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"WAR" 2003 Obituary


WARD  WARDROP  WARKENTIN  WARNICK  WARNOCK  WARR  WARREN  WARRICK  WARRINGTON 

WARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
Fanny (WARD) FOGAL
In loving memory of Fanny (WARD) FOGAL April 18, 1905 to February 28, 2003.
Fanny FOGAL, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, Gore Bay, passed away at the Lodge on Friday, February 28, 2003 at the age of 97 years.
She was born in Allan Township daughter of the late Charles H and Fanny (BOWSER) WARD. She was a member of the United Church, loved hunting and gardening and enjoyed knitting and making quilts. Fanny was a hard working farm wife and mother, and will be fondly remembered for her pride, love and enjoyment of her children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren. Predeceased be her beloved husband Nelson FOGAL. Loving and loved mother of Gurtie NOBLE and husband Arden, Alford FOGAL and wife Doreen all of Gordon Township. Predeceased by one son Emerson and three daughters Dorothy, Elva and Gladys. Dear sister of Sarah WITTY, Charles and Matthew WARD all predeceased. Dear grandmother of 8 grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren and 12 great-great grandchildren. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Sunday March 2, 2003. The funeral service was held on Monday March 3, 2002 from the Wm G. Turner Chapel of the Culgin Funeral Home with Pastor Erwin Thompson officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery in the spring.

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WARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-20 published
Urbain Paul HEBERT
In loving memory of Urbain Paul HEBERT who passed away Tuesday afternoon, August 12th, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Laurentian Site at the age of 70 years.
Beloved husband of Shirley (née (TYSON DUGIT)) HEBERT of Killarney. Loving father of Sheila (husband Bob SIMONEAU) of Gogama, Laura (husband Harold WARD) of Sudbury, Leslie (wife Nicole) of Nova Scotia and Yvette (husband Murray TESSIER) of Chelmsford. Cherished grandfather of Michele (partner Mike), Paul, Anthony, Kevin, Peter, Natalie, Kelly, Taylor, Chris and Steven. Dear son of Joseph and Mary HEBERT both predeceased. Dear brother of Blanche McDONALD of Hamilton, predeceased by Raymond, Robert, Ella PITFIELD, Flora PROULX (husband Allan of Killarney,) Robina GRESCO and Elwood (wife Mandy of Providence Bay). Sadly missed by many nieces, and nephews. Born in Killarney where he married Shirley in 1960. He was the Junior Ranger Subforeman for 24 years as well as a commercial fisherman. He was an avid outdoorsman who enjoyed trapping, fishing and hunting. Urbain was an accomplished goalie having played competitive hockey for many years. Rested at Veteran's Memorial Hall, Killarney. Funeral Mass was held in St. Bonaventure Church Killarney on Saturday, August 16th, 2003 at 11 am. Cremation in the Parklawn Crematorium. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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WARD o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2003-11-21 published
WARD, Madison
Suddenly at her home in Wasaga Beach on Saturday, November 8th, 2003. Cherished infant daughter of Jennifer SAVARD and James WARD. Beloved baby sister of Dominic and Brooke. Dear granddaughter of William and Roxanna WARD of Wasaga Beach and Christin SAVARD of Toronto. Also sadly missed by her great grandparents and many aunts, uncles and cousins. A memorial service was held at the Nottawa Hall on Friday November 14th, 2003. Donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario through Grey Bruce Cremation And Burial Services Inc. 1-877-991-9995
Page 26

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WARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-04 published
DEVLIN, Major Edward Gordon
Died suddenly on April 2, 2003. A former student of the Royal Conservatory of Music, distinguished World War 2 veteran, avid concert goer and antique collector. Beloved brother of Betty JARVIS, the late Dorothy BAGSHAW and the late John DEVLIN. Dear Uncle of Bill BAGSHAW, Bettyann WARD, Carolyn MacLEOD, John KINGSMILL, Julie, Jane and Lesley DEVLIN and predeceased by his niece Gillian KINGSMILL. Devoted Great Uncle of Joshua, CONNOR and Caitlin KINGSMILL, Laura THORNBERRY, John WARD and Susan ENGLAND, Cameron and Kaylie MacLEOD and Ellie, Kate and Alex POMERANT. The family would like to thank the caring staff at The Briton House. Friends may visit on Saturday, April 5th from 11: 00 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at Morley Bedford Funeral Home at 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.), Toronto, following which a private family service will be held. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Toronto Humane Society or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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WARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-05 published
Clifton WARD
By Sheryl SPENCER Monday, May 5, 2003 - Page A18
Veteran, printer, father, stepfather, grandfather. Born March 19, 1913, in Surrey, England. Died December 3, 2002 in Barrie, Ontario of natural causes, aged 89.
