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"WEB" 2003 Obituary


WEBB  WEBER  WEBKAMIGAD  WEBSTER 

WEBB o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Albert George WEBB
In loving memory of Albert George WEBB, April 9, 1921 to December 24, 2002.
Albert WEBB, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 at the age of 81 years. He was born in Durham, and had lived on Manitoulin for the past 6 years. Previous to that, Al had lived in Elliott Lake and Armstrong. He had a great love of the north country, which led him to his job as a bush pilot He truly loved his work, and spent many enjoyable years pursuing his love of the north and of flying. Al was a veteran of WW2, having served overseas.
Survived by his beloved partner Val TAILOR/TAYLOR of Providence Bay, and her family. Will be sadly missed by Ruby CANNARD, the Mike SPRACK family, Linda and Al BAILEY, Harvey and Diane DEBASSIGE, Lloyd JACKSON and Marshall RICHARD of Elliott Lake, Ryan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Jim HARASYM. Survived by many Friends in the Armstrong, Elliott Lake and Manitoulin area. Also survived by sons Warren and Chris, and one brother in the Hamilton area.
At Al's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation will take place.
Val TAILOR/TAYLOR would like to thank the doctors and nurses at Mindemoya Hospital for the wonderful care and concern given to Al and herself, during this time. Words cannot express the appreciation. Culgin Funeral Home

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WEBB o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-08 published
NESBITT, Andrew Maxwell ''Mac'' (1924- 2003) President of Anderson Bros. Ltd. Veteran of World War 2, Royal Canadian Navy
Surrounded by family, Mac died peacefully at the Kingston General Hospital Friday September 5th, 2003 after a brief illness. Beloved husband of Glenna (POWNALL) NESBITT; dear father of John and his wife Maureen of Calgary; dear grandfather of Glen, Diane and Colleen. Dear brother of William and his wife Irene of Nepean and the late Dorothy WEBB; dear brother-in-law of Evelyn FUDGE and Donald WEBB. Also survived by nieces and nephews. Mac and Glenna's ''expanded family'' also includes Andree and Rejean LEMAY and their children Elyse and Matthieu of Kingston. Mac was born in his grandfathers home at the corner of Princess and Division Street; he attended Victoria Public School then Trinity College School. During World War 2, Mac served in the Royal Canadian Navy on the corvette ''Mordan''. On his return from the war, he helped rebuild the family business, Anderson Bros. Ltd; destroyed by fire that same year. For the next 50 years, Mac successfully operated four businesses from the corner of Division and Princess Street. His volunteer service includes: President of Kingston branch of the School of Convocation of Trinity College School for over 10 years, Governor of Trinity College School, and Board Member of Kingston General Hospital. Mac and Glenna recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in a glorious event attended by family and many close Friends. Mac was known for his sage advice, his fabulous sense of humour and his unending passion for meeting new people and helping his Friends in whatever way he could. Mac will be sorely missed by his family and countless Friends. The family will receive Friends at the Robert J. Reid & Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson (at Barrie Street), Kingston, on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9. Funeral service will be held at St. George's Cathedral, King Street East (at Johnson Street), Kingston, on Tuesday, September 9 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment at Cataraqui Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy the family would appreciate memorial donations to Kingston General Hospital Foundation: Intensive Care Research.
Online Guest Book ReidFuneralHome.com (613) 548-7973

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WEBB o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
ACTON, Colin
Peacefully, at Grand River Hospital, Kitchener, Ontario on Monday, December 8, 2003. Born in Brighton, England, in 1925, Colin was in active service with the British Army in France and Germany in World War 2. After the war he went to sea with Cunard Lines. He worked his way up to Staff Purser on the Queen Elizabeth and, in that role, met his future wife, Cathie WEBB, a Toronto-born Canadian traveling to Europe on Cunard Lines. After the birth of their first child they emigrated to Canada where Colin started at the bottom again as a clerk at Canada Life. He retired in 1989 as a Vice-President; quite an accomplishment on a Grade 8 education. Throughout his life, Colin was an avid reader and a prolific writer, earning extra money for his short stories and articles published in newspapers and magazines. He fully embraced the computer age, acquiring one of the first 10 Macintosh computers in Canada. Prior to retirement, Colin moved to St. Catharines where he was active in the community until disabled by Alzheimer's. He lived most recently at Leisureworld in Elmira, Ontario. Colin will be missed by his children: Janet and her husband Neil KENNEDY of Elmira, Lee ACTON and his wife Cindy of Seattle, Craig ACTON of Toronto and Maria POWERS, also of Seattle, Washington. He leaves grandchildren Kate, Thomas, Colin, Julia and Brittany. His wife, Cathie, died on June 30, 2003. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service and interment will be held in May 2004 at Little Lake Cemetery in Peterborough, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Alzheimer Society of Canada (www.alzheimer.ca) or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada (www.HeartAndStroke.ca) would be greatly appreciated by the family. Stories and memories about Colin may be shared with his family by email at Colin_Acton@hotmail.com

