in the room.
Howard grew up in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, the youngest of four children born to a production manager at the mighty CIP paper mill. As a child he was a Boy Scout, soloist in the church choir and an avid canoeist. He would later tell stories about paddling around the islands in the St. Lawrence River and watching the foam from the mill make the paddles disappear.
His voice eventually changed and, when he got to Montreal's McGill University, so did the songs. Howard studied environmental biology, but his true passion was the game of rugby. In recent years, Howard was best known as the heart and soul of the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club, as well as a key organizer of its annual Robbie Burns night. In Montreal, however, he's a legend: it was his monumental gaffe (he loudly lambasted a group of football coaches while the men in question sat in the next room listening to every word) that led to the creation of the Howie Hoag Award. Since its inception in 1971, "the Hoag" has been given out weekly during the MacDonald College football season to the player who performs the most remarkable misdeed of the week.
We are comforted to know that the last several years of Howard's too-short life were the absolute best. At 48, the classic lad and confirmed bachelor met the love of his life, the incomparable Louise RICH, and her daughter, Odette HUTCHINGS. This perfect trio -- whose adopted nickname was H.R.H. -- did not have anything like the number of years they deserved together, but what they did have was packed with enough love and laughter to fill many longer lifetimes.
Tragically, last Christmas Eve, Howard, who'd battled cancer as a child, learned that the radiation treatment that had saved his life 42 years earlier had probably led to the growth of an inoperable tumour in one of his bile ducts. In early June, Howard was given only a few days to live, but survived long enough to marry Louise and spend another week with his family and the Friends he loved. He also lived long enough to die on the day and at the hour of what used to be his absolutely favourite kind of night: just after midnight on a midsummer's eve with a full moon, which Howard used to say was "God's flashlight."
Steve, Julia, Mike and Marty are Friends of Howard HOAG.

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WOODSWORTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
Died This Day -- James Shaver WOODSWORTH, 1942
Thursday, March 20, 2003 - Page R9
Minister, social worker, politician, born at Etobicoke, Ontario, on July 29, 1874; moved to Brandon, Manitoba, as boy; in 1898, ordained; 1904-13, worked at mission in Winnipeg slums; left Methodist church because of its attitudes toward war and social reform; in June, 1919, charged with sedition in Winnipeg General Strike; in 1921, elected Member of Parliament as independent in 1933, co-founded Cooperative Commonwealth Federation; in 1935, Cooperative Commonwealth Federation elected seven Members of Parliament; in 1939, refused to back declaration of war; left party; in 1940, won re-election with reduced majority; suffered stroke and died in Vancouver.

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WOODSWORTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-27 published
Died This Day -- M.J. COLDWELL, 1974
Wednesday, August 27, 2003 - Page R5
Teacher, politician, founder of Co-operative Commonwealth Federation party, born December 1, 1888, at Seaton, England; 1910, came to Canada as a teacher; 1924-34, led teachers' organizations 1932, elected leader of Saskatchewan provincial Farmer-Labour Party; 1935, elected to Parliament; 1942, succeeded J.S. WOODSWORTH as Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation leader; led Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation in five general elections until 1962 died in Ottawa.

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WOODWARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
Reta Ellen WOODWARD
By Elizabeth (WOODWARD) HENRY, Friday, November 28, 2003 - Page A24
Aunt, "Cabbagetown angel." Born July 24, 1915, in Toronto. Died October 12, in Maple, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 88.
Toronto's Cabbagetown of the forties and fifties was the humble habitat of the poor. Faithful blue-collar labourers from downtown factories wearily wended their way home by streetcar at the end of each long day. They struggled on low, non-union wages to be breadwinners for their one-income families. That era is far removed from the contemporary two-income families thriving in this upgraded enclave of today.
Our family consisted of two parents and nine children living in a tiny rented Cabbagetown house with no running hot water and with coal stoves as our only source of heat. There was no basement nor an upstairs. The outside world included little corner stores on quiet streets void of parked automobiles, colourful horse-drawn bread, milk, and tea wagons as well as wagons delivering blocks of ice to those families fortunate enough to have an ice-box. Along the back lane travelled the dusty coal man and the unkempt rag man, the former delivering and the latter soliciting. Falling chestnuts, children playing homemade games, and the ever-present popcorn man added to the scenery.
To this lowly landscape of my life in a poor Cabbagetown family came an elegant angel: a very special aunt.
Reta Ellen WOODWARD was born in Toronto on July 24, 1915. The great flu epidemic broke out in many places in 1918, including Toronto. Reta's mother died in that epidemic, leaving her motherless at age 2½ along with her four-year-old brother, who later became my father. The children were cared for in a boarding home until their father remarried.
Reta grew up through the Great Depression as a young teenager with no opportunity for further education. She worked diligently in a packaging factory, Progress Packaging, for 40 years, often coming home with blue fingers, bruised by the machines as she tried to work faster and accomplish more than it was safe for a human to achieve.
Reta never married nor had children but became the treasured and cherished Auntie Reta to the nine of us. We were her children. Throughout our childhood years she was our stability and hope. Small in stature, quiet and unassuming, her constant generosity and inner warmth, shown toward each one of us, was very large and real. In spite of her deprived childhood, she took great delight in lighting up our needy lives and encouraging us at every new chapter. We each felt like an only child as she focused her deep care upon us individually, never forgetting our birthdays, Christmas, graduations, weddings and our children's birthdays.
Her income was meagre but she used it unselfishly to make us happy. She had no car but took us places like the Santa Claus parade, the Canadian National Exhibition, Centre Island, the Riverdale Zoo and a farm outside the city -- usually one-on-one and we felt unique. She read to us stories about faraway countries, played games with us and, best of all, hugged us.
My favourite old photo is of her hugging me in the modest back yard of my Cabbagetown house. Her hugs, smiles and personal attention touched my deprivation and poverty. She made me rich with genuine love and I felt secure within her warm embrace. She lived for us kids. She had no favourites and we knew it. We were each her favourite. We gravitated to any chance to visit at her house, see her neatly made bed and the interesting things on her dresser and in her room.
She was insignificant in terms of education, prestige or wealth but to us she was most significant, like Maria in The Sound of Music, or like royalty, but truly beyond royalty, she was angelic "our Cabbagetown angel."
Elizabeth is one of Reta's nieces.

