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"WHE" 2003 Obituary


WHEELER  WHELAN 

WHEELER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
Vera Ilene SHERING (née WOOD)
In loving memory of Vera Ilene SHERING who passed away peacefully at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie on Wednesday, January 29, 2003 in her 78th year. Beloved wife of the late Joseph ARMSTRONG and the late Monty SHERING. Loving mother of Harold ARMSTRONG and his wife Lynne, Bill ARMSTRONG and his wife Linda, Ken ARMSTRONG and his wife Andrea, Carolyn SMURTHWAITE and her husband Norm, Marlene WHEELER and her husband Steve, Cathie Gould and her husband Jack. Dear grandma of 11 grandchildren and four great grandchildren. Vera is survived by her sisters Myrtle WOOD, Marie TANN, Bernice SLOSS, and Edith BAYER and by her brother Lorne WOOD. Friends may call at the Innisfil Funeral Home, 7910 Yonge street, (Stroud) on Saturday, February 8th from 1: 00 pm until time of service at 3:00 pm. Cremation. Words of comfort may be forwarded to the family at verashering@funeralhome.on.ca

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WHEELER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
JONES, Hazel Ethyl
85, of Brooklyn, Hants Co., Nova Scotia, passed away Wednesday, March 5, 2003, at Queen Elizabeth 2nd Health Sciences Centre, Infirmary Site, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Born in Elora, Ontario, she was a daughter of the late Gilbert and Daisy WHEELER. Hazel is survived by her husband, Harrison 'Gray' JONES, Brooklyn daughters Judith 'Judy' (Gerry) JOHNSTON, Rawdon, and Wendy JONES, Brooklyn; granddaughter, Jenni JOHNSTON; great-granddaughter, Moira JOHNSTON; a sister, Helen WILSON, Peterborough, Ontario Besides her parents, she was predeceased by a brother, Blake. Cremation has taken place. Memorial service will be held Sunday, March 9, 2003 at 3: 00 p.m. in Windsor United Church, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Reverend Bill GIBSON officiating. Private interment at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Lohnes-Beazley Funeral Service Ltd., 419 Albert Street, Windsor, Nova Scotia Messages of condolence may also be made on-line at www.familycare.ca

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WHEELER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-26 published
COLTHART, John Marshall M.D.
Born March 31, 1916 in Rodney, Ontario, died April 24, 2003 in Uxbridge, Ontario. Graduate University of Western Ontario Medicine '42, Major in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp World War 2 overseas, family physician in East York 1946-1954, industrial physician with Bell Canada in Toronto 1954-1965, Western Electric/American Telephone and Telegraph in Chicago 1965-1969, Xerox in Rochester, New York 1969-1980 before retiring to Beaverton, Ontario and Clearwater, Florida. John was predeceased by his parents, James and Jeanie (THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) COLTHART, and his wife, Shirley Mae (FITCH) M.D., University of Western Ontario Medicine '42. Father (father-in-law) of Jim of San Diego, California, Doctors Carol (Bob) BROCK in North York, Ontario, Peggy (Bob) McCALLA in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Alice (Rick) DANIEL in Calgary, Alberta and Joan (Dave) ROBERTSON in Shortsville, New York; grandfather of Christie COLTHART, Lisa (Andrew) SCHNEPPENHEIM, John Michael COLTHART, Mike BROCK, Heather (Tom) WHEELER, Catherine BROCK, Andy McCALLA, Matt (Jen) McCALLA, Jen (Dan) BEDETTE, James ROBERTSON, Shirley and Sarah DANIEL and great-grandfather of Christie's son, Kyle BURGESS. He was loved, respected and treasured by family, Friends and patients alike. A celebration of his life will be held at Markham Bible Chapel, 50 Cairns Drive, Markham, Ontario, west of McGowan Road, south from 16th Avenue, on Monday, May 5, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. In remembrance, donations can be made to the Shirley M. Colthart Fund (c/o John P. Robarts Research Institute, P.O. Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8), or the Trans-Canada Trail Foundation or a charity of your choice. Arrangements by Mangan Funeral Home, Beaverton, Ontario (705) 426-5777.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-11 published
Died This Day -- Patrick James WHELAN, 1869
Tuesday, February 11, 2003, Page R7
Tailor and Fenian born in Ireland in 1840, found guilty of assassinating Thomas D'Arcy McGEE, a father of Confederation, on April 7, 1868 hanged in a snowstorm before a crowd of 5,000; Canada's penultimate public execution.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
Lumber king of the Ottawa Valley
For 75 years, he dominated logging in the region and provided all the wood for Inco mineshafts
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER never let his age stand in the way of a day's work. In 1928, at age 12, he was working full-time for his father's logging company in the Ottawa Valley near Pembroke, Ontario, and by 14 was running his own operation.