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WEBER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
Man of peace died with his boots on
Christian-based, stop-the-war mission to southern Iraq ended in tragedy for Canadian peace activist
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, February 12, 2003, Page R7
He was an educator who tried to stop a war before it began. Instead, George WEBER, a former Ontario high-school teacher who was touring Iraq as part of an effort to stave off a war, died there in a road accident. He was 73.
Mr. WEBER was killed instantly when the vehicle he was travelling in as a passenger rolled on an Iraqi highway between Basra and Baghdad.
When the left rear tire blew out of the Chevrolet Suburban, the truck hit the shoulder of the road and flipped over before rolling to a stop upside-down beside the road, said Doug PRITCHARD, Canadian co-ordinator for the Christian Peacemaker Teams, a church-based group dedicated to non-violent activism.
Mr. WEBER, who was travelling in the back seat, was thrown from the vehicle and sustained massive head injuries. Two other activists with the group were injured in the accident.
An investigation has shown that on the day of the accident, the vehicle was in excellent condition, the tires were new and the truck was travelling on a six-lane, lightly travelled highway on a clear day, Mr. PRITCHARD said.
Mr. WEBER, a retired high-school history teacher from the town of Chesley in southwestern Ontario, was among 17 Canadian and American peace activists who arrived in Iraq on December 29. They were committed to living up to a mission statement of the Christian Peacemaker Teams of reducing violence by "getting in the way," Mr. PRITCHARD said.
The group travelled to the country despite warnings from the Department of Foreign Affairs advising Canadians to stay away from Iraq for security reasons. With war looming there, antiwar activists from around the world have been heading to Iraq to act as "human shields" if the bombs start falling, and in solidarity with Iraqis.
"He was a student of world politics," said Reverend Anita Janzen of the Hanover Mennonite Church, where Mr. WEBER and his wife Lena attended. "He was very upset [by] the threat of war [in Iraq]."
Mr. WEBER felt he wouldn't be able to live with himself if war broke out in Iraq and he had failed to do anything, she said.
Yet, when people told him they thought his actions were courageous, his reply was: " 'I'm no hero,' " said his wife Lena. "It was what he felt he needed to do," she said.
In Iraq, Mr. WEBER and the Christian Peacemaker Team visited hospitals, farms and schools to talk to Iraqis about the Persian Gulf war, the United Nations sanctions and the current possible U.S.-led war.
Shortly after arriving in Baghdad, he made a trip to the marketplace to have a local tailor make him a suit. He had planned to pick it up after his trip to Basra but he never made it back to the marketplace. But someone else did. Mr. WEBER wore the suit at his funeral.
Having the suit made in Baghdad fit with Mr. WEBER's personal philosophy of trying to help those most in need. It was not uncommon on his various travels to developing countries to seek out the most decrepit taxi, saying it was that driver who was the most in need of the fare, Lena WEBER said.
"He was really kind of an unassuming and a genuinely humble man who in a quiet way lived his beliefs," said Jim LONEY, a fellow Canadian who was in the truck but escaped serious injuries. Mr. LONEY accompanied Mr. WEBER's body back to Canada from Iraq. Mr. WEBER had been scheduled to return home on January 9. "He was a deeply committed Christian, and deeply committed to peace."
Mr. WEBER's trip to Iraq wasn't his first with the Christian Peacemakers Team. After retiring from teaching, he applied to take part in a Peacemakers mission to Chiapas, Mexico. In his application in 1999, he noted that throughout his life he had been interested in current events and was aware that it was the poor and disadvantaged people in the world who end up suffering the most.
"I think that most of the calamities that befall ordinary folk could be alleviated if it were not for the selfishness and greed that motivate the power structures, which are in place throughout the world.
"But there are also many people of goodwill who wish to treat everyone fairly and with charity. I try to be among this group," he wrote.
He was part of a two-week delegation to Chiapas in February, 2000. This trip was followed by another six-week mission to Hebron in the West Bank in 2001, and another six weeks there in 2002.
In the West Bank, Mr. WEBER was particularly moved by the plight of the Palestinian children and would accompany them to school through military checkpoints ensuring that they arrived safely.
Mr. WEBER had also been a member of the Peace Justice and Social Concerns Committee of the Mennonite Conference of Eastern Canada between 1994 and 1998.
George WEBER was born on July 28, 1929, and grew up on a farm near Elmira, Ontario He was the fifth of seven children born to Ion and Geneva WEBER. After his father died when he was in his 50s, George was left to take over the family farm. A young man, just 20, he helped his mother raise his younger siblings.
When George felt one of his younger siblings was able to take over the farm, he got on a boat headed for Europe. It was during his travels that he decided he would like to one day attend university.
He returned to Canada in his mid-20s and enrolled in the history department at the University of Toronto. After graduating with a degree, he went into teaching. His first job was teaching history at Western Technical-Commercial School in Toronto.
It was through the Mennonite church that he met Lena FREY. The couple married in 1959 and not long afterward went to Africa. Mr. WEBER taught in Ghana and Nigeria during the 1960s for the Mennonite Board of Missions teaching school and his wife worked as a nurse.
After returning to Canada, he taught at a Toronto high school before settling in Chesley, Ontario, where he taught history at a local high school, farmed and was active in the Hanover Mennonite Church.
"George was a very critical thinker," said Barry WOODYARD, a retired vice-principal at Chesley District High School. "He used to challenge his students not to accept anything they heard on the news," or from politicians. "He felt they needed to do their own thinking."
A quiet, hard-working man, he was known among his colleagues for having a particular talent for forming relationships with the difficult students the other teachers often didn't want to deal with.
"If people needed help he would help them," Mr. WOODYARD said.
Mr. WEBER leaves his wife Lena, children Reginald and Tania and four grandchildren. He also leaves two brothers and one sister.
George WEBER, teacher, farmer, missionary, born on July 28, 1929, in Elmira, Ontario; died near Basra, Iraq, on January 6, 2003.

