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"WES" 2003 Obituary


WESSEL  WEST  WESTGATE  WESTMORELAND  WESTON 

WESSEL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Roy Allen GREEN " Squirt"
In loving memory of Roy Allen GREEN on Monday, April 7, 2003,at the age of 54 years.
Cherished husband of Darlene (née OLIVER.) Loved by children Lori and husband Terry CASE of Little Current, Jeff and Tanya of Sault Ste. Marie, Derek and fiancée Lesley of Espanola. Special grandpa of Braedan and Brady CASE. Will be greatly missed by sister Linda and husband Ron BOWERMAN of Sheguiandah, brother Gary and wife Nicole of Little Current, predeceased by sister Norma LLOYD (husband Gerald,) and brother Ronnie (wife Carol WESSEL.) Predeceased by parents Charles and Edna. Fondly remembered by parents-in-law Ting and Pee Wee OLIVER and brothers and sisters-in-law Mike and wife Betty OLIVER, Wanda & husband Lou TROVARELLO, predeceased by Roger OLIVER (wife June.) Uncle to numerous nephews and nieces.
Visitation was from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm Wednesday, April 9, 2003. Funeral Service was held at 2: 00 pm Thursday, April 10, 2003, both at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Little Current.
Cremation with burial in Holy Trinity Cemetery at a later date.

