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"WAT" 2003 Obituary


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WATERSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-27 published
Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY
In loving memory of Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY, May 7, 1920 to August 13, 2003.
Beloved wife of George Bruce TOOLEY of Steinbach Manitoba. Loving mother of Brucette WATERSON (Doug), Theodore (Betty), Juanita BROWN (Buster), Andre (Gail). Predeceased by sons Douglas and James. Loving grandmother of Crystal (Mark), Michael (Nancy), Jennifer (Paul), Jason, Sonny, Evelyn (Corey), Justin (Brandy), Jesse (Crystal), Lynette, Shawee, Teri, predeceased by Sean (Brucette), Bruce (Andre). Great Grandmother of Fern, Miah, Natashia, Alexandra, Brooklyn, Riley, Cameron, Tristen and Trinity. Sister of Rose (Harold) DOOLEY and Geraldine (Carl) ZIEGLER of Little Current, Oscar McGREGOR, Godfrey (Ann) and Jean-Mary Jane (Lawrence) ANDREWS of Birch Island. Predeceased by parents Dave and Louise McGREGOR, Theresa, Blanche, Theodore, Gordon (Rebecca), and Evelyn. Sister-in-law of Roy (Bernice), Jim (Betty), Fred (Dianne) and Velma (predeceased). Special Aunt to many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Sunday, August 17, 2003 at the Birch Island Community Centre. Funeral service was held on August 19, 2003 at St. Gabriel Lalement Roman Catholic Church. Interment in Birch Island Cemetery, Birch Island, Ontario. Reverend Michael STOGRE officiating.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-16 published
Bluesman made his mark
Canadian harpist's brush with greatness was frustrated by his battle with the bottle
By Bruce Farley MOWAT Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, January 16, 2003, Page R9
He will be remembered for creating some of the high water marks in the history of popular music in Canada. Blues harpist Richard NEWELL, also known as King Biscuit Boy, has died. He was found dead at his house in Hamilton on January 5.
Richard NEWELL's story is the stuff of legend, but not legendary. The Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines legend as "a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical, but unauthenticated."
Nearly all the career anecdotes surrounding King Biscuit Boy have been verified. Yes, he really was recruited for the Allman Brothers in 1969, for Janis JOPLIN's Full Tilt Boogie Band in 1970 and for a mid-seventies session with Aretha FRANKLIN. The stellar Houston blues guitarist, Albert COLLINS was recording a version of Mr. NEWELL's Mean Old Lady, before he died in 1994.
Mr. NEWELL, though, would rarely volunteer to offer up such information, unless you prodded him for it. He didn't think it was important.
He was born the son of Lily and Walter (Dick) NEWELL, an Royal Air Force airman stationed in Canada during the Second World War. Richard NEWELL developed an early interest in music, from the country of Hank WILLIAMS Sr. to the jump blues of Louis JORDAN, to the frenetic sounds of such original rock 'n' rollers as Little Richard. At age 12, he purchased his first harmonica after discovering the blues via late-night AM radio.
Mr. NEWELL spent seven years rehearsing his ever-expanding collection of blues 45s, which he purchased on regular hitchhiking forays to Buffalo. Few of his Friends at the time were even aware that he played harmonica and guitar.
In 1963, Ronnie COPPLE's sock-hop rock 'n' roll group, the Barons, recruited Mr. NEWELL as its lead singer. Mr. NEWELL had heard a recording of their instrumental original, Bottleneck, and came by with an record by the prototypical American electric blues slide guitarist, Elmore JAMES.
Within weeks of his joining, the group was transfigured into the flat-out, deep blues band, The Chessmen Featuring son Richard. The sound was guitar driven and harmonica-heavy, certainly not the type of thing you'd find at the average mid-sixties Southern Ontario teen dance. The band made it to Europe the following summer, playing successful shows at U.S. Army bases to predominantly black audiences.
Back in Canada, Mr. NEWELL would go on to become the lead singer of Richie Knight and The Mid Knights in 1966. He also made his debut professional recording at this time, as a session harmonica player on a recording by country singer, Dallas HARMS, best known for writing such hits as Paper Rosie for American country singer Gene WATSON.
When ex-Mid Knight and future Full Tilt Boogie band member Rick BELL was recruited for the Ronnie HAWKINS band in 1968, Mr. NEWELL's name came up. After one audition, he was hired on the spot and rechristened with the royal King Biscuit Boy moniker, a title he was never totally comfortable with.
Back in his native Arkansas, HAWKINS had rehearsed in the basement of the old KFFA radio station where blues harpist, Sonny Boy Williamson 2nd (Rice MILLER,) did his King Biscuit Flour Hour broadcasts. To HAWKINS, Mr. NEWELL must have sounded like a letter from home.
When JOPLIN scooped BELL and guitarist John TILL from HAWKINS's band early in 1970, Mr. NEWELL and drummer Larry ATAMANUIK were left with the task of re-assembling the band. That group would become the first King Biscuit Boy-led outfit, Crowbar. In a fit of pique, HAWKINS had inadvertently given the band its name in an exchange of parting shots at the Grange Tavern in Hamilton. "You guys are so dumb," he yelled, "you could fuck up the moving parts of a crowbar."
As the bandleader, singer, harmonica player and guitarist on Official Music, Mr. NEWELL was responsible for building a razor-sharp and singularly intense sound. The rehearsals for these sessions were apparently tension-laden affairs, but the payoff came when the album muscled its way on to the Canadian charts, (without the benefit of Canadian-content regulations), the fastest-selling domestic release to date.
Mr. NEWELL and the band would part ways after King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar had scored on the singles chart with the traditional piece, Corrina, Corrina. In 1971, Crowbar (without King Biscuit Boy) earned a place on the bestseller charts with a song that was to become a perennial Canuck rock anthem. Oh, What a Feeling was the first domestic single to take advantage of the newly legislated Canadian-content rules for broadcasting.
Fate intervened throughout the following years to rob Mr. NEWELL of his career momentum. The backing band he assembled to promote Good 'Uns, the 1971 followup to Official Music, was beginning to work on a third album, when the funding for it ran out.
With the momentum lost, that unit disintegrated, with guitarist Earl JOHNSON leaving to form the hard-rock outfit, Moxy.
In 1974, sessions produced by Allen TOUSSAINT, the architect of many a New Orleans Rhythm and Blues classic, would culminate in the Epic label release of a self-titled recording. Mr. NEWELL would tour the United States the following year with The Meters (featuring future members of the Neville Brothers) as his backup band. When the Epic label cleaned house later that year, though, he was one of the acts dropped.
In 1972, Mr. NEWELL wed Jacqueline WILLETTS but found that married life did not curb his increasingly frequent drinking binges. The couple divorced in 1979. Alcoholism was also the source of most of his professional woes for the better part of his life, as key shows were either cancelled, or worse, rendered into shambles. Musicians who worked with him tended to admire him, but found it incredibly frustrating that such an enormous talent was being squandered.
At several junctures in his career, Mr. NEWELL managed to quit drinking. Of the three albums he recorded and released in the eighties and nineties, two were the direct dividends of his abstinence. Those recordings earned him Juno nominations, in 1988 for Richard NEWELL aka King Biscuit Boy,and in 1996 for Urban Blues Re: NEWELL. The latter is still in print on Holger Peterson's Stony Plain label. Official Music, along with Good'Uns and Badly Bent, a best-of compilation, are available on the Unidisc label (http://www.unidisc.com). The rest of the King Biscuit Boy catalogue, including the 1980 Mouth of Steel album, is out of print.