My Grandpa's early years were marked by the First World War. His earliest memory was of being very afraid while travelling with his mother by train to London; German zeppelins were trying to bomb the train. My grandpa's father, Reuben WARD, served in that war.
After that war, Reuben WARD took a position "in service" as a chauffeur. Grandpa witnessed his father at the estate owner's beck-and-call day and night, and at some point he realized that should his father ever leave his job, their family would be out of house and home. As a result, that my grandfather became a lifelong socialist.
At the age of 14, my grandfather was apprenticed to the estate manager. It was he who got Grandpa a job as a typist at the West Surrey Farmers' Association in Guildford. Grandpa left the West Surrey Farmers' Association as assistant manager in 1951.
As a young adult my Grandpa read everything he could get his hands on; he played badminton and tennis; he bought himself a motorcycle and became a trials rider; and he acquired an Austin Ulster Healey sports car. Most importantly, my Grandpa learned to dance. He said that there were not many things that he could do really, really well, but dancing was one of them.
It was through playing badminton that Grandpa met Marion WALTHER. She was from a higher "class, " but they danced well together. It was expected that they would marry, so they did.
When the Second World War broke out, my grandpa enlisted with the Royal Air Force. He spent most of the war in North Africa and felt that his greatest contribution was having taken part in the Battle of El Alamein. During the war, Grandpa was often under fire; his only injury, however, was a bone broken at the top of his little finger. He felt that he was not spared death for any special purpose; he was just lucky.
After the war, Grandpa and Marion settled into domestic life. They bought a house and adopted two children, Leila and Paul. In 1951, however, they decided to emigrate to Canada. Grandpa found work in Barrie, Ontario, first at the Simcoe District Co-operative and then in the commercial printing department of the Barrie Examiner.
Grandpa and Marion divorced in 1962 and Grandpa moved to Toronto and began a job with Web Offset, another printing company. He took an apartment and met a woman who lived in the same building: my grandmother, Sylvia McFADDEN.
When my grandpa married my grandmother in 1965 he took on a huge, ready-made family: my grandmother's seven children and what would become (by my estimate) 27 grandchildren, 39 great-grandchildren and eight great-great grandchildren.
Grandpa said that he found in my grandmother an anchor -- and that commitment extended to all of us. My grandparents' home was the central clearing depot of all family information. They sent thousands of cards over the years, lent money, and offered a spare room and a warm welcome to anyone who needed it. It was remarkable enough when my grandmother was alive that no birthday was ever forgotten; it was even more remarkable after her death in 1992 that the cards kept coming.
My grandpa never intended to live to be 89. He missed my grandmother, his sister, Doff, and his brother, Leslie, who all predeceased him. He thought he was dying for many years before his courtship with death was finally consummated. The love and support he and my grandmother gave, these lie now within us, our gift to bestow on the generations to come.
Sheryl is Clifton's granddaughter.

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WARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Godfather of Canadian paratroops
'Superb combat leader' led a courageous allied rush to the Baltic in the closing days of Second World War
By John WARD, Ottawa
Fraser EADIE, a legendary soldier who commanded the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion in the waning days of the Second World War and went on to be the godfather to generations of post-war paratroopers, has died at age 86.
During the war, Mr. EADIE fought through northern Europe and led his battalion to Wismar, on Germany's Baltic coast, as the fighting ended.
His men remembered him as a disciplinarian who would nod at unorthodox tactics that worked. In the postwar period, he was patron of Canada's paratroop association. He served as honorary colonel of the Canadian Airborne Regiment from 1989 until it was disbanded in disgrace in 1994 after the Somalia affair.
In 1993, at the age of 76, he marked the Airborne's 25th anniversary by making a parachute jump with the outfit.
"He was a natural leader, a superb combat leader," said Bob LOCKHART, a retired paratroop officer who knew Mr. EADIE well after the war.
Mr. EADIE began his military career as a militia soldier in the 1930s, serving as a private in both the Calgary Highlanders and the Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
After the war broke out, he left his job with the Ford Motor Co. for the army and went overseas as a lieutenant with the Rifles.