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WEST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-15 published
Maker of men: 'The Chief' ran Kilkoo Camp for Boys
For 25 years, Ontario educator ran a wilderness camp for boys and then helped launch Toronto's Greenwood College
By Allison LAWLOR Thursday, May 15, 2003 - Page R9
John LATIMER's idea of a perfect evening was visiting with young campers in their cabins at Kilcoo Camp, telling stories and listening to tales of their day's adventures.
"You haven't seen the Pied Piper in action until you saw John in action," said his long-time friend David HADDEN, the head of Lakefield College School, a private school in Lakefield, Ontario "The kids just loved him."
Mr. LATIMER's life-long love of Kilcoo Camp, the Ontario boy's camp he directed for more than 25 years, began in 1938. At the age of 8, Mr. LATIMER arrived at Kilcoo, located on the shores of Haliburton's Gull Lake, about two hours' drive northeast of Toronto, as a young camper.
He loved the outdoors and became an accomplished canoeist. After several years as a camper, Mr. LATIMER moved on to become a leader-in-training, counsellor and program director at the camp. Then in the fall of 1955, he bought the camp and became its director.
Mr. LATIMER, along with his wife Peggy, directed Kilcoo until 1981. It was as director of Kilcoo that he became known as "Chief" a name that stuck with him throughout his life. After retiring from Kilcoo, he had a cottage built beside the camp and remained active in camp life and as a well-known face to the young campers. Not long after stepping down as the camp's director, Mr. LATIMER's eldest son, David LATIMER, took over and continues to direct the camp.
Mr. LATIMER later wrote a book called Maker of Men: The Kilcoo Story, about the place he loved so much. He also co-authored a camp-counsellor's handbook. With his wide smile and keen interest in people, Mr. LATIMER captured people with his enthusiasm.
"He just had this special gift," said Mr. HADDEN, who considers Mr. LATIMER his mentor and the reason he pursued a career working with young people. "No one I know has had a greater capacity to love so many people."
Mr. HADDEN added: "He had the ability to touch people's souls, really I believe that."
John Robert LATIMER was born on October 13, 1930, in Toronto. After graduating from Lawrence Park Collegiate Institute in north Toronto, he went on to radio school. He completed his training and went to work as an announcer at private radio stations in Guelph, Ontario, and Stratford, Ontario, before joining the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto. At the public broadcasting corporation, he worked in the film department but continued to spend his summers at Kilcoo Camp.
"I think he worked to go to Kilcoo," said his long-time friend John KENNEDY.
At a party of camp Friends, he met his future wife Peggy MacDONALD. The couple married on April 29, 1961, and later had three sons, who grew up around the camp.
Not long after retiring as director of Kilcoo in 1981, Mr. LATIMER went to work in the Ontario government's Office of Protocol.
"He never had any intention of retiring," his wife Peggy LATIMER said. "He always said he didn't like golfing."
As acting chief of protocol, Mr. LATIMER was responsible for making sure visits to the province by the Royal Family and heads of state ran smoothly.
In his role, Mr. LATIMER and his wife had occasion to meet the Queen, Prince Philip, the late Queen Mother and several other members of the Royal Family. The Duchess of York, Sarah FERGUSON, spent time at Kilcoo Camp learning how to paddle a canoe.
From the Ontario government, Mr. LATIMER went to Royal St. George's College, a private boys' school in Toronto, where he was headmaster from 1988 to 1996. About three years ago, Mr. LATIMER and his son David sat down with Richard WERNHAM, a lawyer and entrepreneur who made millions selling his mutual-fund company Global Strategy, to talk about their dream of starting up a private school in Toronto.
Together they, along with Mr. WERNHAM's wife Julia WEST, founded Greenwood College School (the school was named in honour of Mr. LATIMER's mother, Zetta GREENWOOD.) The school, which emphasizes not only academic achievement but the student's emotional, social and physical development, opened last September.
"He fully believed in leadership and building leaders," said David LATIMER, who is the school's director of community life. "He always believed that through leadership, all kids could be helped."
An active member of the school, John LATIMER served on the school's board of directors and took part in interviewing hundreds of prospective students for the school's first year.
Having founded the school, which fulfilled a long-time dream, Mr. LATIMER pursued another goal. He got tickets for his first rock concert. Sitting in the 11th row of the Rolling Stones concert in Toronto last year was a spry man in his 70s, said his son David.
Known as a prankster, Mr. LATIMER's jokes ran from sending dead flowers on a birthday, to filling a room full of balloons, to placing a strange object in a bed.
Mr. KENNEDY can remember finding a plastic rose in his lush rose garden at his home in British Columbia and opening up his suitcase after a trip with Mr. LATIMER to find hundreds of packages of matches tucked away in shirt pockets, socks and underwear.
About three years ago, Mr. KENNEDY and his wife joined the LATIMERs on a trip to Disneyland in California. The two couples spent three days going on every ride, and exploring every exhibit.
"He revelled in it -- he loved it," Mr. KENNEDY said of the trip. "If there is such thing as an inner child, he had it."
Mr. LATIMER, who died in Toronto on April 22 after a short battle with cancer, leaves Peggy, his wife of 42 years, their three sons David, Jeffrey and Michael, and grandchildren Tori, Thomas, T. J. and Charlie.
"I do not regret leaving this Earth... because my life has been utterly fantastic," Mr. LATIMER said not long before he died.

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WEST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
TOMPKINS, Kevin Joseph, M.D.C.M., F.R.C., F.R.C.P. (C,) F.A.C.O.G.
Died Thursday, June 19, 2003 in his 70th year as a result of a hiking accident in the Niagara Gorge. Loving husband of Mary (née SHEPPARD) and devoted father of Joanne (Alan LAWSON) of Brisbane, Australia, Susan (Craig HUDSON) of Toronto, Sean (Cindy TOMPKINS) of San Diego, California., and Clare (Scott WEST) of Victoria, British Columbia. Caring grandfather of Myles, James, Evan and Rhys HUDSON and Teagan and Tasmin WEST. Will be sadly missed by many siblings, relatives, Friends, colleagues and former patients. An avid traveller, outdoorsman, geneologist, published author and raconteur, Dr. TOMPKINS was fiercely loyal to his Cape Breton roots. Visitation at the P.X. Dermody Funeral Home, 796 Upper Gage Avenue (between Fennell and Mohawk), Hamilton, 905-388-4141 on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Parish Prayers Tuesday at 8: 00 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be offered at St. Joseph's Catholic Church on Wednesday, June, 25, 2003 a 11: 00 a.m. Private Cremation. Donations to The Bruce Trail Association, P.O. Box 857, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3N9 would be appreciated by the family.