In 2000, Mr. NEWELL's mother died and he left regular stage work, preferring the seclusion of his home in the central Mountain neighbourhood of Hamilton. His last recordings include a version of Blue Christmas, available on the Hamilton Hometown Christmas Compact Disk compilation assembled by saxophonist and long-time friend, Sonny DEL RIO. An original composition, Two Hound Blues, along with material recorded by DEL RIO and Mr. NEWELL in the late seventies (the Biscuit With Gravy sessions) is planned for release this year.
Mr. NEWELL, who leaves his father Dick, brother Walter (Randy,) and son Richard James Oddie, made his last public performance in a cameo appearance with The Little Red Blues Gang on September 12, 2002, at Mermaids Lounge in Hamilton. The 60 or so audience members present were treated to a version of his hit, Corrina, Corrina, which is strange, because he never particularly cared for that song.
Richard Alfred NEWELL, musician; born March 9, 1944, in Hamilton died in Hamilton, January 5, 2003.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
ADAM/ADAMS, Robert ''Bob'' Watson
Born January 22, 1921 in Windsor, Ontario, Bob died February 10, 2003 at the age of 82, from complications arising from heart disease and cancer. Bob started Adams Rent-All in 1967, with his first store on Avenue Road. The business grew to include six stores in the Toronto area. He retired in 1989 upon selling the business. An active member of the Rental Association of Canada until his death, he served as president in 1973 and 1974. The son of Dr. Frederick ADAM/ADAMS and Essie (née WATSON,) Bob was a Flight Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Air Force. In November 1943, his Wellington aircraft was shot down while bombing a ship in Naxos harbour, Greece, and for the next six weeks he and his crew evaded enemy capture before returning to Allied territory. In 1965, he became a member of the newly formed Royal Air Forces Escaping Society (Canadian Branch). Its 140 members were Canadian airmen who, after being shot down over Europe, escaped or evaded capture with the help of the underground. The Society's purpose was to honour and assist the individuals who guided airmen to safety, and who often suffered from imprisonment and torture as a result. Bob was president of the Society's Canadian Branch in 1995 and 1996. Bob is survived by his loving wife and best friend, Joan (née BERKELEY;) his children John, Patricia, and Mary; his sons-in-law, Lawrence SOLOMON and Steve DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS; and his granddaughters Essie and Catharine. He will be missed dearly by them, and by his many Friends. Bob is predeceased by his brothers, Frederick Coulson and John Charles, both Royal Canadian Air Force pilots, who were killed in action in 1941 and 1945. A celebration of Bob ADAM/ADAMS' life will be held on February 23, at 2900 Yonge Street. All who knew him and his family are welcome to drop by, anytime from 1: 00 pm until 5:00 pm. If desired, donations can be made to Toronto's West Park Healthcare Centre in Bob's memory.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
STINSON, Thomas Gordon
Died suddenly, at age 53, in Toronto on February 28th, 2003. Beloved husband of Christine (née CURLOOK,) cherished and adored father of daughters Emma Madeleine, 7, and Alexa Nicole, 5. Loving son of Margaret and Gordon STINSON (Thunder Bay,) he will be be deeply missed by siblings Joan STULAC (Toronto,) Lois WATSON (Anchorage) and James (Toronto). Dear son-in-law of Jennifer and Walter CURLOOK (Toronto,) he will be missed by his brothers-in-law Paul CURLOOK (Waterloo,) Michael CURLOOK (Vancouver) and sister-in-law Andrea CURLOOK (Dallas) and nephews, cousins, Friends, family and colleagues. A private service was held and cremation has taken place at his request. Memorial donations and flowers are gratefully declined.
May he rest in peace.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
WATSON, David Barr (M.B.E., Territorial Efficiency Medal, Canadian Forces Decoration, B.Com.)
Retired Partner, Woods Gordon and Co. (now Ernst and Young), Colonel, Royal Canadian Signals (Retd)
Died on Wednesday, April 9, 2003 at Ian Anderson House in Oakville in his 83rd year. He leaves his beloved wife Nancy (CRETNEY,) sons Nigel and Ian, daughters-in-law Natalie and Monica, and grandchildren Matthew, Thomas, Joy, Benjamin, Geoffrey, Christopher and Scott.
He was born in Swansea, Wales and was educated at Haileybury College and The London School of Economics. During World War 2 he was Commanding Officer, 1st British Airborne Corps Signals. He jumped into North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Normandy and Holland, and was awarded the Member of the British Empire and was twice mentioned in dispatches for gallantry. After emigrating to Canada in 1947 he joined the 8th Signal Regt. (Canadian Militia) and later was appointed Hon. Colonel, 709 (Toronto) Communication Regt.
He joined Woods, Gordon and Co., Management Consultants, in Toronto in 1949, and became a Partner in 1953. He established a worldwide reputation as a Management Information Systems specialist and developed many unique computer systems in Canada, U.S.A., United Kingdom, Australia, South Africa, Hong Kong and Iran. He retired in 1981.
He was a member of the Institute of Management Consultants of Ontario, Royal Canadian Military Institute, Oakville Probus Club, Signal Officers Club and Fort York Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion.
Friends may call at the Oakview Funeral Home, 56 Lakeshore Road West, Oakville (905) 842-2252 on Friday, April 11 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be at St. Jude's Church, 160 William Street, Oakville on Saturday, April 12, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Ian Anderson House, Lions Foundation Dog Guides or the Salvation Army would be appreciated by the family.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
SPRAGGE, Godfrey L.
Died suddenly, at Kingston General Hospital, on Sunday, May 4, 2003, in the presence of his sons John and Michael. He leaves behind a loving family, a circle of Friends who shared his passionate concern for peace and social justice, and who will miss him very much. He was married to Shirley (née COX) for forty-one years. They were a couple and best Friends for fifty years before her death in 1995.
Born in Toronto on January 4, 1929, he studied at Trinity College, Toronto, and worked as a land surveyor and Urban Planner before obtaining his Masters of Planning from Cornell University. He then went on to help found the School of Urban and Regional Planning at Queen's University, Kingston, where he taught for twenty-five years. Following his retirement from Queen's, he trained with Project Accompaniment to serve as an electron observer and witness for peace in Guatemala.
His passion for social justice led him to the Early Years Coalition and Better Beginnings, Kingston Electors On Line, and the Kingston Faith and Justice Coalition. He derived great strength from his involvement with men's support groups, and great pleasure from piano lessons and singing with the Kingston Choral Society and Open Voices Choir. His spiritual journey began with the Anglican Church and led to the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers).
Since the death of his wife, he found great joy with his many Friends. He is survived by his sisters Elizabeth (J.D. WATSON and their three children) of Belfast, and Monica of Toronto sons John (Allison MacDUFFEE) and Michael (Lynne FORAN) of Toronto. He particularly delighted in his grandchildren Kathleen and Liam.
His family will receive Friends at the Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson Street, Kingston, on Thursday, May 8 from 6 to 9 p.m. His life will be celebrated at a meeting for worship in the Quaker tradition on Saturday, May 10 at 1: 30 p.m. at the University Club, 130 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario. There will also be a Memorial Service at Trinity College Chapel on Monday, May 12 at 2 p.m. with a reception to follow in the Combination Private Dining Room. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the United Way serving Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington for the Success by Six Program, 417 Bagot Street, Kingston, Ontario K7K 3C1 or the Kingston Symphony Association, P.O. 1616, 11 Princess Street, Suite 206, Kingston, Ontario K7L 5C8.
Online Guest Book www.reidfuneralhome.com (613) 548-7973