He was promoted to captain and then major, and took a parachute course before joining the fledgling parachute battalion. As a hockey player before the war, he was in top physical shape. He breezed through gruelling training which left many gasping by the wayside.
In March, 1944, the battalion took part in Operation Varsity, leapfrogging the Rhine River into Germany.
The jump zone was heavily defended and the battalion commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Jeff NICKLIN, was killed. One story says he died when he landed in a clump of trees directly above a German machine-gun nest, but Jan DEVRIES, who was a private at the time, doubts that.
"NICKLIN was actually probably dead before he came into the trees because he sailed right over a German machine-gun," Mr. DEVRIES said.
With the commander dead and the landing under heavy fire, the Canadians were in a crisis.
"Fraser immediately assumed command," said Mr. DEVRIES.
He rallied the men and despite heavy casualties -- 25 killed, about 50 wounded and 20 missing out of 475 -- he led them to seize their objectives.
The battalion jumped into Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944, as part of a larger British unit. The Canadians fought in Normandy for weeks and helped break the German army in France.
Mr. DEVRIES said Mr. EADIE showed a sense of humour even in combat. He recalled an incident in Normandy when Mr. EADIE spotted a German tank and called for artillery support, telling the gunners he faced a Tiger tank, a formidable piece of armour. When a corporal pointed out that the tank was, in fact, a smaller though still potent Mark IV, Mr. EADIE smiled at him: "Don't spoil a good story."
Mr. EADIE was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, promoted to lieutenant-colonel and confirmed as battalion commander.
In the final weeks of the war, the battalion was paired with a British armoured unit, driving into northern Germany. The Canadians commandeered cars, trucks and other vehicles and outran the British, Mr. Lockhart said.
"They were moving so fast with their captured cars and such that the armoured battalion ran out of gas."
At one point, a British general arrived to inspect the regiment and was shocked to find some soldiers decked out in German parachute smocks, others sporting looted bowler hats.
Mr. EADIE was driving a big German staff car at the time and was hardly in a position to complain. He remembered later that the general was taken aback by the scorn for dress regulations.
He told Mr. EADIE: "I saw one fellow wearing what looked like a rugby sweater embossed with the words, Flin Flon."
Mr. EADIE said the general never did figure out what that meant and no one enlightened him.
Mr. DEVRIES said the Canadians, in company with the Royal Scots Greys, an armoured outfit, eventually ran into the Russians on the Baltic.
"Their orders were to go to Denmark," Mr. DEVRIES said. Mr. EADIE would have none of that and confronted the Russians, telling his men "Get ready lads."
"He told the Russian officer, 'you better have 10 men for my one.'"
The Russians backed down.
The official history of the Canadian Army notes: "Wismar, taken by Lt.-Col. EADIE's men and the Royal Scots Greys was in fact the most easterly point reached by any Commonwealth troops in this campaign and the first point where any Commonwealth troops serving in it made contact with the Russian ally.
"It is satisfactory that a Canadian battalion was there."
The battalion went home in September, 1945, and was disbanded. Mr. EADIE went back to Ford, where he spent 46 years in all.
Canadian Press

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WARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
HERGERT, Raymond Henry
Died peacefully in Toronto, on Sunday, November 2, 2003 in his 93rd year. Raymond was the only child of the late L. K. HERGERT and Emily Victoria THOM. He graduated from Upper Canada College and joined his father in business at Hunts Limited. He retired as Vice-President of Canadian Food Products. Raymond and his loving wife, Janet WINNIFRED, enjoyed happy years of retirement at Lake Nipissing. He leaves his treasured daughters, Sally WHITE/WHYTE and Wendy KASTA, and his dear son-in-law, Peter WHITE/WHYTE. His beloved grandchildren, Paul and Tim KASTA, David WHITE/WHYTE and his wife Mary Jane YULE, Nancy WHITE/WHYTE and her husband Mark BADALI, and Steven WHITE/WHYTE, share wonderful memories of Poppa. He was the adored great-grandfather of Amanda WARD, Thomas WHITE/WHYTE, Alex and John Henry BADALI, and Matthew and Carly WHITE/WHYTE. A private family service was held with interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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WARDROP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Sculptor 'entirely original'
A wood carver from a young age who made many public works, he was befriended by the Group of Seven and later carved their tombstone epitaphs
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page F10
A Canadian sculptor who as a young man was adopted by the Group of Seven has died in Toronto. E. B. COX, who prided himself on achieving artistic and commercial success without ever taking a penny in government grants, was 89.