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WEST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
BEST, Winnifred McDonald
Winn BEST died peacefully on June 24, 2003, at the age of 95. Loving mother of Catherine CARTER (Donald) of Kingston and Michael BEST (Patti) of Waterloo. Beloved grandmother of Ian CARTER (Chrissie YAO), Colin CARTER (Toni THORTON), Gillian BEST, David BEST and Kerri BEST and great-grandmother to Nathan CARTER. Loving aunt to Elizabeth McDONALD (Ken WEST) and Anne HILLMER and her children Victoria and Andrew. Special friend to Norbert MacKENZIE. Predeceased by her husband John BEST, her brother Murray McDONALD and her sister-in-law and best friend, Catherine McDONALD. Winn lived for her family and Friends, her warmth and empathy will not be forgotten. A memorial service will be held at the church that she grew up in, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 9860 Keele Street, Maple, Ontario, on Thursday, July 3, 2003 at 1: 30 p.m. Donations in memory of Winn may be made to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 9860 Keele Street, Maple, Ontario L6A 1R6.

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WESTGATE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-02 published
Jeanette Katherine Emily (Ma) LINDOKKEN
By John RICHTHAMMER, Tuesday, December 2, 2003 - Page A24
Nurse, grandmother, leader, merchant. Born August 9, 1910, in McTavish, Manitoba Died April 2, 2003, in Winnipeg, after a stroke, aged 92.
After more than 71 consecutive years in Northwestern Ontario, Jeanette "Ma" LINDOKKEN returned to her childhood home of Winnipeg to be near her family. Within a week of her arrival, Jeanette's hip shattered. Undaunted, she started therapy for recovery -- which was ultimately not to be.
Jeanette's prairie roots were deep. She was born in a southern Manitoba hamlet to a family who began homesteading there in 1876. Although she idolized her father James for his gentleness, the home was ruled by her distant, undemonstrative mother, Sarah Annie WESTGATE. Even in old age, Jeanette fondly spoke of her younger sister, Ethel, who had died from juvenile diabetes in Jeanette finished high school in Petersfield, Manitoba, where the family had moved to farm, and at the outset of the Depression, enrolled in a three-year nursing program. Then she took nursing jobs in Winnipeg, and in a tuberculosis sanatorium in Saskatchewan.
In 1932, at 21, Jeanette travelled by canoe to return an infant to a remote Anishinaape community in Northwestern Ontario. En route, she washed diapers in the lakes and cooked over open fires. The experience forever changed Jeanette's life and began seven decades of Friendship and work with First Nations people.
In the Northern Ontario community of Deer Lake, Jeanette met a Norwegian-born trapper and prospector Oskar LINDOKKEN. The Beaver magazine described him as "a figure who might have stepped out of... the stirring days of beaver hats, freight canoes and singing voyageurs." He became her rugged partner-in-life for the next 47 years.
They married in 1933 in Winnipeg, and then returned to Deer Lake to build a log home. Their meals were fish, moose, rabbit, and bannock. Jeanette fished, trapped, hunted, and made campfires, as well as cooked, sewed and made clothing, often from hide she skinned and stretched. Despite her small, lithe frame, she often carried heavy loads.
Jeanette used her nursing skills in every aspect of health care, from tuberculosis treatment to midwifery to palliative care. She nursed several generations of families, saved lives, and also treated injured animals, which she fed with baby bottles.
Assuming charge of a situation, Jeanette often tread on toes. But if she had a reputation for bossiness and brutal honesty, everyone knew it stemmed from her caring intensely about others' welfare. She was known as "Ma." Her defence of the underdog was the stuff of local legend. In honour of her 50 years of nursing there, the Deer Lake community nursing station was named after Jeanette, and the Ontario government presented her with a medal of service.
The LINDOKKENs also operated a general trading post, tourist camp, and commercial fishing and flying enterprises. Oskar was the garrulous, savvy front man, while Jeanette, a natural manager, did everything else. Their store was a community gathering place.
Deeply religious, Jeanette laughingly described herself as "probably the only Scottish Presbyterian Mennonite in the world." Her unshakeable faith guided her through tragedies such as the death of her only child, Jimmy, in an aircraft crash nearly 40 years ago, the death of her beloved Oskar, and her own oncoming blindness. Despite these hardships, the tiny-framed woman who withstood every rigour of the remote North remained indomitable and engaged to the end.
John RICHTHAMMER was considered an adopted grand_son by Jeanette.