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-30 published
Died This Day -- Homer WATSON, 1936
Friday, May 30, 2003 - Page R11
Artist born on January 14, 1855, at Doon, Canada West; self-taught inspired by illustrated magazines of period, drew and painted as a boy; from 1874 to 1876, recieved some instruction while living in Toronto and New York; returned home to paint; prolific output of landscapes compared with such European masters as John Constable; one of few contemporaries to achieve international reputation; died at Doon near Kitchener, Ontario

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-24 published
Thomas Alexander HUMPHREY
By Bruce T. HUMPHREY Tuesday, June 24, 2003 - Page A20
Husband, father, grandfather, community leader, funeral director. Born December 6, 1918 in Toronto. Died October 22, 2002 in Barrie, Ontario, of cancer, aged 83.
Tom HUMPHREY was born the only child of Albert (Bert) and Florence HUMPHREY. When his father died at the age of 44, Tom's mother took control of the family firm with the assistance of a manager until Tom was old enough, in 1939, to obtain his funeral director's licence.
He and his mother operated both the funeral home and the ambulance service they provided to the public. As the third generation HUMPHREY to guide the family business, Tom took great care in making sure that the firm continued to upgrade its services and facilities within an ever-changing society.
Active in the community, Tom helped create the Metropolitan and Provincial Ambulance Groups.
He was also a member of the Toronto Board of Trade; the Masonic Order, and Bedford Lodge No. 638 G.R.C. for more than 50 years.
Tom also belonged (and held office) in the Rameses Shriners as well, he was a member for 50 years (in addition to having served as a past director) of the Royal Order of Jesters Court 83 and a member of the Toronto-Leaside Rotary Club for more than 45 years.
He was one of the founders of the Funeral Society of Ontario (Fraternal), known today as Guaranteed Funeral Deposits of Canada. He also served as a director on various boards for several companies and participated in several professional associations during his life.
Tom was a member of Toronto's Leaside United Church since 1956, having served many years as an elder.
Boating was a also great interest -- almost a passion -- to my father; this led to his becoming the first Commodore of the Big Bay Point Yacht Club.
Thomas HUMPHREY moved to Thornhill, Ontario, shortly after his marriage to Lois Belle LEONARD, the love of his life since their meeting 70 years ago. Eventually, he and his family moved to homes in Big Bay Point and the Barrie area in Ontario, providing him with great personal satisfaction and an ever-increasing and enlarging circle of Friends.
"His other love in life has been to travel with my mom to wonderful and exotic locales around the world, with his home time divided between Ontario and Florida," says his daughter Valerie DICKSON/DIXON.
Thomas's wife Lois says: "His personal and corporate success will be long remembered and revered by family, Friends and business associates. "
Most of all, Tom loved his family members, who meant so much to him. He will always be missed and loved by his children, grandchildren and all those who were close to him.
Tom is survived by his wife Lois, daughter Valerie and her husband Rod DICKSON/DIXON; son Bruce and his wife Christina K. HUMPHREY.
Tom was predeceased by daughter Denise WATSON and is father-in-law to John WATSON.
Tom is lovingly remembered by his grandchildren Andrew WATSON Sean and Jeffrey DICKSON/DIXON; and Adam, Jacquelyn and Courtney HUMPHREY.
Bruce HUMPHREY is Thomas HUMPHREY's son and president of Humphrey Funeral Home, A.W. Miles Chapel.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Notice To Creditors And Others In the estate of Douglas Graeme WATSON, deceased
All persons having claims against the estate of Douglas Graeme WATSON, late of Toronto and Penetang, who died on May 24, 2003 are hereby notified to furnish full particulars of their claims to the undersigned executors of the will and codicil of the said deceased, on or before the 10th day of September, 2003. Immediately after that date, the executors will distribute the assets of the said deceased having regard only to claims of which they shall then have notice.
Dated this 6th day of August, 2003.
H. Donald GUTHRIE and Frederick W. HACKER, Executors,
by Hacker Gignac Rice, 518 Yonge Street,
Midland, Ontario, L4R 2C5, their
solicitors herein.
Page B12