Mr. COX was a young associate, of some of the Group of Seven with whom he went on northern sketching trips; A. Y. JACKSON once complimented him on his "good sense of form." He later carved their tombstone epitaphs.
A wood carver from a young age, he came to master stone and even the delicate art of faceting and carving precious stones; he also tried metal, ceramics and glass. Because he liked to work fast, he pioneered the use of power tools to quicken the chiselling process, a technique that purists initially disdained as a form of cheating.
According to one 1990s guide-book, he had "more sculpture on view in Toronto's public places than any other single artist." His 20-piece Garden of the Greek Gods, originally installed in the 1950s on the Georgian Peaks near Collingwood, Ontario, was later relocated to the far more populous grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition near the Dufferin Gate. The only fully human representation in the group, an 11-foot-high statue of Hercules, was carved from a six-tonne piece of Indiana limestone -- "the biggest piece of stone used by a sculptor in Canada," according to friend and patron, Ken SMITH.
Among his many other public works are a fish fountain for a courtyard at the former Park Plaza Hotel, a stone bear for the Guild Inn, a stone Orpheus for Victoria College, lavish countertops and railings for historic bank buildings, a large seated lady for McMaster University and whimsical creatures for a school yard in Milton, Ontario
Having mastered big, he also excelled at small: He used to claim that he invented coffee-table art. He carved little totem poles to put himself through university, and became known for his small bear sculptures, which he sold at popular prices, especially at Christmas. "At university, I damned near starved," he would explain. "I don't believe in starving artists."
Influenced by Iroquois and West Coast Haida art, he focused on bears, beavers, birds and other animals as well as human torsos, masks and heads; he often caught the animals in quirky fluid poses and never failed to capture their essential natures. He once crafted an all-Canadian limited-edition chess set for the Hudson's Bay Co., with beavers as pawns, coureurs de bois as knights, Indian princesses as queens, and so on. He was "the great bridge between aboriginal art and modern art," according to Mr. SMITH and others. A picture book about him, featuring an essay by Gary Michael DAULT, was published by Boston Mills Press in 1999.
"He was entirely original," said Toronto sculptor Dora DE PEDERY- HUNT. "Absolutely nobody else did what he did. What style he had was entirely his. I call him a real good sculptor, a real good artist."
The younger of two brothers, Elford Bradley COX was born on July 16, 1914, in Botha, Alberta., where his family made a short-lived attempt at farming; he learned to carve by watching his maternal grandfather whittle kindling by the fireside. He persisted in sculpting even though his pious father was vehemently opposed to the creation of "graven images," he told Toronto Life magazine in 1997. The family returned to Bowmanville, Ontario, where E. B. spent most of his childhood, and where his mother died suddenly after an epileptic attack when her favoured son was a young teenager. When it was time for him to go to university, "his father sent him off with $5, a suitcase and a wish of good luck," said Kathy SUTTON, the younger of his two daughters.
Studying languages at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1938, Mr. COX was befriended by German professor and painter Barker FAIRLEY, who introduced him to A. Y. JACKSON, Fred VARLEY and Arthur LISMER of the Group of Seven.
Mr. COX started teaching languages at Upper Canada College, but soon left to join the war effort as an intelligence officer, interrogating prisoners of war in Europe.
Afterward, he resumed teaching at Upper Canada College, and devoted part of a summer to a school canoe trip on the Mississauga River the next summer he escorted a group of boys on an even more adventurous trip down the Churchill River in the barren lands. "That was just unheard-of in those years," recalled Terence A. WARDROP, who joined that expedition and became Mr. COX's lifelong friend and solicitor. "It was a big trip and it was almost historic the rivers and some of the lakes were unmapped in 1948."
Quitting his teaching job in 1949, Mr. COX married the former Betty CAMPBELL, bought a farm near Palgrave, Ontario, and discovered that he could survive as a full-time artist. (Although he considered government subsidies poisonous, he once applied for a government grant to study Canadian stones suitable for sculpting -- and was turned down. "I did my stone research without their damn-fool money," he told The Globe and Mail in 1970.) Moving to a rural property in north Toronto and later to a Victorian house in eastern Toronto, he separated from his wife but remained on excellent terms with her and their daughters.