On a cold February morning 73 years later, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, who was known as Hec Sr., drove 150 kilometres to his family's lumber camp near Mattawa. He toured the site and chatted with his sons and two of his grandchildren who run the family owned business, before driving home in his pickup truck, accompanied by his spaniel. Three days later, on February 9, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER suffered a heart attack and died at his Pembroke home. He was 87.
"To the day he died, he was an integral part of the company, said his son Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER Jr.
During his 75-year association with the logging business, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER operated lumber operations in the Ottawa Valley and as far north as Sturgeon Falls and Blind River, Ontario For a time, Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER and Sons was one of the largest local employers.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER also built the Northwood Hotel near Pembroke and owned Northwood Stables, which bred, trained and raced pacers and trotters. At one point, he had 150 horses.
Born in Petawawa in February 1, 1916, his beginnings as an Ottawa Valley success story began in the early 1920s when a shortage of money in his family forced him to leave elementary school to work at his father Thomas's lumbering operation. Within two years, he bought a horse and started his own business, delivering logs to the Pembroke Splint Lumber Co.
In his first year in business, the red and white pines felled by Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER's company produced 400,000 board feet of lumber, double his father's production.
"He said his father's operation was nice and neat and tidy but that it wasn't making enough money, " said Hector Jr., who is a former Member of Parliament for the riding of Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke and is now an adviser to Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN.
In the 1930s and 40s, the diminutive Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER expanded the business and modernized his equipment. His operation prospered during the Second World War. In 1945, he married Molly SMITH, a nurse from the Ottawa Valley community of Pakenham. The couple raised 10 children on their 375-acre farm located between Pembroke and Petawawa.
His company continued to operate in Renfrew County until about 1950 when he moved north to the Sturgeon Falls area to launch a new operation that employed 160 workers and cut enough trees to yield 10 million board feet of lumber a year. Later, he opened a second near Elliot Lake, Ontario, employing an additional 140 employees and producing another 10 million board feet of lumber annually. For many years, his company provided all of the pine for the shafts at the Inco mines in Sudbury. Eventually, the company diversified into pulpwood and, in the 1980s, provided kits for building log homes.
In 1960, the family returned to Pembroke so that the children would have easier access to schools. Sadly, 11 years later, Molly CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER died, leaving her husband to raise their children. He never remarried.
"We used to tease him about that and he'd say: 'Are you crazy? I couldn't find a woman crazy enough to look after you kids, ' " Hector Jr. said.
During his years in the logging industry, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER saw horses, broad axes and crosscut saws replaced by trucks, power saws, skidders and tree fellers that could cut and delimb trees in a matter of minutes. Over time, technology reduced crews from 200 to 30.
"The mechanization saddened him because he always felt the bush was kept cleaner with horses, and he felt good about employing so many people, " Hector Jr. said.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER Sr., a skilled log driver, was known as an innovator. Among his inventions was a device he nicknamed the "submarine." Using a winch, a generator and a floating wooden platform, it replaced dynamite as a way of breaking up logjams that blocked rivers. The submarine was soon adopted by competitors after premature detonations had killed log drivers.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER also had a passion for horses that stemmed from a love for the hard-working animals that for years had pulled his logs out of the bush.