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Notice To Creditors And Others In the estate of Douglas Graeme WATSON, deceased
All persons having claims against the estate of Douglas Graeme WATSON, late of Toronto and Penetang, who died on May 24, 2003 are hereby notified to furnish full particulars of their claims to the undersigned executors of the will and codicil of the said deceased, on or before the 10th day of September, 2003. Immediately after that date, the executors will distribute the assets of the said deceased having regard only to claims of which they shall then have notice.
Dated this 6th day of August, 2003.
H. Donald GUTHRIE and Frederick W. HACKER, Executors,
by Hacker Gignac Rice, 518 Yonge Street,
Midland, Ontario, L4R 2C5,
their solicitors herein.
Page B7

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
WATSON, In the estate of Douglas Graeme
Notice To Creditors And Others
In the estate of Douglas Graeme WATSON, deceased
All persons having claims against the estate of Douglas Graeme WATSON, late of Toronto and Penetang, who died on May 24, 2003 are hereby notified to furnish full particulars of their claims to the undersigned executors of the will and codicil of the said deceased, on or before the 10th day of September, 2003. Immediately after that date, the executors will distribute the assets of the said deceased having regard only to claims of which they shall then have notice.
Dated this 6th day of August, 2003.
H. Donald GUTHRIE and Frederick W. HACKER, Executors,
by Hacker Gignac Rice, 518 Yonge Street,
Midland, Ontario, L4R 2C5,
their solicitors herein.
Page B10