Being partial to pranks, he once purchased a canoe for his wife as a gift and, to achieve maximum surprise, paddled it to the dock at the family cottage in a rented disguise. Along with his love of humour, Friends recall his sharp wit and his ability to cut through social pretense. "He said he wanted his gravestone to read, 'I told you I was sick,' " recalled art dealer John INGRAM. " That's what I remember about him -- his great sense of humour and just what a wonderful compassionate guy he was. He tried to give this air of being an old curmudgeon, but in fact, he was anything but."
Becoming a mentor to many young artists, Mr. COX generously shared his tools and experience with them. "He didn't have much mentoring when he was learning to be an artist -- people didn't help him so he took the opposite tack," said his daughter Kathy.
Always enthusiastic and full of ideas, he was usually in his workshop early in the morning -- and kept on working even after losing his sight in his final years. His home was full of fine sculpture and painting, including a portrait of Mr. COX by Mr. FAIRLEY that hung over the mantel. "It was a lovely place, and by the time you got out of there, you were in a buying fever," Mr. SMITH recalled. "E.B. himself was part of the fun of buying stuff. People were just charmed by the atmosphere he created." He was also famously not particular about the prices he asked from genuine admirers of his work.
As for his art's place in the world, he was confident it would last, at least in the physical sense. "We'd have these long philosophical talks about whether there was an afterlife and what legacy to leave behind," friend Eric CONROY recalled. "He'd say that his stone works would be there long after Rembrandt's paintings had crumbled."
E. B. COX died in Toronto on July 29, leaving his wife Betty, daughters Sally SPROULE and Kathy SUTTON, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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WARKENTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
REIMER, Waldemar (Wally) H., A.A.C.I.
Passed away peacefully in his sleep, at Victoria General Hospital, in Winnipeg on April 7, 2003, after a lengthy and courageous struggle with many health issues.
Beloved husband of Mary TOEWS for 50 years; dear father of Henry (who died in infancy), Hélène (Peters) and Tim Green Mississauga, Paul and Brenda REIMER of Calgary, Judy and Vic WARKENTIN and Margaret and Jeff HARASYM of Winnipeg. Opi of Lora and Neil PETERS, Paul WARKENTIN, Andrew REIMER and Stephen HARASYM. Brother to Elvera and Gerry THIESSEN; John and Annelies REIMER, Ruth and Nelson EDWARDS and Elaine REIMER. Predeceased by his parents Henry REIMER, Sara (BRAUN) Reimer PANKRATZ, step-father, Nicholas PANKRATZ, brother Victor, sisters Annie POETKER and Mary WILLMS, brother-in-law Henry POETKER.
Formerly of Waterloo, Wally was a well known member of the business community through his years at Mutual Life, various real estate and development companies and then for 26 years, as President of W.H. Reimer Limited.
Funeral services were held in Winnipeg on Friday April 11, 2003. A memorial service to celebrate Wally's life will be held at W-K United Mennonite Church in Waterloo, on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, at 10: 30 a.m. A time to visit with the family will follow the service. Interment will take place at Mount Hope Cemetery, Waterloo.
Donations to the Waterloo Adult Recreation Centre, Mennonite Central Committee, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or the Lung Association of Waterloo Region would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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WARNICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
MacDONALD, Catherine Mildred (née JOHNSON)
Died peacefully at home, on August 19, 2003, in her 87th year, surrounded by those she loved. Daughter of the late Michael and Catherine JOHNSON. Cherished wife and constant companion of Martin for over 61 years. Devoted mother of Stephen, David and Jody, Bob and Moira, Tom and Lise Anne, Andrew and Ellen, and Paul. Loving grandma of Kaeli, Liane, Michael, Mark, Colin, Kristen, Brendan, Katie, Andrew, Joana and Matthew. Much loved sister of Geraldine, Sister Gertrude, Congregation of Notre Dame, Father Joseph, S.J., and Theresa, the late Ellen, Bernard, George, Gerald, John and Howard. Special sister-in-law of Margaret KINNA. Family and Friends may call on Thursday, August 21, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, August 22, 2003 at St. Gabriel's Roman Catholic Church, 650 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, followed by burial at Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill. Special thanks to Dr. Anne PYPER, Virginia CLARK- WEIR, R.N., and friend Andrea WARNICK, R.N., for their extraordinary care and kindness. In lieu of flowers, donations to North York General Hospital Foundation, Attn. Freeman Centre for Palliative Care (4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, Ontario M2K 1E1) would be most appreciated. Millie/mom/ grandma was an extraordinary woman who touched all who knew her. She will be deeply missed.
