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"WAD" 2003 Obituary


WADDELL  WADE  WADEY 

WADDELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Patricia Marilyn THORPE (née THOMAS)
Passed away suddenly on August 28, 2003 in London, Ontario, at the age of 70 years.
Patricia was born October 7, 1932 in Saint Thomas, Elgin County, Ontario. Daughter of the late Hon. F. S. (Tommy) Thomas (1957) and Myrtle (SYMES) THOMAS (1982.) Wife of the late Cameron George THORPE (1969,) partner of William Henry WADDELL. Beloved mother of James (Suzanne) THORPE, Burbank, California and Jane THORPE, Ottawa. Sister of Carolyn THOMAS, Saint Thomas, Shirley (Harry) FOSTER and Robert (Margery) THOMAS and aunt of Brien, Bruce, Kate and Mark THOMAS, all of Union, Ontario. Dear friend of the late John M. PECK (1994,) Grand Bend, Ontario (son Jeffrey, daughter Sandra,) and the NITSCHE family, London, Ontario. Adoptive "grandmother" to Emily, Valerie, and Jamie.
A dedicated teacher, Patricia touched the lives of thousands of children. She began her educational career in 1951 in Ottawa and subsequently taught for various Ontario school boards including Windsor, Toronto, Welland, Port Stanley, Lynhurst and ending with her retirement from the London Board of Education in 1986.
Patricia was also a talented musician and composer who played the piano and accordion, as well as a published poet, author and photographer. Her passion for learning continued on into her retirement years where she continued to pursue higher education in the arts and foreign languages.
Once met, never forgotten -- Patricia was a vibrant spirit whose gifts of love, courage, laughter and song will continue to bring joy and inspiration to her family and Friends for many years to come. Cremation, no service.

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WADE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
WADE
-In loving memory of Brent. April 12, 1977 to November 9, 1999.
There is a bridge of memories,
From here to heaven above,
That keeps you very close to us
It's called the bridge of love.

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WADE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-12 published
WADE
-In loving memory of a dear son and brother, Brent, who passed away November 9, 1999.
Four years have come and gone my son,
and if I knew then what I know now.
Oh, how I could have lived my life so differently.
If I knew it would be the last time
that I'd see you walk out the door.
I would give you a hug and kiss
And call you back for just one more.
If I knew it would be the last time
I'd hear your voice lift up in praise
I would videotape each action and word
so I could play them back day after day
If I knew it would be the last time
I would be there to share your day.
Well, I'm sure you'll have so many more
So I can just let this one slip away.
For surely there is always tomorrow
To make up for an oversight,
And we always get a second chance
To make everything right.
There will always be another day
To say our "I love yous"
And certainly there is another chance
To say our "Anything I can dos."
But just in case I might be wrong,
And today is all I get,
I'd like to say how much I love you
And I hope we never forget.
Tomorrow is not promised to anyone
young or old alike
And today may be the last chance you get
To hold your loved one tight.
So hold your loved ones close today
And whisper in their ear,
Tell them how much you love them
And that you'll always hold them near.
Take the time to say "I'm sorry," "please forgive me"
"Thank you" or "it's okay"
And if tomorrow never comes,
You'll have no regrets about today.
Brent we thank God every day for giving
you to us.
Our lives and hearts are full of joy
In memories that we share.
Our lives have changed without you son,
But one thing will never change,
And that is our love for you and how
You've touched our lives.
--Forever in our hearts. Love into Eternity,
Mom, Chrissy and Laura

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WADE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-12 published
WADE
-In loving memory of our dear grand_son, Brent, who passed away November 9, 1999.
We think of you in silence
No eyes can see us weep
But still within our hearts
Your memory we keep.
--Always remembered and sadly missed by Gramma and Poppa ELLIOT/ELLIOTT.

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WADE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-12 published
WADE
-In memory of Brent.
Four years have passed
Since you were taken so
Suddenly from us.
But your smile still burns
Bright in our hearts and our memories of you
Will never fade.
Til we meet again
Bonnie and Calvin.