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-02 published
Lobbyist was an aviation 'visionary'
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, September 2, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- It was a case of boredom that helped propel Angus MORRISON into a flying career and saw him become the aviation industry's top lobbyist for nearly a quarter of a century.
"Frankly, I was bored. I had been a regimental officer, and I wasn't really interested in what was going on. The war was over, so I decided I was going to learn to fly," Mr. MORRISON said in a 1989 interview.
The Toronto native's interest in flying and his expertise at representing the interests of Canadian airline operations and manufacturers through the Air Transport Association of Canada, earned him a spot in Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame.
Mr. MORRISON, a resident of Almonte, Ontario, near Ottawa, died on June 30 after a brief illness. He was 84.
"My uncle, Brigadier General Arthur MORTIMER, spent his whole career in the military and that wasn't for dad," says Mr. MORRISON's son Jamie. "He had a lust for flying, he wanted to spread his wings, so to speak, and not be a career military man. He felt he was built for more than that.'' When his father, a stockbroker, died during the market crash of 1929, Mr. MORRISON, who was born on April 22, 1919, moved to Ottawa and spent much of his childhood with the family of Mr. MORTIMER. Eventually, he returned to Toronto and was educated at Upper Canada College and Bishop's College, before joining the military.
"He enlisted in the navy but uncle Arthur would not have it. He hauled him out and said he had to enlist in the proper form of the military, which was the army," says Jamie MORRISON.
During the Second World War, he served with the 21st Canadian Armoured Regiment, Governor-General's Footguards, serving in North Africa and Italy, advancing to the rank of captain.
In 1946, shortly after earning his wings, Mr. MORRISON formed Atlas Aviation, based at Ottawa International Airport and five years later, sold his share in the company to join the Air Industries and Transport Association, as executive secretary. The association later split, to form the new Air Transport Association of Canada, which represents most airline companies, from the smallest flying school in Canada to Air Canada.
He became president of Air Transport Association of Canada in 1962 and held the job until he retired in 1985.
"Angus was a visionary, as were many of his board," Don WATSON, former president of Pacific Western Airlines said in a statement read at Mr. MORRISON 's funeral. "Many of the plans for the future of our air transport were near to impossible but Angus would smile and say, 'If we can dream, we can do it.' Angus fully represented [the] air transport industry not only to our government but also to the governments of many countries around the world.'' In 1986, Mr. MORRISON was given the C.D. Howe Award by the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute, for planning and policy-making. He was inducted into Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame in 1989.
On its Web site, the hall of fame cites Mr. MORRISON for his work in convincing the federal government to liberalize flying rules and standardize training. He also helped federal officials negotiate the first bilateral air agreement with the U.S., says Jamie MORRISON, who is a pilot and vice-president and general manager of Montreal-based Execaire Inc., which manages aircraft on behalf of corporations.
After retiring, Mr. MORRISON began working by correspondence courses toward a degree in naval architecture at the Boston Institute of Naval Architecture in Massachusetts to further his lifelong love of the sea and boats.
Mr. MORRISON, who was also an Almonte town councillor during the 1960s, leaves sons Jamie, Christian and Mark and daughter Sandra. His wife died in the fall of 2002.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
KEITH, Jean Campbell
On September 12, 2003, in her 90th year, Jeannie, whose light brown hair had long since turned to silver, died after a third bout with cancer. She was a proud graduate ''with honour'' of University College, at the University of Toronto, in mathematics and sciences, in 1935, a time when these fields of study did not always welcome women. Employed in the actuarial department of Canada Life Insurance Company, she married Arthur George KEITH on May 1, 1940, after a long engagement, immediately before he went overseas with the Second Field Regiment of the Royal Canadian Engineers. After his safe return and many years together in Port Credit and Toronto, Art and Jeannie retired to the Bowmanville area, where both were active in St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Jeannie was predeceased by her brother, Howard, in 1994 and by Arthur in 1996. She will be tenderly remembered by her children and their partners: Maggie KEITH and Robert STACEY; Gordon KEITH and Shanna FAROUGH; and Louise WATSON and Don LOREE; and by her sisters-in-law Marian BEATTY of Saint Mary's, and Louisa KEITH of Toronto. Her family thanks the staff of the Altamont Nursing Home for their care and compassion and her Friends and minister at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church and Wilmot Creek for the love and support that enabled Jeannie to live her last years with grace and dignity. Friends may call at the Northcutt Elliott Funeral Home, 53 Division Street North, Bowmanville, on Sunday, September 14 (2: 00-4:00 P.M. and 7:00-9:00 P.M.). The funeral will take place at the funeral home at 1: 00 P.M. on Monday, September 15, 2003, followed by tea at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 47 Temperance Street, Bowmanville. In place of flowers, the family would welcome donations to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church Accessbility Fund or the Alzheimer's Society.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-02 published
Jean Watson VERNON
By Kate BARLOW Thursday, October 2, 2003 - Page A26
Singer, teacher. Born April 23, 1909, in Scotland. Died August 12 in Oakville, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 94.
Coloratura contralto Jean WATSON sang in each province in Canada and every state of the Union during the Second World War, taking her magnificent three-octave voice to the war weary. This Canadian singer was the first "British" singer to be invited to sing at the great Wagner Festival at Bayreuth, Germany, after that war.
She performed with the great conductors of the age -- Bruno Walter, Eugene Ormandy and Serge Koussevitsky -- always to sensational reviews. She sang more than a dozen concerts in Carnegie Hall represented Canada in the elite choir assembled for Queen Elizabeth's Coronation in Westminster Abbey in 1953 and became a principal contralto at Covent Garden.
I knew none of this in 1981 when I enrolled in a creative writing course. Our instructor asked us to introduce ourselves. Then the turn came of the smartly dressed woman sitting opposite. She appeared to be in her mid-fifties. Huge brown eyes looked out from a still striking face, made up to the nines. Her blond hair was immaculate and so were her clothes.
We listened spellbound as this stranger recounted, in carefully modulated tones, how she had been born in Scotland, emigrated to Canada with her family when she was 10, studied at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and in New York. She had returned to Britain after the war, she said, to try her fortune as an opera singer. Oh yes, and she had sung at Covent Garden and in Westminster Abbey at the Queen's Coronation, before losing her voice to breast cancer. She had recently returned to Canada, after the death of her beloved husband, Edmond VERNON.
(When she was diagnosed with breast cancer, what she feared above death itself happened. The radical mastectomy affected her chest muscles, ruining that huge voice; a voice still capable of sending shivers down my spine when I listen to a rare scratchy 78 rpm vinyl recording of Jean singing Abide with Me, accompanied by the great Gerald Moore.)
Her tale seemed too gothic, even for an embryo writer. I was intrigued and gave her a lift home at the end of the class. I had never before met a true "diva." It proved an education. She had had a great voice. She said so herself. If you asked her opinion on some deathless prose you had written, she told the truth. Even in her eighties, she retained that "star quality" of hers, usually becoming the centre of attention at social gatherings.
Jean had loved her husband Edmond deeply and in return been equally loved by the eminent research chemist, who had put his own career on hold to follow her around the world's great concert and opera houses. And who then supported her in her time of trial.
After her voice was gone and she had conquered her initial despair, she taught music to small children in the pre-prep school of the famous English private school Harrow, where her husband had found work as a master.
When her husband died suddenly, shortly before he was due to retire, Jean returned to Canada, moving to Oakville, Ontario, to be near her brother. But her right arm began to wither, as a result of the cancer operation all those years before. Undeterred, the right-handed Jean wrote a Harlequin Romance novel using just her left hand. She was 79 when Love's Perjury, written under the pen name Marina Francis (she disliked British royal, Princess Marina, as much as she admired writer, Dick Francis) was released in 1988. It proved a bestseller in the romance genre and was translated into seven languages.
Jean died in a long-term care centre, leaving only a few old recordings of her magnificent voice.
Kate BARLOW is a friend of Jean.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
Acting up helped PoW survive camp
But working in the salt mines took its toll on Canadian soldier in First World War
By Gloria GALLOWAY, Monday, November 10, 2003 - Page A3
First World War soldiers were rarely taken prisoner.
Most of the Allied casualties died in the mud with a German sniper's bullet in their head, or riddled with shrapnel, or drowned in their own mucus after poison gas filled their lungs. Of the more than 600,000 Canadians who fought in the War To End All Wars, only 4,000 were captured.
Private William McLEISH was among the unfortunate few. He was captured in France in April of 1915 and spent the last 2½ years of the war at Rennbahn PoW camp near Munster, Germany.
Pte. McLEISH survived, while nearly 60,000 other Canadians perished, but it would be wrong to say he was lucky. The hardships he endured took away his ability to function in a postwar world. He could not provide for his family or enjoy the life he had fought to protect.
In Rennbahn, at the age of 22, Pte. McLEISH was put to work in the salt mines, a gruelling task overseen by civilian bosses who treated the PoWs like slaves.
But camp life was a world of bizarre contrasts and the unfortunate souls who found themselves the unwilling guests of the Germans did what they could to alleviate the cycle of toil and tedium. Thus the Rennbahn Empire, a stage troupe of prisoners, was formed.
Mr. McLEISH died in 1966 after spending his last decades in and out of mental hospitals, a victim of what is now called post-traumatic stress disorder. He left a box of mementos that his daughter, Glen FAYET, submitted to the Memory Project organized by The Globe and Mail and the Dominion Institute.
They include cast photos of the plays her father and other prisoners performed. The men took all parts, slipping into dresses, wigs and hats as required by the script. In the yellowing photos they pose with faces contorted into character.
Jonathan VANCE, a history professor at the University of Western Ontario and a leading expert on the lives of prisoners of war, says it wasn't uncommon for First World War PoWs to be permitted to put on plays.
"It kept them out of trouble, for one thing," he said. "For another thing, international laws provided for prisoners to take advantage of recreation opportunities, including intellectual opportunities. So most camps had not only theatres, but libraries and art classes and occupational therapy classes... orchestras in some cases."
A book of remembrance created by prisoners of Rennbahn thanks family and Friends for sending props, costumes and even grease paint into the camps.
"In the First World War, you could get in pretty well anything. You could get food hampers sent in from major London department stores," Dr. VANCE said.
The theatrical paraphernalia made it possible to stage performances at Rennbahn every Wednesday. The shows had titles like Roll on Blighty! and Le Danseur Inconnu. Listed on the playbills is one W. McLEISH.
"We didn't think that he had that type of outgoing personality," Pte. McLEISH's daughter, Ms. FAYET, said with a quiet laugh.
Her father had immigrated to Montreal from Scotland in 1911 when he was 18 and joined the army reserve soon after his arrival. He signed up when war was declared and was quickly shipped overseas.
While on leave in Britain, Pte. McLEISH visited an aunt in Edinburgh, where he met Margaret WATSON. Love quickly followed, and the Canadian in uniform remained in Ms. WATSON's thoughts after he returned to the front.
Then came word of his capture. Ms. WATSON wrote to the Red Cross, asking his whereabouts. He was in the camp near Munster, she heard. But "this man does not write very often," said the official response.
Many soldiers emerged from captivity "with job-related injuries that would prevent them from earning a living for the rest of their lives," Dr. VANCE said. "You have all kinds of stories about people losing hands and feet, getting arms mangled in machinery, getting bit of their bodies blown off in mine explosions."
This was William McLEISH's life for nearly three years. It must have been a very strange existence, Dr. VANCE said, to be working in such trying conditions for 12 to 14 hours then return to camp to take part in a music hall or a play.
Certainly the men would have derived some comfort from the performances. But the evening diversions weren't enough to keep Pte. McLEISH whole.
When he was freed after Germany surrendered, he found the Scottish lass and they wed. They settled in Canada and had a son and a daughter.
"He was quite well to begin with," Ms. FAYET said, "but then he had problems dealing with everyday life and eventually he could no longer go into the office to work."
He quit his job at the Grand Trunk Railway and his wife became the family's breadwinner.
"She took any job that she could in order to supplement the income. As I understand it, they received $25 a month for four people to live on from the government," Ms. FAYET said.
Her father's nerves were shot and he became a regular patient at the veterans' hospital in Ste. Anne de Bellevue. "People knew that there was such a thing as shell shock, but, in a lot of minds, that was a moral failing rather than a physical or psychological failing," Dr. VANCE said. "It wasn't really appreciated, the degree to which prolonged stress has physiological impacts on the brain."
But Mr. McLEISH's family knew the toll it had taken. Ms. FAYET said he never talked about the war, except occasionally to mention a practical joke someone had played or an amusing anecdote.
The horror of the war remained buried inside Mr. McLEISH until he died. Perhaps it was softened by a box of photographs and fading playbills that bear his name.

