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"WON" 2003 Obituary


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WONG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
Cecilia Pik-Ling TAM
Just over a week after being diagnosed with cancer, died peacefully at Scarborough General Hospital with her loving family at her side on February 9, 2003. She was 54. She will be sadly missed by her husband Paul and children Janice and Anthony. Dear sister to Paulson LEE and his wife Winifred WONG, Anita LEE and her husband Choy Ping YIN, Leslie LEE and her husband Gilbert HUNG, Antonia LEE and her husband Norman TU, Josephine LEE and her husband William CHAN, Bernard LEE and his wife Happy SHEE. Predeceased by her parents LEE Chun Kwok and LO Kwei Yuen as well as her siblings LEE Pik Kwan, Betty LEE, Elsie LEE and her husband Chau Kai Hang, and LEE Pik Shan. Francis LEE, Betty LEE's husband, will also miss Ceci. Loving sister-in-law to Peter TAM and his wife Julianna CHEUNG, Alice TAM and her husband Charles YAM, Henry TAM and his wife Teresa TSANG. Her many relatives and Friends will miss her kindness and beauty. She passed away with extraordinary grace, courage, and faith. Surely God was on her side. Her selfless devotion will be remembered by all the people she has touched during her shortened lifetime. Family and Friends may visit at the Jerrett Funeral Home ­ North York Chapel, 6191 Yonge Street, North York (2 lights South of Steeles Ave.) on Wednesday from 6 ­ 9 p.m. and Thursday from 2 ­ 4 and 6 ­ 9 p.m. There will be no visitation on Friday. The Funeral Mass will be on Saturday February 15, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at St. Bonaventure Roman Catholic Church, 1300 Leslie St. (at Lawrence Ave. East.). Private burial for family members only. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Cecilia TAM Memorial Fund at 42 Fulham Street, Scarborough, Ontario, M1S 2A5.

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WONG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-26 published
'She wore a smile all the time'
A nursing 'hero' cared for severe acute respiratory syndrome victims, became one herself and died not knowing the fate of her husband
By Allison LAWLOR Saturday, July 26, 2003 - Page F10
'I don't think she worried about it," Michael TANG says of his mother. "She was very invincible."
But Tecla LIN knew the risks far better than most people. She was among the first to volunteer when West Park Healthcare Centre, where she was a part-time nurse, set up a special unit to treat Toronto health-care workers stricken in the city's initial outbreak of sudden acute respiratory syndrome.
It was dangerous duty, but she knew what to watch for -- especially the high fever so closely associated with the mysterious disease. So, whenever she went to sleep, a thermometer could be found with the face creams and makeup on her bedside table.
Then, on April 4, she realized she had sudden acute respiratory syndrome symptoms and immediately checked herself into Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
"We didn't think much of it the first week or so," recalls Mr. TANG, 32. "We remained optimistic."
But Ms. LIN's health started to deteriorate and soon she required an oxygen mask. For three months she remained in hospital, and "it got harder and harder for her to breathe," her son says.
Last month she was transferred to the William Osler Health Centre in Etobicoke, where she died last Saturday morning at the age of 58.
She probably knew the end was near. What she didn't know was that Chi Sui LIN, the husband she had infected, had passed away just three weeks after she went into Sunnybrook.
Mr. TANG says he and his brother Wilson decided to keep their stepfather's death from their mother, feeling she needed all her strength to fight her own illness.
Born on December 18, 1944, in Hong Kong, Tecla Lai Yin WONG was the eldest of four children. Her father died while she was still young, and she became largely responsible for supporting the family.
"There was a great deal of obligation to help the family and to help others," Mr. TANG says.
After graduating from the Government School of Nursing, she began her career in Kowloon, Hong Kong, in 1968, spending five years as an operating-room nurse at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital.
In June, 1968, she married Augustine TANG, the father of Wilson and Michael. Five years later, the couple (who divorced in the mid-1980s) brought their family to Canada, settling in Toronto and opening a Chinese restaurant.
Ms. LIN worked in the struggling restaurant with her husband but in 1977 landed a job at the Doctors Hospital, where she worked there for more than 20 years. In that time, she became a specialist in dealing with high-maintenance patients. She also went back to school, to earn her nursing degree from Ryerson University and to complete a certificate in critical-care nursing.
She started to work part-time at West Park Healthcare Centre in October, 1999, mainly in the rehabilitation centre's respiratory-services unit. She also worked part-time at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, often on the night shift.
By working at night, she could spend the day doing the other things that she enjoyed. She regularly went to the Chinese Community Centre of Ontario in downtown Toronto with Mr. LIN, whom she had married after her divorce from Mr. TANG in the mid-1980s.
"They were very devoted to each other," says Donald CHEN, president of the community centre, where Ms. LIN became an executive director.
"The two of them would come in together and enjoy the company of others."
Almost 20 years his wife's senior, Mr. LIN had lived in Taiwan before coming to Canada. He served in the air force, Mr. CHEN said, and went on to become a teacher and then the head of an elementary school.
"We called him 'Principal,' " he said.
Mr. LIN was in his mid-70s when he died, and had long been retired. His own children live in Taiwan, according to Mr. TANG, who says he was not close to his stepfather.
At the centre, Ms. LIN organized such activities for the women as tai chi, gardening and dancing. But she also had a passion for mahjong, the popular Chinese tile game, often taking on some of the seniors at the centre.
"She could play all night," Mr. TANG said.
Friendly and outgoing, "she wore a smile all the time," Mr. CHEN says. "She was very sweet and very friendly," enjoyed the company of others, and treated people at the centre as "sisters and mothers."
Mr. TANG agrees, saying: "She liked to chat."
She also liked to help. In March, she traded her part-time duties in West Park's respiratory services for a full-time job in the new sudden acute respiratory syndrome unit. Fourteen staff members from Scarborough Hospital (Grace Division), the initial sudden acute respiratory syndrome epicentre, had been infected and transferred to the ward for treatment.
The caregivers managed to fight off the infection until last month, when June, Nelia LAROZA, 51, of North York General Hospital, became the first nurse to die. Ms. LIN was the second. Her death brought the sudden acute respiratory syndrome fatalities in Canada to 41, all in Ontario.
Colleagues at West Park Healthcare Centre are in mourning. Last weekend, the hospital lowered its flag to half-mast, and later issued a statement saying that Ms. LIN, "like everyone else who had worked to contain sudden acute respiratory syndrome and care for patients under stressful and extreme circumstances, was considered a hero."
Barbara WAHL, president of the Ontario Nurses' Association, says that "I certainly heard outstanding things about her nursing care. She was totally dedicated."
Her death, Ms. WAHL adds, "is a terrible blow to her colleagues," and to her profession.
Those co-workers remember her compassion and generosity.
"Tecla provided a unique mix of skilled nursing and unwavering compassion for her patients and fellow staff members," the statement says. "Popular, hard working and beloved by many, she would even sometimes bring lunch for her colleagues."
She was also, her son says, "known for her resilience and strength."
Even while confined to her hospital bed, she was trying to plan a wedding -- Wilson, 34, is to be married in September. "She was really looking forward to it," brother Michael says.
A private funeral service for family, Friends and invited guests will be held at 10 a.m. on Tuesday at the Hong Kong Funeral Home, located at 8088 Yonge Street, in Thornhill, Ontario
The public will be received at the funeral home tomorrow from 2 to 6 p.m. and Monday from 5 to 9 p.m.
Tomorrow afternoon at 3, the Chinese Community Centre, located at 84 Augusta Ave., will conduct a special memorial service for Mr. and Ms. LIN, who leaves her mother, a sister and two brothers in Hong Kong, as well as her sons.
Ms. LIN was an animal lover with two cats. Her family asks that memorial donations be sent to the Toronto Humane Society.