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WADE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
STEEL, V.R.J. (Vin)
Born Durban South Africa April 23, 1926, died Toronto, February 19, 2003. Survived by daughters, Melissa and Joanne and son Graeme and brothers John and Cecil. Fondly remembered by Suzanne CURTIS, Marlene and Tin THOMAS, Rosemary MANN, Margaret and Phillip WADE and the OSTROMS.
Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth,
And danced the skies on laughter
-silvered wings.

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WADE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-26 published
He was the voice of the land
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation broadcaster oversaw radio programming that connected the country's isolated agricultural and fishing communities
By Carol COOPER, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 26, 2003 - Page R15
It wasn't a great beginning. Racked with nerves during his first on-air stint for a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Winnipeg radio agricultural show in 1944, Bob KNOWLES gabbled the market reports in a record three minutes, instead of the scheduled 10, with the result that his boss had to spend the next seven minutes rereading them.
"I don't suppose anyone made any sense out of anything I'd read," Mr. KNOWLES told the Regina Leader Post in 1981.
Many voice and elocution lessons later, Mr. KNOWLES became an accomplished and well-loved farm broadcaster, who won the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation farm department's Cowhide Trophy for proficiency in broadcasting in 1951 and then rose through the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ranks to become the national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts.
Mr. KNOWLES, who in that capacity, oversaw programs such as Country Calendar, Country Magazine, Summer Fallow and the daily agricultural noon-hour shows, died in his sleep recently. He was 83.
Farm shows on radio and television offer up-to-date market information, advice on growing crops and raising animals, and news on the latest agricultural research from the universities to their busy and isolated rural audience. In days gone by, when many more Canadians made their living from the land without modern communication methods, radio farm shows were particularly important.
As national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts, and chair of National Farm Radio Forum's executive committee for a number of years, Mr. KNOWLES contributed to one ground-breaking Canadian show. Launched in the early forties as an adult-education program for farmers, Farm Radio Forum brought farmers, their wives and often their children together in an early version of interactive radio. Gathering weekly throughout the winter in living rooms, kitchens and community halls across the country, they listened to the show's broadcasts.
After hearing a panel discussion, the group discussed questions presented in study guides. A secretary recorded answers, which were sent back to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, some to be aired the following week. Their responses helped shape agricultural policy across the country and initiated several projects, said Rodger Schwass, a former national secretary of Farm Radio Forum and professor emeritus from York University.
As its chair during the late fifties and early sixties, Mr. KNOWLES helped choose show topics and panelists and became involved in one of its projects, Radios for India.
Forums across Canada raised money to help start a radio forum in India, one of several countries, including Jamaica, Belize, Ghana and Nigeria that adopted the Canadian idea. When the head of Indian radio came to Canada for three months to study radio forums, Mr. KNOWLES shepherded him around the country. In turn, Mr. KNOWLES participated in a training program in India. Radio forums became the chief means of disseminating information during India's Green Revolution, which ended up doubling the country's food production.
Robert Gordon KNOWLES was born on February 5, 1920 to Gordon and Catherine Finn KNOWLES on the family's homestead in Rutland, Saskatchewan. The family had settled there from Ontario in 1907, in the town that no longer exists, roughly 160 kilometres west of Saskatoon. Affected by mild cerebral palsy resulting from a difficult birth, Mr. KNOWLES walked with a mild limp and was unable to use his right hand.
Although Mr. KNOWLES wanted nothing more than to become a farmer, his father feared his son's disability would make that difficult. Instead, he encouraged Mr. KNOWLES to continue his education. Upon completing his B.Sc. in agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan in 1942, and with a low service rating because of his disability, Mr. KNOWLES did not enlist during the Second World War. Instead, he completed his master's degree in agriculture at the university in 1944, where he had met Pat APTED, an honours graduate in arts and biology, whom he married in 1943.
With so many men overseas, Mr. KNOWLES had three job offers upon graduation: as a district agriculturalist in Alberta, as a land inspector for the Canadian Pacific Railway, or as a western farm commentator with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He chose the people's network. "At that time, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was only eight-years-old and it seemed like a very glamorous position," Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News in After his first position in Winnipeg, he transferred to Edmonton for a similar job, staying nine months, before returning to Winnipeg as regional farm-broadcast commentator in 1950.
Of his early days in broadcasting, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon paper, "I made my work pass the following test: Is it of interest and value to the farmer to know about this and why? I think I did all right because I've been criticized equally by all farm organizations at one time or another."
In 1954, Mr. KNOWLES and his family packed up and moved to Toronto, where he became the assistant supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts and 19 months later, the supervisor.
Not only did he manage the section's budget, set its policy and advise regional announcers across the country, but at least once provided the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with a breaking story.
In 1963, Mr. KNOWLES and most of the network's farm department were on a flight that crashed during landing at Toronto International Airport.
Uninjured, Mr. KNOWLES left the plane to be put into a holding room with fellow passengers. Once there, he demanded to call home to reassure his wife and young family. Granted the privilege, he immediately called the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's newsroom.
In 1967, with a major network restructuring under way, Mr. KNOWLES took a three-year leave of absence to work for the Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome on the development of farm broadcasts.
Upon returning to Canada, he found his job had disappeared. Mr. KNOWLES took the only Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Radio farm commentator's job available, where he reported, wrote and delivered approximately 6,000 broadcasts for Radio Noon in Regina, until his retirement in 1980.
Said Bonnie DONISON, producer of Radio Noon. "Because he was so friendly and warm, people really liked to talk to him and And he held some interesting interviews, once with a trouserless federal minister of agriculture, Otto LANG. Mr. LANG had ripped his pants getting out of a taxi, so he removed them, sent them aside for mending and carried on, recalled Gerry WADE, a fellow farm-broadcaster who worked with Mr. KNOWLES in Regina.
Of his broadcasting career, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News, "I can honestly say that during all of my time as a journalist, there never was a day I didn't want to go into work."
Mr. KNOWLES also helped create the Canadian Farm Writers Federation and was inducted into the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame in 1990.
He died on November 5 in Ottawa. His first wife Pat, predeceased him in 1997. He leaves his second wife Marney, children Tony, Laura, Alan and Janet, seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