''Deo gratis''

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WARNOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
JACKSON, Robert
Internationally known muralist and painter, died suddenly on August 17th, 2003 at his home in Livingston, New York as the result of Lou Gehrig's Disease. Born in Toronto in 1931, Robert was educated at Williamson Road Public School, U.T.S. and University of Toronto where he earned an Honour's Degree in Art and Archaeology. Throughout his childhood and youth, Robert performed with the Toronto Children's Players, on radio, and the early days of television. He performed the second lead in an American production of No Time for Sargeants in London, England for 2 years, then began his lifelong career as a muralist in the restoration of Horace Walpole's house Strawberry Hill in Surrey, England. His murals can be seen in the White House, Blair House, The Department of State, The Metropolitan Museum in New York City and in private homes in the U.S., Canada, Holland, France and Italy. Robert JACKSON's easel paintings and watercolours were displayed in group shows at Hart House and Victoria College in 1953 and 1954. Later, during his residency in London, England, Robert had a one man show held in Toronto. His easel paintings grace houses around the world. Robert is survived by his sister Eleanor WARNOCK, three nephews and a niece, nine great-nieces and nephews, and his longtime companion Frederic CORKE. Friends are requested to make a donation to the charity of their choice. A private memorial service is planned.

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WARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-26 published
CHAMBERS, Dorothy Gail (née ALLEN) September 24, 2003
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Gail CHAMBERS, in her 56th year. Beloved mother of Rebecca and Jesse; loyal, loving and supportive wife to Jim for over 32 years. Gail's loving presence will be missed by her brothers Glen and Gene and sister and brother-in-law Maureen and John and her extended family and Friends, too numerous to name. Gail lived fully engaged and with great humour, love and compassion with cancer for over 13 years. This was not a battle -- it was a co-existence with a disease that focused her energies on the things that were important to her, family, Friends, and a profound respect for the scared and the sacred and the spiritual, which she found in the natural world, particularly at her cottage in Muskoka. Gail will be sorely missed by the many Friends and relatives she touched in her life. Particular thanks must be given to the St. Elizabeth Visiting Nurses' Association home care who treated her with love and respect. Special thanks to Dr. Rob BUCKMAN who risked the very human trait of mixing health care with compassion and Friendship, also Dr. Molyn LESZCZ whose compassionate counselling helped her through the rough part of her difficult journey. Heartfelt thanks to Dr. Angela MAZZA- WHELAN who was present when Gail died in the loving embrace of her family. Thanks also to Doctors WARR and TOZER for their care. Also the unsung heroes of the health care system - the nurses. Cremation has taken place. A Celebration of Gail's life will take place on Saturday, September 27th at 2: 00 p.m. at Olivet United Church followed by a reception. Olivet United Church, 40 Empress Avenue at Prince George Street, Hamilton. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals would be appreciated by the family.

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WARREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
BROWN, Ruth Elizabeth (née TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Tillsonburg
Suddenly on March 6, 2003. Beloved wife of Grant C. (Bud) BROWN, Q.C. for 61 years. Loving mother of Lyn SMITH (David,) Craig BROWN (Jane,) Kathy GIRVIN (David) and Timothy BROWN (Kathé.) Dear grandmother of Sara SMITH (Brian DYCK) and Cullen SMITH (Deceased); Will, Anna and Julian BROWN; Scott and Martha GIRVIN Lyn BROWN. Great-grandmother of Jacob and Liam DYCK. She will also be greatly missed by her sisters Kay WARREN and Jean HUNT and her brother, Campbell TAILOR/TAYLOR (Ruby) of Galt. The family will receive Friends and relatives at The Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg, on Sunday, from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm. Funeral service will be conducted on Monday at 2 pm. at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 48 Brock Street, West, Tillsonburg. Interment to follow in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. If you wish, donations to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church or Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital Foundation would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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WARREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
A character in life and work
Toronto-born actor played supporting roles in hundreds of films and television shows, including the cult-hit sitcom Mary Hartman
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page R5
As a genial, six-foot, balding performer who wore a trademark mustache and glasses, Graham JARVIS was not the leading-man type. The Toronto-born actor from a privileged background, who died last month in California at 72, courted but never achieved stardom and instead gained a kind of small-roles fame by appearing in hundreds of supporting parts in film and television productions.