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WATSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
MURRAY, Mari-Ellen
It is with great sorrow that we announce the death of Mari-Ellen MURRAY on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 while vacationing in South Africa. A vibrant and determined woman, Mari-Ellen lived life as a perpetual adventure, unaltered by her battle with breast cancer. She died quickly and mercifully while pursuing her love of travel with her cherished husband Andrew BISHOP. Beloved daughter of Norman and Nerina MURRAY; granddaughter of Luigia SINELLI, sister of Jacqueline, Stephanie and Rob WATSON, Marisa and Paul GRETHER, and Christine; treasured Aunt Mimi of Madeleine and Cole WATSON; much-loved daughter-in-law of Trevor and Barbara BISHOP; sister-in-law of Timothy and Michael. Our inspiration and pillar of strength, she will be sorely missed by all who knew her. Visitation at Kopriva Taylor at 64 Lakeshore Road West in Oakville from 2: 00 to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 30th, 2003. The Funeral Mass will take place on Monday, December 1st at 1: 30 p.m. at St. Basil's Church, 50 St. Joseph Street at Bay Street in Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Ave. Toronto, M5G 2M9 or Willow Breast Cancer Support and Resource Services, 785 Queen Street East, Toronto, M4M 1H5 would be greatly appreciated.

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WATSYK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-05 published
CLARK, Reginald Harold, 1928-2003,
B.Sc., PhD (Imperial College, London),
Professor Emeritus, Queen's University
Died peacefully at Providence Manor, Kingston on Tuesday, April 2, after a long illness. Survived by his wife, Oris, children, Natalie (Mark) REYNOLDS of Adelaide Australia, Adrian, Stefanie (Petrus BOOTS) and grandchildren Aidan, Evan, Liam REYNOLDS and Samsara BOOTS. Also survived by brother Norman (Gwen,) London England and brother-in-law John WATSYK, Thunder Bay.
Dr. CLARK came to Canada in 1955 and joined Queen's University in the department of Chemical Engineering, serving as head of Department from 1961-1970, and continuing until his retirement in 1992. He was the President of the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering, 1967-1968.
Cremation has taken place. There will be a memorial service at Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson Street (at Barrie St.), Kingston, on Monday, April 7 at 7: 00 p.m. The family will receive Friends prior to the service from 6: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Providence Continuing Care Centre Providence Manor Site or Partners in Mission Food Bank.
Online Guest Book reidfuneralhome.com 613-548-7973