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WESTMORELAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-02 published
Susan WESTMORELAND
By Anria LOUBSER, Wednesday, July 2, 2002 - page A18
Wife, mother, friend, reporter.
Born August 5, 1965, in Hamilton, Ontario Died April 28 in Hamilton, of breast cancer, aged 59.
Bright, wacky, fun-loving and fiery of temperament, Susan Westmoreland brought abundant energy to everything she did and could put a positive, often humorous, spin on just about anything. Even cancer. "Pick up some lottery tickets, sweetie - we lost the cancer lottery and someone owes us big time!" (Don't think she was flippant. She was plucky and very determined to have a good time.)
Sue was 5-foot-8 but, through a combination of heels and personality, seemed six feet tall.
Her intelligence, sociability, sharp wit and palpable integrity could make her seem intimidating at first. She was competitive in the best sense of the word and didn't readily cut slack for herself or others. Still, those close to her got to hear and see the doubts, fears and vulnerabilities that made her adorable.
Friends and family (both human and furry) were at the heart of Sue's world.
She loved the ritual of getting together and had a way of making moments memorable by doing something special, creating a tradition or saving a memento. Sue was a devoted, attentive friend; she gave the best of her enthusiasm to others.
Sue brought all her gifts for Friendship to bear in her marriage to Jon MAGIDSOHN.
Whether you knew them as "SueandJon" or "JonandSue," you knew they shared many interests and had a deep love for and loyalty to one another, but always with an awareness of and deference to each other's autonomy.
Sue had a very deliberate way of envisioning, planning and making everything and anything happen, from decorating her home to a radical career change.
Vision and ambition drove Sue to find work that she loved. After a degree in political science, a year in France, four years working on Parliament Hill and four as an actor, Sue undertook the broadcast journalism program at Ryerson University, graduating with honours in 1998.
Susan was a born video-journalist. Every aspect of the job drew on her strengths and challenged her to use them in new ways. In 1999, she and Jon moved to Windsor, Ontario, where she had landed a television-news reporter job at CHWI. She was exhilarated by the demands of her job and became involved in the community.
Devoted to family and Friends in the Toronto area and missing the big city life, Sue and Jon moved back to Toronto in January, 2002, when Sue was hired as an arts reporter for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio.
Sue was almost defiant in the face of the diagnosis she was given a year ago. She was four months pregnant. After agonizing deliberation, she and Jon chose to have a course of chemotherapy that was. as far as research could attest, safe for pregnant women. It was very, very difficult for her to go for those treatments, but she went and Jon read her Dr. Seuss and The Stinky Cheese Man while the intravenous dripped. Sue took a leave from work, kept up her social calendar and enjoyed the nesting phase of expectant parenthood. She had a vision of her and Jon's life as parents and kept her eyes resolutely "on the prize."
Sue gave birth to Myles Day on Oct.16, 2002, and declared (with gusto) that she was taking a little holiday from cancer. Then, later, her voice cracked as she talked about just wanting to be a healthy mom. The commonplace feelings of self-doubt and anxiety experienced by new parents were painfully magnified for her.
Sue was admitted to hospital April 24; as the pain ebbed away, her tenacity finally did, too. Her sparkly aura and mega-watt smile are indelibly in our hearts.
Anna is a friend of Sue. Jon MAGISDSOHN, Sue's husband, contributed to this essay.