Mr. JARVIS took character parts in films as diverse as Alice's Restaurant, Cold Turkey, Middle Age Crazy, Silkwood and Misery, and a similar assortment of television shows including Star Trek, ER, Murder She Wrote, Gunsmoke, The X-Files and Six Feet Under.
His first role was as an understudy in a mid-1950s Broadway production of Tennessee Williams's Orpheus Descending, and his last was as the grandfather in an episode of the television series Seventh Heaven, which aired four days after his death in April.
He is perhaps best known for his portrayal of Charlie Haggers, the devoted husband of a country singer in the 1970s television sitcom Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. "Nobody outside the business knows my name, but it doesn't bother me," he told an interviewer in 1982. "Fans still know me as Charlie, years after we went off the air. Fans went nuts over that character for some reason and I love the guy myself."
A scion of the historic Toronto family for whom JARVIS Street is named, Graham Powely JARVIS was also the grand_son of John LABATT Jr., who built up the famous Labatt brewery. A strain of theatrical talent obviously runs in the Labatt blood: His cousins include two legendary theatre personalities -- nonagenarian actor Hume CRONYN and Broadway producer Robert WHITEHEAD, who died last year.
It was Mr. WHITEHEAD who helped Mr. JARVIS attain the gig in Orpheus Descending and an audition at the Barter Theatre in Abbingdon, Va., where he trained for three seasons. Mr. CRONYN also helped him land a Broadway role, Mr. JARVIS said in 1982, adding that he rarely liked to mention the celebrated theatrical connections within his own family.
"This is the first time I've let this information out because I've tried not to trade on it," he said. "But I guess I've been around long enough now not to worry about it."
His father, an investment banker who was instrumental in founding what is today known as Scotia McLeod and was later president of Labatt, moved the family to New York when Graham was 5. He was sent to Bishop Ridley College, a prep school in St. Catharines, Ontario, and later to Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. A confused dropout at 23, he found work on the midnight shift in a penny arcade on 42nd Street in Manhattan. Then a friend invited him to watch an off-Broadway troupe in rehearsal and a light went on in his head. "I can do that!" he told himself, and he never looked back.
"Graham was such a great character actor because he could just go into character," said his niece, Sandra JARVIS of Toronto. "He was just brilliant that way. You'd be having a conversation with him and he'd just don a role, and it would take you a second to realize that Graham was now acting. Anyone who knew him well could just see this glow in his eyes -- this glint that told you he knew he was having fun with you."
"He loved acting," said his friend, actor Wil ALBERT. " When he was acting he was like a little boy going to the candy store."
Mr. JARVIS was a graduate of the American Theatre Wing acting school as well as of the Barter Theatre. He was an original member of the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater and a veteran of many Broadway and off-Broadway productions.
His first film role (in Bye Bye Braverman, 1968) enticed him to move to Hollywood, and he soon landed the part of the narrator in the stage production of The Rocky Horror Show at the Roxy Theatre on Sunset Boulevard.
Television producer Norman LEAR spotted him there and eventually recommended him for Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. Mr. JARVIS also appeared in the show's sequel, Forever Fernwood. Another memorable role was of John Erlichman in Blind Ambition, a well-received 1979 television miniseries about the Watergate political scandal.
Relishing the idea of free airfare to Toronto where he had family and Friends, Mr. JARVIS took occasional work from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer Ross McLEAN once told of auditioning him as a talk-show host, but felt his bald dome would need to be covered. Mr. JARVIS owned a hairpiece but had left it in California.
"Makeup pulled 20-odd rugs out of storage," Mr. McLEAN wrote. "Everything he tried on looked absurdly out of place." Ultimately, Mr. JARVIS arranged for his L.A. agent to go to his house, find the hairpiece and rush it to Toronto.
"The rug made it on time," Mr. McLEAN noted, adding that "I have rarely seen a less convincing thatch of regrouped Hong Kong hair." In short, Graham JARVIS looked best -- and did the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation audition -- as himself.
In a 1980s television series called Making the Grade, Mr. JARVIS played a buck-passing inner-city high-school principal who didn't care that a student couldn't read. In real life, however, he worked as a volunteer to teach literacy skills to young offenders.
"It was really fascinating to hear him talk about it," said his wife, JoAnna. "He felt they couldn't read because they couldn't speak -- they were speaking a street patois. He went back to college to get his teaching certificate so he could do this on a regular basis." Active in civic politics, he pushed for handgun control and helped voters get to the polls on election day. He also sang in his church choir and worked in its Sunday school.