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WATT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-26 published
WATT, Julia Conn
Died peacefully, after a valiant struggle, at her Toronto home April 16, 2003. She is survived by her sons Jeremy and Joshua, her grand_sons Zachary and Cody, and Friends from all walks of life too numerous to mention. Born in Sherman, Texas on May 22, 1951 Julia graduated in 1969 from Kirbyville High School, Texas and later obtained a B.Sc in Education from Stephen F. Austin University, Texas. She attended the University of Kansas M.B.A. program while continuing to work to finance her education and support her young family. Julia demonstrated a rare drive, determination, and knack for business at an early age, starting her own small enterprise at the age of nine. She rose through the ranks of the computer industry to eventually become President of Tech Data Canada Corp. Though retired for the last few years, she shared her expertise through her role as director of a number of companies. She also devoted much time and energy to the community and was a former member of the Board of Directors of Sunnybrook Hospital. Julia loved her adopted home Toronto but she never forgot her southern roots. In her daily life, she always expressed the highest ideals of kindness, perseverance, and decency. She will be greatly missed. Her family and Friends ask that in lieu of flowers donations be made for a Memorial to: Leon RUDANYCZ in trust for Julia Watt Memorial, c/o Cornermark Capital Corp, Suite 1800, 130 King Street West, P.O. Box 427, Toronto, Ontario M5X 1E3 or charitable donations to Sunnybrook and Women's Foundation, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 re: Angiogenesis Research Account in Memory of Julia Watt or re: Virtual Oncology Resource Centre Account in Memory of Julia Watt. A Celebration of the Life of Julia Conn WATT will be held at 7: 30 p.m. on Monday, April 28, 2003 at The Royal Canadian Yacht Club, 141 St. George Street, Toronto.

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WATT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Elizabeth Aleen AKED, late of the City of Toronto, Ontario, deceased, who died on or about March 21st, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before August 18th, 2003. Thereafter, the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, Ontario, on June 26, 2003
Catherine A. ROBERTS and Kerry I.J. WATT,
Estate Trustees by their solicitors:
McMillan Binch LLP (Catherine A. ROBERTS)
200 Bay Street, Suite 3500
Toronto, Ontario, M5J 2J7
Page B7

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WATT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-19 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Elizabeth Aleen AKED, late of the City of Toronto, Ontario, deceased, who died on or about March 21st, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before August 18th, 2003. Thereafter, the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, Ontario, on June 26, 2003
Catherine A. ROBERTS
Kerry I.J. WATT,
Estate Trustees by their solicitors:
McMillan Binch LLP (Catherine A. ROBERTS)
200 Bay Street, Suite 3500
Toronto, Ontario, M5J 2J7
Page B5

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WATTERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
WATTERS, Walter
On Monday, September 15, 2003, after a valiant's struggle with cancer, Walter died peacefully, without fear, in the presence of his wife, children, and grandchildren, at the age of 74. Beloved husband of Geraldine and dear father of Carolyn, James, Helen and John. Loving grandfather of Blake, Mary-Ellen, Corrina, Tyler, Joey, Jay, Tim, and Jenn. Great grandfather to Andrea, Laura, Sydney and Rielly. He will be greatly missed by family and Friends. A special note of thanks to the 6th floor staff of the Lakeridge Oshawa Hospital. The family will receive Friends at the McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax (Pickering Village) 905-428-8488 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Thursday, September 18, 2003 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment - Pine Ridge Memorial Gardens. Should family and Friends so desire, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated.

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WATTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JOHNSON, Frances Joan
Joan JOHNSON (née WATTS,) whose gentle spirit moved all who knew her, passed away peacefully at the Northumberland Health Care Centre in Cobourg, Ontario on Thursday, March 6, 2003. She was 77 years of age. Joan was the cherished wife of the late Dr. Robert (Bob) Herbert JOHNSON; loving mother of Susan, Wendy, Gordon, and Douglas; dear sister of Audrey DALGLISH and the late Barbara PERRY; and beloved aunt of her nieces and nephews. Joan will be sadly missed and her memory will be honoured by her sons-in-law Larry and David and by her daughters-in-law Wendy and Melyssa. Her grandchildren, Katie, Andrew, and Molly, will hold memories of their 'Noanie' close to their hearts. Joan lived her life with unfailing strength and dignity and with quiet good humour. She served her country in the Canadian Navy during World War 2, achieving the rank of Sub Lieutenant. After she left the Navy, she studied nursing at the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children School for Nurses, graduating in 1950. It was at the School for Nurses that she met her future husband, Bob, a pediatrician at the Hospital for Sick Children. Bob and Joan were married in 1953. Following a year in Boston furthering their respective careers in medicine, they moved back to Canada, settling in Mississauga. Bob and Joan lived there for 25 years, raising their children Sue, Wendy, Gord and Doug. Joan was truly a Canadian pioneer. She achieved her private pilot's license in her 40s and was an expert canoeist, which was evident to anyone who visited her and Bob at their treasured cottage in Georgian Bay. She often carved paddles for herself and for members of her family and in her 70s, built a cedar strip canoe which she paddled in and around the waters of the Bayfield-Nares Inlet. Joan was also creative and talented, producing whimsical stuffed animals for her children and grandchildren and entertaining family and Friends with her all-too-infrequent performances on the piano. During her last few years, Joan was cared for by her daughter Wendy. Wendy's selfless compassion was deeply appreciated by Joan and her family. A Memorial Service will be held at Trinity United Church (Corner of Chapel Street and Division Street in Cobourg), on Saturday, March 15th at 11 a.m. Those wishing may make a memorial contribution by cheque to the Northumberland Health Care Foundation. Arrangements by MacCoubrey Funeral Home  Cobourg (905) 372-5132 Condolences received at maccoubrey@sympatico.ca.