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WOODYARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
Man of peace died with his boots on
Christian-based, stop-the-war mission to southern Iraq ended in tragedy for Canadian peace activist
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, February 12, 2003, Page R7
He was an educator who tried to stop a war before it began. Instead, George WEBER, a former Ontario high-school teacher who was touring Iraq as part of an effort to stave off a war, died there in a road accident. He was 73.
Mr. WEBER was killed instantly when the vehicle he was travelling in as a passenger rolled on an Iraqi highway between Basra and Baghdad.
When the left rear tire blew out of the Chevrolet Suburban, the truck hit the shoulder of the road and flipped over before rolling to a stop upside-down beside the road, said Doug PRITCHARD, Canadian co-ordinator for the Christian Peacemaker Teams, a church-based group dedicated to non-violent activism.
Mr. WEBER, who was travelling in the back seat, was thrown from the vehicle and sustained massive head injuries. Two other activists with the group were injured in the accident.
An investigation has shown that on the day of the accident, the vehicle was in excellent condition, the tires were new and the truck was travelling on a six-lane, lightly travelled highway on a clear day, Mr. PRITCHARD said.
Mr. WEBER, a retired high-school history teacher from the town of Chesley in southwestern Ontario, was among 17 Canadian and American peace activists who arrived in Iraq on December 29. They were committed to living up to a mission statement of the Christian Peacemaker Teams of reducing violence by "getting in the way," Mr. PRITCHARD said.
The group travelled to the country despite warnings from the Department of Foreign Affairs advising Canadians to stay away from Iraq for security reasons. With war looming there, antiwar activists from around the world have been heading to Iraq to act as "human shields" if the bombs start falling, and in solidarity with Iraqis.
"He was a student of world politics," said Reverend Anita Janzen of the Hanover Mennonite Church, where Mr. WEBER and his wife Lena attended. "He was very upset [by] the threat of war [in Iraq]."
Mr. WEBER felt he wouldn't be able to live with himself if war broke out in Iraq and he had failed to do anything, she said.
Yet, when people told him they thought his actions were courageous, his reply was: " 'I'm no hero,' " said his wife Lena. "It was what he felt he needed to do," she said.
In Iraq, Mr. WEBER and the Christian Peacemaker Team visited hospitals, farms and schools to talk to Iraqis about the Persian Gulf war, the United Nations sanctions and the current possible U.S.-led war.
Shortly after arriving in Baghdad, he made a trip to the marketplace to have a local tailor make him a suit. He had planned to pick it up after his trip to Basra but he never made it back to the marketplace. But someone else did. Mr. WEBER wore the suit at his funeral.
Having the suit made in Baghdad fit with Mr. WEBER's personal philosophy of trying to help those most in need. It was not uncommon on his various travels to developing countries to seek out the most decrepit taxi, saying it was that driver who was the most in need of the fare, Lena WEBER said.
"He was really kind of an unassuming and a genuinely humble man who in a quiet way lived his beliefs," said Jim LONEY, a fellow Canadian who was in the truck but escaped serious injuries. Mr. LONEY accompanied Mr. WEBER's body back to Canada from Iraq. Mr. WEBER had been scheduled to return home on January 9. "He was a deeply committed Christian, and deeply committed to peace."
Mr. WEBER's trip to Iraq wasn't his first with the Christian Peacemakers Team. After retiring from teaching, he applied to take part in a Peacemakers mission to Chiapas, Mexico. In his application in 1999, he noted that throughout his life he had been interested in current events and was aware that it was the poor and disadvantaged people in the world who end up suffering the most.
"I think that most of the calamities that befall ordinary folk could be alleviated if it were not for the selfishness and greed that motivate the power structures, which are in place throughout the world.
"But there are also many people of goodwill who wish to treat everyone fairly and with charity. I try to be among this group," he wrote.
He was part of a two-week delegation to Chiapas in February, 2000. This trip was followed by another six-week mission to Hebron in the West Bank in 2001, and another six weeks there in 2002.
In the West Bank, Mr. WEBER was particularly moved by the plight of the Palestinian children and would accompany them to school through military checkpoints ensuring that they arrived safely.
Mr. WEBER had also been a member of the Peace Justice and Social Concerns Committee of the Mennonite Conference of Eastern Canada between 1994 and 1998.
George WEBER was born on July 28, 1929, and grew up on a farm near Elmira, Ontario He was the fifth of seven children born to Ion and Geneva WEBER. After his father died when he was in his 50s, George was left to take over the family farm. A young man, just 20, he helped his mother raise his younger siblings.
When George felt one of his younger siblings was able to take over the farm, he got on a boat headed for Europe. It was during his travels that he decided he would like to one day attend university.
He returned to Canada in his mid-20s and enrolled in the history department at the University of Toronto. After graduating with a degree, he went into teaching. His first job was teaching history at Western Technical-Commercial School in Toronto.
It was through the Mennonite church that he met Lena FREY. The couple married in 1959 and not long afterward went to Africa. Mr. WEBER taught in Ghana and Nigeria during the 1960s for the Mennonite Board of Missions teaching school and his wife worked as a nurse.
After returning to Canada, he taught at a Toronto high school before settling in Chesley, Ontario, where he taught history at a local high school, farmed and was active in the Hanover Mennonite Church.
"George was a very critical thinker," said Barry WOODYARD, a retired vice-principal at Chesley District High School. "He used to challenge his students not to accept anything they heard on the news," or from politicians. "He felt they needed to do their own thinking."
A quiet, hard-working man, he was known among his colleagues for having a particular talent for forming relationships with the difficult students the other teachers often didn't want to deal with.
"If people needed help he would help them," Mr. WOODYARD said.
Mr. WEBER leaves his wife Lena, children Reginald and Tania and four grandchildren. He also leaves two brothers and one sister.
George WEBER, teacher, farmer, missionary, born on July 28, 1929, in Elmira, Ontario; died near Basra, Iraq, on January 6, 2003.