"I think the consensus among almost everyone who knew Graham is that he was a very warm, enjoyable man," said actor Jerry HARDIN, a friend for almost 50 years.
"You came away feeling he was a good human being if you had any contact with him. He was very empathetic. He had compassion for people's difficulties and problems, and he would help them if he could."
Friends and family also recall his storytelling skills and his joy at giving visitors detailed historic tours of New York and later Hollywood. By all accounts, he was a humble man.
"He didn't think he was nearly as successful as he was," said Barbara WARREN, a niece. "He was always extremely surprised and delighted when people would stop him on the street and ask him for his autograph.
"He loved to deliver the lines and get the shock on your face," Ms. WARREN said. "You never saw him poise himself, he just walked right in as if he was that person."
Mr. JARVIS died at his home in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles on April 16. Besides his wife, JoAnna, he leaves sons Matthew and Alex in California and sister Kitty Blair in Toronto.

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WARRICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
Robert E. WHARTON
Peacefully at his home in Bermuda at 8: 25 a.m., Thursday March 6th 2003, at the age of 66, after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Gerardina ('Gert') WHARTON for 44 years. Loving son of Mary Elizabeth ('Lil') and the late Hugh WHARTON Sr. Loving father of Richard and friend Janet PARKIN Sandra and husband Kevin SULLIVAN; Bridget and husband Scott ROOS; Robby and wife Katy; and daughter-in-law Caroline. Dear grandfather of Lara and Kendra; Thomas, Jack, Zoë and Ty; Tristin, Nicholas and Jonathan. Survived by his brother Hugh and wife Carmen; sister Mary TULLIS and Don THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON; brother David and wife Christi; and sister-in-law Betty WHARTON. Will be sadly missed by his nieces and nephews and many good Friends. Special thanks to Dr. NELLIGAN, Dr. GULLANE and Dr. O'SULLIVAN, for their incredible efforts, support and kindness. Dr. WARRICK and the wonderful staff at Princess Margaret and Toronto General for their support, dedication and kindness. A memorial will be held at The Weston Golf Club on Tuesday March 25, 2003 at 4: 00 pm. 50 Saint Phillips Road, Etobicoke, Ontario ph# 416-241- 8538. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to 'The Wharton head and Neck Centre' at Princess Margaret Hospital c/o The Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5G 2M9, (416) 946-6560 We love you and will all dearly miss you. Rest in Peace Dad.

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WARRINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-26 published
SWINDELL, Gerald S.
Passed away peacefully at the Veterans' Wing of Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre in Toronto on July 17, 2003 at the age of 88. Gerry was predeceased by his first wife, Jean WARRINGTON, in 1947, and by his second wife of more than 40 years, Bettie BROCKIE, in 1990, and by his sister Elaine, brother Charles and son-law Andy CLARK. He is survived by his three children, Sharon, Gerry and Carol, his granddaughter Christine MAKI, his sisters Geraldine REES and Marie SMITH, his brothers-in-law Bill BROCKIE and Don SMITH and several nieces and nephews and their families.
Although Gerry was born in Grenfell, Saskatchewan and died in Toronto, he spent most of his life in Winnipeg, Manitoba. A graduate of the University of Manitoba, Gerry spent his entire business career with Wood Gundy, joining the firm in 1938 and retiring as a Vice President and Director in 1974. During the Second World War he served as a Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Navy. He was an active and enthusiastic member of the Manitoba Club and served as its President in 1975 and 1976. He was also the Chairman of the Board of the Winnipeg Stock Exchange from 1969 to 1972 and was active throughout his business career with a number of charitable organizations.
For relaxation he enjoyed the company of his wife and their many good Friends, frequent dinners at Rae and Jerry's, annual trips to Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, Arizona, golf at the St. Charles Country Club and billiards at the Manitoba Club. Unfortunately, his retirement years were marred by the debilitating effects of Paget's Disease and the untimely death of his beloved wife Bettie. Our thanks to the staff at Deer Lodge Hospital Veterans' Wing and We Care in Winnipeg and at Sunnybrook K Wing and Selectcare in Toronto for all their help in his final years. Although he moved to Toronto in 1997 to be closer to his children, his heart always remained in Winnipeg. He returns there now. A graveside service will be held at Garry Memorial Park, 1291 McGillivray Blvd., Winnipeg on Tuesday, July 29th at 2: 30 p.m. followed by a reception at the on site funeral home. In lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of choice would be greatly appreciated.

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