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WEBER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
Sara STARK (Sarika)
By Peter STARK, Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page A22
Mother, Serb, snack-bar administrator. Born September 19, 1925, in Subotica, Yugoslavia. Died September 21, in Toronto, of natural causes, aged 78.
Back in 1997, I took my mother back to Belgrade. We arrived midday and, to pass some time, we went to a piac (market). Strolling around, mother spotted a stall that had a chicken in a pot of water. "How much for the chicken?" she asked in Serbian. "Twenty a kilo and she's two kilos!" the well-sauced proprietor answered. Now Sara was a country girl and knew a bird when she saw one: "Why you liar! That chicken is the size of a pigeon and is less than a kilo!" The farmer stirred, picked up on our Western clothing and launched into a verbal assault. Quickly others stepped in. What a scene! Less than half-an-hour on the ground and my mother had found a battle -- but she was never one to back down.
Sara, or Sarika as she was known to the villagers of Zitiste, was the only daughter of the wealthy WEBERs -- Moijse and Nina and the granddaughter of family matriarch, Malvina HAJDUSKA.
Sara grew up in privileged surroundings, yet her upbringing included some stern lessons in individuality and self-reliance: From the age of 11, she was expected to produce butter and sell it in the village for her pocket money. Perhaps that's why the residents of Plandiste (where the family owned a second farm) met her with such joy in 1997. Not having seen her for 55 years they had no problem recognizing her and came running shouting, "Sarika! Sarika!"
Back in 1942, at the age of 17, Sara, along with Nina and Malvina, were moved to the Jewish ghetto in Subotica. Deported to Bacalmas in 1943 they were later sent to Strasshof, Austria, where they worked 15-hour days on the land. At season's end, they were put on a train for Auschwitz but over-crowding there forced the re-routing of the train to Bergen-Belsen. Later, they were transferred to Theresienstadt, where Sara met Alex. At war's end, she, Alex and Nina (Malvina had died on the day of liberation) went on foot to Budapest.
In Budapest, Sara and Alex were married and had three children: Robert (1946), Peter (1948), and Judy (1950).
Life was not easy. Alex's father, Aladar, had a small shoe store and provided them with stock to sell in country markets. On market days, Sara and Alex rose at 3 a.m. to load a truck and head out with other vendors. Regardless of the difficulty in making a living, Sara insisted that her children receive the best: they were immaculately dressed in their weekend whites, and were the talk of the neighbourhood.
During the 1956 uprising, the family fled, eventually to arrive in Canada, in Ottawa -- Alex would only live in a capital city.
Sara, despite a fluency in seven languages, accepted any position available -- cook, maid, cleaner -- to make a living. Later, she worked in the kitchen at the Jewish day school and also ran a community snack bar on weekends. Her reputation as cook spread and she landed the position of head of the kitchen at an Ottawa home for the aged.
Retirement did not suit my mother -- she had an active, nervous mind that needed constant activity.
Her three kids provided the opportunity. Ever a dabbler in their lives, they were never aught but cubs to her tigress. "I can criticize you all," she used to say, "but if anyone else does I'll scratch their eyes out!"
Yes, that was mum. Loyal, intuitive, and brave as all get out possessor of a natural nobility that never needed proving nor felt shame at doing menial tasks when necessary. She loved and hated fiercely, and her Friends knew it and accepted the storms along with the plentiful sunshine.
Peter STARK is the son of Sara STARK.