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WESTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Canada's Catholic leader, CARTER dies at 91
By Michael VALPY Religion And Ethics Reporter Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A1
Three weeks ago, John TURNER met Gerald Emmett CARTER for their annual St. Patrick's Day drink. The former prime minister held the glass for his friend of 50 years while he sipped his Irish whisky through a straw.
When the retired cardinal archbishop of Toronto died yesterday morning at the age of 91, a reputation as richly coloured as the scarlet of his soutane died with him.
Canadian Roman Catholicism will probably never see his like again: a prince of the church who, while never unmindful of the meek and the poor, made no bones about being comfortable rubbing elbows with fellow princes of politics and business.
He was the close friend of prime ministers and premiers. He enjoyed socializing in the corridors of power with people like Conrad BLACK, Hilary and Galen WESTON and Fredrik EATON. He displayed an unabashed fondness for Progressive Conservative Party gatherings. ("I think at one Christmas party, I was the only Liberal there," Mr. TURNER said in an interview.)
Yet academics and religious and business leaders also spoke yesterday of a man with an acute understanding of Canada and its history.
They described an intense, intellectual democrat who believed he should speak out forcefully on the moral and political issues of the day and who welcomed debate with those who disagreed with him. And they talked of a cleric who profoundly understood the nature of the church and who welcomed ecumenism and Canada's emerging pluralism.
"He felt the institution of religion should have a public voice and he was not shy about exercising it," said Michael HIGGINS, principal of St. Jerome's University in Waterloo and co-author of My Father's Business, the 1990 biography of Cardinal CARTER.
"Whenever he spoke, his voice was strong, clear, public, undiluted and welcomed by political leaders even when they disagreed with him. It is an unfortunate circumstance that the marginalization of religious debate occurred at the same time as he was eclipsed by a stroke, retirement and age, at a time when his church needed him. He embodied a certain kind of churchman we probably won't see again."
Cardinal CARTER suffered a stroke in 1981 and retired in 1990.
Cardinal Aloysius AMBROZIC, his successor as archbishop of Toronto, said Cardinal CARTER "wanted to know what the movers and shakers were doing."
Cardinal AMBROZIC described him as a man totally engaged with his church and with his society -- an advocate for the poor, for immigrants and for the homeless.
"What I admired about him, what I found so instructive about him, was his sense of responsibility for the church and for society at large. He was very much a man of Vatican 2 [the church's 1962-65 ecumenical council] and he knew what the Catholic Church was about."
There was also, said Cardinal AMBROZIC, "his own personal style. He had panache."
The priest who rose from a working-class Montreal background to become the most powerful cleric in Canada met Mr. TURNER when the former prime minister was a young lawyer in Montreal doing legal work for the church. "He was a great human being who understood the balance between the religious and secular worlds," Mr. TURNER said.
"He loved tennis, and he had a wicked serve."
Former prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU consulted him on the Constitution in the early 1980s and became a close friend. At the celebration of Cardinal CARTER's 75th birthday in 1987, instructions were given that an entire pew was to be reserved for Mr. TRUDEAU in Toronto's St. Michael's Cathedral.
Mr. TRUDEAU delayed his arrival until just before the cardinal entered the church. "All eyes were trained on TRUDEAU until Cardinal CARTER arrived," said Dr. HIGGINS. "It was symbolic of the close relationship they had."
Toronto's Anglican Archbishop, Terence FINLAY, who first met Cardinal CARTER when they were both bishops in London, Ontario, in the 1970s, said the Roman Catholic Church in Canada had lost a great leader.
"He enabled us to bring our churches closer together. I certainly counted on him as a friend and colleague. He had an impressive understanding of Canada's history and political situations. He knew who we were."

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