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WONG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

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WONGTHONGLUA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
MacLELLAN, Robert Gordan Primrose April 6, 1919 - March 2, 2003
Robert G. P. MacLELLAN, of Calgary, Alberta retired General Counsel of the Husky Oil Company, died on Sunday, March 2, 2003 of pneumonia, at Rockyview General Hospital in Calgary. He was a month short of his 84th birthday. Born in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, on April 6, 1919, Robert was the only child of Dr. Robert Gordon MacLELLAN and Hazel Carré Primrose MacLELLAN. His father died in 1930, and his mother in 1937. An aunt helped his widowed mother raise him. Robert attended local schools and university in Halifax, Nova Scotia, graduating in law from Dalhousie University, Halifax, after World War 2. Robert enlisted in the Canadian Army in 1942 until 1946, as a Lieutenant in the British Columbia Dragoons (the 9th Canadian Armoured Regiment), serving in Italy, Belgium and Holland. He served as General Counsel of the Husky Oil Limited, the parent company with its two wholly-owned subsidiaries, Husky Oil Company, and Husky Oil Canadian Operations, for 35 years, based in Calgary, until he retired in the early l980's. Robert, (his Friends called him 'Bob'), enjoyed the Friendship of his colleagues at Husky Oil and after his retirement, he and others formed a dining club, the Husky Dining Club. It still operates at the Hospitality Inn.A bachelor, he enjoyed life at his Riverdale Avenue bungalow, where he had a large library. A fall and a stroke weakened him five years ago, and he entered Scottish Extendicare on 25th Avenue South West. Due to its imminent closure, Robert was moved to the Colonel Belcher nursing facility in February. Robert came from a distinguished Nova Scotian family. His paternal grandfather, for whom he and his father were named, Robert MacLELLAN, a distinguished educator, was Principal of Pictou Academy from 1889 to 1923. The elder MacLELLAN helped to prepare young minds for the challenges of the 20th century. Pictou Academy, through its principals and graduates had strong links to Dalhousie University. Robert's maternal grandfather was Senator Clarence PRIMROSE, also of Pictou. Robert is survived by several cousins, among them, Janet Maclellan TOOLE of Fredericton, New Brunswick, Judith Ann (MacLELLAN) GIBSON, of Saint John's, Newfoundland, and Ann MacLELLAN of Amherstview, Ontario. His family is greatly indebted to the care-giving services of 'Tip' Pornthip WONGTHONGLUA, whose intelligence, gentleness and devotion were always exceptional, during his stay at Scottish, Colonel Belcher and Rockyview Hospital. A committal service in Nova Scotia will take place in the summer. Friends who wish to pay their respects to Robert's memory and sign the memorial book may visit Mcinnis and Holloway's 'Fish Creek Chapel' (14441 Bannister Road S.E., Calgary, Alberta). To e-mail expressions of sympathy: condolences@mcinnisandholloway.com Subject Heading: Robert MacLELLAN. In living memory of Robert MacLELLAN, a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by Mcinnis & Holloway Funeral Homes, 'Fish Creek Chapel', 14441 Bannister Rd. S.E. Calgary, Alberta Tel: (403) 256-9575

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