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WEBKAMIGAD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-13 published
Phillip Howard DEBASSIGE
In loving memory of Phillip Howard DEBASSIGE, February 5, 1947 to August 9, 2003. "Lover of Horses" Phillip DEBASSIGE, a resident of M'Chigeeng First Nation, began his spiritual journey through the western door, on Saturday, August 9, 2003 at the age of 56 years. He was born in Mindemoya, son of Vincent DEBASSIGE and the late Margaret (MIGWANS) DEBASSIGE.
Phillip worked in M'Chigeeng teaching computers at Kenjgewin Teg, a member of the Economic Development Committee and worked with the Union of Ontario Indians as well as Metis Nation of Ontario. He also enjoyed band politics especially the First Nation Governance Act. Phillip enjoyed playing the trumpet, playing lotteries especially Keno and horse racing. He was a great community worker as he helped many work in their garden, visited elders, enjoyed his time at the maple sugar camp and helped others with house construction and renovations. This familiar sight walking in the neighbourhood or on his way to Gus's store to play his numbers, will be greatly missed by all who knew him.
Loving father of Corena RYAN and husband Justin, Ladeanne DEBASSIGE and Nathan MIGWANS. Loved Mishomis of Justice and Reign RYAN. Survived by his former wife Giovanna. Dear brother of Ina PANAMICK, Alfred DEBASSIGE (wife Gladys), Marjorie WEBKAMIGAD, Greg DEBASSIGE (friend Bonnie,) Norma CORBIERE (friend Charlie,) Lyla KINOSHAMEG (husband Ray,) Nicolas DEBASSIGE (Alice,) Patrick DEBASSIGE, Joanne DEBASSIGE (Amadeo), Stanley DEBASSIGE (wife Donna) and Doris DEBASSIGE (friend Ronnie.) Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called at the home of Alfred DEBASSIGE Monday and Tuesday. The funeral mass will be celebrated at Immaculate Conception Church, M'Chigeeng on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Robert FOLIOT as celebrant. Interment in M'Chigeeng Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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WEBSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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WEBSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
COLQUHOUN, Stephen Murray
It is with great sadness that we announce that Stephen Murray COLQUHOUN died suddenly on Wednesday, June 18th, 2003 in Thunder Bay, Ontario. Steve will be sorely missed and always cherished by his wife Maria (née SALATINO,) sons Stevie and Jamie, his sisters Liz (Mike EVANS), Marg (Brian WEBSTER), Mary Louise (Paul RADDEN,) and brother Bob (Judy COLQUHOUN.) He died too young. First and foremost in Stevie's life was always Maria and his boys. He will also be missed by his in-laws Maria and Giacomo SALATINO, his wife's sisters Rosa (Cheslan CHOMYCZ,) Anna (Chris KELOS), Gina (Dan CHAMPAGNE), Aunt and Uncle Jim and Cappy COLQUHOUN. A funeral was held at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church on Monday, June 23, 2003. In lieu of flowers, a donation to a trust fund for his children, c/o any branch of the Bank of Nova Scotia, account #006870000485 would be greatly appreciated.