He bought his first horse in 1951 for $100 and raced it at the Perth Fair where he got into an accident and broke his arm. He began breeding horses in 1955 and at one point had more than 150 racehorses. Among his most noted pacers was Barney Diplomat, which raced successfully for trainer Keith WAPLES in the mid 1950s and JJ's Metro, which won purses totalling $350,000.
His Northwood Stables and the Northwood Hotel were located across from each other on what is now County Road 17 west of Pembroke. His daughter Sandra and Hector Jr. drove horses for their father's stable.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was a past president of the Quebec Harness Horseman's Association, was one of the longest serving directors of the Canadian Standardbred Horse Society and helped found the Ontario Harness Horse Association, which in 1961 began representing the interests of horse owners, drivers, trainers, grooms and their families on matters such as track conditions, pension plans, disability insurance and purses.
"Hec Sr. was one of the founding fathers of organized horsemen in Ontario who helped negotiate purses so that people could have a career in horse racing, said Jim WHELAN, president of the Ontario Harness Horse Association in Mississauga. "He was a pioneer.
A strong secondary interest after racing was fishing. When he was not working, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER often disappeared to fish favourite lakes with a favourite dog.
Mr. HIGGINSON, who knew Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER for 35 years, said his friend had a soft spot for children who loved sports but couldn't afford the equipment.
"If a kid needed new skates, all of a sudden there would be a pair of skates for that child and nobody ever said where they came from. That side of him developed from what went on in his own family that was not well off at the start. Hec knew what it meant to be scratching out an existence -- he was interested in what was going on around him."
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was predeceased by his wife, four sisters and seven brothers. He leaves five sons and five daughters. Sons Tom, Willy and Jimmy, plus grandchildren Clyde and Shannon, run the family logging company.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
A man of uncommon passion and drive
Despite hints of scandal, the scrappy former Liberal member of parliament, who spent a lifetime fighting for social safety nets, earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for the working people
By Ron CSILLAG Special to the Globe and Mail; With a report from staff Saturday, August 30, 2003 - Page F8
He died with his boots on.
John MUNRO, a Trudeau era Liberal warhorse once described as a rumpled fighter who had gone too many rounds, had just put the finishing touches to a barn-burning speech, to be delivered to a Rotary Club, on the evils of concentration of media ownership when he suffered at heart attack at his desk in his Hamilton home on August 19. He was 72.
It was almost just as well that he went suddenly, his daughter, Anne, said in a eulogy, for her father could not stand suffering. Rather, he would not abide it. Suffering had no place in Canada, he reasoned, which is why his name is so closely associated with such social safety nets as medicare, the Canada Pension Plan and improvements to Old Age Security.
More than 500 well-wishers, including old political pals, steel-workers, artists, business people and labourers, packed the James Street Baptist Church last Saturday to laud Hamilton's favourite son, a scrappy lawyer who earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for working people, despite the recurring taint of scandal.
As the Member of Parliament for Hamilton East from 1962 to 1984 and through five cabinet posts, he was proudly on the left of the Liberal Party, alongside people such as Allan MacEACHEN, Judy LAMARSH, Lloyd AXWORTHY, Eugene WHELAN -- and probably Pierre TRUDEAU himself -- fighting for medicare, against capital punishment and in favour of a guaranteed annual income. As minister of national health and welfare, he didn't win the battle for a guaranteed annual income, but he did get the Guaranteed Income Supplement that has made life easier for many seniors. He was also known and often ridiculed -- for being a chain-smoking health minister.
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN, who entered Parliament a year after Mr. MUNRO, mourned the death of his former cabinet colleague. "We were very good Friends, and I'm terribly sorry that he passed away. He was a very good member of Parliament, and he was a very good minister and a guy who worked very, very hard in all the files that were given to him."