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WOOLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-26 published
WOOLAND, Joy B.
On April 19th, 2003, at her Barrie home, in her 81st year. Her husband Roy (''Jim'') and children Geoffrey, Virginia, Richard and three grandchildren were with her in her final hours. She died as she had lived: gently. No flowers. Any donations to aid the homeless.

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WOOLNOUGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-29 published
DARE, Ruth Eleanor (née ROTTERS)
Ruth Eleanor DARE (née ROTTERS,) born Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 1918, died November 28th, 2003 at age 85, at Columbia Forest Long Term Care Centre, Waterloo. She suffered a hemorrhaging stroke in June 2002 after enjoying her 60th wedding anniversary with all her children and grandchildren in attendance. She was a member of St. Peters Lutheran Church, Kitchener, Westmount Curling Club, Probus Club, a long term member of the Kitchener-Waterloo Young Women's Christian Association, a founding member of the Kitchener-Waterloo-Gyrette Club, a long term volunteer member of the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery and the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony, and worked for the Canadian Blind Institute. She was also an ardent swimmer and canoeist during her Muskoka summers.
Ruth was the much loved mother of Carolyn WILFRED (Harmon) of Christchurch, New Zealand, Graham (Sandra) of Kitchener, and Bryan (Malkin) of Waterloo. In addition she is survived by her loving husband Carl and her grandchildren Tanya LEVERETTE, Carla WOOLNOUGH (Scott), Sydney, Jacob, Kaitlin, Alexa, Katherine and Laurence DARE.
A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at St. Peter's Lutheran Church, 49 Queen Street North, Kitchener at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, December 2nd. Flowers are gratefully declined but a donation in Ruth's memory to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
We know that like a candle
Her lovely light must shine
To brighten up another place
More perfect - more divine
And in the realm of Heaven
Where she shines so warm and bright
Our loved one lives forever
In God's Eternal Light.

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WOOLWORTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
Died This Day -- Jennie Creighton WOOLWORTH, 1924
Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page R5
Homemaker and multimillionaire born in Picton, Ontario, in 1855 grew up on family farm in Prince Edward County; on June 11, 1876, married F.W. WOOLWORTH, store clerk from Watertown, New York in 1878, husband experimented with sale of five-cent-only items and sold out in day; next year, opened first five-and-dime store by 1911, chain totalled 600 stores; in 1919, assumed $40-million estate when husband died of long illness brought on by dental neglect; became world's richest woman but suffered Alzheimer's disease; declared incompetent and never comprehended situation died without leaving will; $60-million divided among two daughters and four-year-old granddaughter, Barbara HUTTON.

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WOOTTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
WOOTTON, Marjorie Irenee
Marjorie WOOTTON, cherished wife of the late Frank WOOTTON died peacefully, at Saint Mary's of the Lake Hospital, on Thursday, August 7, 2003. Beloved mother to Jane SHERWOOD and Ned WOOTTON (Amy ROSS,) and grandmother to Kate, Will and Jamie. In keeping with Marjorie's wishes, there will be no funeral service. Arrangements entrusted to the Kingston Cremation Services (613) 634-0463.

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