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WEBSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-13 published
WEBSTER, Eric Taylor
Died on Saturday, October 11, at Queensway-Carleton Hospital in Ottawa, at the age of 87. Eric was the youngest and last surviving of the six children of Senator Lorne WEBSTER and Muriel Taylor WEBSTER of Montreal. He was predeceased by brothers Colin, Stuart, Howard and Dick, and by their sister, Marian. Born in Montreal on March 1, 1916, he attended Selwyn House School and Lower Canada College, then graduated from Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick. Already a licensed pilot, in 1939 he volunteered for the Royal Canadian Air Force, in which he served until 1945, rising to the rank of Wing Commander. In 1940 he married Elizabeth (Ibby) PATERSON, daughter of Senator Norman and Eleanor PATERSON of Fort William, Ontario. After the war, they settled in Sherbrooke, Quebec, where he became President of J.S. Mitchell and Co. and established Eastern Townships Warehousing Ltd. He was a leader in a wide range of community activities including Trinity United Church, the Sherbrooke Hospital, the Eastern Townships Protestant School Board, Bishop's College School, Bishop's University and Stanstead Wesleyan College. He also went into farming in North Hatley and served a term as President of the Canadian Hereford Association. His interests included antique and classic cars and family motor coaches, in which he traveled widely. He could install an oil burner, design a cottage or lead a fund- raising campaign, but never seemed happier than when under a motor vehicle, tinkering with its innards. When Ibby died in 1974, he married Jane Sweny ARMITAGE of Ottawa, where they lived until he died. Eric leaves his widow, Jane, and children Norman WEBSTER of Montreal (with wife Pat,) William WEBSTER of Vancouver (Diana,) and Maggie GALLAGHER of Oakville, Ontario (Tom.) Two other children, David and Ruth WEBSTER, died in infancy. He also leaves stepsons Mark ARMITAGE of Montreal (Pam,) Bill ARMITAGE of Ottawa (Jan) and David ARMITAGE of Ottawa. There are 12 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. There will be a memorial service at Plymouth-Trinity United Church, 380 Dufferin Street, Sherbrooke, on Thursday, October 16, at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Queensway-Carleton Hospital Foundation, 3045 Baseline Rd., Nepean, Ontario, K2H 8P4.

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WEBSTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
Part of Globe history passes with DALGLEISH
Ex-publisher's wife dies on the same day as their son
By Michael VALPY, Tuesday, December 9, 2003 - Page A17
Delsya DALGLEISH was a beautiful South African ballet dancer. She gave her name to one of the world's best-known brands of toilet paper. She married a legendary Globe and Mail editor and publisher, and, when she died at 92, it was on the same day in the same hospital as her son, Peter.
The deaths last Thursday were coincidental. Mr. DALGLEISH, 68, died in the afternoon of a cancer that had been diagnosed a short time earlier. Ms. DALGLEISH, who had been in a nursing home, died of old age later the same day. She was not aware her son had predeceased her, as had his two brothers several years earlier.
Born Delsya GRIFFITHS in Wales, she was raised in South Africa and had an established London stage career when she met Oakley DALGLEISH, a 22-year-old Canadian student at the London School of Economics. They married almost immediately. He was appointed editor-in-chief of The Globe 15 years later and publisher 10 years after that.
The DALGLEISHes were a glamorous and adventurous couple, travelling the world and partying throughout Europe and North America with the powerful and celebrated.
Ensconced members of what passed for Toronto café society in the 1940s and 1950s (Steak Oakley was on the menu of Winston's restaurant on Bay Street for years), they and their companions in full evening dress would sometimes go into The Globe's newsroom late in the evening for a nightcap in the editor's office.
Ms. DALGLEISH, in clinging gowns, would twirl gaily around the floor, eliciting whistles from copy editors toiling beneath green eyeshades.
Her husband Oakley, a handsome, elegantly dressed man, had lost his left eye as the result of a freak childhood accident involving a fire truck, and from his earliest adult days he wore a jet-black eye patch. The look was dashing, and was noticed by an advertising executive at a New York cocktail party who gave birth to the Hathaway shirt man.
The same executive, after being introduced to, and charmed by, Delsya DALGLEISH, bestowed her name (with his own spelling) on a toilet-paper account, Kimberley-Clark's Delsey "bathroom tissue."
Mr. DALGLEISH died at age 53 in 1963. Ms. DALGLEISH was appointed to The Globe's board of directors by her husband's successor, Montreal businessman R. Howard WEBSTER, and was consulted by Mr. WEBSTER on how the newspaper should be run.

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