The political bug bit early. At 18, Mr. MUNRO ran for president of the Tribune Society at Westdale Secondary School in Hamilton. Mark NEMIGAN, a lifelong friend, remembers his resourcefulness: "He went to a local bus stop and festooned all the park benches with banners reading, 'Vote for John.' It worked too. He had uncommon drive and passion, even then."
Born in Hamilton on March 26, 1931, to lawyer John Anderson MUNRO and Katherine CARR, a housewife, John Carr MUNRO became a municipal alderman at the age of 23 while attending law school at Osgoode Hall in Toronto.
"I have no idea how he did that," Mr. NEMIGAN says. "The guy didn't sleep."
Mr. MUNRO took his first run at federal politics in the seat of Hamilton West in 1957, but was beaten by Ellen FAIRCLOUGH, who went on to become Canada's first female cabinet minister. In 1962, he switched ridings, and won the seat he would hold for the next 22 years.
With the election of Mr. TRUDEAU in 1968, a string of cabinet positions followed for Mr. MUNRO: minister without portfolio, amateur sport, health and welfare, labour and Indian affairs and northern development, the last earning him the hard-won respect of aboriginal groups.
In the 1968 general election, an aggressive young poll captain named Sheila COPPS worked on Mr. MUNRO's re-election bid. She would go on to replace him in the seat in 1984.
Tom AXWORTHY, who was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, recalled that the prime minister often turned to Mr. MUNRO for support on progressive positions at the cabinet table: "When we had those kind of debates, he would kind of look over to MUNRO when he wanted to hear the liberal perspective on the issue."
Mr. MUNRO's support for the decriminalization of marijuana led to a perk in December, 1969: A 90-minute chat about drugs with John LENNON and Yoko ONO, fresh from the duo's "bed-in" at Montreal's Queen Elizabeth Hotel. Documents unearthed this spring by a researcher for an Ottawa Beatles Web site revealed that Mr. LENNON joked that while Mr. TRUDEAU and Mr. MUNRO, then health minister, were members of the "establishment," they were both "hip."
"Mr. MUNRO's speech [on the decriminalization of marijuana] was the only political speech I ever heard about that had anything to do with reality that came through to me," Mr. LENNON is quoted as saying in the 12,000-word document.
Contacted by a reporter in May, Mr. MUNRO recalled that the incident, and his stand on cannabis, didn't go over well. "Yeah, I was in a little hot water at the time," he laughed. "Everybody thought I wanted to give the country to the junkies."
Mr. LENNON and Ms. ONO made a distinct impression, he said. "The more I think about it, the more I remember he and his wife were very polite and committed people."
In 1974, the water became considerably hotter when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided Mr. MUNRO's campaign headquarters during a probe into kickbacks and bid rigging on Hamilton Harbour dredging contracts.
Around the same time, Mr. MUNRO was criticized for accepting a $500 campaign donation from a union whose leaders were under investigation.
In 1978, he was forced to resign from the cabinet when it was revealed that he had talked to a judge by telephone to give a character reference for a constituent on the day of the person's sentencing for assault. But he bounced back with a tenacity that Mr. TRUDEAU was said to have admired and in 1980 won reappointment to the cabinet.
Mr. MUNRO's stamp on Hamilton was legendary, from the reclamation of land that gave the city Confederation Park, to the Canada Centre for Inland Waters, to the fundraising of more than $50-million for the local airport, renamed in his honour in 1998. "Without a doubt, he was the feistiest, most stubborn person I knew in public life," former mayor Bob MORROW remarked. "I don't think we will ever meet his equal of scaring up funds for Hamilton."
When Mr. TRUDEAU retired in 1984, Mr. MUNRO ran for the Liberal leadership and prime minister. He finished a poor fifth in a field of six. There began what his daughter called the "decade from hell," starting with a four-year Royal Canadian Mounted Police investigation so vigorous, the Mounties even considered using a helicopter to track Mr. MUNRO because the officers assigned to tail him couldn't keep up with his car.