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WATTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
Canadian Football League wide receiver 'was always there' and rarely missed a pass
All-round athlete was also a prolific artist who amused teammates and Friends with his skillful caricatures
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, July 21, 2003 - Page R5
Ottawa -- Kelvin KIRK was an artist on and off the football field.
On the gridiron, the former Canadian Football League wide receiver was known as an all-round athlete with tremendous breakaway speed who rarely missed a pass within his grasp; in the locker room, at home and in his second career in the advertising department at an Ottawa newspaper, he was skilled with pen, pencil and paintbrush.
His humorous caricatures often left his teammates and fellow employees grabbing at their sides with laughter.
Mr. KIRK, who was born on December 13, 1953, died on July 2 of an apparent heart attack while playing pickup basketball in Ottawa.
The 49-year-old native of Mt. Pleasant, Florida, began his football career at Dunbar High School in Ohio where he caught 13 touchdown passes in two years for the Dunbar Wolverines.
In 1973, the 5-foot-11 (1.79 metre), 175-pound (65-kilogram) receiver joined the Dayton Flyers at the University of Dayton in Ohio, where he was the Flyers' top pass receiver for three straight years and was voted the team's most valuable player in 1975.
When he left after three seasons, he held the school's record for receiving yardage, with 1,676 yards. In the Flyers' record book, he continues to hold fourth place in career receiving yardage, says Doug HAUSCHILD, director of media relations and sports information at the University of Dayton.
After being selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 17th round of the 1976 National Football League draft, Mr. KIRK walked out of training camp when he sensed he wasn't getting a legitimate opportunity to make the club.
He was named "Mr. Irrelevant" because as the 487th selection, he proved to be the last player taken in the draft, says Shawn LACKIE, a public-relations spokesman for the Canadian Football League.
He signed with the Canadian Football League's Toronto Argonauts in 1977 and led the team in pass receptions.
He also played for the Calgary Stampeders, Saskatchewan Roughriders and the Ottawa Rough Riders. He was Ottawa's most valuable player in 1981 when the Rough Riders made it to the Grey Cup that year but lost 26 - 23 to the Edmonton Eskimos.
His quarterback that year was J.C. WATTS, who would later become an Oklahoma congressman.
During his Canadian Football League career he caught 153 passes for 2,942 yards and 16 touchdowns. He returned 163 punts for 1,678 yards and 82 kickoffs for another 1,922 yards. His runbacks produced seven touchdowns.
"When the ball was thrown to him, he was always there. He had great breakaway speed," says Rick SOWIETA, a teammate of Mr. KIRK's when both broke into the Canadian Football League with the Argonauts.
"He had good speed, great hands -- he was our deep threat," says Jeff AVERY, one of Mr. KIRK's former Ottawa Rough Riders teammates, and now a radio commentator for the Ottawa Renegades of the Canadian Football League. "I remember one game when he caught three touchdown passes to help us whip the Montreal Concorde." Most of his former Rough Riders' teammates remember Mr. KIRK's biggest missed pass, though the failed reception wasn't his fault.
"It was the 1981 Grey Cup game in the third or fourth quarter and Kelvin was streaking down the sidelines in the clear. J.C. [WATTS] overthrew him by about six inches. Had he made the catch, it was a touch-down and we would have won the cup," says Mr. SOWIETA, now a restaurant owner in Ottawa.
A professional artist and trained art teacher, Mr. KIRK joined the advertising department at The Ottawa Citizen in 1989 in an order entry position and eventually worked on layouts and processing copy for advertisements, before moving into desktop publishing, which involved the creation of ads.
"There was nothing you could put on his desk that he couldn't handle," says Rejéan SAUMURE, manager of advertising services at the Citizen.
"Kelvin never complained. He took it all on with a smile that was worth a million bucks.
"He was the kind of guy who, as soon as he walked into the office, everyone liked. He had a magnetism about him. He warmed a room." Besides staying in tip-top shape, Mr. KIRK kept involved in football by helping coach the Ottawa Sooners of the Ontario Football Conference. He was also a prolific artist, one of his specialties being caricatures that amused his former teammates and Citizen colleagues.
During his years as a player, he would often sneak into the locker room prior to practice and draw cartoons on a chalk board, usually poking fun at teammates, coaches and various on-field happenings, says Mr. AVERY. He continued his antics as a coach with the Sooners as a way of keeping the mood light, adds Mr. SOWIETA.
"Before practice, players always checked the board to see who was being picked on that day by this mystery drawer. His work could be hilarious," says Mr. AVERY.
At the Citizen, where one of his dreams was to become a newsroom artist, Mr. KIRK often drew caricatures of co-workers and members of his own family.
His drawings often appeared on the birthday cards that circulated around the office.
"People would be quite amused," says Mr. SAUMURE. " His work was not always flattering but it always captured those he was drawing." Mr. KIRK leaves his 20-year-old son, Jonathan, and his wife Joann LARVENTZ, from whom he was separated.

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WATTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-13 published
WATTS, Fraser Herbert
Passed away quietly on December 10, 2003 at the Toronto Western Hospital, surrounded by his sons and daughter-in-law. Predeceased by his beloved wife of 48 years, Audrey Margaret WATTS. Loving father of Kingsley (Pearl), Rebeccah (Graham) and Jason. Gentle grandfather of Evan, Silas, Kelsey, and Jesse. Dear brother-in-law to George PETRIE, Kit McMAHON and Mandy McMAHON. Born in Toronto, Fraser attended Stanford and Yale before receiving his diploma from the Architectural Association in England where he met Audrey McMAHON. Trained as both an Architect, and as a Landscape Architect at Harvard, he practiced and taught for thirty five years at the University of Toronto and at the University of Waterloo where he served as Dean of Architecture. Perhaps most comfortable with a pencil in hand, he loved to solve visual problems through design. He was fascinated with the history of gardens, a subject he taught to a generation, or two, of Canadian architects. He loved to walk and to observe, pleasures he shared with the greatest love of his life, his wife. He read voraciously, and had a weakness for British detective novels, and Canadian Fiction writers. He listened religiously to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's ''Ideas'' programs to the day he died. He will be remembered as a private, loving, and complex man who cared passionately for his family, and for the visual world. There will be a visitation at the Turner & Porter Funeral Home, 436 Roncesvalles Avenue on Tuesday, December 16th from 7: 00 - 9:00 p.m. In memory of his wife, donations may be made to the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society, 265 Yorkland Blvd., Suite 300A, North York, M2J 1S5, or at www.alsontario.org

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