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WADEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
NORMAN- SMITH, Keeva Minette
Born May 16, 2003 in Toronto to Martha NORMAN and P. Roch SMITH, Keeva died peacefully of a brain stem tumour at home on May 28, 2003 with the love of her parents and brother Ronan. Keeva joins her grandparents F. Charles SMITH (1983) and Rose Marie SMITH (2002) in eternal life. She leaves to mourn her grandparents: Sheelagh NORMAN and Gerry PARKES of Toronto; Conolly and Sharon NORMAN of Fairvale, New Brunswick; her uncles and their families: Randy SMITH and Jill BONNETEAU- SMITH and cousins Cole and Jake of Victoria, British Columbia; Christopher and Pamela SMITH and cousins Victoria and Jacqueline of Sugarloaf, New York; Nick NORMAN of Toronto; Renee MAGUIRE and cousin Devyn NORMAN of Huntington Beach, California. Martha, Roch and Ronan would like to extend a tremendous thank you to midwife Katrina KILROY; R.N. Katie WADEY; the nurses and doctors at the Hospital for Sick Children Mt. Sinai; Home Palliative Care Network; Community Care Access Centre and all those who helped in making Keeva's life a full one and ensuring that she had the opportunity to return home to die in dignity with her family. Thanks for coming to meet us Keeva, you are an incredible daughter. Ronan sends you dandelion wishes that you are safe. A visitation with Keeva and her family will take place on Wednesday June 4th from 7 - 9 p.m. at Morley Bedford Funeral Services, 159 Eglinton West (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.). A celebration of Keeva's life will be held on Thursday June 5th at 10: 30 am at the Church of the Messiah, Dupont and Avenue Road. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Keeva's memory to Trails Youth Initiatives, 378 Fairlawn Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5M 1T8 (416) 787-2457 (www.trails.ca) or the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8.

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