That investigation killed a re-election bid in 1988 and scuttled his marriage to Lilly Oddie MUNRO, a minister in the former Ontario Liberal government. It eventually produced 37 flimsy charges of breach of trust, conspiracy, corruption, fraud and theft stemming from his years as Indian affairs minister. After a trial that dragged on for most of 1991, the judge threw out nearly all the charges without even calling for defence evidence. The Crown later withdrew the rest.
Mr. MUNRO welcomed the verdict as "complete exoneration" but was left with legal bills estimated at nearly $1-million and a reputation in ruins. Swimming in debt (he had to rely on Ontario Legal Aid), he filed a civil suit in 1992, claiming malicious prosecution and maintaining he had been targeted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to embarrass him. He attempted a political comeback in 1993, only to have Mr. CHRÉTIEN refuse to sign his nomination papers. Mr. MUNRO responded by filing an unsuccessful court challenge seeking to strip Mr. CHRÉTIEN of his power to appoint candidates.
Mr. MUNRO, who had returned to an immigration law practice in Hamilton, felt betrayed by the government's refusal to pay his legal bills, and it took an emotional toll.
"I'm not mad at the world," he said in 1996. "I realized this could totally destroy me if I didn't live a day at a time. You have to impose discipline, or you're finished. The motivation to carry on is voided. There's nothing to look forward to except endless grief."
He finally won nearly $1.4-million in compensation from Ottawa in 1999, but most of the money went to pay taxes, legal bills and other expenses. He could have avoided problems by declaring bankruptcy, but insisted on clearing his debts.
"He was no saint, but he was dedicated and hardworking," said his daughter Susan. "He was deeply hurt."
Mr. MUNRO had no interest in the personal trappings of wealth, she said, adding that he had a weakness only for Chevy Chevettes and homemade muffins. Good thing too, for a proposal for bankruptcy he filed in 1995 showed a monthly living balance of $476.
His last political gasp came in 2000 when he ran unsuccessfully for mayor of Hamilton. Asked in 1996 about writing his memoirs, he said: "I'm not ready. There's no last chapter yet."
Mr. MUNRO leaves his third wife, Barbara, and four children.

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WHELAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-26 published
CHAMBERS, Dorothy Gail (née ALLEN) September 24, 2003
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Gail CHAMBERS, in her 56th year. Beloved mother of Rebecca and Jesse; loyal, loving and supportive wife to Jim for over 32 years. Gail's loving presence will be missed by her brothers Glen and Gene and sister and brother-in-law Maureen and John and her extended family and Friends, too numerous to name. Gail lived fully engaged and with great humour, love and compassion with cancer for over 13 years. This was not a battle -- it was a co-existence with a disease that focused her energies on the things that were important to her, family, Friends, and a profound respect for the scared and the sacred and the spiritual, which she found in the natural world, particularly at her cottage in Muskoka. Gail will be sorely missed by the many Friends and relatives she touched in her life. Particular thanks must be given to the St. Elizabeth Visiting Nurses' Association home care who treated her with love and respect. Special thanks to Dr. Rob BUCKMAN who risked the very human trait of mixing health care with compassion and Friendship, also Dr. Molyn LESZCZ whose compassionate counselling helped her through the rough part of her difficult journey. Heartfelt thanks to Dr. Angela MAZZA- WHELAN who was present when Gail died in the loving embrace of her family. Thanks also to Doctors WARR and TOZER for their care. Also the unsung heroes of the health care system - the nurses. Cremation has taken place. A Celebration of Gail's life will take place on Saturday, September 27th at 2: 00 p.m. at Olivet United Church followed by a reception. Olivet United Church, 40 Empress Avenue at Prince George Street, Hamilton. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals would be appreciated by the family.

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